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Encyclopedia > A Plea for Captain John Brown
Henry David Thoreau

Central topics Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (623x768, 150 KB) Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Source : http://eserver. ...

Henry David Thoreau
Civil Disobedience
Herald of Freedom
Life Without Principle
The Last Days of John Brown
Paradise (to be) Regained
A Plea for Captain John Brown
Reform and the Reformers
Remarks After the Hanging of John Brown
The Service
Sir Walter Raleigh
Slavery in Massachusetts
Thomas Carlyle and His Works
Walden
A Walk to Wachusett
Wendell Phillips Before the Concord Lyceum
The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau
Thoreau Society
Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau[1]) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher who is best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance... Civil Disobedience is an essay by Henry David Thoreau. ... Herald of Freedom was an essay by Henry David Thoreau published in The Dial in 1844 that praised Herald of Freedom, the journal of the New England Anti-Slavery Society and its editor, Nathaniel P. Rogers. ... Life Without Principle is an essay by Henry David Thoreau that gives his program for right livelihood. ... The Last Days of John Brown is an essay by Henry David Thoreau written in 1860 that praised the executed abolitionist militia leader John Brown. ... Paradise (to be) Regained is an essay written by Henry David Thoreau and published in 1843 in the United States Magazine and Democratic Review. ... Reform and the Reformers is an essay written by Henry David Thoreau. ... Remarks After the Hanging of John Brown is a speech given by Henry David Thoreau on 2 December 1859 at the time of John Brown’s execution. ... The Service is an essay written in 1840 by Henry David Thoreau. ... Sir Walter Raleigh is an essay by Henry David Thoreau that has been reconstructed from notes he wrote for a lecture he gave in 1843 and drafts of an article he was preparing for The Dial. ... “Slavery in Massachusetts” is an 1854 essay by Henry David Thoreau based on a speech he gave at an anti-slavery rally at Framingham, Massachusetts, on July 4, 1854, after the reënslavement in Boston, Massachusetts of fugitive slave Anthony Burns. ... Thomas Carlyle and His Works is an essay written by Henry David Thoreau that praises the writings of Thomas Carlyle. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Walk to Wachusett is an essay penned by Henry David Thoreau about a journey he took with companion, Richard Fuller from Concord, Massachusetts to the summit of Mount Wachusett located in Princeton, Massachusetts. ... Wendell Phillips Before the Concord Lyceum is a letter-to-the-editor written by Henry David Thoreau and published in The Liberator in 1845 that praised the abolitionist lecturer Wendell Phillips. ... The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau is a project that aims to, for the first time, provide accurate texts of the works of Henry David Thoreau, the American author, including his journal, his personal letters, and his writings for publications. ... About Established in 1941, the Thoreau Society has long contributed to the dissemination of knowledge about Thoreau by collecting books, manuscripts, and artifacts relating to Thoreau and his contemporaries, by encouraging the use of its collections, and by publishing articles in two Society periodicals. ...


Related topics

Abolitionism · Anarchism
Anarchism in the United States
Civil disobedience
Concord, Massachusetts
Conscientious objection
Direct action · Ecology
Environmentalism
History of tax resistance
Individualist anarchism
John Brown · Lyceum movement
Nonviolent resistance
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Simple living · Tax resistance
Tax resisters · Transcendentalism
The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail
Walden Pond This English poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery. ... Anarchism is a form of social criticism, a political movement as well as a political philosophy. ... Anarchism in the United States spans a wide range of anarchist philosophy, from individualist anarchism to anarchist communism and other less known forms. ... Anti-war activist Midge Potts is arrested for civil disobedience on the steps of the Supreme Court of the United States on February 9, 2005. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Town  25. ... John T. Neufeld was a WWI conscientious objector sentenced to 15 years hard labour in the military prison at Leavenworth. ... Direct action is a form of political activism which seeks immediate remedy for perceived ills, as opposed to indirect actions such as electing representatives who promise to provide remedy at some later date. ... Ernst Haeckel coined the term oekologie in 1866. ... For the psychology topic, see Environmental psychology. ... Tax resistance has probably existed as long as those in a position of power have imposed taxes. ... Individualist Anarchism is an anarchist philosophical tradition that has a strong emphasis on sovereignty of the individual[1] and is generally opposed to collectivism[2]. The tradition appears most often in the United States, most notably in regard to its advocacy of private property. ... John Brown John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was the first white American abolitionist to advocate and practice insurrection as a means to the abolition of slavery. ... The lyceum movement in the United States was a early form of organized adult education based on Aristotles Lyceum in Ancient Greece. ... Nonviolent resistance (or nonviolent action) is the practice of applying power to achieve socio-political goals through symbolic protests, economic or political noncooperation, civil disobedience and other methods, without using violence. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Simple living (or voluntary simplicity) is a lifestyle individuals may pursue for a variety of motivations, such as spirituality, health, or ecology. ... A tax resister resists or refuses payment of a tax because of opposition to the institution collecting the tax, or to some of that institution’s policies. ... Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in New England in the early-to mid-19th century. ... The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail is a two-act play written by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. ... Thoreaus Cove, Concord, Mass. ...

A Plea for Captain John Brown is an essay by Henry David Thoreau. It is based on a speech Thoreau first delivered to an audience at Concord, Massachusetts on October 30, 1859, two weeks after John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry, and repeated several times before Brown’s execution on December 2, 1859. It was later published as a part of Echoes of Harper's Ferry in 1860.1 An essay is a short work of writing that treats a topic from an authors personal point of view. ... Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau[1]) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher who is best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Town  25. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... John Brown John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was the first white American abolitionist to advocate and practice insurrection as a means to the abolition of slavery. ... Harpers Ferry, West Virginia 1865. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...

Contents

Context

John Brown, a radical abolitionist, and twenty-one other men seized the federal armory at Harper's Ferry, the holding place for approximately 100,000 rifles and muskets, hoping to arm slaves and create a violent rebellion against the south. However, after thirty-six hours the revolt was suppressed and Brown was taken to jail by a Robert E. Lee-led federal force. The raid resulted in thirteen deaths, twelve rebels and one U.S. Marine. After being found guilty of murder, treason, and inciting a slave insurrection, Brown was hung on December 2, 1859. Although largely called a failure at the time, the raid and Brown's subsequent execution impelled the American Civil War. This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Slave redirects here. ... // This article is about the Confederate general. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


Synopsis

Thoreau's essay espoused John Brown and his fight for abolition. In opposition with popular opinion of the time -- Thoreau vehemently refuted the claims of newspapers and his fellow countrymen who characterized Brown as foolish and insane -- he painted a portrait of a peerless man whose embracement of a cause was unparalleled. Brown's commitment to justice and adherence to the United States Constitution forced him to fight state-sponsored injustice, one he was only affected by in spirit. Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of the United States of America Page one of the original copy of the Constitution. ...


A unique man, Thoreau proclaimed in admiration, Brown was highly moral and humane. Independent, "under the auspices of John Brown and nobody else," and direct of speech, Brown instilled fear, which he attributed to a lack of cause, into large groups of men who supported slavery. Incomparable to man, Thoreau likens Brown's execution -- he states that he regards Brown as dead before his actual death -- to Christ's crucifixion at the hands of Pontius Pilate with whom he compares the American government. Christ is the English of the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... Ecce Homo (Behold the Man!), Antonio Ciseris depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting a scourged Jesus to the people of Jerusalem. ...


Thoreau vents at the scores of Americans who have voiced their displeasure and scorn for John Brown. The same people, Thoreau says, can't relate to Brown because of their concrete stances and "dead" existences; they are truly not living, only a handful of men have lived. Thoreau also criticizes contemporary Christians, who say their prayers and then go to sleep aware of injustice but doing nothing to change it. Similarly, Thoreau states those who believe Brown threw his life away and died as a fool, are fools. Brown gave his life for justice, not for material gains, and was completely sane, perhaps more so than any other human being. Rebutting the arguments based on the small number of rebels, Thoreau responds "when were the good and the brave ever in a majority?" Thoreau also points out the irony of The Liberator, a newspaper, labeling Brown's actions as misguided. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the abolitionist newspaper. ...


While many agree that Brown fought bravely and independently for justice, something his government failed to provide. Instead the politicians killed liberators and enslaved four million, others deplore the brutality of many of his methods in Kansas, though some feel the ends justified the means. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ...


On-line sources

External links

  • Comparing Thoreau’s journals with A Plea for Captain John Brown

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Brown by Henry David Thoreau (6633 words)
Little as I know of Captain Brown, I would fain do my part to correct the tone and the statements of the newspapers, and of my countrymen generally, respecting his character and actions.
I am told that his grandfather, John Brown, was an officer in the Revolution; that he himself was born in Connecticut about the beginning of this century, but early went with his father to Ohio.
With one son dead by his side, and another shot through, he felt the pulse of his dying son with one hand, and held his rifle with the other, and commanded his men with the utmost composure, encouraging them to be firm, and to sell their lives as dear as they could.
John Brown (abolitionist) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4046 words)
Brown was particularly affected by the Sacking of Lawrence, in which a sheriff-led posse destroyed newspaper offices, a hotel, and killed two men, and Preston Brooks's brutal caning of anti-slavery Senator Charles Sumner.
Brown was charged with murdering four whites and a fl, with conspiring with slaves to rebel, and with treason against Virginia.
John Brown is buried on the John Brown Farm in North Elba, New York, south of Lake Placid.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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