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Encyclopedia > A Clockwork Orange
A Clockwork Orange

Dust-jacket from the first edition
Author Anthony Burgess
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre(s) Science fiction novel
Publisher William Heinemann (UK)
Publication date 1962
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback) & Audio Book (Cassette, CD)
Pages 192 pages (Hardback edition) &
176 pages (Paperback edition)
ISBN ISBN 0-434-09800-0 (Hardback edition) &
ISBN 0-14-118260-1 (Paperback edition UK)

A Clockwork Orange is a speculative fiction novel by Anthony Burgess, published in 1962, and was later the basis for a 1971 film adaptation of the same name by Stanley Kubrick. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Some notable science fiction novels, in alphabetical order by title: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne 2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke 334 by Thomas M. Disch An Age by Brian Aldiss The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton The Atrocity Exhibition by J.G. Ballard... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) book is bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth or heavy paper) and a stitched spine. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Typical 60-minute Compact Cassette. ... CD redirects here. ... ISBN redirects here. ... This article is about the film. ... A Clockwork Orange is a novel by Anthony Burgess Clockwork Orange can also refer to: A Clockwork Orange, a movie based on the novel Clockwork Orange, a song by techno group Lords of Acid Clockwork Orange is a nickname of the Glasgow Subway, the SPT metro line of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... This article is about the film. ... Kubrick redirects here. ...


The novel was chosen by TIME Magazine as one of the 100 best English-language novels from 1923 to 2005.[1] This article is about the concept of time. ...

Contents

Plot introduction

Explanation of the novel's title

Anthony Burgess wrote that the title was a reference to an alleged old Cockney expression "as queer as a clockwork orange".¹ Due to his time serving in the British Colonial Office in Malaysia, Burgess thought that the phrase could be used punningly to refer to a mechanically responsive (clockwork) human (orang, Malay for "man"). St Mary-le-Bow The term cockney is often used to refer to working-class people of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. ... Gear with escapment mechanism For other uses, see Clockwork (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (L.) Osbeck[1] Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ...


Burgess wrote in his later (Nov. 1986) introduction, titled A Clockwork Orange Resucked, that a creature who can only perform good or evil is "a clockwork orange — meaning that he has the appearance of an organism lovely with color and juice, but is in fact only a clockwork toy to be wound up by God or the Devil; or the almighty state." The term God (capitalized in English language as a proper noun) is often used to refer to a Supreme Being. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ...


In his essay "Clockwork Oranges"², Burgess asserts that "this title would be appropriate for a story about the application of Pavlovian, or mechanical, laws to an organism which, like a fruit, was capable of colour and sweetness". This title alludes to the protagonist's positively conditioned responses to feelings of evil which prevent the exercise of his free will. For other uses, see Pavlov (disambiguation). ... Free-Will is a Japanese independent record label founded in 1986. ...


Point of view from one person

A Clockwork Orange is written in first person perspective from a seemingly biased and unreliable source. Alex never justifies his actions in the narration, giving a good sense that he is somewhat sincere; a narrator who, as unlikeable as he may attempt to seem, evokes pity from the reader through the telling of his unending suffering, and later through his realization that the cycle will never end. Alex's perspective is effective in that the way that he describes events is easy to relate to, even if the situations themselves are not. He uses words that are common in speech, as well as Nadsat, the speech of particular younger generation subcultures. First-person narrative is a literary technique in which the story is narrated by one character, who explicitly refers to him or herself in the first person, that is, I. the narrator is a fool putting his nose into the storytelling exercise. ... Alex DeLarge is a fictional character in Anthony Burgess novel A Clockwork Orange and the movie adaptation, in which he is played by Malcolm McDowell. ... Nadsat is a constructed slang dialect of English with many Russian influences invented by the linguist, novelist, and composer Anthony Burgess. ...


Plot summary

Part 1: Alex's world

Set in a dystopian near future, the novel opens with the introduction of protagonist, fifteen-year-old Alex, who, with his gang members (known as "droogs") Pete, Georgie and Dim, roam the streets at night, committing violent crimes ("ultraviolence") for enjoyment. Alex DeLarge is a fictional character in Anthony Burgess novel A Clockwork Orange and the movie adaptation, in which he is played by Malcolm McDowell. ... For other uses, see Ultraviolence (disambiguation). ...


Essentially, the first part of the novel is a character study of the protagonist. We learn that Alex and his "droogs" (Russian for friends) have their own language known as Nadsat, and their own hierarchy, in which Alex is the leader. There is a general disregard for the law and for older generations — creating an image of a youth movement that is taking control of this fictional future. (This of course being the exaggeration of the concern that came with the changing values of the 1960s, in which teenagers were becoming decidedly more unruly and rebellious.) Nadsat is a constructed slang dialect of English with many Russian influences invented by the linguist, novelist, and composer Anthony Burgess. ...


Part 1 involves Alex reflecting on his illegal activity (such as beating strangers, inciting gang fights, the seduction of two 10-year-old girls, and the rape of the wife of writer F. Alexander). It describes the treachery of his droogs, resulting in Alex's capture and prison sentence for murder.


The use of lyrical language and Nadsat somewhat masks the horrible imagery of Alex's actions, and, to some extent, Alex is able to draw empathy from the reader, through his friendly nature towards his audience (referring to them as his "only friends," and to himself as "Your Humble Narrator," etc.).


Part 2: The Ludovico Technique

After being caught for his crimes Alex is sentenced to 14 years for murder. Alex gets a job as an assistant to the prison chaplain. He feigns an interest in religion, and amuses himself by reading the Bible for its lurid descriptions of "the old yahoodies (Jews) tolchocking (beating) each other", imagining himself taking part in "the nailing-in" (the Crucifixion of Jesus). Alex hears about an experimental rehabilitation programme called "the Ludovico Technique", which promises that the prisoner will be released upon completion of the two-week treatment, and will not commit crimes afterwards. A chaplain in the 45th Infantry Division leads a Christmas Day service in Italy, 1943. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... // The Ludovico technique is a fictitious drug-assisted aversion therapy from the novel and film A Clockwork Orange. ...


Partially by taking part in the fatal beating of a cellmate, Alex manages to become the subject in the first full-scale trial of the Ludovico Technique. The technique itself is a form of aversion therapy, in which Alex is given a drug that induces extreme nausea while being forced to watch graphically violent films for two weeks. Among the films shown are propaganda films such as Triumph of the Will, which includes Alex's beloved Beethoven (last movement of the 9th symphony). He pleads with them to remove the music, but the clinicians refuse, saying it's "for his own good," and that the music may be the "punishment element". At the end of the treatment, Alex is unable to carry out or even contemplate violence without crippling nausea. He is also unable to listen to Beethoven's 9th Symphony without experiencing the same jarring physical reaction.. Aversion therapy is a form of psychiatric or psychological treatment in which the patient is exposed to a stimulus while simultaneously being subjected to some form of discomfort. ... For other uses, see Nausea (disambiguation). ... Triumph of the Will (German: Triumph des Willens) is a propaganda film by the German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ...


Part 3: After prison

The third part of the novel concentrates mostly on the following punishment to which Alex is subjected after his treatment. Alex encounters many of his former victims, all of whom seek revenge upon him. He finds himself powerless to defend himself against them, due to feelings of sickness and fear of death, as a reaction to the violence. He finds that his parents have replaced him with a lodger in his own home, and wanders into the public library, only to be attacked by an aging old man whom he had beaten up with his droogs in chapter one. The police are called by the librarian and when they arrive, he sees that the police are no other than his old 'droog' Dim, and arch-enemy Billy Boy. Taking advantage of their positions, they take Alex into a rural part of town to beat him up, and then leave him to his own devices. While looking for solace, Alex falls into the hands of F. Alexander, the husband to the woman whom he earlier raped. Friends of the writer intend to use Alex as a weapon against the political party, exposing the terrible things that have been done to him. Although it is not clear whether the friends of F. Alexander intend it, their playing of Beethoven's 9th Symphony below Alex's locked room drives him to throw himself out of a window instead of enduring the sickness of the treatment's conditioning. Alex's suicide attempt fails, and leads to his being cured, after the bad publicity for the political party that follows.


Touching on themes of the power struggles between old and young generations, the corruption of the police, and also politics, and attempted (but failed) suicide, the third section of the novel is the most reflective of the troubles of future society, mostly shown through the final chapter, where Alex reflects that he and his friends have either been killed (Georgie), fallen victim to the state (Dim's becoming a police officer) or outgrown their destructive behaviour (Pete). Alex finds that he no longer finds pleasure in "ultra-violence" and yearns for a wife and a child of his own. Alex knows that the generation after his will probably be just as destructive, and the one after that,"...and nor would he be able to stop his own son, brothers. And it would itty (go) on till the end of the world..." — perhaps revealing Burgess's ultimate deliberation on the unruly youth.


Characters

Alex — The novel's anti-hero and leader among his "droogs,". Alex often refers to himself as "Your Humble Narrator". At the point of seducing two ten year old girls in a music shop, Alex reveals himself as "Alex The Large". This was later the basis for Alex's surname DeLarge in the 1971 film. However, following the attempted suicide the newspapers state his name as 'Alex Burgess' very clearly.


George or Georgie — A droog of Alex's. Georgie attempts to undermine Alex's status as leader of the gang.


Pete — A droog of Alex's. The more rational, democratic and least violent of the gang.


Dim — A slow-witted droog of Alex's. The real brute force of the gang.


P.R. Deltoid — A social worker assigned to Alex, who monitors his progress through reform schools.


The Prison Chaplain (also called the 'prison charlie', a take on Charlie Chaplin) — The character who first questions whether or not forced goodness is really better than chosen wickedness. The only character who is truly concerned about Alex's welfare; he is not taken seriously by Alex, though. Yaweh redirects here. ...


The Governor — The man who decides to let Alex "choose" to be the first reformed by the Ludovico Technique.


Dr. Brodsky — One of the co-founders of the Ludovico Technique. He at first seemed like a friend to Alex, and then introduced him to pain. Plays the "Bad Cop" role when talking to Alex before and after his sessions in the theater. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Dr. Branom — The other Co-Founder of the Ludovico Technique. He says much less than Brodsky and is interpreted as the "Good Cop" role when addressing Alex.


F. Alexander — An author writing, at the beginning of the novel, his own novel called A Clockwork Orange. His wife is raped by Alex and his droogs, and subsequently dies. He later takes Alex in and subjects him to his extremist friends. Shortly after meeting it is possible that they try to kill him using the weaknesses caused by the Ludovico Technique.


Differences in U.S. editions

Although the book is divided into three parts, each containing seven chapters (7 being a reference to Shakespeare's seven stages of man and 21 being a symbolic reference to the British age of majority at the time the book was written[2]), the 21st chapter was omitted from the versions published in the United States until 1986. The film adaptation, which was directed by Stanley Kubrick, follows the American version of the book, ending prior to the events of the 21st chapter. Kubrick claimed[citation needed] that he had not read the original version until he had virtually finished the screenplay, but that he certainly never gave any serious consideration to using it. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with All the worlds a stage. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


It has also been noted that Kubrick, on obtaining the novella, ripped it in half, kept one and gave the other half to Terry Southern, co-writer of the screenplay.[citation needed]


Slang

The book, narrated by Alex, contains many words in a slang dialect which Burgess invented for the book, called Nadsat. It is a mix of modified Slavic words, Polari, Cockney rhyming slang, derived Russian (like "baboochka"), and words invented by Burgess himself. For instance, the term 'droog' means 'friend' in Russian; 'korova' means 'cow'; 'golova'(gulliver) means 'head'; 'malchick' or 'malchickiwick' means 'boy'; 'soomka' means 'sack' or 'bag'; 'Bog' means 'God'; 'khorosho'(horrorshow) means good, 'prestoopnick' means 'criminal'; 'rooker' is 'hand', 'cal' is 'crap'; 'litso' is 'face'; and so on. One of Alex's doctors explains the language to a colleague as "Odd bits of old rhyming slang; a bit of gypsy talk, too. But most of the roots are Slav propaganda. Subliminal penetration." Some words are not derived from anything, but merely easy to guess, e.g 'in-out, in-out' or 'the old in-out' means sexual intercourse and 'cutter' means money. Nadsat is a constructed slang dialect of English with many Russian influences invented by the linguist, novelist, and composer Anthony Burgess. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... Polari (or alternatively Parlare, Parlary, Palarie, Palari, Parlyaree[1], from Italian parlare, to talk) was a form of cant slang used in the gay subculture in Britain. ... Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ... Language(s) Romani, languages of native region Religion(s) Romanipen, combined with assimilations from local religions Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) This article is about the Indo-Aryan ethnic group. ... A subliminal message is a signal or message embedded in another medium, designed to pass below the normal limits of perception. ...


In the first edition of the book, no key was provided, and the reader was left to extrapolate the meaning from the context.


Droogism refers to the portrayal of violence that is not utilitarian, i.e. violence for its own sake. Kidnapping a young salesman to demand ransom may be a crime, and violent, as well, but it does not qualify as droogism until the person kidnapped is tortured or killed, thereby becoming counter-productive to the reason the person was kidnapped in the first place.


Ultraviolence

The term "Ultraviolence", referring to excessive and/or unjustified violence, was coined by Burgess in the book, which includes the phrase "do the ultra-violent." The term's association with aesthetic violence has led to its use in the media.[3][4][5][6] For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... A neologism is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (or coined), often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ... The aestheticization of violence in high culture art or mass media is the depiction of violence in a manner that is stylistically excessive in a significant and sustained way so that audience members are able to connect references from the play of images and signs to artworks, genre conventions, cultural...


Awards and nominations

  • 1983 - Prometheus Award (Preliminary Nominee)
  • 1999 - Prometheus Award (Nomination)
  • 2002 - Prometheus Award (Nomination)
  • 2003 - Prometheus Award (Nomination)
  • 2006 - Prometheus Award (Nomination)[1]

The Prometheus Award is an award for libertarian science fiction novels given out annually by the Libertarian Futurist Society (which also publishes a quarterly journal, Prometheus). ...

Other adaptations

The best known adaptation of the novel to other forms is the 1971 film by Stanley Kubrick, but there have been others. The earlier 1965 film by Andy Warhol entitled Vinyl was an adaptation. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... This article is about the film. ... Kubrick redirects here. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... A short black-and-white experimental film directed by Andy Warhol. ...


Excerpts from the first two chapters of the novel were dramatized and broadcast on BBC TV's programme Tonight, 1962 (now lost, believed wiped). This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ...


After Kubrick's film was released, Burgess wrote a Clockwork Orange stage play. In it, Dr. Branom defects from the psychiatric clinic when she grasps that the aversion treatment has destroyed Alex's ability to enjoy music. The play restores the novel's ending: Alex deciding to start a family. One of Alex's early victims, a bearded trumpeter who plays "Singin' in the Rain" at the Korova milkbar, is modeled on Stanley Kubrick.


In 1990, a second play, titled A Clockwork Orange 2004,[citation needed] was written for the Royal Shakespeare Company. It makes no references to the film version, yet does away with the novel's ending. The performance was scored by Bono and The Edge of U2.[7] In 2001, UNI Theatre (Mississauga, Ontario) presented the Canadian premiere of the play under the direction of Terry Costa. http://mirateca.com/archives/archives/unitheatre19972001/default.aspx In 2002, Godlight Theatre Company presented the New York Premiere adaptation of Anthony Burgess's 'A Clockwork Orange' at Manhattan Theatre Source. The production went on to play at the SoHo Playhouse (2002), Ensemble Studio Theatre (2004), 59E59 Theaters (2005) and the Edinburgh Festival Fringe (2005). While at Edinburgh, the production received rave reviews from the press while playing to sold-out audiences. The production was directed by Godlight's Artistic Director, Joe Tantalo. Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is a British theatre company. ... For other uses, see Bono (disambiguation). ... For other subjects called The Edge, see The Edge (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ...


In the 1995 film Tales from the Hood, A character undergoes a similar rehablitation technique. Tales from the Hood is a 1995 horror film. ...


Release details

  • 1962, UK, William Heinemann (ISBN ?), Pub date ? December 1962, Hardcover
  • 1962, US, W W Norton & Co Ltd (ISBN ?), Pub date ? ? 1962, Hardcover
  • 1963, US, W W Norton & Co Ltd (ISBN ?), Pub date ? ? 1963, Paperback
  • 1965, US, Ballantine Books (ISBN 0-345-01708-0), Pub date ? ? 1965, Paperback
  • 1969, US, Ballantine Books (ISBN ?), Pub date ? ? 1969, Paperback
  • 1971, US, Ballantine Books (ISBN 0-345-02624-1), Pub date ? ? 1971, Paperback
  • 1972, UK, Lorrimer, (ISBN 0-85647-019-8), Pub date 11 September 1972, Hardcover
  • 1973, UK, Penguin Books Ltd (ISBN 0-14-003219-3), Pub date 25 January 1973, Paperback
  • 1977, US, Ballantine Books (ISBN 0-345-27321-4), Pub date 12 September 1977, Paperback
  • 1979, US, Ballantine Books (ISBN 0-345-31483-2), Pub date ? April 1979, Paperback
  • 1983, US, Ballantine Books (ISBN 0-345-31483-2), Pub date 12 July 1983, Unbound
  • 1986, US, W. W. Norton & Company (ISBN 0-393-31283-6), Pub date ? November 1986, Paperback (Adds final chapter not previously available in U.S. versions)
  • 1987, UK, W W Norton & Co Ltd (ISBN 0-393-02439-3), Pub date ? July 1987, Hardcover
  • 1988, US, Ballantine Books (ISBN 0-345-35443-5), Pub date ? March 1988, Paperback
  • 1995, UK, W W Norton & Co Ltd (ISBN 0-393-31283-6), Pub date ? June 1995, Paperback
  • 1996, UK, Penguin Books Ltd (ISBN 0-14-018882-7), Pub date 25 April 1996, Paperback
  • 1996, UK, HarperAudio (ISBN 0-694-51752-6), Pub date ? September 1996, Audio Cassette
  • 1997, UK, Heyne Verlag (ISBN 3-453-13079-0), Pub date 31 January 1997, Paperback
  • 1998, UK, Penguin Books Ltd (ISBN 0-14-027409-X), Pub date 3 September 1998, Paperback
  • 1999, UK, Rebound by Sagebrush (ISBN 0-8085-8194-5), Pub date ? October 1999, Library Binding
  • 2000, UK, Penguin Books Ltd (ISBN 0-14-118260-1), Pub date 24 February 2000, Paperback
  • 2000, UK, Penguin Books Ltd (ISBN 0-14-029105-9), Pub date 2 March 2000, Paperback
  • 2000, UK, Turtleback Books (ISBN 0-606-19472-X), Pub date ? November 2000, Hardback
  • 2001, UK, Penguin Books Ltd (ISBN 0-14-100855-5), Pub date 27 September 2001, Paperback
  • 2002, UK, Thorndike Press (ISBN 0-7862-4644-8), Pub date ? October 2002, Hardback
  • 2005, UK, Buccaneer Books (ISBN 1-56849-511-0), Pub date 29 January 2005, Library Binding

is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The aestheticization of violence in high culture art or mass media is the depiction of violence in a manner that is stylistically excessive in a significant and sustained way so that audience members are able to connect references from the play of images and signs to artworks, genre conventions, cultural...

References

  • A Clockwork Orange: A Play With Music. Century Hutchinson Ltd. (1987). An extract is quoted on several web sites: [2], [3], [4].
  • Burgess, Anthony (1978). Clockwork Oranges. In 1985. London: Hutchinson. ISBN 0-09-136080-3 (extracts quoted here)
  • Vidal, Gore. "Why I Am Eight Years Younger Than Anthony Burgess," in At Home: Essays, 1982-1988, p. 411. New York: Random House, 1988. ISBN 0-394-57020-0.
  • Tuck, Donald H. (1974). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy. Chicago: Advent, 72. ISBN 0-911682-20-1. 
  1. ^ The Complete List | TIME Magazine - ALL-TIME 100 Novels. TIME Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  2. ^ Burgess, A.: "A Clockwork Orange Resucked", Introduction to W.W. Norton 1986 Edition of A Clockwork Orange, page vi
  3. ^ AFP. "Gruesome 'Saw 4' slashes through North American box-office", 2007-10-29. Retrieved on 2008-01-15. 
  4. ^ Q&A With 'Hostel' Director Eli Roth and Quentin Tarantino - New York Magazine. Retrieved on 2008-01-15.
  5. ^ ADV Announces New Gantz Collection, Final Guyver & More: Nov 6 Releases. Retrieved on 2008-01-15.
  6. ^ CBS News. ""Manhunt 2": Most Violent Game Yet?, Critics Say New Video Game Is Too Realistic; Players Must Torture, Kill - CBS News". Retrieved on 2008-01-15. 
  7. ^ Sams, Aaron. U2 Discography - The Fly single. U2Wanderer.Org. Retrieved on 2007-09-15.

Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) (pronounced and , ) is an American author of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays, and the scion of a prominent political family. ... Author of A Handbook of Science Fiction and Fantasy. ... Advent: Publishers is a publishing house founded by Earl Kemp and other members of the University of Chicago Science Fiction Club in 1956, to publish criticism, history, and bibliography of the science fiction field, beginning with James Blishs The Issue at Hand. ... TIME redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... City Journal is a quarterly magazine, published by the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, a conservative think tank based out of New York City. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... The Long Day Wanes: A Malayan Trilogy is the title of Anthony Burgesss trio of novels published in the late 1950s, which explore the effects of the Malayan Emergency and Britains final pull-out from its Southeast Asian territories. ... 1956 Heinemann edition Time for a Tiger is part one of Anthony Burgesss Malayan Trilogy The Long Day Wanes, the first panel of a triptych set in the twilight of British rule of the peninsula. ... 1958 Heinemann edition The Enemy in the Blanket (1958) is the second novel in Anthony Burgesss Malayan Trilogy The Long Day Wanes. ... 1959 Heinemann edition Beds in the East is the third novel in Anthony Burgesss Malayan Trilogy The Long Day Wanes. ... 1960 Heinemann edition The Right to an Answer is a darkly comic 1960 novel by Anthony Burgess, the first of his repatriate years (1960-69). ... The Doctor is Sick is a 1960 novel by Anthony Burgess. ... 1961 Heinemann edition The Worm and the Ring is a 1961 novel by English novelist Anthony Burgess, drawing on his time as a teacher at Banbury Grammar School, Oxfordshire, England, in the early 1950s. ... Devil of a State is a 1961 novel by Anthony Burgess based on his experience living and working in Bandar Seri Begawan in the Southeast Asian sultanate of Brunei, on the island of Borneo, in 1958-59. ... 1999 Carroll & Graf edition One Hand Clapping is a 1961 work by Anthony Burgess published originally under the pseudonym Joseph Kell. ... (Pan Books) The Wanting Seed is a dystopian novel by the English author Anthony Burgess, written in 1962. ... W.W. Norton 1996 imprint Honey for the Bears is a 1963 novel by Anthony Burgess. ... Inside Mr Enderby is a the first volume in the four-book Enderby series of comic novels by the British author Anthony Burgess. ... 2006 Hesperus Press edition The Eve of St. ... Nothing Like the Sun: A Story of Shakespeares Love Life is Anthony Burgesss 1964 fictional biography of Shakespeare. ... A Vision of Battlements is a 1965 novel by Anthony Burgess based on his experiences during World War II in Gibraltar, where he was serving with the British army. ... Enderby Outside, first published in 1968 in London by William Heinemann, is the second volume in the Enderby series of comic novels by Anthony Burgess. ... 2004 Penguin imprint M/F (also published as MF) is a 1971 novel by the English author Anthony Burgess. ... German edition (Klett-Cotta, 1982) Napoleon Symphony: A Novel in Four Movements (ISBN 0-224-01009-3) is Anthony Burgesss fictional recreation of the life and world of Napoleon Bonaparte, which he said he found elephantine fun to write. ... The Clockwork Testament is a novella by the British author Anthony Burgess. ... Beards Roman Women is a 1977 novel by British novelist Anthony Burgess. ... 2000 vintage edition Abba Abba was published in 1977. ... 1985 is a novel by English writer Anthony Burgess. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Earthly Powers is a panoramic saga of the 20th century by Anthony Burgess first published in 1980. ... 1984 McGraw-Hill edition Enderbys Dark Lady is a 1984 novel by Anthony Burgess, the final volume in the Enderby series. ... 2003 Allison & Busby edition The Kingdom of the Wicked is a 1985 historical novel by Anthony Burgess. ... French edition (Grasset 1989) The Pianoplayers is a 1986 novel by Anthony Burgess, drawing heavily on his memories of his father, a pub piano-player. ... Any Old Iron, Anthony Burgesss epic updating of the Excalibur legend, was published in 1988. ... French translation of Mozart and the Wolf Gang, published by Grasset in 1993 under the title Mozart et Amadeus Mozart and the Wolf Gang is a 1991 novel by Anthony Burgess about the life and world of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, which among other things attempts a fictional version of the... A Dead Man in Deptford is a book written later in Anthony Burgesss life, and the last of his novels to be published during his lifetime. ... The Devils Mode (1989) is a collection of short stories by the English author Anthony Burgess. ... An Essay on Censorship is a lengthy letter, in verse, by Anthony Burgess addressed to his fellow novelist Salman Rushdie. ... 2002 Carroll & Graf edition Shakespeare, a biographical and critical study of William Shakespeare by Anthony Burgess, was published in 1970. ... 1975 Harcourt edition Joysprick: An Introduction to the Language of James Joyce is a work of literary criticism by Anthony Burgess. ... The following novels were discussed in Anthony Burgesss book Ninety-nine Novels: The Best in English since 1939 — A Personal Choice (1984): Chinua Achebe - A Man of the People - (1966) Brian Aldiss - Life in the West (1980) Kingsley Amis - Lucky Jim (1954) Kingsley Amis - The Anti-Death League (1966... A Mouthful of Air: Language and Languages, Especially English is a work on the subject of linguistics written by Anthony Burgess and published in 1992. ... 1988 Penguin edition with portrait of Burgess sculpted by Milton Hebald Little Wilson and Big God, volume I of Anthony Burgesss autobiography, was first published by Heinemann in 1986. ... 1991 Penguin edition with portrait of Burgess sculpted by Milton Hebald Youve Had Your Time, volume II of Anthony Burgesss autobiography, was first published by Heinemann in 1990. ...

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A clockwork orange - A Clockwork Orange (p1) (453 words)
A Clockwork Orange is een anti-utopische (ook wel: dystopische) roman uit 1962 van de Britse schrijver Anthony Burgess.
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A Clockwork Orange A Clockwork Orange · Postmodern Literature
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