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Encyclopedia > A Boy Named Charlie Brown
A Boy Named Charlie Brown

A Boy Named Charlie Brown DVD cover
Directed by Bill Meléndez
Produced by Lee Mendelson
Written by Charles M. Schulz
Starring Peter Robbins
Pamelyn Ferdin
Glenn Gilger
Andy Pforsich
Sally Dryer
Ann Altieri
Erin Sullivan
Lynda Mendelson
Christopher DeFaria
David Carey
Andy Pforsich
Bill Meléndez
Hilary Momberger
Music by Vince Guaraldi (score)
Rod McKuen
Ludwig van Beethoven
Ingolf Dahl
John Stafford Smith
Distributed by National General Pictures
Release date(s) December 4, 1969
Running time 86 minutes
Language English
IMDb profile

A Boy Named Charlie Brown is a 1969 animated film produced by Cinema Center Films and Lee Mendelson Films for National General Pictures, directed by Bill Meléndez, and is the first featured film based on the Peanuts comic strip. It was also the final time that Peter Robbins voiced the character of Charlie Brown. (Robbins had voiced the role for all the Peanuts television specials up to that point, starting with the debut of the specials, 1965's A Charlie Brown Christmas) Image File history File links Size of this preview: 366 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (565 × 925 pixel, file size: 199 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A Boy Named Charlie Brown DVD cover. ... Bill Meléndez (born José Cuauhtemoc Meléndez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Peanuts series. ... Lee Mendelson (born ca. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922[1] – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Peter Robbins is a former child actor best known for his voice-over work as Charlie Brown in the 1960s. ... Pamelyn Ferdin (born February 4, 1959) is an outspoken animal rights activist and former child actress. ... Sally Dryer (a. ... Lynda Mendelson was a child actress noted for providing the voice of Frieda in several Peanuts animated films during the early 1970s. ... Chris DeFaria was born on May 20, 1959 in Alameda County, California. ... David Carey was a child actor most noted for voicing the character of Schroeder from the Peanuts musical, Snoopy Come Home. ... Bill Meléndez (born José Cuauhtemoc Meléndez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Peanuts series. ... Hilary Momberger was a child actress in the late 1960s and early 1970s, known primarily for playing the part of Sally Brown, Charlie Browns little sister in the Peanuts motion picture and TV specials including: A Boy Named Charlie Brown and Snoopy Come Home. ... Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ... Rod McKuen (born April 29, 1933) is a bestselling American poet, composer, and singer, instrumental in the revitalization of popular poetry that took place in the 1960s and early 1970s. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Ingolf Dahl (b. ... John Stafford Smith (1750 - 1836) is a composer best known for writing To Anacreon in Heaven. ... National General Pictures is a Distribution and Film production company which was active between 1948 and 1973. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A Boy Named Charlie Brown is an unreleased television documentary film about Charles M. Schulz and his creation Peanuts, produced by Lee Mendelson with some animated scenes by Bill Melendez and music by Vince Guaraldi. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Lee Mendelson (born ca. ... National General Pictures is a Distribution and Film production company which was active between 1948 and 1973. ... Bill Meléndez (born José Cuauhtemoc Meléndez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Peanuts series. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Peter Robbins is a former child actor best known for his voice-over work as Charlie Brown in the 1960s. ... For the album, see A Charlie Brown Christmas (album). ...

Contents

Music

A Boy Named Charlie Brown also included several original songs, some of which boasted vocals for the first time: Failure Face (sung by Lucy and the other girls to discourage Charlie Brown from entering the spelling bee), I Before E Except After C (sung by Charlie Brown and Linus while studying for the spelling bee), and Champion Charlie Brown (sung by the entire cast after Charlie wins the school spelling bee). (Before this film, musical pieces in Peanuts specials were primarily instrumental, except for a few traditional songs in A Charlie Brown Christmas.) Rod McKuen wrote and sang the title song. He also wrote Failure Face and Champion Charlie Brown. For the album, see A Charlie Brown Christmas (album). ... Rod McKuen (born April 29, 1933) is a bestselling American poet, composer, and singer, instrumental in the revitalization of popular poetry that took place in the 1960s and early 1970s. ...


The instrumental tracks interspersed throughout the entire feature were composed by Vince Guaraldi and arranged by John Scott Trotter (who also wrote I Before E Except After C). The music consisted mostly of uptempo jazz tunes that had been heard since some of the earliest Peanuts television specials aired back in 1965; however, for A Boy Named Charlie Brown, they were given a more "theatrical" treatment, with lusher horn-filled arrangements. Instrumental tracks used in the film included Skating (first heard in its original form in 1965's A Charlie Brown Christmas), Baseball Theme (first heard in its original form in 1966's Charlie Brown's All-Stars), and others. Guaraldi and Trotter were nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Score for their work on A Boy Named Charlie Brown. Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ... A television special is a television program, typically a short film or television movie, which interrupts or temporarily replaces programming normally scheduled for a given time slot. ... For the album, see A Charlie Brown Christmas (album). ... Charlie Browns All-Stars is one of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


The animated Snoopy segment during the "Skating" sequence was choreographed by American figure skater Skippy Baxter). A segment during the middle of the film, in which Schroeder plays the second movement of Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata, had piano performed by Ingolf Dahl. Skippy Baxter is an American figure skater. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Piano Sonata No. ... Ingolf Dahl (b. ...


The film also features a Jew's harp, which Snoopy plays to help Charlie with his spelling. Jews harp, from an American Civil War camp near Winchester, Virginia A modern jews harp A metal Jews harp (demir-xomus) from Tuva The Jews harp, jaw harp, or mouth harp is thought to be one of the oldest musical instruments in the world; a musician...


Style

A Boy Named Charlie Brown, while directed and produced by the same team of Bill Melendez and Lee Mendelson, who were responsible for all the Peanuts television specials (Phil Roman directed later TV specials starting around the mid 1970s), has many different aspects that the specials did not explore in a visual sense. The film itself has moments where there is rotoscoping prevalent, as in the sequence when Snoopy skates, and you can see silhouettes of real hockey players behind him. Some backgrounds have a very pop art kind of feel which was very reminiscent in much of the animation style of the late 1960s. Many sequences have a strong visual feel to them, as in The Star-Spangled Banner sequence, where the images are purposely chaotically edited or the sequence where Schroeder plays Beethoven on his piano. There also seems to be a strong Andy Warhol kind of approach where actual photographs seem to have been painted over in semi day-glo psychedelic colors. Melendez, who had previously worked with Bob Clampett on cartoons back in the 1940s, also uses garish colors in some sequences, which takes its cues from many Clampett backgrounds, particularly a Warner Bros. cartoon called The Big Snooze which was directed by Clampett and which Melendez had also worked on. Many backgrounds are also rendered in watercolor, or simple pen strokes, or fine lines, or sometimes all three at once. There are scenes where colors will change solidly and erratically, as witnessed by the Snoopy Red Baron sequence in the film. Perspective and horizon points are showcased in the "I Before E" scene. Split screen is also used to much effect in A Boy Named Charlie Brown as well. But even with all these theatrical enhancements, at its core, the film still has the look and feel of many of the Peanuts TV specials. Phil Roman (born December 21, 1930 in Fresno, California), was the founder of Film Roman, Inc. ... Rotoscoping is an animation technique in which animators trace over live-action film movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... The Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... Robert Emerson Bob Clampett (May 8, 1913–May 4, 1984) was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... “WB” redirects here. ... The Big Snooze is a 1946 Warner Bros. ...


Story Background

The film was partly based on a series of Peanuts comic strips originally published in newspapers in 1966. That story had a much different ending: Charlie Brown was eliminated in his class spelling bee right away for misspelling the word maze ("M-A-Y-S" while thinking of baseball legend Willie Mays), thus confirming Violet's prediction that he'd make a fool of himself, and then yelled at his teacher in frustration ("Why do I have my head on my desk, ma'am? BECAUSE I BLEW THE STUPID SPELLING BEE, THAT'S WHY!"), causing him to be sent to the principal's office. (A few gags from that storyline, however, were also used in the 1967 special You're in Love, Charlie Brown.) Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Maze (disambiguation). ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... Violet from a comic strip. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Youre in Love, Charlie Brown is the fourth of what would become many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ...


DVD Release

This film made its Region 1 DVD debut in anamorphic widescreen on U.S. DVD on March 28, 2006, by Paramount Home Entertainment/CBS Home Entertainment (co-producer Cinema Center Films was owned by CBS). The DVD has about 5 minutes of footage not seen since the 1969 test screening and premiere. The footage consists of new scenes completely excised from earlier home video releases (VHS and CED Laserdisc) and TV prints - most notably, a scene of Lucy's infamous "pulling-away-the-football" trick after her slide presentation of Charlie Brown's faults (and her instant replay thereof). This also includes extended existing scenes. Region 1–8 redirects here. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... For the film format, see anamorphic format. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... CBS Home Entertainment (formerly CBS Video Enterprises) is the home video entertainment arm of CBS, Inc. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... A test screening is a preview screening of a movie conducted before its general release, in order to gauge audience reaction. ... Premiere, from French language première meaning first, generally means a first performance. Premieres for theatrical, musical, and other productions are often extravagant affairs, attracting large numbers of socialites and much media attention. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... For other uses of the term Instant replay, see Instant replay (disambiguation). ...


External links

For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... 555 5 95472 is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Charlotte Braun is a long-forgotten character from Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts, who first appeared on November 30, 1954. ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... Eudora is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Franklins July 31, 1968 introduction in Peanuts. ... For other uses of the name see Frida (disambiguation) Frieda is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... Charles Charlie Brown is the principal character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Lila was a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... The Little Red-Haired Girl is an unseen character in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz, and is a symbol of unrequited love. ... “Marcie” redirects here. ... Miss Othmar is an unseen character in Charles M. Schulzs Peanuts comic strip. ... Patty from a comic strip. ... Peggy Jean shows off her new pair of gloves. ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... José Peterson is a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts created by Charles M. Schulz. ... Pig-Pen is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Poochie is a female character in the comic strip Peanuts who debuted on January 7, 1973. ... Roy was a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... Every Christmas its the same - I always end up playing a shepherd. ... Joe Shlabotnik was a fictional baseball player in the world of Charles Schulzs long-running comic strip, Peanuts. ... Snoopy is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... In the comic strip, Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz, Snoopy was often stated to have seven siblings. ... Thibault (sometimes spelled Thiebault, and pronounced Tee-bo) is a minor character who first appeared in the Peanuts comic strip in 1970. ... Linus van Pelt is one of the characters in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... Book cover Lucy van Pelt is a character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. ... Rerun on the back of his mothers bicycle. ... Violet from a comic strip. ... Woodstock is a fictional character in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... Snoopy, Come Home is an 1972 musical animated film, produced by Cinema Center Films and Lee Mendelson Films for National General Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez, and based on the Peanuts comic strip. ... Race For Your Life, Charlie Brown is a 1977 animated film produced by United Feature Syndicate for Paramount Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez and Phil Roman, and based on the Peanuts comic strip. ... Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (and Dont Come Back!!) is a 1980 animated film produced by United Feature Syndicate for Paramount Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez. ... This is a list of adaptations in film, television and musical theater, based on characters from the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz. ... There are at least two versions of the Christmas music album A Charlie Brown Christmas. ... The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show is an animated television series featuring characters and storylines from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... Linus and Lucy is a jazz piano piece written by Vince Guaraldi and made popular in many of the Peanuts animated television specials. ... Snoopy!!! The Musical is a musical comedy by Larry Grossman and Hal Hackaday that was based on the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is America, Charlie Brown opening title sequence This is America, Charlie Brown was an eight-part animated TV mini-series, depicting events in American history with characters from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... Snoopy title screen. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922[1] – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Bill Meléndez (born José Cuauhtemoc Meléndez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Peanuts series. ... Lee Mendelson (born ca. ... Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ... The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center is a museum dedicated to the works of Charles Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip. ...

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