FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > 4th United States Congress
Contents

Dates of Sessions

1795-1797

Major Political Events

Officers

Senate

House of Representatives

Members of the Fourth United States Congress

Senate

Connecticut

Delaware

Georgia

Kentucky

  • John Brown (Republican)
  • Humphrey Marshall (Federalist)

Maryland

Massachusetts

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

North Carolina

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

Tennessee

Vermont

  • Elijah Paine (Federalist)
  • Moses Robinson (Republican) and then Isaac Tichenor (Federalist)

Virginia

House of Representatives

Connecticut

Delaware

Georgia

  • Abraham Baldwin (Republican), At-Large
  • John Milledge (Republican), At-Large

Kentucky

Maryland

  • George Dent (Federalist), 1st District
  • Gabriel Duvall (Republican) and then Richard Sprigg, Jr. (Republican), 2nd District
  • Jeremiah Crabb (Federalist) and then William Craik (Federalist), 3rd District
  • Thomas Sprigg (Republican), 4th District
  • Gabriel Christie (Republican), 5th District
  • Samuel Smith (Republican), 5th District
  • William Hindman (Federalist), 6th District
  • William Vans Murray (Federalist), 7th District

Massachusetts

  • Henry Dearborn (Republican), 1st District
  • Peleg Wadsworth (Federalist), 2nd District
  • Dwight Foster (Federalist), 3rd District
  • Theodore Sedgwick (Federalist) and then Thomson J. Skinner (Republican), 3rd District
  • George Thatcher (Federalist), 3rd District
  • Samuel Lyman (Federalist), 4th District
  • William Lyman (Republican), 4th District
  • Nathaniel Freeman, Jr. (Federalist), 5th District
  • Fisher Ames (Federalist), 6th District
  • John Reed (Federalist), 6th District
  • George Leonard (Federalist), 7th District
  • Joseph B. Varnum (Republican), 9th District
  • Theophilus Bradbury (Federalist), 10th District
  • Benjamin Goodhue (Federalist) and then Samuel Sewall (Federalist), 11th District

New Hampshire

  • Abiel Foster (Federalist), At-Large
  • Nicholas Gilman (Republican), At-Large
  • John S. Sherburne (Republican), At-Large
  • Jeremiah Smith (Fedearlist), At-Large

New Jersey

  • Jonathan Dayton (Federalist), At-Large
  • Thomas Henderson (Federalist), At-Large
  • Aaron Kitchell (Republican), At-Large
  • Isaac Smith (Federalist), At-Large
  • Mark Thomson (Federalist), At-Large

New York

  • Edward Livingston (Republican), 1st District
  • Jonathan N. Havens (Republican), 2nd District
  • Philip Van Cortlandt (Republican), 3rd District
  • John Hathorn (Republican), 4th District
  • Theodorus Bailey (Republican), 5th District
  • Ezekiel Gilbert (Federalist), 6th District
  • John E. Van Alen (Federalist), 7th District
  • Henry Glen (Federalist), 8th District
  • John Williams (Federalist), 9th District
  • William Cooper (Federalist), 10th District

North Carolina

Pennsylvania

  • John Swanwick (Republican), 1st District
  • Richard Thomas (Federalist), 3rd District
  • Andrew Gregg (Republican), 4th District
  • Frederick A. C. Muhlenberg (Republican), 4th District
  • Samuel Sitgreaves (Federalist), 4th District
  • John Richards (Republican), 4th District
  • Daniel Hiester (Republican) and then George Ege (Federalist), 5th District
  • John W. Kittera (Federalist), 7th District
  • Thomas Hartley (Federalist), 8th District
  • David Bard (Republican), 10th District
  • Samuel Maclay (Republican), 10th District
  • William Findley (Republican), 11th District
  • Albert Gallatin (Republican), 11th District

Rhode Island

South Carolina

  • William L. Smith (Federalist), 1st District
  • Robert G. Harper (Federalist), 1st District
  • Lemuel Benton (Republican), 3rd District
  • Richard Winn (Republican), 4th District
  • Wade Hampton (Republican), 4th District
  • Samuel Earle (Republican), 6th District

Tennessee

Vermont

  • Israel Smith (Republican), 1st District
  • Daniel Buck (Federalist), 2nd District

Virginia

  • Robert Rutherford (Republican), 1st District
  • Andrew Moore (Republican), 2nd District
  • George Jackson (Republican), 3rd District
  • George Hancock, 5th District
  • Francis Preston (Republican), 5th District
  • Isaac Coles (Republican), 6th District
  • Abraham B. Venable (Republican), 7th District
  • Thomas Claiborne (Republican), 8th District
  • William B. Giles (Republican), 9th District
  • Josiah Parker (Federalist), 11th District
  • Anthony New (Republican), 12th District
  • John Page (Republican), 12th District
  • Carter B. Harrison (Republican), 13th District
  • John Heath (Republican), 13th District
  • John Clopton (Republican), 13th District
  • Samuel J. Cabell (Republican), 14th District
  • James Madison (Republican), 15th District
  • John Nicholas (Republican), 15th District
  • Richard Brent (Republican), 18th District

External links

  • Acts of the 4th Congress (http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=llsl&fileName=001/llsl001.db&recNum=30)


Previous:

3rd Congress

United States Congress
1795–1797
Next:

5th Congress



 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m