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Encyclopedia > 5th United States Congress
Contents

1 Major Political Events
2 Officers

3 Members of the Fifth United States Congress

Fifth United States Congress

This is currently a draft article. The text in this article is computer-generated. Links and spelling have to be verified. See Wikipedia:WikiProject US Congress.


1797-1798

Major Political Events

Officers

Senate

House of Representatives

Members of the Fifth United States Congress

Senate

Connecticut

Delaware

  • Henry Latimer (Federalist)
  • John Vining (Federalist) and then Joshua Clayton (Federalist) and then William H. Wells (Federalist)

Georgia

Kentucky

  • John Brown (Republican)
  • Humphrey Marshall (Federalist)

Maryland

Massachusetts

New Hampshire

New Jersey

  • John Rutherfurd (Federalist) and then Franklin Davenport (Federalist)
  • Richard Stockton (Federalist)

New York

  • John Laurance (Federalist)
  • Philip J. Schuyler (Federalist) and then John S. Hobart (Federalist) and then William North (Federalist) and then James Watson (Federalist)

North Carolina

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

Tennessee

Vermont

Virginia

House of Representatives

Connecticut

Delaware

  • James A. Bayard, Sr. (Federalist), At-Large

Georgia

  • Abraham Baldwin (Republican), At-Large
  • John Milledge (Republican), At-Large

Kentucky

  • Thomas T. Davis (Republican), At-Large
  • John Fowler (Republican), At-Large

Maryland

  • George Dent (Federalist), 1st District
  • Richard Sprigg, Jr. (Republican), 2nd District
  • William Craik (Federalist), 3rd District
  • George Baer, Jr. (Federalist), 4th District
  • Samuel Smith (Republican), 5th District
  • William Matthews (Federalist), 6th District
  • William Hindman (Federalist), 7th District
  • John Dennis (Federalist), 8th District

Massachusetts

  • Theophilus Bradbury (Federalist) and then Bailey Bartlett (Federalist), At-Large
  • Stephen Bullock (Federalist), At-Large
  • Dwight Foster (Federalist), At-Large
  • Nathaniel Freeman, Jr. (Federalist), At-Large
  • Samuel Lyman (Federalist), At-Large
  • Harrison G. Otis (Federalist), At-Large
  • Isaac Parker (Federalist), At-Large
  • John Reed (Federalist), At-Large
  • Samuel Sewall (Federalist), At-Large
  • William Shepard (Federalist), At-Large
  • Thomson J. Skinner (Republican), At-Large
  • George Thatcher (Federalist), At-Large
  • Joseph B. Varnum (Republican), At-Large
  • Peleg Wadsworth (Federalist), At-Large

New Hampshire

  • Abiel Foster (Federalist), At-Large
  • Jonathan Freeman (Federalist), At-Large
  • William Gordon (Federalist), At-Large
  • Jeremiah Smith and then Peleg Sprague (Federalist), At-Large

New Jersey

  • Jonathan Dayton (Federalist), At-Large
  • James H. Imlay (Federalist), At-Large
  • James Schureman (Federalist), At-Large
  • Thomas Sinnickson (Federalist), At-Large
  • Mark Thomson (Federalist), At-Large

New York

  • Edward Livingston (Republican), 1st District
  • Jonathan N. Havens (Republican), 2nd District
  • Philip Van Cortlandt (Republican), 3rd District
  • Lucas C. Elmendorf (Republican), 4th District
  • David Brooks (Federalist), 5th District
  • Hezekiah L. Hosmer (Federalist), 6th District
  • John E. Van Alen (Federalist), 7th District
  • Henry Glen (Federalist), 8th District
  • John Williams (Federalist), 9th District
  • James Cochran (Federalist), 10th District

North Carolina

Pennsylvania

  • Blair McClenachan (Republican), 1st District
  • John Swanwick (Republican) and then Robert Waln (Federalist), 1st District
  • Richard Thomas (Federalist), 3rd District
  • John Chapman (Federalist), 4th District
  • Andrew Gregg (Republican), 4th District
  • Samuel Sitgreaves (Federalist) and then Robert Brown (Republican), 4th District
  • George Ege (Federalist) and then Joseph Hiester (Republican), 5th District
  • John A. Hanna (Republican), 6th District
  • John W. Kittera (Federalist), 7th District
  • Thomas Hartley (Federalist), 8th District
  • David Bard (Republican), 10th District
  • William Findley (Republican), 11th District
  • Albert Gallatin (Republican), 11th District

Rhode Island

South Carolina

  • Lemuel Benton (Republican), At-Large
  • Robert G. Harper (Federalist), At-Large
  • William Smith (Republican), At-Large
  • William L. Smith (Federalist) and then Thomas Pinckney (Federalist), At-Large
  • John Rutledge, Jr. (Federalist), At-Large
  • Thomas Sumter (Republican), At-Large

Tennessee

Vermont

  • Matthew Lyon (Republican), 1st District
  • Lewis R. Morris (Federalist), 2nd District

Virginia

  • Richard Brent (Republican), At-Large
  • Samuel J. Cabell (Republican), At-Large
  • Thomas Claiborne (Republican), At-Large
  • Matthew Clay (Republican), At-Large
  • John Clopton (Republican), At-Large
  • John Dawson (Republican), At-Large
  • Thomas Evans (Federalist), At-Large
  • William B. Giles (Republican) and then Joseph Eggleston (Republican), At-Large
  • Carter B. Harrison (Republican), At-Large
  • David Holmes (Republican), At-Large
  • Walter Jones (Republican), At-Large
  • James Machir (Federalist), At-Large
  • Daniel Morgan (Federalist), At-Large
  • Anthony New (Republican), At-Large
  • John Nicholas (Republican), At-Large
  • Josiah Parker (Federalist), At-Large
  • Abram Trigg (Republican), At-Large
  • John J. Trigg (Republican), At-Large
  • Abraham B. Venable (Republican), At-Large


Previous:

4th Congress

United States Congress
1797–1799
Next:

6th Congress



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