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Encyclopedia > 54th United Kingdom general election
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Politics of the United Kingdom,
Subseries of the Politics series Image File history File links free clipart image of ballot box and ballot File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... The contents of this page have been moved to http://en. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The politics of the United Kingdom are based upon a unitary state and a constitutional monarchy. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Politics Look up Politics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Politics (disambiguation) Democracy History of democracy List of democracy and elections-related topics List of years in politics List of politics by country articles Political corruption Political economy Political movement Political parties of...

The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... This article describes the British monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Lord Falconer of Thoroton The Right Honourable Charles Leslie Falconer, Baron Falconer of Thoroton, PC (born 19 November 1951) is a British lawyer and Labour Party politician. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and is now the dominant branch of Parliament. ... In the United Kingdom, the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, and is seen historically as the First Commoner of the Land. ... Michael Martin The Right Honourable Michael John Martin (born July 3, 1945, Glasgow, Scotland) is the Speaker of the House of Commons in the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Douglas Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the kp. ... The Government of the United Kingdom contains a number of Ministries, known in the United Kingdom as Government Departments. ... The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba in Gaelic, Scots Pairlament in Scots) is the national unicameral legislature of Scotland. ... The term Scottish Executive is used in two distinct but closely related senses. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) (Welsh: Llywodraeth Cynulliad Cymru, LlCC) is the executive body of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of the First Minister and his Cabinet. ... The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly is a six flowered linen or flax plant, chosen for the plants historical economic importance to the region. ... The Northern Ireland Executive as established by the Northern Ireland Act 1998 is the (currently suspended) executive body for Northern Ireland, answerable to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... The United Kingdom is made up of four parts - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The Greater London Authority (GLA) administers the 1579 sq. ... The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ... The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The governing Labour Party, led by Tony Blair, was looking to secure a third consecutive term in office and to retain a large majority. ... The next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June, 2010. ... Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ...

Politics portal

The next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June, 2010. The previous election in the UK was the general election of 2005 held on 5 May 2005. June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 2010 (MMX) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The governing Labour Party, led by Tony Blair, was looking to secure a third consecutive term in office and to retain a large majority. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Queen may, at the request of the Prime Minister, order the dissolution of Parliament at any time within five years of the date of the previous general election, although typically at least four years elapse before a new election is considered. It is possible that it may be held on June 11, 2009 in order to coincide with elections to the European Parliament, combining elections dates is a common practice in the UK with the intention of reducing costs and increasing turnout. In England, the elections for County Councils are on a four-year cycle and are set for 2009. This would be keeping in line both with the recent practice for four-year terms, and the convention of holding parliamentary elections on a Thursday. Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... In parliamentary systems, a dissolution of parliament is the dispersal of a legislature at the call of an election. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 2009 by topic 2009 (MMIX) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ...


The general election will take place in all constituencies of the United Kingdom, for seats in the House of Commons. There are currently 646 seats in the house, although the number of constituencies and their boundaries will change from those used at the previous general election, especially in England and Wales where a ten-year review is due for completion in 2007. United Kingdom general elections are the elections held when the Members of Parliament (MPs) forming the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom are elected. ... To see the list in alphabetical order see the categories UK Parliamentary constituencies and UK Parliamentary constituencies (historic). ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and is now the dominant branch of Parliament. ... 2007 (MMVII) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


Overview

The governing Labour Party will be looking to secure a fourth consecutive term in office and to maintain its majority. The Conservative Party will seek to regain its dominant position in politics against losses in the 1990s, and to replace Labour as the governing party. The Liberal Democrats will hope to make gains from both sides and to become the Official Opposition, replacing the Conservatives. Bookmakers are already taking bets and are predicting that Labour's majority will be reduced to between 20 and 30, losing seats mainly to the Conservatives; the bookmakers' predictions are based on boundary changes and applying the uniform swing toward the Conservatives that was seen in the 2001 and 2005 elections. Given that elections are influenced mainly by events that happen after the last one, these predictions may be wholly inaccurate. The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The 1990s refers to the years 1990 to 1999; the last decade of the 20th Century, but in an economical sense The Nineties is often considered to span from the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 to the September 11 attacks in 2001. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The Official Opposition (more formally, Her Majestys Loyal Opposition) in the United Kingdom is usually the largest political party or coalition which is not a member of the government. ... The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The governing Labour Party, led by Tony Blair, was looking to secure a third consecutive term in office and to retain a large majority. ...


Leadership of the parties

Since David Cameron has now replaced Michael Howard as Conservative leader, and Tony Blair has declared his intention to stand down before the next general election, it will be the first general election since 1979 in which both Labour and the Conservatives have leaders who are contesting their first general election as leader. Charles Kennedy of the Liberal Democrats has made clear no such intention, though as of late 2005 has been subject to immense public speculation about his future. The two main party leaders going into the 1979 General Election were Labour Prime Minister James Callaghan and Conservative Party leader Margaret Thatcher, whilst the Liberals also had a new leader, David Steel. The result of the 2005 election for the Conservative leadership was announced on December 6 with David Cameron winning. David Cameron MP The Right Honourable David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of Her Majestys Loyal Opposition in the House of Commons. ... Michael Howard The Right Honourable Michael Howard, QC, MP (born July 7, 1941) is a British politician and caretaker Leader of the Opposition and the Conservative Party, having formally resigned the post on 7 October 2005. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Douglas Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... The UK general election, 1979 was held on May 3, 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... Charles Kennedy, current leader of the UK Liberal Democrat Party The Right Honourable Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959) is a British politician, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats (the third largest political party in the United Kingdom) since 1999. ... The Right Honourable Sir Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... The Right Honourable Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925), is a British politician. ... David Martin Scott Steel, Baron Steel of Aikwood KT PC KBE (born March 31, 1938) is a British and Scottish politician and a Liberal Democrat member of the UK House of Lords. ... The 2005 Conservative leadership election was announced by party leader Michael Howard on May 6, 2005, when he announced that he would be stepping down as leader in the near future. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... David Cameron MP The Right Honourable David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of Her Majestys Loyal Opposition in the House of Commons. ...


Other parties

Many seats will also be contested by other parties. Parties with representation at the previous general election at Westminster include the Democratic Unionist Party, Health Concern, Plaid Cymru, RESPECT The Unity Coalition, the Scottish National Party, Sinn Féin (who do not take their seats as they will not swear the Oath of Allegiance to the Queen), the Social Democratic and Labour Party, and the Ulster Unionist Party. There was one independent member of Parliament, Peter Law, elected in the 2005 General election. Given vocal groups of opposition within both of the main parties, it is possible that the number of independent MPs will increase as members are expelled or resign. The Democratic Unionist Party is a hardline unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... Independent Kidderminster Hospital and Health Concern (often known by the shorter name Health Concern) is a political party based in Kidderminster, England. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-07-12, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... RESPECT The Unity Coalition is a left wing British political party founded on January 25, 2004 in London. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ... Members of both UK Houses of Parliament are required to take an oath of allegiance to the Crown on taking their seat in Parliament. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP) is a unionist political party in Northern Ireland, and was the party of government in Northern Ireland between 1921 and 1972. ... Peter Law in the 2005 General Elections, standing next to Maggie Jones, the Labour party candidate as the results are declared. ...


Parties expected to contest the election that won no representatives at Westminster in 2005, but had seats in the devolved assemblies and European Parliament, include the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland, the United Kingdom Independence Party, the various national Green parties, and the Scottish Socialist Party. Devolved government is government which is devolved, either wholly or partially, from state level to a more local level. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... The Green Party was formed in 1973 as the Ecology Party. ... This article deals with the Scottish Socialist Party that was formed in 1998. ...


Benchmarks (calculated on 2005 boundaries)

Any swing to Labour since 2005: Increased Labour majority in Parliament
Less than 2.35% swing to Conservative: Labour overall majority
Between 2.35% and 4.65% swing to Conservative: Labour largest party in a hung parliament
Between 4.65% and 6.34% swing to Conservative: Conservatives largest party in a hung parliament
More than 6.34% swing to Conservative: Conservative overall majority

Most governments can survive a parliamentary term on a majority of about 25 seats over all other parties. Labour would be reduced to 25 on a swing to Con of 1.48% and the Conservatives would gain a 25 seat majority on a swing to Con of 7.01%.


It is notable that most votes lost by Labour in the 2005 election did not change to the Conservatives but rather to the Liberal Democrats; the Labour to Conservative swing was only 0.6%.


Boundary Changes in England, Wales and Northern Ireland

When the periodical 8-12 year review of boundaries by the Boundary Commission in 2007 is completed, England and Wales will have a revision of its 569 seats. This is the first major change to Parliament constituencies since the 1997 General Election. In the United Kingdom, the four Boundary Commissions are responsible for determining the boundaries of House of Commons constituencies. ...


Some new seats will be created, some will be absorbed into others and other changes in the size and shape of constituencies will occur. The majority of seats, though, will only have minor alterations. It is already known that new seats are to be created in Bristol, Warwickshire, Lancashire and South Yorkshire, and that seats are to be abolished in Merseyside, North London and a combined region of Salford/Manchester and Trafford, but the list of created and abolished seats is always hard to confirm due to the nature of radical boundary alterations.


In Wales, the total number of seats is to remain at 40, although new seats have been created by radical redrawing of boundaries in Clwyd and Gwynedd; Arfon and Dwyfor Meirionnydd replace Caernarfon and Meirionnydd Nant Conwy respectively; Aberconwy replaces Conwy.


Wales has not seen a drop in the number of constituencies, unlike Scotland in the 2002 boundary changes north of the border. Currently Welsh constituencies have on average 25,000 fewer people than the average English constituency. The current disribution is seen to benefit the Labour party, who have strong support in Wales, especially in the South where there are many small constituencies. National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS 1... Travel guide to Scotland from Wikitravel Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in...


The Northern Ireland Boundary Commission are currently holding public meetings concerning their review. Some assumed that the board would axe one of Belfast's four seats, but the provisional recommendations extend the capital's constituencies into suburban areas whilst creating a new Antrim Coast and Glens seat from the existing East Antrim constituency. Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... Belfast (Béal Feirste in Irish) is a city in the United Kingdom, and the second-largest city on the island of Ireland. ...


The current list of confirmed constituencies in England, Scotland and Wales is in Constituencies in the next United Kingdom general election. The initial estimates of the way the new constituencies would have gone in 2005 is: Labour 350 (-6), Conservative 205 (+7), Liberal Democrats 65 (+3) and others 30 (unchanged). Constituencies in the next United Kingdom general election lists the constituencies which are expected to be established at the time of the next United Kingdom general election. ... The Labour Party is the principal centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ...


External links

Boundary Changes

  • Boundary Commission for England
  • Boundary Commission for Wales
  • Comisiwn Ffiniau i Gymru (in Welsh)
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