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Encyclopedia > A Charlie Brown Christmas
A Charlie Brown Christmas
Directed by Bill Melendez
Produced by Bill Melendez
Lee Mendelson
Written by Charles M. Schulz
Starring Bill Melendez
Peter Robbins
Christopher Shea
Music by Vince Guaraldi
Distributed by CBS
Release date(s) 1965
Running time 25 min.
Language English
IMDb profile
For the album, see A Charlie Brown Christmas (album).

A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965) is the first of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. It was produced and directed by former Warner Bros. and UPA animator Bill Melendez. Image File history File links CharlieBrownChristmas. ... Bill Melendez (born José Cuauhtemoc Melendez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Charlie Brown series. ... Bill Melendez (born José Cuauhtemoc Melendez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Charlie Brown series. ... Lee Mendelson (born ca. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Bill Melendez (born José Cuauhtemoc Melendez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Charlie Brown series. ... Peter Robbins is a former child actor best known for his voice-over work as Charlie Brown in the 1960s. ... Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ... CBS (an abbreviation for Columbia Broadcasting System, its former legal name) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... See also: 1964 in television, other events of 1965, 1966 in television and the list of years in television. For the American network television schedule, please see 1965-66 American network television schedule. ... There are at least two versions of the Christmas music album A Charlie Brown Christmas. ... Prime Time is the major news analysis, current affairs and politics programme broadcast on Radio Telifís Éireann in Ireland. ... Animation is the filming a sequence of drawings or positions of models to create an illusion of movement. ... A television special is a television program, typically a short film or television movie intended to debut in prime time, the term used to define any television program which interrupts or temporarily replaces programming normally scheduled for a given time slot. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Peanuts was a syndicated daily comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz, which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000 — the day after Schulzs death. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Warner Bros. ... The UPA opening title card from How Now Boing Boing (1954) The legacy of the United Productions of America animation studio, better known as UPA, has largely been forgotten in the wake of the animation renaissance of the 1990s; it has been overshadowed by the commercialization of Warner Bros. ... Bill Melendez (born José Cuauhtemoc Melendez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Charlie Brown series. ...

Contents

Synopsis

A Charlie Brown Christmas features Charlie Brown's search for meaning in the Christmas holiday. He starts the special seeking to understand why he always ends up depressed around the holidays. On the advice of Lucy, he gets involved in directing a school play about the Nativity. When he loses control of the production because of the cast members' refusal to listen to him, he is given the lesser responsibility of finding a Christmas tree for the play. Charles Charlie Brown (occasionally called Chuck by certain characters) is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Christmas or Christmas Day is an annual holiday that marks the traditional birthdate of Jesus of Nazareth. ... Depression, or a depressed mood, may in everyday English refer to a state of melancholia, unhappiness or sadness, or to a relatively minor downturn in mood that may last only a few hours or days. ... Book cover Lucy van Pelt is a character in the immensely popular comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. ... For the Nativity of Jesus, see Nativity of Jesus. ... A Christmas tree in a Danish home. ...


Instead of buying a "big, shiny, aluminum" artificial tree as he was instructed to do by Lucy, he chooses a pitiful little twig. This makes him the target of laughter and derision by all except Linus. Charlie Brown cries out in abject desperation, wondering if anyone understands what Christmas is all about. Linus answers him by reciting the story of the birth of Jesus. Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... Jesus (8–2 BC/BCE to 29–36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ...


Meanwhile, Snoopy has decorated his doghouse with colorful flashing lights and other baubles, and won 1st Prize in a decorating contest. Charlie Brown takes the decorations and puts a single ornament on his tree, which promptly collapses under the weight. He flees in despair. Snoopy is the name of Charlie Browns pet beagle in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... First dog Dash, outside of his doghouse during U.S. President Harrisons tenure. ... Section of a string of Christmas lights Christmas lights (also sometimes called fairy lights, twinkle lights or holiday lights in the United States) are strands of electric lights used to decorate homes, public/commercial buildings and Christmas trees during the Christmas season, mostly in the West. ...


Having heard Linus's explanation of what Christmas is all about, the other kids realise they've been too hard on Charlie Brown, and fix his tree up into a brilliant Christmas display using the rest of Snoopy's decorations. Charlie Brown returns to find the whole gang gathered around his tree. In a rare moment of happiness, he joins the crew in singing the Christmas carol "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing", as the closing credits roll. Singing carols: John Denver and the Muppets: A Christmas Together A Christmas carol (also called a noël) is a carol (song or hymn) whose lyrics are on the theme of Christmas, or the winter season in general. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Hark! the Herald Angels Sing Hark! The Herald Angels Sing is a Christmas hymn or carol written by Charles Wesley, the brother of John Wesley. ... Closing credits of Sesame Street. ...

Themes

The story touches on the over-commercialization of Christmas, continuing a theme explored by satirists such as Stan Freberg and Tom Lehrer during the 1950s. This article needs cleanup. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Stanley Victor Freberg (born August 7, 1926 in Los Angeles) is a voice actor, comedian, and advertising creative. ... Tom Lehrer in 1960. ... The 1950s was the decade spanning from the 1st of January, 1950 to the 31st December, 1959. ...


History

Bringing the Peanuts characters to television was not an easy task. The strip's creators, with funding from sponsor Coca-Cola, presented the CBS network with an idea for a Christmas television special starring Schulz's characters. The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... CBS (an abbreviation for Columbia Broadcasting System, its former legal name) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ...


The production was done on a shoestring budget, resulting in a somewhat choppy animation style and, from a technical standpoint, poorly mixed sound. With the exception of the actors who voiced Charlie Brown and Lucy, Peter Robbins and Tracy Stratford, respectively, none of the children had any experience doing voice work. This was especially challenging for Kathy Steinberg, who voiced Sally: she was too young to read and needed to be cued line by line during the soundtrack recording. The technical issues are in evidence on the show's audio track, which at times is noticeably choppy and poorly enunciated. Melendez has said he's somewhat embarrassed to see the show repeated every year with all its problems, but Schulz vetoed his idea of "fixing" the program years later. Audio mixing is used in sound recording, audio editing and sound systems to balance the relative volume and frequency content of a number of sound sources. ... Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... Enunciation is the act of speaking clearly and concisely. ...


Network executives were not at all keen on several aspects of the show, forcing Schulz and Melendez to wage some serious battles to preserve their vision. The executives did not want to have Linus reciting the story of the birth of Christ from the Gospel of Luke (Lk 2:8-14); the network orthodoxy of the time assumed that viewers would not want to sit through passages of the King James Version of the Bible. A story reported on the Whoopi Goldberg-hosted version of the making of the program (see below) that Charles Schultz was adamant about keeping this scene in, remarking that "If we don't tell the true meaning of Christmas, who will?" The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... H:For other uses of King James Version, see King James Version (disambiguation). ... Whoopi Goldberg (born Caryn Elaine Johnson, November 13, 1955[1]), is an Academy Award, Daytime Emmy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, BAFTA and Grammy Award-winning American comedian, film actress and radio DJ. Although her father was a Protestant preacher, Goldberg says that her family is of mixed religious heritage - including...


Another complaint was the absence of a laugh track, a common element of children's cartoons at the time. Schulz maintained that the audience should be able to enjoy the show at their own pace, without being cued when to laugh. (CBS did create a version of the show with the laugh track added, just in case Schulz changed his mind. This version remains unavailable.) A third complaint was the use of children to do the voice acting, instead of employing adult actors. Finally, the executives thought that the jazz soundtrack by Vince Guaraldi would not work well for a children's program. When executives saw the final product, they were horrified and believed the special would be a complete flop. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Voice acting is the art of providing voices for animated characters (including those in feature films, television series, animated shorts), doing voice-overs in radio and television commercials, audio dramas, dubbed foreign language films, video games, puppet shows, and amusement rides. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ... Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ...


The show first aired on Thursday, December 9, 1965, preempting Gilligan's Island. To the surprise of the executives, it was both a critical and commercial hit. None of the special's technical problems detracted from the show's appeal; to the contrary, it is thought that these quirks, along with several other choices, are what lent the show such an innovative, authentic and sincere feeling. A full 50% of the televisions in the United States were tuned to the broadcast 1. A Charlie Brown Christmas won an Emmy and a Peabody award, and is considered by many to be a timeless holiday classic. Watching it is an annual tradition for countless viewers. The success of A Charlie Brown Christmas gave rise to a series of animated Peanuts TV specials, several full-length animated feature films, and a Saturday morning cartoon over the years. December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... For the NES video game, see Gilligans Island (video game). ... An Emmy Award. ... The George Foster Peabody Awards, more commonly referred to as the Peabody Awards, are annual international awards given for excellence in radio and television broadcasting and cable television. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... Saturday morning cartoon is the colloquial term for the animated television programming which was typically scheduled on Saturday mornings on the major American television networks from the 1960s to the 1990s. ...


In 2000, the broadcast rights were acquired by ABC, which is where the special currently airs. On September 12, 2000, the special was released to DVD. The show enjoyed its 40th anniversary with its broadcast of Tuesday, December 6, 2005. This broadcast had the highest ratings in its time slot. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Portal:Currentevents September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... DVD (Digital Versatile Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are generally reduferring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ...


On December 6, 2001, a half-hour documentary on the special entitled The Making of "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (hosted by Whoopi Goldberg) aired on ABC. This documentary was released (along with the special Charlie Brown's Christmas Tales) as a bonus feature with the special I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown on October 26, 2004. December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2001. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Whoopi Goldberg (born Caryn Elaine Johnson, November 13, 1955[1]), is an Academy Award, Daytime Emmy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, BAFTA and Grammy Award-winning American comedian, film actress and radio DJ. Although her father was a Protestant preacher, Goldberg says that her family is of mixed religious heritage - including... Charlie Browns Christmas Tales is one of many prime-time animated TV specials, based on characters from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown is one of the Peanuts made-for-television specials. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Versions

The special has not been seen in its original, uncut form since the first three telecasts in 1965, 1966 and 1967. Much of this is due to the opening and closing credits containing references to Coca-Cola, the show's original sponsor. Specific, acknowledged cuts are: 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ...

  • The main titles have Linus crashing into a Coca-Cola sign after Snoopy has spun both him and Charlie Brown around with Linus' blanket. In the versions currently available, the viewer never sees where Linus' trajectory lands him.
  • In the "fence" scene, where several of the Peanuts gang are attempting to knock cans off a fence with snowballs, Linus is seen knocking down a can with his blanket. In the original airing, this is a Coke can, but was later replaced with a nondescript can.
  • The final end credit originally had text and graphics wishing the viewer a "Merry Christmas from the people in your town who bottle Coca-Cola." This is why the "Hark!" chorus sung at the end trails off oddly before the song would normally end, as an announcer originally did a voice over this point in the credits to repeat and reemphasize the local bottler's well wishes to the TV audience.

Although the FCC eventually imposed sanctions preventing sponsor references in the context of a story (especially children's programming), this had no effect upon the decision to impose these edits. The Coca-Cola product placement elements were removed when the company ceased being the sole sponsor, replaced in 1968 by Dolly Madison snack products, who continued to sponsor the Peanuts specials through the 1980s. While current FCC product placement rules would prevent restoration and broadcast TV airing, the sole reason this footage has not been restored for the DVD or VHS releases has been related to royalties that would have to be paid to The Coca-Cola Company for use of their trademarks. Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... Snoopy is the name of Charlie Browns pet beagle in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... Charles Charlie Brown (occasionally called Chuck by certain characters) is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Peanuts was a syndicated daily comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz, which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000 — the day after Schulzs death. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The FCCs official seal. ... Childrens television series are television programs designed for and marketed to children, normally aired during the morning and afternoon hours, mainly before and after school. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Biography Dolly Madison created ice cream. ... The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ... A royalty is a sum paid to the creator of performance art for the use of that art. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is the largest manufacturer, distributor and marketer of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world. ... A trademark, trade mark, ™ or ®[1] is a distinctive sign of some kind which is used by an organization to uniquely identify itself and its products and services to consumers, and to distinguish the organization and its products or services from those of other organizations. ...


Finally, there is some disagreement among those who have studied the various releases of the special about whether or not another edit was made after the initial airing. A quick - and arguably sloppy - cut occurs during the "Auditorium" scene, when the gang begins dancing to "Linus and Lucy" right after Charlie Brown gives his "am I right? I said, am I RIGHT??" speech. The moment of the cut occurs as the camera is zooming in on Schroeder, and quickly jumps to Linus dancing with Sally. The camera proceeds to pan around to the rest of the gang as they go through their own unique dance styles. The sloppiness of this cut is exacerbated by the fact that the music makes an audible jump as well, actually skipping a beat forward and sounding rather awkward. No information as to the nature of this cut has been determined, and none of the production staff - including director Bill Melendez - can recall if or why such an edit was done. A Canon Inc. ... Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... Panning refers to the horizontal movement or rotation of a film or video camera, or the scanning of a subject horizontally on video or a display device. ... See also the beat disambiguation page. ...


Trivia

  • The actors, all of them children, learned their lines phonetically, often not knowing what they meant. This led to the now-familiar Peanuts delivery style.
  • All of the versions of the show broadcast on CBS between 1968 and 1996, and the earliest home video release were edited to completely delete the scene where the gang throws snowballs at a can on a fence.
  • Just before her remarks about Christmas being a big commercial racket, Lucy refers to Charlie Brown simply as "Charlie". This is the only time she does this in any of the TV specials; every other time it's "Charlie Brown".
  • This was also the very first feature special and color TV appearance of The Peanuts gang. Around five years earlier they had appeared in a 30 second black and white car commercial for the Ford Falcon.

Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone meaning sound, voice) is the study of sounds and the human voice. ... CBS (an abbreviation for Columbia Broadcasting System, its former legal name) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Peanuts was a syndicated daily comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz, which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000 — the day after Schulzs death. ... This article is about the Australian car model. ...

Mistakes

  • In the scene where Charlie Brown consults Lucy for psychiatric help, her sign (as read from the front) says, "The Doctor Is Real In". However, when seen from the side angle, the sign simply says, "The Doctor Is In".
  • During the final scene, the Peanuts gang gathers around the little tree and begins to sing "Hark the Herald Angels Sing" (singing "Ooo Ooo Ooo"). As everyone takes a breath, Pig-Pen's head disappears briefly and Patty's orange dress (she's behind him) "pops up" to where his head used to be. Older VHS tapes based on the CBS version have the mistake; newer tapes and the remastered DVD based on the ABC remastered version do not.
  • The blanket wrapped around the foot of the tree keeps changing in appearance.
  • Also during the final scene, Shermy - the boy in the yellow on the right side of the screen - disappears after the gang greets Charlie Brown. In Shermy's place is 5 - the boy in a blue coat - who is still on the right side of the screen. So Shermy disappears and out comes a clone of 5.
  • During Linus's speech from Luke 2:8-14 there are several continuity errors. First, he drops his security blanket when he says, "Fear not: for behold..." He continues the rest of his speech with the blanket on the stage next to him. However, in the long shot when he says, "And on earth peace, good will toward men," it is back in his left hand. Immediately after he finishes making his speech, he makes a point of picking his blanket up off the stage. Also, when Linus is making his speech Charlie Brown is behind him and to his left, and he is not wearing his red coat; when Linus is briefly shown from his right Charlie Brown is in the background wearing the coat. The shot cuts back to a front view and the coat is gone again.
  • The cels of Lucy in her psychiatry stand are not properly aligned to the background, so that the cutoff line of her body overlaps the edge of the tabletop.
  • During the scene where Schroeder and Lucy talk while Schroeder plays the piano, Snoopy suddenly appears, seemingly out of nowhere.

Pig-Pen is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Patty is a character in the comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz (not to be confused with Peppermint Patty, a different and later character from the same strip). ... Shermy was an early character in the comic strip Peanuts, by Charles Schulz. ... 555 5 95472 is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... A security blanket is any familiar object whose presence provides comfort or security to its owner, such as the literal blankets often favored by small children. ... A cel, short for celluloid, is a transparent sheet of plastic (usually acetate) on which objects are drawn or painted for traditional, hand-drawn animation. ... Psychiatrist redirects here, for the party game, see Psychiatrist (game) Psychiatry is a medical specialty dealing with the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of mental illness. ...

Influence

Cover from the soundtrack album for A Charlie Brown Christmas
Cover from the soundtrack album for A Charlie Brown Christmas

The musical soundtrack to A Charlie Brown Christmas, by jazz composer Vince Guaraldi, has become as well-known as the story itself. (In particular, the piece entitled "Linus and Lucy" has come to be regarded as the signature musical theme of the Peanuts specials.) A soundtrack album for the special was released by Fantasy Records and remains a perennial best-seller. (While the CD release of the soundtrack album contains much music that does not appear in the TV special - it runs, after all, some 20 minutes longer than the special itself - it also fails to include two musical themes which appear in the special.) A Charlie Brown Christmas, record cover, deemed fair use This work is copyrighted. ... A Charlie Brown Christmas, record cover, deemed fair use This work is copyrighted. ... There are at least two versions of the Christmas music album A Charlie Brown Christmas. ... Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ... Linus and Lucy is a jazz piano piece written by Vince Guaraldi and made popular in many of the Peanuts animated television specials. ... There are at least two versions of the Christmas music album A Charlie Brown Christmas. ... Fantasy Records is a United States based record label, which was founded by Max and Sol Weiss in 1949 in San Francisco, California. ...


Some religious commentators, who decry what they regard as the secularization of the modern Christmas holiday season, point to this program as a rare exception, due to its straightforward references to the birth of Jesus. Secularization is a contentious term because the concept of secularization can be confused with secularism, a philosophical and political movement that promotes the idea that society benefits by being less religious, whereas the opposing view is that the values and beliefs implicit in religions support a more moral and, therefore...


A Charlie Brown Christmas is often credited with spearheading the popular stigmatization of artificial Christmas trees. Social stigma refers to severe social disapproval of personal characteristics that is against cultural norms. ...


Sequels

Three lesser-known true sequels were produced decades after the 1965 original. All three are 30 minutes in length (with commercials) and aired on CBS Television (as of now, ABC): A sequel is a work of fiction in literature, film, and other creative works that is produced after a completed work, and is set in the same universe but at a later time. ...

All three avoid the social commentary of the original, placing the emphasis on light-hearted humor. The latter two were made after the death of Charles Schulz and were based on his Peanuts comic strips. Its Christmastime Again, Charlie Brown is a television special based off the comic strip Peanuts. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... DVD (Digital Versatile Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... Charlie Browns Christmas Tales is one of many prime-time animated TV specials, based on characters from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... DVD (Digital Versatile Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown is one of the Peanuts made-for-television specials. ... I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown is one of the Peanuts made-for-television specials. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Peanuts was a syndicated daily comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz, which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000 — the day after Schulzs death. ...


While not true sequels, two other Charlie Brown holiday season specials were produced and are generally regarded as higher quality than the '90s/'00s shows: 1973's A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (still aired annually on ABC) and Happy New Year, Charlie Brown! from 1985. Germans dancing on the Berlin Wall in late 1989, the symbol of the cold war divide falls down as the world unites in the 1990s. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving is one of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... Happy New Year, Charlie Brown is one of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Further reading

  • Lee Mendelson (2005-09-27). A Charlie Brown Christmas: The Making of a Tradition. Harper Paperbacks. ISBN 0-06-076659-X.
  • Bill Nichols. "The Christmas classic that almost wasn't", USA Today, 2005-12-05.
  • Brian Heater. "The Lonely Tree: The Story of A Charlie Brown Christmas", PopMatters, 2006-12-14.

2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... PopMatters is an international magazine of cultural criticism. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

A Scrubs Christmas

There is a short on youtube that uses footage from a charlie brown christmas and uses the voice actors from scrubs and forms it into a scrubs verson of the story.


External links

  • A Charlie Brown Christmas at the Internet Movie Database
  • A Charlie Brown Christmas at Keyframe - the Animation Resource
Peanuts television specials
Be My Valentine… | A Boy Named… (documentary) | A Charlie Brown Celebration | A Charlie Brown Christmas | A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving | A Charlie Brown Valentine | Charlie Brown's All-Stars | Charlie Brown's Christmas Tales | Happy Birthday… | Happy New Year…!| He's A Bully… | He's Your Dog… | I Want a Dog for Christmas… | Is This Goodbye…? | It Was a Short Summer… | It Was My Best Birthday Ever… | It's Arbor Day… | It's Christmastime Again… | It's Flashbeagle… | It's Magic… | It's Your First Kiss… | It's a Mystery… | It's an Adventure… | It's the Easter Beagle… | It's the Girl in the Red Truck… | It's the Great Pumpkin… | It's the Pied Piper… | I Want a Dog for Christmas… | Life Is a Circus… | Lucy Must Be Traded… | Play It Again… | She's a Good Skate… | Snoopy's Getting Married… | Snoopy's Reunion | Snoopy!!! The Musical (television special) | Someday You'll Find Her… | There's No Time for Love… | What Have We Learned…? | What a Nightmare…! | Why, Charlie Brown, Why? | You Don't Look 40… | You're Not Elected… | You're a Good Man… (television special) | You're a Good Sport… | You're in Love… | You're in the Super Bowl… | You're the Greatest…

  Results from FactBites:
 
A Charlie Brown Christmas at AllExperts (1347 words)
A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965) is the first of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz.
A Charlie Brown Christmas won an Emmy and a Peabody award, and is now considered a timeless holiday classic and an annual tradition by millions of viewers.
The musical soundtrack to A Charlie Brown Christmas, by jazz composer Vince Guaraldi, has become as well-known as the story itself, especially the piece entitled "Linus and Lucy," which has come to be regarded as the signature musical theme of the Peanuts specials.
Are you having a Charlie Brown Christmas? (3027 words)
This year as I watched the Charlie Brown Christmas special for the umpteenth time, I found myself suspecting that he was experiencing a "Charlie Browniest Christmas" or a case of the "Holiday Blues." As the show proceeded he revealed his feelings about Christmas, "I think there’s something wrong with me. I just don’t understand Christmas.
Based on his description of how he is feeling, Charlie Brown appears to have a classic case of the Holiday Blues.
For those who have experienced a significant loss or change during the year, it is normal to feel subdued, reflective and blue like Charlie Brown "I don’t understand Christmas.…Instead of feeling happy, I feel sort of let down." Laughter and happiness are perceived as sentiments for others, not for someone grieving a loss.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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