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Encyclopedia > A Wrinkle in Time
A Wrinkle in Time

A Wrinkle in Time hardcover, 1960s (same cover as first edition except for addition of the Newbery Medal)
Author Madeleine L'Engle
Cover artist Ellen Raskin (1960s editions),
Leo and Diane Dillon (current hardcover)
Country United States
Language English
Series Time Quartet
Genre(s) Young Adult, Science fiction novel
Publisher Farrar, Straus & Giroux
Publication date 1962
Media type Print (hardcover and paperback)
Pages 211 pp
ISBN ISBN 0-374-38613-7
Followed by A Wind in the Door

A Wrinkle in Time is a science fantasy[1] novel by Madeleine L'Engle, written between 1959 and 1960[2] and published in 1962 after at least 26 rejections by publishers[3] because it was, in L'Engle's words, "too different". The book went on to win a Newbery Medal, Sequoyah Book Award, and Lewis Carroll Shelf Award, and was runner-up for the Hans Christian Andersen Award.[4] It is the first in L'Engle's series of books about the Murry and O'Keefe families. In 2003, a television adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time was completed by Disney. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (512x754, 116 KB) cover and dust jacket of A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine LEngle, eleventh printing, 1965, later printings ISBN 0-374-38613-7. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... Leo and Diane Dillon are a husband and wife team of illustrators. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Time Quartet is a fantasy/science fiction series of four young adult novels written by Madeleine LEngle. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Some notable science fiction novels, in alphabetical order by title: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne 2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke 334 by Thomas M. Disch An Age by Brian Aldiss The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton The Atrocity Exhibition by J.G. Ballard... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Farrar, Straus and Giroux is an American book publishing company, founded in 1946 by Roger W. Straus, Jr. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hardcover books A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) is a book bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth, heavy paper, or sometimes leather). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... ISBN redirects here. ... A Wind in the Door (1973, ISBN 0-374-38443-6) is a young adult science fantasy novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... Science fantasy is a mixed genre of story which contains some science fiction and some fantasy elements. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... The Sequoyah Book Award is given each year to the book which is selected by Oklahoma students in 3rd-6th grades as their favorite. ... The Lewis Carroll Shelf Award was given annually from 1970 to 1979 to books deemed to possess enough of the qualities of Alice in Wonderland to enable them to sit on the same book shelf. ... For other uses, see Hans Christian Andersen (disambiguation). ... The Time Quartet is a fantasy/science fiction series of four young adult novels written by Madeleine LEngle. ...

Contents

Plot summary

Meg Murry is a teenage girl, regarded by her peers and teachers as a bad-tempered underachiever. Her family recognizes her problem as a lack of emotional maturity but also regards her as being capable of great things. The family includes her beautiful scientist mother, her mysteriously missing scientist father, her five-year-old brother Charles Wallace Murry —a nascent super-genius— and ten-year-old twins, athletic brothers Sandy and Dennys Murry. Information Nickname(s) Meg Aliases Margaret Murry OKeefe Occupation Student, later mathematician Spouse(s) Dr. Calvin OKeefe Children Polly, Charles, Xan, Den, Peggy, Johnny, Rosy Relatives Drs. ... David Dorfman as Charles Wallace Murry in the 2003 television adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time Charles Wallace Murry is a major character in Madeline LEngles young adult science fiction novels A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, and A Swiftly Tilting Planet, sometimes referred to... Sandy and Dennys on the cover of Many Waters Alexander Sandy Murry and Dennys Murry are fictional identical twins in Madeline LEngles Time Quartet. ...


The book begins with the line, "It was a dark and stormy night," an allusion to the opening words in Edward George Bulwer-Lytton's 1830 novel Paul Clifford. The Murrys are visited by an eccentric old woman named Mrs Whatsit, who has previously made the acquaintance of Charles Wallace. After drying her feet and having a midnight snack with Charles, Meg and their mother, Mrs Whatsit tells an already perplexed Dr. Murry that "there is such a thing as a tesseract." The phrase It was a dark and stormy night, made famous by comic strip artist Charles M. Schulz, was originally penned by Victorian novelist Edward Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton as the beginning of his 1830 novel Paul Clifford. ... Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton (May 25, 1803 - January 18, 1873) was an English novelist, playwright, and politician. ... Paul Clifford is a novel published in 1830 by English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton. ... For other uses, see Tesseract (disambiguation). ...


Shortly thereafter, Meg and Charles encounter Meg's schoolmate Calvin O'Keefe, a high school junior who, although he is a "big man on campus", turns out to be keen to join Meg and Charles Wallace for further encounters with Mrs Whatsit and her equally eccentric friends Mrs Who and Mrs Which. Calvin OKeefe is a major character in Madeleine LEngles Time Quartet series of books, and, as Dr. Calvin OKeefe, an important character in her OKeefe series of young adult novels. ...


Mrs Whatsit, Mrs Who, and Mrs Which turn out to be transcendental beings who transport Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin through the galaxy by means of tesseract, a fifth dimensional concept which is explained as being similar to folding the fabric of space and time. The "Mrs W's" reveal to the children that the galaxy is under attack from a dark cloud, which is the visible manifestation of evil. Meg's missing father was working on a secret government project to achieve faster-than-light travel by tesseract, and accidentally wound up on Camazotz, an alien planet inside the "Black Thing". The children also discover that Earth is partially covered by the darkness, although great religious figures, philosophers, and artists are fighting against it. They also learn that Mrs Whatsit was a star who exploded in an act of self-sacrifice to fight the darkness. The Holtzman effect is a fictional scientific phenomenon in the Dune universe, created by Frank Herbert. ...


The children travel to Camazotz and rescue Meg's father, who has been imprisoned by an evil disembodied brain with powerful telepathic abilities, which the inhabitants of Camazotz call "IT". However, Charles Wallace is mentally dominated by IT, and is left behind when the others flee, tessering through the Black Thing to a planet inhabited by sightless but wise beasts. When she arrives, Meg is paralyzed, and coldly resentful. Meg recovers and is tessered to Camazotz with Mrs Which, as she is the only one who can rescue Charles Wallace from IT. Confronting IT, Meg realizes that she can free her brother by loving him intensely, because love is an emotion that the evil IT cannot stand. Charles Wallace is freed, and the three Murrys and Calvin return home.


Characters

Madeleine LEngle, an American novelist, diarist and poet, has produced over fifty books since her first novel, The Small Rain, in 1945. ...

Primary human characters

Meg Murry

Margaret "Meg" Murry is the eldest child of scientists Alex and Kate Murry. Mathematically brilliant but less than adept at other subjects in school, Meg is "awkward", unpopular, and defensive around authority figures as well as her peers. Although she has the brains to accomplish difficult tasks, she rarely puts her strengths to use. She loves her family, especially her brother, Charles Wallace, and longs desperately for her missing father. Like many adolescent girls Meg is unhappy with her physical appearance, particularly her mouse-brown, unruly hair, braces and glasses; and considers herself a "monster" in comparison with her mother. Her age is not given in the book (or in subsequent books of the series), but she is "a couple of grades" below Calvin, who is fourteen years old but in eleventh grade, making her approximately fourteen years old also. Introduced on the first page of the book, she is the story's protagonist. Information Nickname(s) Meg Aliases Margaret Murry OKeefe Occupation Student, later mathematician Spouse(s) Dr. Calvin OKeefe Children Polly, Charles, Xan, Den, Peggy, Johnny, Rosy Relatives Drs. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ...


Charles Wallace

Charles Wallace Murry is the youngest Murry child, the most extraordinary and the most vulnerable of the novel's human characters, and the youngest to journey to Camazotz. Charles Wallace did not talk at all until he was nearly four years old, at which time he began to speak in complete sentences. Now five years old, Charles Wallace seldom speaks to anyone but his family, but can empathically or telepathically "read" certain people's thoughts and feelings, and has an extraordinary vocabulary. A biological "sport", he is intellectually curious, loving, and unfazed by extraordinary people and events. He was the first to meet the Mrs Ws and brought Meg to see them. Initially able to block IT out of his mind, he opens himself to the Man with Red Eyes and thus falls under ITs control. He first appears in Chapter One. David Dorfman as Charles Wallace Murry in the 2003 television adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time Charles Wallace Murry is a major character in Madeline LEngles young adult science fiction novels A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, and A Swiftly Tilting Planet, sometimes referred to... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ...


Calvin O'Keefe

Calvin O'Keefe is the third eldest of Paddy and Branwen O'Keefe's eleven children, a tall, thin, red-haired 14-year-old[5] high school junior who plays on the school basketball team. Neglected by his own family, Calvin joyfully enters the lives of the Murry family, starting in Chapter Two. He shows some signs of being able to communicate telepathically, a technique referred to in later books as kything. Calvin OKeefe is a major character in Madeleine LEngles Time Quartet series of books, and, as Dr. Calvin OKeefe, an important character in her OKeefe series of young adult novels. ... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... Kything is a type of communication, in a sense like telepathy, found in several of the books in Madeline LEngles Time Quartet. ...


Primary immortal characters

Hardcover art by Leo and Diane Dillon, showing the Mrs Ws
Hardcover art by Leo and Diane Dillon, showing the Mrs Ws
Current book cover art by Taeeun Yoo, showing the Mrs Ws (at the left) and the children at the CENTRAL Central Intelligence building (at the right)
Current book cover art by Taeeun Yoo, showing the Mrs Ws (at the left) and the children at the CENTRAL Central Intelligence building (at the right)

Image File history File links Wrinkle_In_Time_Cover. ... Image File history File links Wrinkle_In_Time_Cover. ... Leo and Diane Dillon are a husband and wife team of illustrators. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Mrs Whatsit

Mrs Whatsit is first described as an elderly woman wrapped in layers of clothes. She first appears in chapter one. Charles Wallace, a five year old boy in the book, found her in a 'haunted house' in the woods, where she has been living with her two friends, Mrs Who and Mrs Which. Mrs Whatsit is the youngest of the Mrs W's (despite being over 2.37 billion years old), and the best of the three at interacting with the children. (See also List of types of clothing) Introduction Humans often wear articles of clothing (also known as dress, garments or attire) on the body (for the alternative, see nudity). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In Chapter Four, the group (Charles Wallace, Calvin, and Meg) witnesses the physical transformation of Mrs Whatsit into a centaur-like winged being on the planet Uriel. Mrs Whatsit is also revealed to have been a star that sacrificed itself by exploding in order to destroy a section of the Black Thing. This article is about the mythological creatures. ...

See also: Buraq

Buraq from a 17th-century Mughal miniature The Buraq (Arabic: البُراق al-buraaq, meaning lightning, also means the element boron; Turkish: Burak), is according to Islamic tradition a creature from the heavens that carried Muhammad from earth to heaven and back during the Isra and Miraj (Night Journey). ...

Mrs Who

Mrs Who is described as a plump woman with spectacles. She is seen quoting Latin, Spanish, German, French, Portuguese and Greek. She also quotes William Shakespeare and the Bible repeatedly. Mrs Whatsit explains that Mrs Who finds it "difficult to verbalize" in her own words. She is first introduced in Chapter Two. Glasses, spectacles, or eyeglasses are frames bearing lenses worn in front of the eyes, sometimes for purely aesthetic reasons but normally for vision correction or eye protection. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ...


Mrs Which

Mrs Which is the oldest of the Mrs W's, and the most authoritative, although she interacts less with the children than do Mrs Whatsit and Mrs Who. She is normally seen as little more than a shimmer of light or a shadow. Mrs Which seldom (if ever) fully materializes, but in human form she resembles a stereotyped witch in black robe and peaked hat. She finds it hard to think as a corporeal being. In Chapter Five, she accidentally takes Charles, Meg, and Calvin to a two-dimensional world. In common usage, the dimensions (from Latin measured out) of an object are the parameters or measurements required to define its shape and size, that is, usually, its height, width, and length. ...


IT

IT is the bodiless telepathic brain that dominates the planet of Camazotz. It speaks through The Man With Red Eyes and later through Charles Wallace, and is functionally part of the interstellar cloud of evil called the Black Thing. IT is described as slightly larger than a human brain. Housed near the "CENTRAL Central Intelligence" building, IT is said to pulse and quiver on its dais. Its aim is to enforce absolute conformity on Camazotz, with the claimed benefit of eliminating war, unhappiness and inefficiency. However, IT is aware of its cruelty, referring to "ITself" as "the Happiest Sadist". Look up sadism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Proper way to refer to the immortal characters

Madeleine L'Engle specifically requested her American publisher to use the British punctuation of "Mrs" (with no full stop following) to designate the characters Mrs Who, Mrs Which and Mrs Whatsit. However, there were several mix-ups regarding punctuation in general, and the books were printed with a full stop following "Mrs" despite the author's wishes.[6]


Supporting human characters

Dr. Alexander (Alex) Murry

Dr. Alexander (Alex) Murry is an astrophysicist, researching the mysteries of the space/time continuum, specifically five-dimensional means of travel between planets. He is also the father of Meg, Sandy, Dennys and Charles Wallace. He has been missing for some time as the novel opens. Not even his government colleagues know where he is. (Note: Dr. Murry's first name is given in a later novel in the series, a fact that was ignored by the writers of the book's television adaptation.) He first appears in a flashback in Chapter One.


Dr. Katherine (Kate) Murry

Dr. Kate Murry is a microbiologist, wife of Dr. Alexander Murry, and mother of the four Murry children. She is considered beautiful by the Murry children and others, having "flaming red hair" and violet eyes. Her physical attractiveness, academic and scientific accomplishments give Meg a bit of an inferiority complex. She is introduced in Chapter One, and usually referred to as Mrs. Murry. As in her husband's case, her first name is revealed in a later book, and does not match the one given in the television version of the story.


Alexander (Sandy) Murry

Sandy Murry and his twin brother Dennys are the middle children in the Murry family, older than Charles Wallace but younger than Meg. They are 10 years old at the time of this book. Sandy is named after his father, Dr. Alex Murry. Although they are certainly intelligent, Sandy and his twin are considered the "normal" children in the family: B students, good at sports, and well able to fit in with their peers. Of the twins, Sandy is generally the leader, and the more pragmatic of the two. He and Dennys first appear in Chapter One. Sandy and Dennys on the cover of Many Waters Alexander Sandy Murry and Dennys Murry are fictional identical twins in Madeline LEngles Time Quartet. ...


Dennys Murry

Dennys Murry is the twin of Sandy Murry. Dennys and his twin are usually inseparable, with Dennys generally following Sandy's lead. However, Dennys is slightly less skeptical than his brother about the strange theories and even stranger adventures of Meg and Charles Wallace. (Note: The name Dennys is a shortened version of "Dionysus", but is pronounced the same way as the more common spelling Dennis.) Sandy and Dennys on the cover of Many Waters Alexander Sandy Murry and Dennys Murry are fictional identical twins in Madeline LEngles Time Quartet. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ...


Supporting alien characters

The Happy Medium lives in a cavern on a planet in Orion's Belt. Human in appearance, she is described as wearing a satin gown and a silk turban, and uses a crystal ball to look at distant places and people. Her title comes from the character's jolly temperament, and her preference for looking at happy things. She is introduced in chapter five. (The name "Happy Medium" is a pun alluding to the common expression for reaching an acceptable compromise: "to find a happy medium.") This article is about an emotion. ... Mediumship is a form of relationship to spirits practiced in many religions, including Spiritualism, Spiritism, Espiritismo, Candomblé, Voodoo, Kardecism, and Umbanda. ... This article is about the fortune telling object; for other uses, see Crystal ball (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ...


Aunt Beast is a character who takes care of Meg on the planet Ixchel after Meg is "frozen" by the Black Thing. Introduced in chapter ten, the character has four arms, no eyes or mouth, and numerous long, waving tentacles instead of fingers. Tall, gray in color, sightless and telepathic, Aunt Beast has a motherly, nurturing attitude toward Meg. The name Aunt Beast is one that Meg and the alien come up with together, based on the character's perusal of Meg's mind. The character's actual name, if any, is not given. Tentacles can refer to the elongated flexible organs that are present in many invertebrates, and sometimes to the hairs of the leaves of insectivorous plants. ...


Locations

Early scenes in the novel take place in and around an unnamed village, later established in An Acceptable Time as being in Connecticut. The nearly 200-year-old Murry farmhouse and the nearby "star-watching rock" have parallels in both the Austin family series of books and in L'Engle's Connecticut home, Crosswicks.[6] Cover of the Farrar, Straus & Giroux edition of Meet the Austins by Madeleine LEngle, 1997, depicting Seven Bay Island. ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... An Acceptable Time is a 1989 young adult science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2] Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[5] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km... FarmHouse Fraternity is an all-male international social fraternity founded at the University of Missouri in 1905. ... Vicky Austin and Zachary Gray on the cover of the 1981 paperback edition of The Moon by Night Victoria Vicky Austin is one of Madeline LEngles most frequently-used fictional characters, appearing in eight books and referred to in at least one more. ...


When Meg, Calvin and Charles Wallace travel to other planets, the ones whose names are given include the following:

  • Camazotz – A planet of extreme, enforced conformity, ruled by a disembodied brain called IT. Camazotz is similar to Earth, with familiar trees such as birches, pines, and maples, an ordinary hill on which the children arrive, and a town with smokestacks, which "might have been one of any number of familiar towns". The horror of the place arises from its ordinary appearance, endlessly duplicated. Thus, the houses are "all exactly alike, small square boxes painted gray"; this characterization has been compared with "the burgeoning American suburbia"[7] such as the post-war housing developments of Levittown, Pennsylvania. The people who live in the houses are similarly described, with "mother figures" who "all gave the appearance of being the same". Camazotz has also been compared with "an early sixties American image of life in a Communist state", a characterization partially dismissed as too glib.[8] The name Camazotz refers to a Mayan bat god, one of L'Engle's many mythological allusions in her nomenclature.[9]
  • Ixchel – A planet of muted colors, inhabited by tall, sightless creatures with tentacles. It orbits the same sun as Camazotz. Then name Ixchel refers to a Mayan jaguar goddess of medicine.[9]
  • Uriel – A planet with extremely tall mountains, an allusion to the Archangel Uriel. It is inhabited by creatures that resemble winged centaurs. It is the third planet of the Starmark in the spiral nebula Messier 101. The site of Mrs Whatsit's temporary transformation into one of these winged creatures, it is the place where "the guardian angels" (i.e. the Mrs Ws, who are explicitly referred to as such by Calvin later in the book) "show the questers a vision of the universe that is obscured on earth."[10]

They also stop briefly on an unnamed two-dimensional planet and on an unnamed planet in Orion's belt, the latter of which is the home of the Happy Medium. Levittown, Pennsylvania is a census-designated place (CDP) and suburban community located in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, within the Philadelphia metropolitan area. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ixchel or Ix Chel is the Yucatec Maya language name of the aged jaguar goddess of midwifery and medicine. ... Mount Cook, a mountain in New Zealand A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... 12th century icon of the Archangels Michael and Gabriel (Saint Catherines Monastery, Mount Sinai). ... For other uses, see Uriel (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... Spiral nebula is an old term for a spiral galaxy. ... Messier Object 101, the Pinwheel Galaxy. ... For other uses, see Dimension (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Orion. ...


Major themes

Religious content

On the planet Uriel, the centaur-like beings sing a song which translates (brackets indicates text that is in the book but not in the Bible): "Sing unto the Lord a new song, and his praise from the end of the earth, ye that go down to the sea, and all that is therein; the isles, and the inhabitants thereof. Let the wilderness and the cities thereof lift up their voice[,] … let the inhabitants of the rock sing, let them shout from the top of the mountains. Let them give glory unto the Lord[!]" —Isaiah 42:10–12a (KJV) This article is about the mythological creatures. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Book of Isaiah. ... The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ...


When the Mrs W's reveal their secret roles in the cosmic fight against "the darkness" they ask the children to name some on Earth (a partially dark planet) who fight the darkness. First named is Jesus followed by several scientists, religious figures, and artists, including Buddha, Gandhi, Bach, Einstein, Euclid and Copernicus. The three women are ancient star-beings who act as guardian angels.[10] This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Siddhartha and Gautama redirect here. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Euclid (disambiguation). ... Nicolaus Copernicus (in Latin; Polish Mikołaj Kopernik, German Nikolaus Kopernikus - February 19, 1473 – May 24, 1543) was a Polish astronomer, mathematician and economist who developed a heliocentric (Sun-centered) theory of the solar system in a form detailed enough to make it scientifically useful. ... The Annunciation - the Angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she will bear Jesus (El Greco, 1575) An angel is an ethereal being found in many religions, whose duties are to assist and serve God. ...


After the escape from Camazotz, while they are on Ixchel, Alex Murry (Meg's father) tells Meg: "And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose." Later in the same chapter, the alien 'Aunt Beast' says to Meg, "We are the called according to His purpose, and whom He call[s], them He also justifie[s]." —Romans 8:28, 30 (KJV) The Epistle to the Romans is one of the letters of the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ...


The last chapter, "The Foolish and the Weak", Mrs Who advises Meg, "The foolishness of God is wiser than men; and the weakness of God is stronger than men. For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called, but God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty. And base things of the world, and things which are despised, hath God chosen, yea, and things which are not, to bring to naught things that are." —1 Corinthians 1:25–28 The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ...


L'Engle's liberal Christianity has been the target of criticism, especially with respect to certain elements of A Wrinkle in Time. This novel is on the American Library Association list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–2000 at number 22.[11] Reasons given include the book's references to witches and crystal balls[12] (although the characters are not in fact witches, and the crystal ball is a science fictional one), the claim that it "challenges religious beliefs"[13], and the listing of Jesus "with the names of great artists, philosophers, scientists, and religious leaders".[14] ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... Due to the controversial nature of free speech in the United States many books have been challenged by a variety of groups and agencies in order to prevent a particular work from being read by the general public. ...


History

L'Engle has written repeatedly about the writing of the story and the long struggle to get it published. In A Circle of Quiet (1972, ISBN 0-374-12374-8), she explains that the book was conceived "during a time of transition". After years of living at Crosswicks and running a general store, L'Engle's family, the Franklins, moved back to New York City, first taking a ten-week camping trip across the country and back again. L'Engle writes that "we drove through a world of deserts and buttes and leafless mountains, wholly new and alien to me. And suddenly into my mind came the names, Mrs Whatsit. Mrs Who. Mrs Which."[6] This was in the Spring of 1959. L'Engle was reading about quantum physics at the time, which also made its way into the story. However, when she completed the book in early 1960, it received a long series of rejections, "because it deals overtly with the problem of evil, and it was too difficult for children, and was it a children's or an adults' book, anyhow?"[6] See also: 1971 in literature, other events of 1972, 1973 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Smiths Gully General Store in Smiths Gully, Australia. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Car camping is camping in a tent, but nearby the car for easier access and for supply storage Camping is an outdoor recreational activity, in which the campers get away from civilization and enjoy nature by spending one or more nights at a campsite. ... Fig. ...


In "A Special Message from Madeleine L'Engle" on the Random House website, L'Engle explains another possible reason for the rejections: "A Wrinkle in Time had a female protagonist in a science fiction book," which at the time "wasn't done" according to L'Engle. After trying "forty-odd" publishers (L'Engle later said "twenty-six rejections"), L'Engle's agent returned the manuscript to her. Then at Christmas, L'Engle threw a tea party for her mother. One of the guests happened to know John Farrar of Farrar, Straus & Giroux, and insisted that L'Engle should meet with him. Although the publisher did not at the time publish a line of children's books, Farrar met L'Engle, liked the novel and ultimately published it.[15] Farrar, Straus and Giroux is an American book publishing company, founded in 1946 by Roger W. Straus, Jr. ...


The book has been continuously in print since its first publication. The hardback edition is still published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. The original blue dust jacket by Ellen Raskin was replaced with new art by Leo and Diane Dillon with the publication of A Swiftly Tilting Planet in 1978. The book has also been published in a twenty-fifth anniversary collectors' edition (limited to 500 signed and numbered copies), at least two book club editions (one hardback, one Scholastic Book Services paperback), as a trade paperback under the Dell Yearling imprint, and as a mass market paperback under the Dell Laurel-Leaf imprint. The cover art on the paperback editions has changed several times since first publication. A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) book is bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth or heavy paper) and a stitched spine. ... Ellen Raskin (March 13, 1928 – August 8, 1984) was an American writer, illustrator, and designer. ... Leo and Diane Dillon are a husband and wife team of illustrators. ... A Swiftly Tilting Planet A Swiftly Tilting Planet is a 1978 science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... A book sales club is a subscription-based method of selling and purchasing books. ... For other uses, see Scholastic (disambiguation). ... A trade paperback can refer to any book that is bound with a heavy paper cover that is generally cheaper than the hardcover but more expensive than the regular paperback version. ... Categories: Stub | Books ...


The book was reissued by Square Fish in trade and mass market paperback formats in May 2007, along with the rest of the Time Quintet. This new edition includes a previously unpublished interview with L'Engle as well as the text of her Newbery Medal acceptance speech.[16]


Other books in the series

L'Engle has written three other books featuring this generation of the Murry family, collectively known as the Time Quartet. Listed in order of the internal chronology of the series, they are: The Time Quartet is a fantasy/science fiction series of four young adult novels written by Madeleine LEngle. ...

Note that although Many Waters was published approximately eight years after A Swiftly Tilting Planet, it takes place several years earlier, when Sandy and Dennys are in high school and Meg is in college. A Wind in the Door (1973, ISBN 0-374-38443-6) is a young adult science fantasy novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1972 in literature, other events of 1973, 1974 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Many Waters is a 1986 novel by Madeleine LEngle, part of the authors Time Quartet. ... The year 1986 in literature involved some significant events and new books. ... A Swiftly Tilting Planet A Swiftly Tilting Planet is a 1978 science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1977 in literature, other events of 1978, 1979 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


Four further novels have been published that feature Meg and Calvin's children, especially Polly O'Keefe. The most recent of these, An Acceptable Time (1989, ISBN 0-374-30027-5) features Meg's parents, and is marketed with the four Murry books as the Time Quintet. Nearly every novel by Madeleine L'Engle connects to the Murry-O'Keefe series either directly or indirectly due to appearances by recurring characters. See also: List of L'Engle's works and Major characters in the works of Madeleine L'Engle for further detail. Polly OKeefe and Zachary Gray as depicted on the dust jacket of An Acceptable Time Polyhymnia (Polly) OKeefe is the protagonist of the Madeleine LEngle novels A House Like a Lotus and An Acceptable Time, and a major character in two previous books, The Arm of the... An Acceptable Time is a 1989 young adult science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1988 in literature, other events of 1989, 1990 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A recurring character is a fictional character, usually in a prime time TV series, who is not a main character, but appears from time to time during the series run. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... Madeleine LEngle, an American novelist, diarist and poet, has produced over fifty books since her first novel, The Small Rain, in 1945. ...


Concerning A Wrinkle in Time

  • Scholastic BookFiles: A Reading Guide to A Wrinkle in Time ISBN 0-439-46364-5
  • Chase, Carole F. Suncatcher: A Study of Madeleine L'Engle and Her Writing, p. 170. Innisfree Press, 1998, ISBN 1-880913-31-3

Audio book

An unabridged four cassette audio edition, read by the author, was released in 1994 by Listening Library, ISBN 0-8072-7587-5.

Image File history File links Awrinkleintimetv. ... Image File history File links Awrinkleintimetv. ... David Dorfman as Charles Wallace Murry in the 2003 television adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time David Benjamin Dorfman (born 7th February 1993 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actor. ... David Dorfman as Charles Wallace Murry in the 2003 television adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time Charles Wallace Murry is a major character in Madeline LEngles young adult science fiction novels A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, and A Swiftly Tilting Planet, sometimes referred to... Katherine Anne Stuart (born March 22, 1985) is a Canadian actress who has appeared in over 15 movies, ranging from the obscure (Atomic Dog) to the more well-known (X2). ... Information Nickname(s) Meg Aliases Margaret Murry OKeefe Occupation Student, later mathematician Spouse(s) Dr. Calvin OKeefe Children Polly, Charles, Xan, Den, Peggy, Johnny, Rosy Relatives Drs. ... Gregory Edward Smith (born July 6, 1983) is a Canadian/American actor. ... Calvin OKeefe is a major character in Madeleine LEngles Time Quartet series of books, and, as Dr. Calvin OKeefe, an important character in her OKeefe series of young adult novels. ... This article is about the astronomical term. ...

Television movie

Further information: A Wrinkle in Time (film)

In 2003, a television adaptation of the novel was made by Disney. The movie was directed by John Kent Harrison, and the teleplay was written by Susan Shilliday. Among the many differences between the book and the movie are different first names for Meg's parents and a more contemporary and attractive look for Meg, with neither glasses nor braces. More significantly, religious elements of the novel are largely omitted. For example, the name of Jesus is not mentioned as one who fought against evil; and when Mrs Whatsit asks Charles Wallace to translate the song of the centaur-like creatures on Uriel, he simply says "it's about joy". In an interview with Newsweek, L'Engle said of the film, "I expected it to be bad, and it is."[17] The film was subsequently released on DVD. The special features included a "very rare" interview with Madeleine L'Engle, discussing the novel. In 2003, a television adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time was completed by Disney. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Disney redirects here. ... John Kent Harrison is a television producer, director and writer. ... A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


References

  1. ^ L'Engle, Madeleine (1993). The Rock That Is Higher: Story As Truth. Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers, p. 222. ISBN 0-87788-726-8. .
  2. ^ L'Engle, Madeleine (1987). A Wrinkle in Time, 25th Anniversary Collectors' Edition. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, pp. viii-ix. Limited ed.. 
  3. ^ L'Engle, Madeleine (2007). "Go Fish: Questions for the Author", A Wrinkle in Time. New York: Square fish, p. 236. ISBN 0-312-36754-6. 
  4. ^ Chase, Carole F. (1998). Suncatcher: A Study of Madeleine L'Engle And Her Writing. Philadelphia: Innisfree Press, Inc., p. 170. ISBN 1-880913-31-3. 
  5. ^ A Wrinkle in Time, chapter two
  6. ^ a b c d L'Engle, Madeleine (1972). A Circle of Quiet. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, pp 5-6, 21, 66, 217-218. ISBN 0-374-12374-8. 
  7. ^ Hettinga, Donald R. (1993). Presenting Madeleine L'Engle. New York: Twayne Publishers, pg. 27. ISBN 0-8057-8222-2. 
  8. ^ Blackburn, William, “"Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time: Seeking the Original Face"”, Touchstones: Reflections on the Best in Children's Literature Vol. 1: p. 125 ; cited in Hettinga, pp. 27.
  9. ^ a b Stott, Jon (Fall), “"Midsummer Night's Dreams: Fantasy and Self-Realization in Children's Fiction"”, The Lion and the Unicorn Vol. 1 (No. 2): pp 25-39 ; cited in Hettinga, pp. 27, 30.
  10. ^ a b Hettinga, p. 26
  11. ^ "The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–2000". Banned Books Week. American Library Association (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  12. ^ Matheson, Whitney (2007). "Some of the best books in life are ... banned?". Pop Candy. USA Today. Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  13. ^ "Why Were These Books Banned?". Library - Faculty Services. Val A. Browning Library, Dixie State College of Utah (2001). Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  14. ^ "A Wrinkle In Time". banned books project. Solonor.com (2003-09-21). Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  15. ^ L'Engle, Madeleine (2004). "A Special Message from Madeleine L'Engle". Teachers @ Random: A Wrinkle in Time. Random House, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  16. ^ "It's Time to Read A Wrinkle in Time". Square Fish Books (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-01.
  17. ^ Henneberger, Melinda (2003-05-07). "‘I Dare You’: Madeleine L’Engle on God, ‘The Da Vinci Code’ and aging well", Newsweek, MSNBC.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-27. 

Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... Farrar, Straus and Giroux is an American book publishing company, founded in 1946 by Roger W. Straus, Jr. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... Farrar, Straus and Giroux is an American book publishing company, founded in 1946 by Roger W. Straus, Jr. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Whitney Matheson is the author of the popular entertainment blog Pop Candy. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
The Bronze Bow
Newbery Medal recipient
1963
Succeeded by
It's Like This, Cat
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... The Bronze Bow is a book by Elizabeth George Speare that won the Newbery Medal for excellence in American childrens literature in 1962. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... See also: 1962 in literature, other events of 1963, 1964 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Its Like This, Cat is a novel written by Emily Cheney Neville that won the Newbery Medal for excellence in American childrens literature in 1964. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ... The Time Quartet is a fantasy/science fiction series of four young adult novels written by Madeleine LEngle. ... A Wind in the Door (1973, ISBN 0-374-38443-6) is a young adult science fantasy novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... Many Waters is a 1986 novel by Madeleine LEngle, part of the authors Time Quartet. ... A Swiftly Tilting Planet A Swiftly Tilting Planet is a 1978 science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... Polly OKeefe and Zachary Gray as depicted on the dust jacket of An Acceptable Time Polyhymnia (Polly) OKeefe is the protagonist of the Madeleine LEngle novels A House Like a Lotus and An Acceptable Time, and a major character in two previous books, The Arm of the... The Arm of the Starfish is a novel by Madeleine LEngle, first published in 1965. ... Thirteen-year-old Simon Renier has no idea when he boards the M.S. Orion with his cousin Forsyth Phair that the journey will take him not only to Venezuela, but into his past as well. ... A House Like a Lotus (ISBN 0-374-33385-8) is a 1984 young adult novel by Madeline LEngle. ... An Acceptable Time is a 1989 young adult science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... Meet the Austins is the title of a 1960 novel by Madeline LEngle, the first of her books about the Austin family. ... The Moon by Night (ISBN 0-374-35049-3) is the title of a young adult novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... The Young Unicorns (1968, ISBN 0-374-38778-8) is the title of a young adult suspense novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... A Ring of Endless Light is a 1980 novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... Troubling a Star is the last of the Austin family series by Madeleine LEngle, published in 1994. ... The Small Rain is a semi-autobiographical novel by Madeline LEngle, about the many difficulties in the life of talented pianist Katherine Forrester between the ages of 10 and 18. ... A Severed Wasp (1982, ISBN 0-374-26131-8), is a novel by Madeline LEngle. ... Camilla Dickinson, also published as Camilla, is a novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... A Live Coal in the Sea written by Madeleine LEngle and published in 1996, is the sequel to Camilla (also published as Camilla Dickinson), one of LEngles earliest novels. ... Ilsa is a 1946 novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... And Both Were Young is a novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... Information Nickname(s) Meg Aliases Margaret Murry OKeefe Occupation Student, later mathematician Spouse(s) Dr. Calvin OKeefe Children Polly, Charles, Xan, Den, Peggy, Johnny, Rosy Relatives Drs. ... David Dorfman as Charles Wallace Murry in the 2003 television adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time Charles Wallace Murry is a major character in Madeline LEngles young adult science fiction novels A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, and A Swiftly Tilting Planet, sometimes referred to... Calvin OKeefe is a major character in Madeleine LEngles Time Quartet series of books, and, as Dr. Calvin OKeefe, an important character in her OKeefe series of young adult novels. ... Sandy and Dennys on the cover of Many Waters Alexander Sandy Murry and Dennys Murry are fictional identical twins in Madeline LEngles Time Quartet. ... Polly OKeefe and Zachary Gray as depicted on the dust jacket of An Acceptable Time Polyhymnia (Polly) OKeefe is the protagonist of the Madeleine LEngle novels A House Like a Lotus and An Acceptable Time, and a major character in two previous books, The Arm of the... Vicky Austin and Zachary Gray on the cover of the 1981 paperback edition of The Moon by Night Victoria Vicky Austin is one of Madeline LEngles most frequently-used fictional characters, appearing in eight books and referred to in at least one more. ... Canon John Tallis is a major character in the young adult novels of Madeleine LEngle, appearing in four books. ... Ryan Merriman as Adam Eddington gets up close and personal with a bottle-nosed dolphin in the Disney Channel TV movie adaptation of the Madeleine LEngle novel A Ring of Endless Light. ... Polly OKeefe and Zachary Gray as depicted on the dust jacket of An Acceptable Time Zachary Gray (spelled Grey in some editions of the books) is a fictional character in the young adult novels of Madeleine LEngle. ... Madeleine LEngle, an American novelist, diarist and poet, has produced over fifty books since her first novel, The Small Rain, in 1945. ... Cover of the Farrar, Straus & Giroux edition of Meet the Austins by Madeleine LEngle, 1997, depicting Seven Bay Island. ... Echthroi is a Greek word meaning The Enemy, used to refer to a fictional group of creatures who want nothing more than to destroy all of everything. ... Kything is a type of communication, in a sense like telepathy, found in several of the books in Madeline LEngles Time Quartet. ... Hugh Franklin (August 24, 1916 – September 26, 1986) was an American soap opera actor. ... In 2003, a television adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time was completed by Disney. ... A Ring of Endless Light is a 2002 Disney Channel Original Movie, based on the novel by Madeleine LEngle. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
SparkNotes: A Wrinkle in Time: Summary (556 words)
A Wrinkle in Time is the story of Meg Murry, a high-school-aged girl who is transported on an adventure through time and space with her younger brother Charles Wallace and her friend Calvin O'Keefe to rescue her father, a gifted scientist, from the evil forces that hold him prisoner on another planet.
She startles Meg's mother by reassuring her of the existence of a tesseract--a sort of "wrinkle" in space and time.
It is through this wrinkle that Meg and her companions will travel through the fifth dimension in search of Mr.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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