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Encyclopedia > 5th century
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century
Decades: 400s 410s 420s 430s 440s
450s 460s 470s 480s 490s
Categories: Births - Deaths
Establishments - Disestablishments
Europe in 450
Europe in 450

The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. A millennium (pl. ... In the Gregorian calendar, the 1st millennium is the period of one thousand years that commenced with the year 1 Anno Domini. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 350s - 360s - 370s - 380s - 390s - 400s - 410s - 420s - 430s - 440s - 450s Years: 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 Events: Constantine III seizes control of the Roman garrison in Britain, declares himself emperor, and crosses into Gaul. ... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 360s - 370s _ 380s - 390s - 400s - 410s - 420s - 430s - 440s - 450s 460s Years: 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 Events: Sack of Rome by the Visigoths under Alaric Britain lost to the Roman Empire Categories: 410s ... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 370s - 380s - 390s - 400s - 410s - 420s - 430s - 440s - 450s - 460s - 470s Years: 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 Events: Saint Augustine of Hippo publishes The City of God Validity limit for the information on Western Roman Empire in... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 380s - 390s - 400s - 410s - 420s - 430s - 440s - 450s - 460s - 470s - 480s Years: 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 Events: Buddhagosha writes the Visuddhimagga in Sri Lanka (approximate date). ... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 390s - 400s - 410s - 420s - 430s - 440s - 450s - 460s - 470s - 480s - 490s Years: 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 Events Armorica rebels against the Roman empire. ... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 400s - 410s - 420s - 430s - 440s - 450s - 460s - 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s Years: 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 Events and Trends Vandals sack Rome. ... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 410s - 420s - 430s - 440s - 450s - 460s - 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s Years: 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 Events: Aspar becomes magister militum and de facto ruler of the eastern Roman Empire Births: Romulus Augustus, Western Roman... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 420s - 430s - 440s - 450s - 460s - 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s Years: 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 Events and Trends: 476 - abdication of Romulus Augustus Categories: 470s ... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 430s - 440s - 450s - 460s - 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s Years: 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 Events 481 - Clovis I becomes king of the Franks upon the death of Childeric I (or 482) 481 - Baekje... Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Decades: 440s - 450s - 460s - 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s Years: 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 Events: Possible timing of King Arthurs victory over the Saxons. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2275x1649, 111 KB) Summary Map of Europe in 450AD, based on free map of europe Image:BlankMap-Europe. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2275x1649, 111 KB) Summary Map of Europe in 450AD, based on free map of europe Image:BlankMap-Europe. ... // Events Pope Innocent I succeeds Pope Anastasius I. The Vandals start their westward trek from Dacia and Hungary (or 400). ... Events Possible date for the Battle of Mons Badonicus: Romano-British and Celts defeat an Anglo-Saxon army that may have been led by the bretwalda Aelle of Sussex (approximate date; suggested dates range from 490 to 510) Note: This battle may have influenced the legend of King Arthur. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... Anno Domini (Latin: In the year of the Lord), or more completely Anno Domini Nostri Jesu Christi (in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ), commonly abbreviated AD or A.D., is the designation used to number years in the dominant Christian Era in the world today. ...

Contents

Overview

The Western Roman Empire is ruled by a succession of weak emperors, and true power falls increasingly into the hands of powerful generals. Internal instability and pressing military problems caused by foreign invaders finally result in the sacking of Rome by a Visigoth army in 410. Some recovery is made in the following decades, but the Western Empire receives a serious blow when another barbarian group, the Vandals occupy Carthage, capital of the extremely important province of Africa. Attempts to retake the province are interrupted by the invasions of the Huns under Atilla. After Atilla's final defeat and death both Eastern and Western empires join forces for a final assault on Vandal North Africa, but it is a spectacular failure. In 476 the last Roman Emperor, Romulus Augustus (nicknamed Augustulus "Little Augustus") is deposed by a Visgothic warlord. The Eastern Roman Empire ceases trying to prop up its hopeless Western twin, whose former lands are then divided into numerous barbarian kingdoms. Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... Migrations The Visigoths were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... Events Alaric I deposes Priscus Attalus as Roman Emperor. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe (Germanic as defined by Tacitus) that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century. ... Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in North Africa located in modern day Tunis and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Hun (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Look up Barbarian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The Fall of the Roman Empire

The year 476 is widely understood as the point at which the Roman Empire came to an end. Roman power continued in the east however, under the rulers of Constantinople. Scholars normally refer to their empire as the Byzantine Empire, however its inhabitants considered themselves Roman throughout. Recognizable Roman culture continued to exist in the east for another 200 years before the Arab invasions of the 7th Century set off a chain of events that forever changed the face of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the entity that emerged in the next few centuries is what one might refer to as the true Medieval Byzantine Empire. Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Byzantine Empire. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ...


Events

Romulus Augustus, Last Western Roman Emperor
Romulus Augustus, Last Western Roman Emperor

Image File history File links Romulus Augustus. ... Image File history File links Romulus Augustus. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Faxian(Chinese: ; pinyin: ; also romanized as Fa-Hien or Fa-hsien) (ca. ... For other uses, see Hun (disambiguation). ... The Suebi or Suevi were a Germanic people whose origin was near the Baltic Sea . ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe (Germanic as defined by Tacitus) that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century. ... It has been suggested that River Rhine Pollution: November 1986 be merged into this article or section. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Migrations The Visigoths (Western Goths) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... The City of God, opening text, created c. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. ... Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in North Africa located in modern day Tunis and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Pope Leo I was a Roman aristocrat who was Pope from 440 to 461. ... Temple of the Warriors Chichen Itza is the largest of the Pre-Columbian archaeological sites in Yucat n, Mexico. ... Romulus Augustus (460s/470s - after 511) was the last of the Western Roman Emperors. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, a major literary achievement of Eighteenth Century, was written by the English historian, Edward Gibbon. ... Julius Nepos on a coin. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Western Roman Empire is the name given to the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian. ... In the Battle of Mount Badon (Latin Mons Badonicus, Welsh Mynydd Baddon) Romano-British and Celts inflicted a severe defeat on an invading Anglo-Saxon army sometime in the decade before or after 500. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ... Theodoric was a first name frequently encountered in medieval European history. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... There are other articles with similar names; see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Hopewell mounds from the Mound City Group in Ohio Hopewell culture is the term used to describe common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States from 200 BC to 400 A.D. At its greatest extent, Hopewell culture stretched from...

Significant persons

Agatharchus (in Greek Αγάθαρχος) was an Athenian painter of the 5th century BC. He is said by Vitruvius to have been the first to paint a scene for the acting of tragedies. ... Flavius Aëtius or simply Aetius, ( 396–454), was a Roman general of the closing period of the Western Roman Empire. ... An 1894 photogravure of Alaric I taken from a painting by Ludwig Thiersch. ... Migrations The Visigoths (Western Goths) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Flavius Ardabur Aspar (? - 471), an Alan, was the magister militum (Master of Soldiers) of the Byzantine Empire. ... Attila (AD 406 - 453), also known as Attila the Hun was Khan of the Hun people from 434 until his death and leader of the Hunnic Empire. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... Bodhidharma (early 6th century CE) was the Buddhist monk traditionally credited as founder of Zen. ... A woodblock print by Yoshitoshi, (Japan, 1887) depicting Bodhidharma the founder of Chinese Zen. ... John Chrysostom (349–407, Greek: , Ioannes Chrysostomos) was the archbishop of Constantinople. ... The Patriarch of Constantinople is the Ecumenical Patriarch, ranking as the first among equals in the Eastern Orthodox communion. ... Clovis may refer to the following: The personal name of Germanic origin that primarily saw use in Europe before the year 1000 AD. Several locales and persons of historical importance have borne this name. ... St. ... It has been suggested that Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church be merged into this article or section. ... Faxian(Chinese: ; pinyin: ; also romanized as Fa-Hien or Fa-hsien) (ca. ... Geiseric the Lame (circa 389 – January 25, 477), also spelled as Gaiseric or Genseric the Lame, was the King of the Vandals and Alans (428–477) and was one of the key players in the troubles of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century. ... Hawai‘iloa, a voyaging canoe docked at Honolulu Harbor, is named in honor of the legendary navigator. ... Huiyuan (334-417 B.C) was a Buddhist teacher who founded a monastery in Jianxi province and wrote the text ‘A Monk Does Not Bow Down Before A King’ (404B.C.). Huiyuan worked with monks, lay people, and even rulers to further Buddhist principles and Buddhist acceptance in China. ... An imagined portrait of Hypatia of Alexandria Hypatia of Alexandria (Greek: Υπατία; born between 350 and 370 AD – 415 AD) was an Alexandrian Neoplatonist philosopher, who was the first notable woman in mathematics, and also taught in the fields of astronomy and astrology. ... For other uses see: Jerome (disambiguation) Jerome (about 340 - September 30, 420), (full name Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus) is best known as the translator of the Bible from Greek and Hebrew into Latin. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Pope Leo I was a Roman aristocrat who was Pope from 440 to 461. ... Ricimers monogram is struck on the reverse of this coin by Libius Severus. ... Saint Mesrop Mashtots (Armenian:Õ„Õ¥Õ½Ö€Õ¸Õº Մաշտոց) (360 - February 17, 440) was an Armenian monk, theologian and linguist. ... Niall of the Nine Hostages (Irish: Niall Noigíallach) was a High King of Ireland who was active early-to-mid 5th century, dying - according to the latest estimates - around 450/455. ... Statue of Saint Patrick Saint Patrick (died March 17, 462, 492, or 493), is the patron saint of Ireland. ... Socrates Scholasticus was a Greek Christian church historian; born at Constantinople c. ... Salminius Hermias Sozomen (c. ... Tomb of Theodoric in Ravenna Theodoric the Great (454 - August 30, 526), known to the Romans as Flavius Theodoricus, was king of the East Goths, the Ostrogoths (488-526), ruler of Italy (493-526), and regent of the Visigoths (511-526). ... Zu Chongzhi (祖冲之, pinyin Zǔ Chōngzhī, Wade-Giles Tsu Chung-chih) (429-500) was a Chinese mathematician and astronomer during the Song and Qi Dynasties (of the Southern Dynasties). ...

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

Haniwa horse statuette, complete with saddle and stirrups, 6th century, Kofun period, Japan. ... Two horse collars A horse collar is a device used to distribute load around a horses neck, for pulling a wagon or plow. ... For the constellation known as The Plough see Ursa Major. ... Modern horseshoes are most commonly made of iron and nailed onto the hoof. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... The Anglo-Saxon Futhorc are a runic alphabet, extended from the Elder Futhark, consisting of 29, and later even 33 characters. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... The Armenian alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Armenian language since the 5th century. ... Saint Mesrop Mashtots (Armenian:Õ„Õ¥Õ½Ö€Õ¸Õº Մաշտոց) (360 - February 17, 440) was an Armenian monk, theologian and linguist. ... // Events Japanese court officially adopts the Chinese writing system (approximate date). ...

Decades and years


  Results from FactBites:
 
Siti Archeologici Siciliani (3867 words)
The Hellenistic-Roman quarter, whose history spans 10 centuries of history – from the 4th century BC onwards – was laid out according to the hyppodamian urban plan and shows several noting dwellings such as the so called House of the Portico and the House of Dionysius.
Worth-seeing are the Chalcidian Shrine dating from the 7th century BC, the remains of two temples, notably that dedicated to Aphrodite dated between the 7th and the 5th century, remnants of kilns from the 4th-5th century attesting to the Byzantine presence at the area.
The ruins of Halaesa, a Greek colony founded in the 5th century BC, afterwards destroyed by the Arabs, are scattered throughout the territory of Santo Stefano di Camastra.
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