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Encyclopedia > A cappella

A cappella (Italian: “at chapel” or Latin: "From the chapel/choir") music is vocal music or singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. A cappella was originally intended to differentiate between Renaissance polyphony and Baroque concertato style. In the 19th century a renewed interest in Renaissance polyphony coupled with an ignorance of the fact that vocal parts were often doubled by instrumentalists led to the term coming to mean unaccompanied vocal music.[1] In modern usage, a cappella often refers to an all-vocal performance of any style, including barbershop, doo wop, and modern pop/rock. Categories: Todd Rundgren albums | 1985 albums ... Acappella is an all-male Contemporary Christian vocal group that was founded in 1982 by Keith Lancaster, who has variously played the role of singer, songwriter, and producer throughout the groups history. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Vocal music is music performed by one or more singers, with or without non-vocal instrumental accompaniment, in which singing provides the main focus of the piece. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A typical accompaniment pattern of a Mozart concert or aria. ... Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1400 to 1600. ... Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 to 1750 (see Dates of classical music eras for a discussion of the problems inherent in defining the beginning and end points). ... Concertato (sometimes called stile concertato) is a term in early Baroque music referring to either a genre or a style of music in which groups of instruments or voices share a melody, usually in alternation, and almost always over a basso continuo. ... Barbershop harmony is a style of unaccompanied vocal music characterized by consonant four-part chords for every melody note in a predominantly homophonic texture. ... For the Lauryn Hill single, see Doo Wop (That Thing). ...

Contents

Religious traditions

A cappella music originally was, and still often is, used in religious music, especially church music as well as anasheed and zemirot. Gregorian chant is an example of a cappella singing, as is the majority of sacred vocal music from the Renaissance. The madrigal, up until its development in the early Baroque into an instrumentally-accompanied form, is also usually an a cappella form. Christian music is music created by or adapted for the Christian church. ... Anasheed are Islamic songs that usually are sung with no musical instruments in the background. ... Negara Israel akan tetap ada, namun bangsa Jahudi harus bertobat dahulu, agar Mesias dapat memerintah di bumi, di Yerusalem. ... Gregorian chant is the central tradition of Western plainchant, a form of monophonic, unaccompanied sacred song of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1400 to 1600. ... A madrigal is a setting for two or more voices of a secular text, often in Italian. ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 and 1750. ...


Christian

Present-day Christian religious bodies known for conducting their worship services without musical accompaniment include some Presbyterian churches devoted to the regulative principle of worship, Old Regular Baptists, Primitive Baptists, Plymouth Brethren, most congregations among the churches of Christ, the Old German Baptist Brethren, the Eastern Orthodox Christian Church and the Amish. Many Mennonites also conduct some or all of their services without instruments. Sacred Harp, a type of religious "folk" music, is an a cappella style of religious singing, but is more often sung at singing conventions than at church services. Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The regulative principle of worship is a Christian theological doctrine teaching that the public worship of God should include those and only those elements that are instituted, commanded, or appointed by command or example in the Bible; that God institutes in Scripture everything he requires for worship in the Church... // Most Regular Baptists merged with the Separate Baptists near the beginning of 19th century. ... Primitive Baptists are a group of Baptists that have a historical connection to the missionary / anti-missionary controversy that divided Baptists of America in the early part of the 19th century. ... The Brethren are a Christian Evangelical movement that began in Dublin, London, Plymouth, and the continent of Europe in the late 1820s. ... The Churches of Christ discussed in this article are not part of the United Church of Christ; the International Churches of Christ; the Disciples of Christ; the Church of Christ, Scientist (Christian Science); The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or any other denomination within the Latter Day... Old German Baptist Brethren (OGBB) descend from a pietist movement in Schwarzenau, Germany, in 1708, when Alexander Mack founded a fellowship with 8 believers. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... This article is about Old Order Amish, but also refers to other Amish sects. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... Sacred Harp singing is a tradition of sacred choral music that took root in the Southern region of the United States. ...


Christian a cappella polyphony began to be developed in Europe around the late 1400s; early works are often identified with Josquin des Prez. The early a cappellas seem to have had an accompanying instrument, although this instrument doubled the singers and were not independent. By the 1500s, a cappella polyphony had been fully developed; Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina's works are considered excellent examples. After Palestrina, the cantata began to take a cappella's place.[2] Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... 1611 woodcut of Josquin des Prez, copied from a now-lost oil painting done during his lifetime. ... Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (between 3 February 1525 and 2 February 1526[1] - 2 February 1594) was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. ... A cantata (Italian, sung) is a vocal composition with an instrumental accompaniment and generally containing more than one movement. ...


Examples and instruction for New Testament Christians included only singing: Matthew 26:30, James 5:13, 1 Corinthians 14:15, Ephesians 5:19, Colossians 3:16. There is no reference to instrumental music in the worship of the first century church; the first recorded example of a musical instrument in Christian worship was an organ introduced by Pope Vitalian in Rome in 666.[citation needed] The baroque organ in Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by forcing pressurized air (referred to as wind) through a series of pipes. ... Vitalianus (died January 27, 672) was Pope from 657 - 672. ...


Instrumental worship was not widely practiced until the 18th century, and it was opposed vigorously by notable Christian scholars such as Justin Martyr (100–165), John Calvin (1509–1564), and John Wesley (1703–1791).[citation needed] Justin Martyr (also Justin the Martyr, Justin of Caesarea, Justin the Philosopher) (100–165) was an early Christian apologist and saint. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ...


Jewish

Traditional Jewish religious services do not include musical instruments. The use of instruments is traditionally forbidden on the Sabbath out of concern that players would be tempted to repair their instruments, which is forbidden on those days. (This prohibition has been relaxed in many Reform and some Conservative congregations.) Similarly, when Jewish families and larger groups sing traditional Sabbath songs known as zemirot outside the context of formal religious services, they usually do so a cappella, and Bar and Bat Mitzvah celebrations on the Sabbath sometimes feature entertainment by a cappella ensembles. Moreover, many Jews consider the 49-day period of the counting of the omer between Passover and Shavuot to be a time of semi-mourning when instrumental music is not allowed. This has led to a tradition of a cappella singing sometimes known as sefirah music.[3] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Negara Israel akan tetap ada, namun bangsa Jahudi harus bertobat dahulu, agar Mesias dapat memerintah di bumi, di Yerusalem. ... Counting of the Omer (or Sefirat Haomer, Hebrew: ספירת העומר) within Judaism, is a verbal counting with a blessing during the 49 days between Pesach (Passover) and Shavuot (Pentecost) which are counted ceremoniously as a commemoration of the Omer ceremony which was celebrated in the Temple in Jerusalem. ...


Muslim

Many Muslim musicians also perform a form of a cappella music, which are called anasheed. This is due to the possible prohibition of certain musical instruments in Islam, though Muslims remain divided on this issue. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Anasheed are Islamic songs that usually are sung with no musical instruments in the background. ... Islamic music is Muslim religious music, as sung or played in public services or private devotions. ...


A cappella in the United States

A strong and prominent a cappella tradition was begun in the midwest part of the United States in 1911 by F. Melius Christiansen, a music faculty member at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota. The St. Olaf College Choir was established as an outgrowth of the local St. John's Lutheran Church, where Christiansen was organist and the choir was composed at least partially of students from the nearby St. Olaf campus. The success of the ensemble was emulated by other regional conductors, and a rich tradition of a cappella choral music was born in the region at colleges like Concordia College (Moorhead, MN), Luther College (Decorah, IA), Gustavus Adolphus College (St. Peter, MN), Augustana College (Sioux Falls, South Dakota), and Augsburg College (Minneapolis, MN). The choirs typically range from 40 singers to 80 and are recognized for their efforts to perfect blend, intonation, phrasing, and pitch in a large choral setting. St. ... Concordia is the Latin word for harmony, which has been used to refer to many things: Concordia was the Roman goddess of harmony. ... Luther College This Luther College article is not to be confused with the Luther College associated with the University of Regina in Saskatchewan. ... Christ Chapel at Gustavus Adolphus College. ... Augustana College is the name of two colleges in the U.S., both founded by Scandinavian immigrants: Augustana College (Illinois) Augustana College (South Dakota) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Augsburg College is a liberal arts college of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ...


Major movements in modern a cappella over the past century include Barbershop and doo wop. The Barbershop Harmony Society, Sweet Adelines International, and Harmony Inc. host educational events including Harmony College, Directors College, and the International Educational Symposium, and international contests and conventions, recognizing international champion choruses and quartets. The Dapper Dans, a barbershop quartet at Disney World Barbershop harmony, as codified during the barbershop revival era (1940s-present), is a style of a cappella, or unaccompanied vocal music characterized by consonant four-part chords for every melody note in a predominantly homophonic texture. ... For the Lauryn Hill single, see Doo Wop (That Thing). ... The Barbershop Harmony Society, legally and historically named the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America, Inc. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This page lists the Barbershop Harmony Societys international chorus champions by the year in which they won. ... This page lists the Barbershop Harmony Societys international quartet champions by the year in which they won. ...


The King's Singers are credited with promoting interest in small-group a cappella performances in the 1960s. In 1983 an a cappella group known as The Flying Pickets had a Christmas 'number one' in the UK with a cover of Yazoo's (known in the US as Yaz) Only You. A cappella music attained renewed prominence from the late 1980s onward, spurred by the success of Top 40 recordings by artists such as The Manhattan Transfer, but it was The Persuasions who saved the dying art and opened the door for such artists as Bobby McFerrin, Huey Lewis and the News, All 4 One, The Nylons and Boyz II Men.[citation needed] Jerry Lawson, former lead singer, arranger and producer of The Persuasions left The Persuasions after 40 years and in 2007 released his 23 albums with his new a cappella group Jerry Lawson and Talk of The Town. The Kings Singers is an a cappella group. ... The Flying Pickets is a British a cappella vocal group, that had a surprise number one hit in 1983 in the UK singles chart, with their cover of Yazoos track - Only You. // The name Flying Pickets refers to mobile strikers who travel in order to join a picket. ... Yazoo (known as Yaz in the U.S.) was a short-lived but highly successful English synthpop duo from Basildon, Essex that had a number of top ten hits in the British charts in the early 1980s. ... Yaz can refer to either of the following: Carl Yastrzemski, a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Only You is a ballad written by musician Vince Clarke. ... The Manhattan Transfer is an American vocal group that was established in New York City in 1972. ... The Persuasions are an a cappella group who began singing together in Brooklyn, New York in the early 1960s and went on to produce numerous albums covering a wide range of musical genres. ... Bobby McFerrin Robert Bobby McFerrin Jr. ... ... All-4-One is a male R&B group best known for their hit single I Swear from their self-titled 1994 debut album. ... The Nylons are an a cappella group founded in 1979 in Toronto, Canada, best known for their covers of The Turtles Happy Together, Steams Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye, and The Tokens version of the traditional The Lion Sleeps Tonight. However, the group has been criticized for... Boyz II Men is an American R&B/soul singing group from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


Recording artists

One of the legendary 50's R&B groups were the Nutmegs, who were also known as the "Rajahs of a cappella". They were the first of these groups to proudly showcase an a cappella format which became their trademark. Later, many other groups recorded at least one a cappella song. The Classics, singers of "Till then", scored a very popular a cappella hit, "I Apologize". Later in the 1970s, The Belmonts released a seminal a cappella album entitled Cigars, Acappella, Candy,[4] which is representative of the genre. The Belmonts are a doo wop group that originated in the 1950s. ...


Contemporary a cappella includes many vocal bands who add vocal percussion or beatboxing to create a pop/rock sound, in some cases very similar to bands with instruments. One such group is Rockapella. There also remains a strong a cappella presence within Christian music, as some denominations purposefully do not use instruments during worship. Examples of such groups are Take 6 and Acappella. Vocal percussion is the art of creating sounds with ones mouth that approximate, imitate, or otherwise serve the same purpose as a percussion instrument, whether in a group of singers, an instrumental ensemble, or solo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rockapella is an American a cappella musical group best known for their series of Folgers Coffee commercials and the Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? theme song. ... Take 6 is an influential American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... Acappella is an all-male Contemporary Christian vocal group that was founded in 1982 by Keith Lancaster, who has variously played the role of singer, songwriter, and producer throughout the groups history. ...


Arrangements of popular music for small a cappella ensembles typically include one voice singing the lead melody, one singing a rhythmic bass line, and the remaining voices contributing chordal or polyphonic accompaniment. Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ...


A cappella can also describe the practice of using just the vocal track(s) from a multitrack, instrumental recording to be remixed or put onto vinyl records for DJs. Artists sometimes release the vocal tracks of their popular songs so that fans can remix them. One such example is the a cappella release of Jay-Z's Black Album, which Danger Mouse mixed with the Beatles' White Album to create The Grey Album. Multitrack recording is a method of sound recording that allows for the recording and re-recording of multiple sound sources, independent of time. ... A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ... Jay-Z (aka the Jigga, HOV and Hova, born Shawn Carter on December 4, 1970 in Brooklyn, New York) is an African American rapper/hip hop artist and record label executive; one of the most popular and successful rappers of the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... Singles from The Black Album Released: November 11, 2003 Released: January 13, 2004 Released: April 13, 2004 The Black Album is a 2003 hip hop music album by rapper Jay-Z. It was supposedly his last studio album until Jay-Z announced a return to solo recording in 2006. ... Brian Joseph Burton, better known by his stage name Danger Mouse, is an American artist and producer. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The self-titled double album The Beatles, released by the Beatles in 1968 at the height of their popularity, is often hailed as one of the major accomplishments in popular music. ... The Grey Album is an album by Danger Mouse released in 2004 (see 2004 in music). ...


A cappella's growth is not limited to live performance, with hundreds of recorded a cappella albums produced over the past decade. As of December 2006, the Recorded A Cappella Review Board (RARB) had reviewed over 660 a cappella albums since 1994, and its popular discussion forum had over 900 users and 19,000 articles.


Collegiate a cappella

Main article: Collegiate a cappella
See also: List of collegiate a cappella groups

One of the oldest collegiate a cappella groups is The Whiffenpoofs of Yale University[5], formed in 1909, which once included Cole Porter as a member.[5] Collegiate a cappella groups grew throughout the twentieth century. The numbers of these groups exploded in beginning in the 1990s, fueled in part by a change in the style — voices used as modern rock instruments, including vocal percussion/"beatboxing." Some larger universities now have a dozen groups or more, and the total number of college groups grew from 250 circa 1990 to over 1,000 now. In 2006, Columbia University's Kingsmen were featured in the film The Good German. The groups often join one another in on-campus concerts, such as the Chimes' Cherry Tree Massacre, a 3-weekend a cappella festival held each February since 1975, where over a hundred collegiate groups have appeared, as well as International Quartet Champions, The Boston Common, and the contemporary commercial a cappella group Rockapella. Some other gruops include the Harvard Krokodiloes[6], On The Rocks (University of Oregon), and Simmons Sirens from Simmons College (Massachusetts) in Boston. Co-ed groups have produced many up-and-coming artists including solo musician John Legend, an alumnus of the Counterparts at the University of Pennsylvania, and Siddhartha Khosla, lead singer of the band Goldspot (featured on the OC), an alumnus of both Off the Beat and Penn Masala at the University of Pennsylvania. The DQ is the oldest a cappella group at Amherst College. Collegiate a cappella (or college a cappella) ensembles are formal, student-run and -directed singing groups that perform entirely without instruments. ... This is an incomplete list of a cappella musical groups at colleges or universities. ... Whiffenpoofs official logo The Yale Whiffenpoofs are the oldest collegiate a cappella group in the US, established in 1909. ... Yale redirects here. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... Vocal percussion is the art of creating sounds with ones mouth that approximate, imitate, or otherwise serve the same purpose as a percussion instrument, whether in a group of singers, an instrumental ensemble, or solo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Good German is a 2006 feature film adaptation of a novel by Joseph Kanon. ... This page lists the Barbershop Harmony Societys international quartet champions by the year in which they won. ... Boston Common is a Barbershop quartet that won the 1980 SPEBSQSA international competition. ... Rockapella is an American a cappella musical group best known for their series of Folgers Coffee commercials and the Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? theme song. ... Logo Founded in 1946, The Harvard Krokodiloes are Harvard Universitys oldest a cappella singing group. ... Simmons College is a liberal arts womens college in Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Legend (born John Stephens on 28 December 1978) is an American R&B singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Goldspot is currently a Los Angeles based band which takes its name from the Indian soda, Gold Spot. ... Penn Masala is the worlds first Hindi a cappella group, formed in 1996 by students at the University of Pennsylvania. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ...


Increased interest in modern a cappella (particularly collegiate a cappella) can be seen in the growth of awards such as the Contemporary A Cappella Recording Awards (overseen by the Contemporary A Cappella Society) and competitions such as the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella for college groups and the Harmony Sweepstakes for all groups. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella, originally the National Championship of Collegiate A Cappella, is an international competition that attracts hundreds of college a cappella groups each year. ... The Harmony Sweepstakes A Cappella Festival is an annual showcase and competition for a capella groups of all vocal styles. ...


Emulating instruments

In addition to singing words, some a cappella singers also emulate instrumentation by reproducing the melody with their vocal cords. For instance, "Twilight Zone" by 2 Unlimited was sung a cappella to the instrumentation on the comedy television series Tompkins Square. Another famous example of emulating instrumentation instead of singing the words is the theme song for The New Addams Family series on Fox Family Channel (now ABC Family). Groups such as Vocal Sampling and Undivided emulate Latin rhythms a cappella. In the 1960's, the Swingle Singers used their voices to emulate musical instruments to Baroque and Classical music. Vocal artist Bobby McFerrin is famous for his instrumental emulation, and Deke Sharon has taught seminars on how to sing a variety of instrumental sounds. Laryngoscopic view of the vocal folds. ... Twilight Zone is a song by 2 Unlimited. ... 2 Unlimited was a eurodance act formed in 1991. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... The Addams Family is the creation of American cartoonist Charles Addams. ... Fox Family was a cable channel in the United States in the 1990s that aired shows from Fox Kids programming block such as Storytime with Thomas and The Three Friends and Jerry. ... ABC Family is an American cable television network currently owned by Disney-ABC Television Group, a division of The Walt Disney Company. ... Vocal Sampling is a musical group from Cuba who are distinctive for using no instruments, instead emulating accompanying instruments and beatboxing for percussion. ... Bobby McFerrin Robert Bobby McFerrin Jr. ... Deke Sharon is one of the pioneers of the contemporary a cappella movement. ...


The Swingle Singers used nonsense words to sound like instruments, but have been known to produce non-verbal versions of musical instruments. Like the other groups, examples of their music can be found on You Tube. Beatboxing is a form of a cappella music popular in the hip-hop community, where rap is often performed a cappella also. The Swingle Singers (1962-1973) was a vocal group formed in Paris, France with Ward Swingle, Anne Germain, Jeanette Baucomont, and Jean Cussac. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Hip hop (disambiguation). ... Rap redirects here. ...


References

  1. ^ William C. Holmes. "A cappella", Grove Music Online, ed. L. Macy (accessed March 22, 2007), grovemusic.com (subscription access).
  2. ^ "a cappella". (2006). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved December 2, 2006, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online
  3. ^ Shircago, Jewish A Cappella and Sefirat Omer.
  4. ^ The Belmonts – Cigars, Acappella, Candy. Music Hills. Retrieved on 2007-09-13.
  5. ^ a b The Yale Whiffenpoofs. United Singers International. Retrieved on 2007-09-14.
  6. ^ Rapkin, Mickey. "Perfect Tone, in a Key That’s Mostly Minor." The New York Times, 2008-03-23, Sunday Styles section, p. 1.

Second Edition, shelved The Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians is an encyclopedic dictionary of music and musicians and is regarded as the most authoritative reference source on the subject in the English language. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Collegiate a cappella (or college a cappella) ensembles are formal, student-run and -directed singing groups that perform entirely without instruments. ... This is an incomplete list of a cappella musical groups at colleges or universities. ... . ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
A cappella - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (721 words)
A cappella is Italian for like in the chapel (music); the term is due to restrictions on the use of instruments in medieval churches.
Gregorian chant is an example of a cappella singing, as is the majority of sacred vocal music from the Renaissance.
Arrangements of popular music for small a cappella ensembles usually include one voice singing the lead melody, one singing a rhythmic bass line, and the remaining voices contributing chordal or polyphonic accompaniment.
A Cappella Catering: Edmonton, Alberta's leading catering company. (198 words)
From banquets to barbeques, pancake breakfasts to boardroom lunches, cocktail receptions to conference catering, A Cappella Catering is known in the city of Edmonton for delicious food, exceptional services and superior value.
A Cappella is proud to be a caterer of choice for the city's finest venues and most discriminating appetites.
Line-ups at the A Cappella booth are an annual fixture of the Edmonton Folk Festival, and every year we head down to Calgary to serve up beef to more than 14,000 corporate cowboys during the Stampede.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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