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Encyclopedia > A Very Peculiar Practice
A Very Peculiar Practice

This is the main title caption that was seen throughout the series.
Genre Drama
Created by Andrew Davies
Starring Peter Davison
Graham Crowden
David Troughton
Barbara Flynn
John Bird
Country of origin UK
No. of episodes 15
Production
Running time 50 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel BBC
Original run 1986 – 1992
Links
IMDb profile

A Very Peculiar Practice was a BBC comedy-drama series, first shown in 1986. It was the first major success for screenwriter Andrew Davies, and was inspired by his experiences as a lecturer at the University of Warwick. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 320 × 240 pixelsFull resolution (320 × 240 pixel, file size: 9 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Main title caption This image is a screenshot of a copyrighted television program or station ID. As such, the copyright for it is most likely owned... This does not cite its references or sources. ... There are several well-known people named Andrew Davies, including: Andrew Davies (writer) Andrew Davies (politician) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Peter Davison (born 13 April 1951) is an English actor, best known for his roles as Tristan Farnon in the television version of James Herriots All Creatures Great and Small and as the fifth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who, which he played from 1981 to 1984. ... Graham Crowden (born 30 November 1922) is a Scottish actor, best known for his roles in BBC comedy-dramas. ... David Troughton (born June 9, 1950 in Hampstead, North London, England) is a respected Shakespearean actor on the British stage. ... Barbara Flynn (born 5 August 1948) is a British actress. ... John Bird (born 22 November 1936) is an English satirist, actor and comedian. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Andrew Davies (born 1936 in Cardiff, Wales) is a British screenwriter. ... The University of Warwick coat of arms The University of Warwick in Coventry is one of the leading universities in the United Kingdom. ...


Storyline

The series stood out because of its surreal humour. It concerned an idealistic young doctor, Stephen Daker (Peter Davison), taking up a post as a member of a university medical centre. The centre is staffed by a group of misfits including the bisexual Rose Marie (Barbara Flynn) and self-absorbed Bob Buzzard (David Troughton), and headed by decrepit Scot Jock McCannon (Graham Crowden). A central theme of the series is the increasing commercialisation of higher education in Britain with the Vice-Chancellor Ernest Hemmingway (John Bird) trying to woo Japanese investors in the face of resistance from the academic old guard. Hugh Grant made one of his first television appearances as an evangelical preacher; Kathy Burke also had a bit part. In the second series Michael Shannon appeared as the new Vice-Chancellor Jack Daniels, continuing the running joke of naming the VC after an American. Peter Davison (born 13 April 1951) is an English actor, best known for his roles as Tristan Farnon in the television version of James Herriots All Creatures Great and Small and as the fifth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who, which he played from 1981 to 1984. ... Barbara Flynn (born 5 August 1948) is a British actress. ... David Troughton (born June 9, 1950 in Hampstead, North London, England) is a respected Shakespearean actor on the British stage. ... Graham Crowden (born 30 November 1922) is a Scottish actor, best known for his roles in BBC comedy-dramas. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... John Bird (born 22 November 1936) is an English satirist, actor and comedian. ... Hugh John Mungo Grant (born September 9, 1960 in Hammersmith, London) is a Golden Globe winning British actor. ... Kathy Burke (born June 13, 1964) is a British actress. ...


In the first series, Daker had a romance with a policewoman, Lyn Turtle (Amanda Hillwood), who rescued him from drowning in the university's swimming pool. In the second series (1988), she was replaced as love interest by a visiting Polish academic Greta Gretowska (Joanna Kanska). In a sequel film, A Very Polish Practice (1992), Daker went to live with her in Poland, where he struggled with the former Communist country's antiquated health service. This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ...


Lowlands University (the fictional campus at which the series was set) was based on the University of East Anglia campus in Norwich, and it was the UEA campus which featured in the programme's title sequence. However, the outdoor filming for the programme was done at the universities of Keele and Birmingham[1]. This was put down to UEA's concern of being associated with a comedy programme, which might have cast the institution in a bad light. The selection of UEA by the producers was not unintentional as it was the base for Malcolm Bradbury whose development of the British campus novel the series is much indebted. The interiors were shot at BBC Pebble Mill (first series) and London (second), in the then common combined film/video format. The University of East Anglia (UEA) is a leading campus university located in Norwich, Norfolk, England, founded as part of the British Governments New Universities programme in the 1960s. ... Keele University is a research-intensive campus university located near Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire, England. ... Website http://www. ... Sir Malcolm Stanley Bradbury (September 7, 1932 – November 27, 2000) was a British author and academic. ... A campus novel is a novel whose main action is set in and around the campus of a university. ... Pebble Mill Studios were located in the leafy suburbs of Birmingham, England. ...


The theme tune, We Love You was performed by legendary UK singer, Elkie Brooks. Elkie Brooks (born Elaine Bookbinder, 25 February 1945, in Salford) is a British singer, formerly a vocalist with Vinegar Joe, and later a solo artist. ...


The first series was released on DVD (Region 2) in the UK in 2004. Davies novelised both series in two books: A Very Peculiar Practice (1986, Coronet) and A Very Peculiar Practice: The New Frontier (1988, Methuen). DVD (commonly known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A novelization (or novelisation in British English) is a work of fiction that is written based on some other media story form rather than as an original work. ...


References

  1. ^ A VERY PECULIAR PRACTICE. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-02-15.

The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
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The practice of writing mantras as a spiritual practice, became very refined in Japan, and the writing in the Siddham script in which the Sanskrit of many Buddhist Sutras where written, is only seen in Japan nowadays.
practice might include mudras, or symbolic hand gestures, or even full body prostrations; the recitations of mantras; as well as the visualization of celestial beings and visualizing the letters of the mantra which is being recited.
Mantra practice has also been taken up by various New Age groups, although this is typically out of context, and from the point of view of a Hindu or Buddhist practitioner, lacks depth.
A Very Peculiar Practice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (341 words)
A Very Peculiar Practice was a BBC comedy-drama series, first shown in 1986.
In a sequel film, A Very Polish Practice, Daker went to live with her in Poland, where he struggled with the Communist system's antiquated health service.
The programme was based on the University of East Anglia campus in Norwich, and it was the UEA campus which featured in the programme's title sequence.
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