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Encyclopedia > 52 (comic book)
52


Cover 52 Week One (May 10, 2006), art by J. G. Jones Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Shortcut: WP:WIN Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia and, as a means to that end, also an online community. ... Image File history File links 52_1. ... 2006 2005 in comics 2007 in comics Notable events of 2006 in comics. ... J. G. Jones is an American comic book artist. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule Weekly
Publication dates May 2006 - May 2007
Number of issues 52
Main character(s) Animal Man
Black Adam
Booster Gold
Ralph Dibny
Will Magnus
Renee Montoya
The Question
Starfire
Steel
Adam Strange
Creative team
Writer(s) Geoff Johns
Grant Morrison
Greg Rucka
Mark Waid
Keith Giffen
Artist(s) Joe Bennett
Chris Batista
Keith Giffen
Ruy Jose
Jack Jadson
Darick Robertson
Justiniano
Mike McKone
Covers:
J. G. Jones
Alex Sinclair (colors)

52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. The series is written by Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka, and Mark Waid with layouts by Keith Giffen. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... 2006 2005 in comics 2007 in comics Notable events of 2006 in comics. ... 2007 2006 in comics 2008 in comics Notable events of 2007 in comics. ... Animal Man (Buddy Baker) is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... Black Adam is a fictional comic book character whose morally ambiguous nature has his character fall between the lines of heroism and villainy; as a result, he has associated himself with both superheroes and supervillains at different times. ... Booster Gold is a fictional character, a superhero in publications from DC Comics. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... This article is about the mainstream DCU character. ... Renee Montoya is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... Starfire is the name of three superheroes who have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. ... John Henry Irons is the third hero known as Steel, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Greg Rucka is an American writer of novels and comic books. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... Joe Bennett (real name Benedito José Nascimento born February 03, 1968 in Belém) is a Brazilian comic book artist. ... Cover to The Legion #33 by Batista Chris Batista is a comic book artist and penciller. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... Cover of Transmetropolitan: Lust for Life Darick W. Robertson is an artist from San Mateo, California, United States. ... Justiniano is an American comic book artist. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia on one of the following topics: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... J. G. Jones is an American comic book artist. ... Alex Sinclair is a colorist who has worked in the comics industry. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 2005 in comics 2007 in comics Notable events of 2006 in comics. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Greg Rucka is an American writer of novels and comic books. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ...


52 consists of 52 issues, published weekly for one year, chronicling events that took place during the missing year after the end of Infinite Crisis. The series covers much of the DC Universe, and several characters, whose disparate stories interconnect. The story is directly followed by the limited series Countdown. The Lost Year is the unofficial term given to a period of time in the fictional DC Universe. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Countdown is a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 9, 2007, directly following the conclusion of the last issue of 52. ...


52 was also the first weekly comic book published by DC Comics since the short-lived anthology Action Comics Weekly back in 1988-1989. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Format

The use of a weekly publication format is unusual in the North American comics industry, a model traditionally based upon monthly publication. 52 is the longest weekly comic book series published by a major North American publisher. The record was previously held by Action Comics Weekly. Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ...


Back-up stories

History of the DC Universe

A backup story entitled History of the DC Universe appears in Weeks 2 through 11, with the creative team of Dan Jurgens and Art Thibert.[1] Reminiscent of DC's earlier History of the DC Universe limited series, in this story, Donna Troy explores the history of the DC Universe with the help of Harbinger's recording device. In the final chapter, both the device and a Monitor inform Donna Troy that she was supposed to have died instead of Jade. Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... Arthur Art Thibert is a comic book artist, inker and penciller. ... This is a timeline of events in the fictional DC Universe, the setting for the stories featured in DC Comics. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Harbinger is a DC Comics character created in the early 1980s. ... The Monitor was a character created by comic book writer Marv Wolfman and comics artist George Pérez as one of the main characters of DC Comics Crisis on Infinite Earths limited series. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ...


Secret Origins

Weeks 12 through 51 feature Secret Origins written by Mark Waid with a rotating team of artists.[2] Brian Bollands cover to the 1989 Secret Origins collection. ...


Story

In the aftermath of Infinite Crisis, Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman have temporarily retired their costumed identities, and the remaining heroes attend a memorial for Superboy in Metropolis. Time traveler Booster Gold attends the memorial, but when Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman do not arrive as he expects, he suspects his robot sidekick Skeets is malfunctioning. After Skeets reports other incorrect historical data, Booster searches fellow time traveler Rip Hunter's desert bunker for answers, but finds it littered with enigmatic scrawled notes and photos of himself and Skeets surrounded by the words "his fault" with arrows pointing toward them. Booster's reputation is ruined by the unscrupulous ways he attempts to maintain his corporate sponsorships, as well as the arrival of a mysterious new superhero named Supernova. Booster tries to regain the spotlight by containing an explosion, but is seemingly killed in the attempt. Skeets uses Booster's ancestor Daniel Carter to regain access to Hunter's lab, where he sees the photos and arrows pointing at him. Skeets traps Carter in a time loop in the bunker and sets out to locate Hunter himself. He eventually corners Hunter and Supernova in the bottle-city of Kandor, where Supernova reveals himself to be Booster Gold, having faked his death with the help of Hunter to uncover Skeets' true intentions. Hunter and Booster attempt to trap Skeets in the Phantom Zone, but Skeets appears to consume the sub-dimension and pursues his two adversaries through time. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Superboy, also known by his Kryptonian name Kon-El and his human alias Conner Kent, is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Booster Gold is a fictional character, a superhero in publications from DC Comics. ... Skeets is a fictional artificial intelligence robot from the future in the DC Comics Universe. ... Rip Hunter is a DC Comics character who first appeared in Showcase #20 (May 1959), then his own series which ran for 29 issues (1961-65). ... Corporate may refer to either A corporation, a type of legal entity, often formed to conduct business Corporate (film), a 2006 Bollywood film starring Bipasha Basu. ... Supernova is an identity used by three characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... A time loop is a common plot device in science fiction (especially in universes where time travel is commonplace) in which time runs normally for a set period (usually a day or a few hours) but then skips back like a broken record. ... Superman and the modern Kandor. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension featured in the Superman comic books and related media. ...


Ralph Dibny, the Elongated Man, has a gun to his head when he is informed that his dead wife Sue's gravestone has been vandalized with an inverted version of Superman's "S" symbol, the Kryptonian symbol for resurrection. He confronts Cassandra Sandsmark, and she tells Dibny that she is in a cult which believes that Superboy can be resurrected, but they would like to try it first with Sue. Despite his initial consent, Dibny and his friends disrupt the ceremony, and the effigy of Sue crawls to Dibny, calling out to him as it burns; as a result, Dibny suffers a nervous breakdown. Dibny encounters the helmet of Doctor Fate, which promises to fulfill Dibny's desires if he makes certain sacrifices. Dibny journeys with the helmet through the afterlives of several cultures, where he is cautioned about the use of magic. After several failed attempts to resurrect his wife, Dibny prepares a spell in Dr. Fate's tower. Dibny puts the helmet on and shoots it to reveal it as the sorcerer Felix Faust. Faust was posing as Nabu to give Dibny's soul to the demon Neron in exchange for his freedom. Neron kills Dibny but realizes that Dibny's spell has trapped him and Faust inside. Ralph and Sue Dibny are reunited later as ghost detectives. The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Susan Sue Dearbon Dibny is a fictional character from DC comics. ... Cassandra Cassie Sandsmark, aka Wonder Girl, is a DC Comics superheroine. ... Superboy, also known by his Kryptonian name Kon-El and his human alias Conner Kent, is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ... For other uses, see Afterlife (disambiguation). ... Doctor Fate, as seen in Justice League Unlimited Doctor Fate is a comic book superhero and wizard in the DC Comics universe, and a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Felix Faust is a fictional sorcerer and supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... For the US Weather Observation Network, see NERON. Neron is also an alternative name of the Roman Emperor Nero. ...


Lex Luthor announces the Everyman Project, a program designed to give ordinary people superpowers. John Henry Irons deactivates his niece Natasha's Steel armor after an argument about responsibility. Following an encounter with Luthor, Irons' skin transforms into stainless steel, causing Natasha to accuse him of hypocrisy. She enrolls in the Everyman Project and becomes a member of Luthor's superhero team Infinity, Inc. Irons learns that Luthor can deactivate Everyman Project-given abilities and that they have a limited timespan. Luthor negates the powers of one of Natasha's teammates during a battle, and Irons uses the death of her friend to convince Natasha to question Luthor's motives. After Luthor, angered by reports that he is incompatible with the treatment, deactivates the powers of the majority of the Everyman subjects on New Year's Eve, resulting in many of them falling from the sky to their deaths, Natasha works undercover to expose Luthor. Luthor later learns the reports were false and gains powers similar to those of Superman. He discovers Natasha's spying and beats her, using his superpowers. Irons and the Teen Titans attack Lexcorp. With Natasha's help, they bring Luthor to justice. Beast Boy offers Natasha, in her new Steel armor, membership in the Teen Titans, but she declines in favor of forming a new team with her uncle. Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... John Henry Irons is the third hero known as Steel, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Natasha Irons aka the fourth Steel is a fictional character in the DC Universe, who first appeared in Steel #1 in February, 1994. ... The 630 foot (192 m) high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ... Infinity Inc. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... Beast Boy (real name Garfield Mark Gar Logan) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a shapeshifting superhero who is a former member of the Doom Patrol and member of the Teen Titans. ...


Animal Man, Starfire and Adam Strange are marooned on an alien planet after the events of the Infinite Crisis. They are pursued through space by agents of Lady Styx, whose forces are conquering and overrunning planets on a path of destruction toward Earth. The are rescued and joined by Lobo, who claims he has found religion and turned his back on violence. Lady Styx hired Lobo to capture the heroes, but he instead delivers them to her so they can fight her. The heroes triumph, but Animal Man is injected with a toxin and dies. After Starfire and Strange lay his body to rest and leave, Animal Man awakens to find the aliens who gave him his powers standing over him. Animal Man acquires the powers of Sun-Eaters, which he uses to return to Earth. He is pursued by Lady Styx's assassins, who are killed by Starfire just as they arrive at his home. Animal Man (Buddy Baker) is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... Starfire is the name of three superheroes who have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Lady Styx is a fictional supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... Lobo is a DC Comics antihero. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


Black Adam, the superhuman leader of Kahndaq, forges a coalition with several other countries against the United States' superhuman supremacy under the Freedom of Power Treaty until Adrianna Tomaz, a former slave, shows Adam how he can use his abilities more peacefully to help his country. Adam convinces Captain Marvel to give Tomaz the power of Isis, and Adam and Isis free enslaved children across Africa. The Question, Renee Montoya, and Batwoman discover that Intergang is preparing to invade Gotham. The Question and Montoya fly to Kahndaq to investigate further, and they prevent a suicide bomber at Black Adam and Isis' wedding, for which Adam awards them one of Kahndaq's highest honors. The four uncover Intergang, which is inducting children into a religion of crime based on its Crime Bible. Black Adam finds Isis' crippled brother Amon among the children and shares his power with him, and Amon is reborn as Osiris. Osiris befriends a seemingly timid anthropomorphic crocodile named Sobek, who joins Black Adam's Black Marvel Family. Adam and Isis inform the Freedom of Power Treaty member nations that Kahndaq is no longer interested in consolidating power or in executing superhumans. Black Adam is a fictional comic book character whose morally ambiguous nature has his character fall between the lines of heroism and villainy; as a result, he has associated himself with both superheroes and supervillains at different times. ... Kahndaq is a fictional country in the DC Comics Universe. ... The Freedom of Power Treaty is a fictional treaty in the DC Comics Universe. ... Isis is a DC Comics superhero, as well as a separate goddess also living in the DC Universe. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... Renee Montoya is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Intergang is a fictional organized crime organization in Superman comics. ... Osiris is the name of three fictional characters in DC Comics. ... Sobek is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics series 52. ... The Marvel Family is a group of fictional characters, a team of superheroes in the Fawcett Comics and DC Comics universes. ...


Will Magnus, creator of the Metal Men, is abducted to Oolong Island, where Intergang and Chang Tzu are forcing kidnapped scientists to develop new weapons for them. Magnus' anti-depressants are confiscated and he is ordered to build a Plutonium Man robot, but Magnus also secretly rebuilds miniature versions of the Metal Men. The scientists activate their Four Horsemen of Apokolips, which target Black Adam. Suspicious of Black Adam, Amanda Waller destroys Osiris' reputation by maneuvering him into killing the Persuader and leaking footage of the incident to the media. Osiris retires from the public eye as a result, and acid rain ravages Kahndaq. Osiris, convinced that he is the cause of Kahndaq's new miseries, asks Captain Marvel to remove his powers, but he is confronted by Isis and Black Adam and returns to Kahndaq. Sobek tricks Osiris into turning back into Amon and devours him, revealing himself to be the Horseman Famine. The other Horsemen battle Black Adam and Isis. Isis is poisoned by Pestilence and dies while asking Adam to avenge her and Osiris' deaths. This article is about the mainstream DCU character. ... The Metal Men are fictional characters, a team of robot superheroes created by writer Robert Kanigher, pencilled by Ross Andru and inked by Mike Esposito for DC Comics in 1962. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The Science Squad are group of fictional scientist supervillains in the DC Comics Universe. ... In the DC Comics fictional shared Universe, Apokolips was the planet ruled by Darkseid, established in Jack Kirbys Fourth World series. ... Dr. Amanda Blake Waller is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC comics character. ...


Grief-stricken and enraged to the point of madness, Black Adam destroys the country of Bialya, base of the Four Horsemen, and murders the country's entire population before killing the last of the Horsemen. He attacks Oolong Island, but the scientists capture and imprison him. The Justice Society of America invade the island to arrest Adam and subdue the scientists, but Adam escapes and embarks on a week-long rampage across the globe, during which he kills several superhumans. During an enormous battle between many superhumans and Black Adam, Captain Marvel is unable to remove Adam's powers, so he instead reverts him to Teth-Adam and changes Adam's magic word from "Shazam" to an unknown phrase. Teth-Adam goes missing in the resulting explosion and wanders the Earth powerlessly as he tries to guess the new magic word. Bialya is a fictional country in DC Comics. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... This article is about the DC Comics sagas of the same name. ...


The Question and Montoya train with Richard Dragon in Nanda Parbat, where Montoya learns that the Question is dying from lung cancer and wants her to replace him. After they discover a prophecy in the Crime Bible about Batwoman's death, the two join her fight against Intergang in Gotham. When the Question's condition worsens, Montoya journeys back to Nanda Parbat in a failed attempt to save his life. Intergang discovers Batwoman's identity and attempts to sacrifice her. Montoya, as the new Question, joins Nightwing and former Intergang member Kyle Abbot in trying to save Batwoman, but they are unable to prevent Mannheim from stabbing her with a dagger. Batwoman wounds Mannheim and survives. Montoya shines the restored Bat-Signal to call Batwoman back to work. Richard Dragon is a fictional character created by Dennis ONeil and Jim Berry in the novel Dragons Fists (1974). ... Nanda Parbat is a fictional city in the DC Comics universe. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Nightwing is a name used by at least six fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... Kyle Abbot is a fictional villain in DC Comics, first appearing in Detective Comics #743. ...


Skeets is revealed to be Mister Mind, who uses Skeets' metallic body as a cocoon to metamorphose into a gigantic, monstrous form. Rip Hunter and Booster escape to the end of the Infinite Crisis, where they witness the secret creation of 52 identical parallel universes, which Mister Mind intends to consume. Daniel Carter reappears as the new Supernova and saves Hunter and Booster, restoring the Phantom Zone in the process. Mister Mind alters events in the 52 universes, creating new histories for each. Booster and Supernova trap Mister Mind in the remains of Skeets' shell and send him back in time to the beginning of the year, where he is captured by Dr. Sivana. Hunter, Booster and Supernova agree to keep the restored multiverse's existence a secret, and Will Magnus rebuilds Skeets, using a copy he had made of the robot's memories. Prominent members of the Monster Society Of Evil. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ...


World War III

Week 50 of 52 and the four-issue World War III limited series, which was released the same week, depict the superhumans' battle with Black Adam. World War III also depicts Aquaman's transformation into the Dweller of the Depths, Martian Manhunter's change in outlook, Donna Troy's assumption of the Wonder Woman mantle, Supergirl's return to the 21st century, Jason Todd pretending to be Nightwing and Cassandra Cain's joining Deathstroke. This article is about the DC Comics sagas of the same name. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ... Jason Peter Todd is a fictional character published in stories by DC Comics. ... Nightwing is a name used by at least six fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... Cassandra Cain is a fictional character in the DC Universe, and the most recent Batgirl. ... Deathstroke the Terminator (Slade Wilson), also called simply Deathstroke (and originally simply the Terminator) is a fictional character, a supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ...


52 Aftermath

A number of ongoing/miniseries, including Black Adam: The Dark Age, The All New Booster Gold, The Four Horsemen, The Crime Bible, and Infinity Inc. will be released through August/September 2007, chronicling the fallout from the year-long event.


The Science Squad

The Science Squad are a group of fictional mad scientist supervillains in the DC Comics Universe. The group was created by writer Grant Morrison who stated, "I love writing cowardly, petulant, irascible supervillains much more than I enjoy writing truly evil ones, so this whole plot strand was a joy from beginning to end." The members of the team are: Veronica Cale, Doctor Death, Doctor Sivana, I. Q. (Ira Quimbey), Will Magnus, T. O. Morrow, Komrade Krabb, Dr. Tyme, Rigoro Mortis, and are commanded by Egg Fu. They appear in the issue 46. Veronica Cale is a fictional character, an enemy of Wonder Woman in DC Comics. ... Dr. Death is a moniker that has been attached to multiple people: Jack Kevorkian, an American physician who assisted terminally ill people commit suicide during the 1990s Jayant Patel, an Indian-trained doctor who is accused of gross incompetence leading to the deaths of many patients in Queensland, Australia Steve... Doctor Thaddeus Bodog Sivana is a fictional comic book supervillain. ... This article is about the mainstream DCU character. ... Thomas Oscar Morrow is a fictional supervillain in the DC universe. ... Egg Fu is a villain who has battled Wonder Woman. ...


Secret message

In the DC Nation column printed in the back of Week 37, Dan Didio reveals in a coded message that the "secret of 52" is that the DC Multiverse still exists. The message is spelled out using the first letter of every third word: "the secret of fifty-two is that the multiverse still exists" A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ...


Rip Hunter's lab

When Booster enters Rip Hunter's bunker in Week 6, he finds it in disarray. Among the details of Hunter's lab, a giant globe is marked with red X's and the words "World War III Why? How?" A time machine sits broken. Notes scrawled everywhere indicate that there is a problem with the time stream, and as noted above, the number 52 figures prominently in these writings. Many of the writings foreshadow and refer to DC Universe events and characters, some of which are not yet introduced by the time of Booster's discovery.[3] A multitude of clocks are all stopped at 12:52 (00:52). Monitors show images of Rosa Parks, Abraham Lincoln, a sailing ship with the flag of the Knights Templar, Elvis Presley, the Boston Tea Party and a dinosaur. Rip Hunter is a DC Comics character who first appeared in Showcase #20 (May 1959), then his own series which ran for 29 issues (1961-65). ... Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African American civil rights activist and seamstress whom the U.S. Congress dubbed the Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement. Parks is famous for her refusal on December 1, 1955 to obey bus driver James Blake... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ... Elvis redirects here. ... This article is about a 1773 American protest. ...


Papers on the floor bear the titles of canceled DC series, including superhero comic Infinity, Inc., 1940s humor title Casey the Cop, and Silverblade, a 1980s maxi-series about an actor-turned-vigilante. Also on the floor is a book titled Who's Who, using the logo for the DC series of the same name, and two notes: "FIND THE SUN DEVILS" and "What is spanner's galaxy?". Sun Devils and Spanner's Galaxy are the titles of two 1980s maxi-series. Infinity Inc. ... Casey the Cop was a short humor strip created by Henry Boltinoff for DC Comics in the 1950s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is (as of 2004) the third-largest university in the United States with a student body of 57,543. ...


A set of blackboards is covered with more clues. Below is a list of the clues, with items followed by DC Comics details that relate to the phrase:

  • "TIME IS BROKEN" - 52 seconds are missing. In the final week, while witnessing the rebirth of the Multiverse, Booster Gold worries about the "broken time", after being reassured by Rip Hunter that everything is finally the way it was meant to be.
  • The number 52 in a circle litters the boards, the circles sometimes overlapping. The symbol of overlapping circles has been used in the past by DC Comics to represent alternate Earths, or alternate Earths fusing (such as in Infinite Crisis).
  • "Dead by lead?" — In the DC Universe, the Daxamite race is especially vulnerable to lead poisoning. The pre-Crisis Daxamite Mon-El is a 20th century hero whom Superman preserves for 1,000 years in the Phantom Zone when the former contracts lead poisoning. Mon-El re-appears post-Infinite Crisis in Supergirl and the Legion of Super-Heroes #23 (December 2006). Will Magnus kills Chang Tzu using the Metal Man Lead as a bullet.[4]
  • "Further time is different" — The character Father Time appears in the limited series Crisis Aftermath: The Battle for Blüdhaven and Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters (2006). Additionally, a number of events in the present day unfold differently from Booster Gold's knowledge of the past.
  • "The four horsemen will end her rain?" — Chang Tzu mentions "four horsemen", and Isis creates rainstorms to express sadness.[5] Intergang later activates its cybernetic Four Horsemen.[6] Some time later, acid rain falls on Kahndaq.[7] The Horseman Pestilence kills Isis four weeks after the acid rains start.[8]
  • "He won't smell it." — Main character Ralph Dibny's nose is reputed to be able to "smell a mystery".
  • "Find the last 'El'" — "El" is the family name of both Superman (Kal-El) and Supergirl (Kara Zor-El). After the fight in space, Supergirl was sent to the 31st century, when she joins the Legion of Super-Heroes. It is also the name pre-Crisis Superboy gives to Mon-El, another hero who joins the Legion one thousand years into his own future. In addition, for a period of time, Conner Kent (Superboy) uses the name "Kon-El" and also serves with the Legion. One Year Later, an alien being comments that, in addition to Superman and Supergirl, there is a third Kryptonian on Earth.[9]
  • "MAN OF STEEL" — This title, a nickname of Superman, was also given to John Henry Irons in promotional material for the Reign of the Superman storyline that DC published following the Death of Superman storyline. In 52, Irons' skin becomes stainless steel.
  • "Sonic disruptors --> Time Masters --> Time Servants" — In DC Comics, Rip Hunter was given the title "Time Master". The Sonic Disruptors series, was canceled by DC Comics before being completed, apparently because the creators working on the project could not complete it on time.[citation needed] Additionally, Rip Hunter offered various time-traveling supervillains the chance to redeem themselves as Time Masters and fight with him to stop Skeets' plans.[10]
  • "The reach. The reach. The reach." — In the 2006 Blue Beetle title, the New God Metron referred to the newest Blue Beetle as a 'Reach Infiltrator'.[11] It is later discovered that the Blue Beetle was meant to be the vanguard of the Reach race, alien beings reaping planets when they're advanced enough.
  • "Tornado is in pieces" — Red Tornado was shattered in the fight in space.[12]
  • "It hurts to breathe" — The Question develops and dies from lung cancer.[13]
  • Circled: "The Scarab is eternal?" — The new Blue Beetle, Jaime Reyes, is the new host of the scarab owned by the original Blue Beetle, Dan Garrett.
  • "Where is the Curry Heir?" In the "One Year Later" stories, a character named Arthur Curry, who looks exactly like Aquaman, appears. The original Aquaman has been transfigured into the Dweller in the Depths, who guides the new character.
  • "Σ Who is Supernova?" — 52 Week 37 reveals that Supernova is Booster Gold in a new identity. The persona is then taken up by Booster Gold's ancestor Daniel Carter, then later Booster's father.
  • "Σ What happened to the son of Superman?" — The question of Superman's offspring is the subject of a large number of "imaginary stories" and Elseworlds comics, including Son of Superman, a 2000 Elseworlds graphic novel, and The Kingdom limited series, which features the debut of the time/reality concept "Hypertime". Also, Richard Donner's and Geoff Johns' Action Comics run features a boy from Krypton.
  • "Σ Where is the Batman?" — A month after Infinite Crisis, Batman, Robin and Nightwing travel the world and are absent during the year in which 52 takes place.
  • "Σ Who is the Batwoman?" — Kate Kane is the new Batwoman, as seen in 52 Week 11.
  • "Σ Te versus (Au+Pb)" — As noted above, the atomic number of Tellurium (Te) is 52. The other elements mentioned are Gold (Au) and Lead (Pb). Gold and Lead are names of Metal Men, and alchemists attempted to transmute lead into gold. Additionally, "Tellurium"'s root word is "tellus" (which is Latin for "earth"). Tellus is a member of the pre-Zero Hour Legion of Super-Heroes.
  • Circled: "Σ Who is Diana Prince?" — In the "One Year Later" Wonder Woman series, Wonder Woman appears as Diana Prince, a secret agent.
  • "SECRET FIVE!" — The Secret Six, following the events of Infinite Crisis Special: Villains United, are down one member. In the Secret Six limited series, they recruit the Mad Hatter but subsequently kick him out.
  • "Σ Don't ask the Question. It lies." — The Question is one of the main characters of 52.
  • "Σ World War III? Why? HOW?" — World War III was an important event in 52, as Black Adam battled, and killed, several heroes.[1].
  • "IMMORTAL SAVAGE" — Vandal Savage spends the year depicted in 52 in space, and when he returns, he has lost his immortality.
  • "Σ Someone is monitoring. They see us. They see me." — The Monitor returns in DCU: Brave New World.
  • "KHIMAERA LIVES AGAIN" — In the initial "One Year Later" storyline in Hawkgirl, Khimaera appears as a new antagonist.
  • "Σ The old Gods are DEAD, the new Gods want what's left." — The "New Gods" refers to the protagonists of Jack Kirby's "Fourth World" comic book stories whose worlds were created from the remains of two of the Old Gods.
  • "2,000 years from now". - It was revealed in 52 Volume 1 that this comment was a reference to a plot line that was later changed by the writers and never followed up on.
  • "When am I?". - When Skeets is searching for Rip Hunter he asks Waverider "when is Rip Hunter?".
  • "I'm not Kryptonite."-Kryptonite is a weakness of Superman. But in 52, The Cult of Conner, a religious sect dedicated to resurrecting Superboy, employed "Blood Kryptonite" in a preliminary ritual to resurrect Sue Dibny. While physically resembling Green Kryptonite, the "Blood" variant drains a portion of life force from present attendees, intended to direct this energy towards an effigy of the deceased as part of a Kryptonian resurrection ceremony. It is later revealed that this was a manipulation of Felix Faust and the rock was either regular green Kryptonite or not Kryptonite at all.
  • "I'm supposed to be dead?"- In the History of the DC Universe backup feature, when Donna and the artificial intelligence in charge of Harbinger's historical records finished her task of reviewing the DC Universe's history, both the artificial intelligence and one of the new Monitors revealed to her that the current timeline has diverged from its rightful path, in which Donna herself, instead of Jade, should have sacrificed herself for Kyle Rayner.
  • "The Lazarus Pit RISES." - Refers to the Lazarus Pits, which are used by Ra's Al Ghul to lengthen his life span.

Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Daxam is a fictional planet within the DC Universe. ... Lar Gand, known variously as Mon-El, Valor and MOnel, is a fictional character in DC Comics universe who is affiliated with the Legion of Super-Heroes, Superboy, and Superman. ... The Metal Men are fictional characters, a team of robot superheroes created by writer Robert Kanigher, pencilled by Ross Andru and inked by Mike Esposito for DC Comics in 1962. ... Father Time is a morally ambiguous figure in the post-Infinite Crisis DC Universe. ... Blüdhaven is a fictional city in the DC Universe. ... Freedom Fighters is the name of a minor DC Comics comic book superhero team made up of characters acquired from the defunct company, Quality Comics, and the short-lived comic book series of the same name featuring those characters. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional character, a comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... The Death of Superman is a comic book storyline (culminating in Superman #75 in 1993) that served as the catalyst for DC Comics crossover event of 1993. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... Red Tornado is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... Jaime Reyes is a fictional comic book superhero from DC Comics, a Hispanic teenager who became the third person to take up the identity of the superhero Blue Beetle. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Booster Gold is a fictional character, a superhero in publications from DC Comics. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... The Kingdom is a two-issue comic book limited series and crossover event published by DC Comics in 1999, written by Mark Waid and drawn by Ariel Olivetti/Mike Zeck. ... Hypertime is a fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories and a variation or superset of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Richard Donner (born Richard Donald Schwartzberg on April 24, 1930) is an American film director and also producer through the production company, The Donners Company, he and his wife, producer Lauren Shuler-Donner, own. ... Geoff Johns (born 25 January 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American comic book writer, best known for his work for DC Comics. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... General Name, Symbol, Number tellurium, Te, 52 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 16, 5, p Appearance silvery lustrous gray Standard atomic weight 127. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the metal. ... The Metal Men are fictional characters, a team of robot superheroes created by writer Robert Kanigher, pencilled by Ross Andru and inked by Mike Esposito for DC Comics in 1962. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... Tellus is a fictional character, a super-hero and a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes featured in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. ... The Secret Six is the name of three distinct, fictional comic book teams in the DC Comics universe, plus an alternate universes fourth team. ... The Mad Hatter is a fictional character in the Batman comics, published by DC Comics. ... Vandal Savage is a fictional character and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... The Monitor was a character created by comic book writer Marv Wolfman and comics artist George Pérez as one of the main characters of DC Comics Crisis on Infinite Earths limited series. ... One Year Later event logo. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... The New Gods are a fictional race published by DC Comics, as well as the title for four series of comics about those characters. ... The New Gods #1 (February-March 1971) featuring Orion. ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al Ghūl (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ...

Spin-offs

There have been a number of spin-offs and tie-ins. A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... A tie-in is an authorized product that is based on an existing or upcoming media property, such as a movie or video/DVD, computer game, video game, television program/television series, board game, web site, role-playing game or literary property. ...


Action figures

In September 2006, DC Direct premiered a line of action figures based on 52. The first wave, featuring figures based on Batwoman, Isis, Booster Gold, Animal Man and Supernova, was released in May 2007.[14] DC Direct[1] is the exclusive collectibles division of DC Comics, the Time Warner subsidiary that publishes comic books and licenses characters such as Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Flash, Batman, Batgirl and Hawkgirl. ... Zarbon action figure from Dragon Ball Z made by Bandai An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, comic book, video game, or television program. ...


Novelization

Ace Books, under the imprint of The Berkley Publishing Group and published by The Penguin Group, released a novelization written by Greg Cox with cover art done by JG Jones and Alex Sinclair and its design by George Brewer. Ace Books is the oldest continuing publisher of science fiction & fantasy novels, founded in 1953 by magazine publisher A. A. Wyn. ... A novelization (or novelisation in British English) is a work of fiction that is written based on some other media story form rather than as an original work. ... Greg Cox is the New York Times bestselling author of numerous Star Trek novels, including The Eugenics Wars, (Volume One and Two), The Q Continuum, Assignment: Eternity, and The Black Shore. ...


The novel primarily adapts the weekly limited series and the World War III tie-in mini series. The novel deals with the plotlines of Montoya, the Question, Black Adam, Booster Gold, Skeets and the 52 Earths, and ignores the Luthor/Steel/Everyman Project, Ralph Dibny and space plotlines completely; in his introduction, Cox explains that it was not possible to adapt all the plotlines of 52 within a novel of reasonable length. There are also minor differences such as Mister Mind revealing himself within Skeets to the mass gathering of heroes following the battle with Black Adam, rather than revealing himself several weeks later to Rip Hunter and Booster Gold.


Collections

The lead stories of series are collected, with commentary from the creators and other extras, into four trade paperbacks: In comics, a trade paperback (TPB or simply trade) specifically refers to a collection of stories originally published in comic books reprinted in book format, usually capturing one story arc from a single title or a series of stories with a connected story arc or common theme from one or...

  • Volume 1 (collects #1-13, 304 pages, May 2007, ISBN 1401213537)[15]
  • Volume 2 (collects #14-26, 304 pages, July 2007, ISBN 1401213642)[16]
  • Volume 3 (collects #27-39, 304 pages, September 2007, ISBN 1401214436)[17]
  • Volume 4 (collects #40-52, 304 pages, November 2007, ISBN 140121486X)[18]

Other connected collections include:

  • 52: The Companion (224 pages, October 2007, ISBN 1401215572)[19]

See also

The Lost Year is a name given to a period of time in the fictional DC Universe. ... The DC Universe Timeline is a timeline of the major events in the fictional DC Universe. ... Countdown is a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 9, 2007, directly following the conclusion of the last issue of 52. ...

References

  1. ^ DC Comics Solicitations for Product Shipping May, 2006, Comic Book Resources, February 13, 2006
  2. ^ 5.2 (or so) About 52: Week 30, Newsarama, December 1, 2006
  3. ^ 52 About 52 With Stephen Wacker, Newsarama
  4. ^ 52: Week 49
  5. ^ 52: Week 25
  6. ^ 52: Week 38
  7. ^ 52: Week 40
  8. ^ 52: Week 44
  9. ^ Action Comics #843
  10. ^ 52: Week 27
  11. ^ Blue Beetle #11
  12. ^ 52: Week 5
  13. ^ 52: Week 38
  14. ^ http://www.wizarduniverse.com/magazine/toyfare/001649824.cfm
  15. ^ Volume 1 profile at DC
  16. ^ Volume 2 profile at DC
  17. ^ Volume 3 profile at DC
  18. ^ Volume 4 profile at DC
  19. ^ 52: The Companion profile at DC

Comic Book Resources logo Comic Book Resources is a website dedicated to the coverage of comic book-related news and discussion. ... Newsarama. ... Newsarama. ...

External links

DC Comics Crisis Anthology
Crisis on Infinite Earths - Zero Hour - Identity Crisis - Infinite Crisis - Final Crisis
Infinite Crisis Build-up:
Countdown to Infinite Crisis - The OMAC Project - Rann-Thanagar War - Day of Vengeance - Villains United
Infinite Crisis Aftermath:
Characters - Continuity changes - 52 - One Year Later - World War III
Final Crisis Build-up:
Countdown to Final Crisis (and spin-offs) - Death of the New Gods - Salvation Run
See also:
Crisis (DC Comics) - History of the DC Universe

 
 

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