FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
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Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century
Decades: 20s  30s  40s  - 50s -  60s  70s  80s
Years: 51  52  53  - 54 -  55  56  57
54 by topic
v  d  e
Politics
State leaders - Sovereign states
Birth and death categories
Births - Deaths
Establishments and disestablishments categories
Establishments - Disestablishments
54 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 54
LIV
Ab urbe condita 807
Armenian calendar N/A
Bahá'í calendar -1790 – -1789
Buddhist calendar 598
Chinese calendar 2690/2750-12-4
(癸丑年十二月初四日)
— to —
2691/2751-11-13
(甲寅年十一月十三日)
Coptic calendar -230 – -229
Ethiopian calendar 46 – 47
Hebrew calendar 3814 – 3815
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 109 – 110
 - Shaka Samvat N/A
 - Kali Yuga 3155 – 3156
Holocene calendar 10054
Iranian calendar 568 BP – 567 BP
Islamic calendar 585 BH – 584 BH
Japanese calendar
 - Imperial Year Kōki 714
(皇紀714年)
Julian calendar 99
Korean calendar 2387
Thai solar calendar 597
v  d  e


Year 54 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s Years: 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Sometimes the 20s is used as shorthand for the 1920s, the 1820s, or other such decades... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 Sometimes the 30s is used as shorthand for the 1930s, the 1830s, or other such decades in various... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 10s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 Sometimes the 40s is used as shorthand for the 1940s, the 1840s, or other such decades in various centuries... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 Sometimes the 50s is used as shorthand for the 1950s, the 1850s, or other such decades in various centuries Events... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s - 110s 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 Note: Sometimes the 60s is used as shorthand for the 1960s, the 1860s, or other such decades in various centuries... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s - 110s - 120s 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 Note: Sometimes the 70s is used as shorthand for the 1970s, the 1870s, or other such decades in other centuries... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s - 110s - 120s - 130s 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 Note: Sometimes 80s is used as shorthand for the 1980s, the 1880s, or other such decades in different centuries. ... This page indexes the individual years pages. ... This article is about the year 51. ... This article is about the year 52. ... This article is about the year 53. ... For other uses, see number 55. ... // Events By place Roman Empire War between Rome and Parthia broke out due to the invasion of Armenia by Vologases, who replaced the Roman supported ruler with his brother Tiridates of Parthia Publius Clodius Thrasea Paetus becomes a consul in Rome. ... For other uses, see number 57. ... 54 (fifty-four) is the natural number following 53 and preceding 55. ... AD 53 state leaders - Events of AD 54 - AD 55 state leaders - State leaders by year // Africa Kush - Amanitenmemide. ... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... Ab urbe condita (related with Anno urbis conditae: AUC or a. ... The Armenian calendar uses the Armenian numerals. ... The Baháí calendar, also called the Badí‘ calendar, used by the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years of 365 days, and leap years of 366 days. ... The Buddhist calendar is used on mainland southeast Asia in the countries of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar (formerly Burma) in several related forms. ... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar, akin to the Hebrew calendar & Hindu Calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ... The Chinese sexagenary cycle (Chinese: ; pinyin: gānzhī) is a cyclic numeral system of 60 combinations of the two basic cycles, the ten Heavenly Stems (天干; tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (地支; dìzhī). These have been traditionally used as a means of numbering the years, not only in... The Chinese sexagenary cycle (Chinese: ; pinyin: gānzhī) is a cyclic numeral system of 60 combinations of the two basic cycles, the ten Heavenly Stems (天干; tiāngān) and the twelve Earthly Branches (地支; dìzhī). These have been traditionally used as a means of numbering the years, not only in... The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian calendar, is used by the Coptic Orthodox Church. ... The Ethiopian/Geez calendar (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ዘመን አቆጣጠር ) or Ethiopic calendar is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia and is also the liturgical year of christians in Eritrea belonging to the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church, Eastern Catholic Church of Eritrea and Lutheran (Evangelical Church of Eritrea), where it is commonly known as... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... There is disagreement as to the meaning of the Indian word Samvat. ... The Indian national calendar (sometimes called Saka calendar) is the official civil calendar in use in India. ... Kali Yuga is also the title of a book by Roland Charles Wagner. ... The Holocene calendar, Human Era count or Jōmon Era count (Japan) uses a dating system similar to astronomical year numbering but adds 10,000, placing a year 0 at the start of the Jōmon Era (JE), the Human Era (HE, the beginning of human civilization) and the aproximate... The Iranian calendar (Persian: ‎) also known as Persian calendar or the Jalāli Calendar is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwīm-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Koinobori, flags decorated like koi, are popular decorations around Childrens Day This mural on the wall of a Tokyo subway station celebrates Hazuki, the eighth month. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Japanese era name. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... The traditional Korean calendar is directly derived from the Asian calendar. ... The Thai solar, or Suriyakati (สุริยคติ), calendar is used in traditional and official contexts in Thailand, although the Western calendar is sometimes used in business. ... This is the calendar for a common year starting on Tuesday (dominical letter F), e. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ...


Events

By place

Roman Empire

  • October 13Roman emperor Claudius dies, possibly after being poisoned by Agrippina, his wife and niece, and is succeeded by Nero.
  • Nero tries to prohibit the Gladiatorial games.
  • Maiden Castle in Dorset is captured from the Celtic Durotriges by Vespasian.
  • Under Nero, Rome annexes Aden to protect the maritime route between Alexandria and Asia.
  • Two centurions are sent to the south of Egypt to find the sources of the Nile, and possible new provinces. They report that while there are many cities in the desert, the area seems too poor to be worthy of conquest.
  • Violence erupts in Caesarea regarding the a local ordinance restricting the civil rights of Jews, creating clashes between Jews and pagans. The Roman garrison, made up of Syrians, takes the side of the pagans. The Jews, armed with clubs and swords, meet in the marketplace. The Governor of Judaea, Antonius Felix orders his troops to charge. The violence continues and Felix asks Nero to arbitrate. Nero, sides with the pagans and relegates the Jews to second-class citizens. This decision does nothing but increase the Jews' anger.

October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Several notable women of Ancient Rome bore the name Agrippina. ... Nero[1] Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37 – June 9, 68)[2], born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. ... Pollice Verso (With a Turned Thumb), an 1872 painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme, is a well known history painters researched conception of a gladiatorial combat. ... Maiden Castle is a hill fort, mostly dating from the Iron Age, situated 2 miles south of Dorchester, in Dorset, England. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dÉ”.sÉ™t], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... This article is about the European people. ... The Durotriges were one of the Celtic tribes living in the British Islands prior to the Roman invasion of Britain. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa... World map showing the location of Asia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Nile (Arabic: , transliteration: , Ancient Egyptian iteru, Coptic piaro or phiaro) is a major north-flowing river in Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. ... Caesarea is the name of several Roman cities and towns, including: Caesarea Antiochia, properly Antioch in Pisidia, near modern Yalvaç, Turkey Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, modern Kayseri, Turkey Caesarea Palaestina: modern Caesarea, in Israel Caesarea Philippi in the Golan Heights Iol Caesarea: modern Cherchell, in Algeria Caesarea Magna or Caesara... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Marcus Antonius Felix (Felix in Greek: ο Φηλιξ, born between 5/10-?) was the ancient Rome procurator of Iudaea Province 52-60, in succession to Ventidius Cumanus. ...

Asia

Map of the southern Levant, c. ... Front and back of a Judean coin from the reign of Agrippa I. // Agrippa I also called the Great (10 BCE - 44 CE), King of the Jews, the grandson of Herod the Great, and son of Aristobulus IV and Berenice. ... Agrippa II (AD 27–100), son of Agrippa I, and like him originally named Marcus Julius Agrippa. ... Events Rome Roman Emperor Claudius invests Agrippa II with the office of superintendent of the Temple in Jerusalem. ...

By topic

Religion

For other senses, see Patriarch (disambiguation). ... Onesimus In the New Testament, Onesimus (d. ... Stachys the Apostle was the Bishop of Byzantium from 38 to 54 AD. He seemed to be closely connected to Saint Andrew and Saint Paul. ... The Patriarch of Constantinople is the Ecumenical Patriarch, ranking as the first among equals in the Eastern Orthodox communion. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Apollos (Απολλως; contracted from Apollonius) was an early Christian, who is mentioned several times in the New Testament. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Historical Map of Ephesus, from Meyers Konversationslexikon 1888 Ephesus (Greek: , Turkish: ), was one of the cities of Ionia in Asia Minor, located in Lydia where the Cayster River (Küçük Menderes) flows into the Aegean Sea. ...

Births

Deaths


  Results from FactBites:
 
54 (658 words)
I wanted to see the underbelly, how a place like 54 would make people do anything to be a part of it.
Well, this version of the film kind of is. We follow the story of Shane (Ryan Phillippe), a young stud from Jersey, who yearns to get into 54 so he can meet the woman of his dreams Julia (Neve Campbell), a big soap opera actress.
He doesn't want to get into 54 because he wants to be part of this amazing experience.
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