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Encyclopedia > 6th century
Millennia: 1st millennium
Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century
Decades: 500s 510s 520s 530s 540s
550s 560s 570s 580s 590s
Categories: Births - Deaths
Establishments - Disestablishments

The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. This century is widely considered to mark the end of Classical Antiquity the beginning of the Dark Ages. A millennium (pl. ... In the Gregorian calendar, the 1st millennium is the period of one thousand years that commenced with the year 1 Anno Domini. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 - 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 450s - 460s - 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s Years: 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 Events and Trends: Clovis I, king of the Franks, defeats the Visigoths at the battle of Vouille in 507... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 460s - 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s Years: 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 Events and Trends: Possible timing of King Arthurs victory over the Saxons 512 - Roman (Byzantine) Emperor Anastasius I... Centuries: 5th Century - 6th Century - 7th Century Decades: 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s Years: 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 Events and Trends Maelgwn Hir ap Cadwallon, perhaps legendary, assumes the throne of Gwynedd in Great Britain (possible date... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s - 580s Years: 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 Events and Trends Hagia Sophia, Constantinople, built (532-537) General Belisarius fights many campaigns defeating, among others, the Vandals... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s - 580s - 590s Years: 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 Events and Trends The Eastern Roman Empire conquers Milan and the Ostrogoth capital of Ravenna in 540. ... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s - 580s - 590s - 600s Years: 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 Events and Trends Categories: 550s ... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s - 580s - 590s - 600s - 610s Years: 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 Events and Trends The Byzantine conquest of Italy, completed in 560, comes to a premature end with the entrance... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s - 580s - 590s - 600s - 610s - 620s Years: 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 Events and Trends Birth of Muhammad, prophet of Islam, (possibly) Category: ... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s - 580s - 590s - 600s - 610s - 620s - 630s Years: 580 581 582 583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 Events and Trends The Sui Dynasty unites China for the first time since the fall of the Western Jin... Centuries: 5th century - 6th century - 7th century Decades: 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s - 580s - 590s - 600s - 610s - 620s - 630s - 640s Years: 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 Events and Trends Pope Pope Gregory I sends a mission led by Augustine of Canterbury, consisting of forty monks... Events Qi He Di succeeds Qo Dong Hun Hou as ruler of the Chinese Qi Dynasty Pope Symmachus is accused of various crimes, but claims that the secular rulers have no authority over him. ... The population of the Earth rises to about 208 million people. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... Anno Domini (Latin: In the year of the Lord), or more completely Anno Domini Nostri Jesu Christi (in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ), commonly abbreviated AD or A.D., is the designation used to number years in the dominant Christian Era in the world today. ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... Petrarch, who conceived the idea of a European Dark Age. From Cycle of Famous Men and Women, Andrea di Bartolo di Bargillac, c. ...

Contents

Overview

Following the collapse of the Western Roman Empire late in the previous century, Europe fractured into many small Germanic Kingdoms, which competed constantly for land and wealth. From this upheaval the Franks finally became dominant, and carved out a sizeable domain encompassing much of modern France and Germany. Meanwhile, the surving Eastern Roman Empire began to expand under the emperor Justinian, who eventually recaptured North Africa from the Vandals, and attempted to fully recover Italy as well in the hope of re-establishing Roman control over the lands once ruled by the Western Roman Empire. Following Justinian's death, most of his gains were lost. The Western Roman Empire is the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian in 286. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ... Justinian may refer to: Justinian I, a Roman Emperor; Justinian II, a Byzantine Emperor; Justinian, a storeship sent to the convict settlement at New South Wales in 1790. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe, Germanic as defined by Tacitus, that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century. ... The Western Roman Empire is the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian in 286. ...

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6th century

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Events

This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century.
This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (824x2003, 1602 KB) A Buddhist Stela from China, Northern Wei period, build in the early 6th century. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (824x2003, 1602 KB) A Buddhist Stela from China, Northern Wei period, build in the early 6th century. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Stele is also a concept in plant biology. ... The Northern Wei Dynasty (北魏 386-534) is most noted for the unification of northern China in 440, it was also heavily involved in funding the arts and many antiques and art works from this period have survived. ... Gundeshapur (in Persian گندیشاپور, Pahlavi Gund-Ä« Shāh PÅ«r, Gondeshapur, Jondishapoor, Jondishapur, and Jondishapour, Gundishapur, Gondêšâpur, Jund-e Shapur, Jundê-Shâpûr, etc. ... A coin of Khosrau I Khosrau I, (Most commonly known as Anooshiravan also spelled Anushirvan, Persian: انوشيروان meaning the immortal soul), also known as Anooshiravan the Just (انوشیروان عادل, Anooshiravan-e-ādel) (ruled 531–579), was the favourite son and successor of Kavadh I of Persia (488–531), and the most famous and... Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about: Caledonia Caledonia is the Latin name given by the Roman Empire to a northern area of the island of Great Britain. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... Ancient church at Glendalough monastic site Glendalough is a village located at the site of an ancient monastery located in County Wicklow, Ireland. ... Monastery of St. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... Saint Kevin Bokelmann (c. ... Iona village viewed from a short distance offshore. ... Saint Columba (7 December 521 - 9 June 597) is sometimes referred to as Columba of Iona, or, in Old Irish, as Saint Colm Cille or Columcille (meaning Dove of the church). He was the outstanding figure among the Gaelic missionary monks who reintroduced Christianity to Scotland during the Dark Ages. ... Zen is a form of Mahāyāna Buddhism notable for its emphasis on praxis and experiential wisdom, particularly as realized in the form of meditation known as zazen, in the attainment of enlightenment as experienced by the Buddha Siddhārtha Gautama. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... The Jataka stories are a significant body of works about the previous lives of Gautama Buddha. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Zoroastrianism was adapted from an earlier, polytheistic faith by Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) in Persia very roughly around 1000 BC (although, in the absence of written records, some scholars estimates are as late as 600 BC). ... A coin of Khosrau I Khosrau I, (Most commonly known as Anooshiravan also spelled Anushirvan, Persian: انوشيروان meaning the immortal soul), also known as Anooshiravan the Just (انوشیروان عادل, Anooshiravan-e-ādel) (ruled 531–579), was the favourite son and successor of Kavadh I of Persia (488–531), and the most famous and... Commanders King Arthur † Mordred † How Mordred was Slain by Arthur, and How by Him Arthur was Hurt to the Death, by Arthur Rackham Camlann redirects here. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Baekje (or Paekche) and later Nambuyeo (18 BCE – 660 CE) was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. ... Events July - Battle of Taginae: The Byzantine general Narses defeats and kills Totila, king of the Ostrogoths. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The bubonic plague is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... The Plague of Justinian (541-542) is the first known pandemic on record, and it also marks the first firmly recorded pattern of bubonic plague. ... Karantania sometimes Carantania, Carentania, Carinthia (in old Slovenian onomastics Korotan, or Karantanija) was a Slavic principality that developed in the 6th century and was centered on the territory of contemporary Carinthia. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Bulgar warriors slaughter Byzantines, from the Menology of Basil II, 10th century. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Axum, also Aksum, is a city in northern Ethiopia, located at the base of the Adoua mountains. ... Nubia is the region in the south of Egypt, along the Nile and in northern Sudan. ... Jesus Christ in a Coptic icon. ... For other uses, see Aargau (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Funan was the pre-southern Chinese inhabitant in SEA (the Mongoloid-southern Chinese), which is today became Thai-Lao-and Vietnam. ... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411) The Black Death, or Black Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history. ... The Silk Road Silk Route redirects here. ... The Sui Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; 581-619[1]) followed the Southern and Northern Dynasties and preceded the Tang Dynasty in China. ... Old Irish is the name given to the oldest form of the Irish language which can be, more or less, fully reconstructed from extant sources. ... Old Low Franconian is the language ancestral to the Low Franconian languages, including Dutch. ... Abraha (died 570) was a governor of the territories in Arabia for the Axumite Kingdom, and later king of modern Yemen. ... The Kaaba (Arabic: ) , also known as (), ( The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Events The Monophysites again reject the Council of Chalcedon, causing another schism. ...

Significant persons

Saint Gregory redirects here. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Justinian depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... A coin of Khosrau I Khosrau I, (Most commonly known as Anooshiravan also spelled Anushirvan, Persian: انوشيروان meaning the immortal soul), also known as Anooshiravan the Just (انوشیروان عادل, Anooshiravan-e-ādel) (ruled 531–579), was the favourite son and successor of Kavadh I of Persia (488–531), and the most famous and... Sassanid Empire at its greatest extent The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia during the era of the second Persian Empire, from 224 until 651, when the last Sassanid shah, Yazdegerd III, lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the Umayyad Caliphate... Belisarius is thought to be the figure to the right of Emperor Justinian I in the mosaic in the Church of San Vitale Ravenna that celebrates the reconquest of Italy, performed by the Byzantine army under the skillful leadership of Belisarius himself. ... Saint Gregory of Tours (c. ... Beowulf is the hero of the Anglo-Saxon poem by his name (see Beowulf). ... Geatish kings existed since the provinces of Götaland/Gautland/Geatland are considered to have been more or less independent with their own petty kings. ... The Origin and Deeds of the Goths (Latin: De origine actibusque Getarum), commonly referred to as Getica, was written by Jordanes, probably in Constantinople, and was published in AD 551. ... Procopius of Caesarea (in Greek Προκόπιος, c. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Burzoe (Bozorgmehr or Borzoyeh) is a famous Iranian man of learning and politician who lived and worked in the Sassanid Empire of Persia in the sixth century. ... For information about all peoples of Iran, see Demographics of Iran; for Central Asian Persians, see Tajiks. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... This limestone statue of a Boddhisattva was probably created in the Henan province of China around 570, in the Northern Qi Dynasty. ... Empress Suiko , 554–April 15, 628[1]) was the 33rd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, and the first known woman to hold this position. ... Taliesin or Taliessin (c. ...

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

Dionysius Exiguus (Dennis the Little, meaning humble) (c. ... Dionysius Exiguus invented Anno Domini years to date Easter. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Events Bernicia settled by the Angles Ethiopia conquers Yemen The Daisan river, a tributary of the Euphrates, floods Edessa and within a couple of hours fills the entire city except for the highest parts. ... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... Era Vulgaris redirects here. ... Backgammon is a board game for two players in which pieces are moved according to the roll of dice and the winner is the first to remove all his pieces from the board. ... Motto (official) Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« 1(Persian) Independence, freedom, Islamic Republic (ancient) Kerdār-e nÄ«k, pendār-e nÄ«k, goftār-e nÄ«k (Persian) Noble deeds, noble thoughts, noble words Anthem SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān 2 Capital... Burzoe (Bozorgmehr or Borzoyeh) is a famous Iranian man of learning and politician who lived and worked in the Sassanid Empire of Persia in the sixth century. ... Chess is a recreational and competitive game for two players. ... Chaturanga. ... Motto (official) Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« 1(Persian) Independence, freedom, Islamic Republic (ancient) Kerdār-e nÄ«k, pendār-e nÄ«k, goftār-e nÄ«k (Persian) Noble deeds, noble thoughts, noble words Anthem SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān 2 Capital... Shatranj. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Events October 17 - The Adige River overflows its banks, flooding the church of St. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Decades and years


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/6th century BC (2019 words)
The 6th century BC started the first day of 600 BC and ended the last day of 501 BC.
In the Near East, the first half of this century was dominated by the Neo Babylonian or Chaldean empire, which had risen to power late in the previous century after successfully rebelling against Assyrian rule.
Mid-6th century BC — Foundation of Temple of Olympian Zeus (Athens) is made.
6th century - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (293 words)
5th century - 6th century - 7th century
The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era.
This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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