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Encyclopedia > 480 BC
Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC
Decades: 510s BC  500s BC  490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC  460s BC  450s BC 
Years: 483 BC 482 BC 481 BC - 480 BC - 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC
480 BC by topic
Politics
State leaders - Sovereign states
Birth and death categories
Births - Deaths
Establishments and disestablishments categories
Establishments - Disestablishments
v  d  e
The Persian invasion of Greece in 480-479 BC
The Persian invasion of Greece in 480-479 BC
480 BC in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 480 BC
Ab urbe condita 274
Armenian calendar N/A
Bahá'í calendar -2323 – -2322
Buddhist calendar 65
Chinese calendar 2157/2217
([[Sexagenary cycle|]]年)
— to —
2158/2218
([[Sexagenary cycle|]]年)
Coptic calendar -763 – -762
Ethiopian calendar -487 – -486
Hebrew calendar 3281 – 3282
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat -424 – -423
 - Shaka Samvat N/A
 - Kali Yuga 2622 – 2623
Holocene calendar 9521
Iranian calendar 1101 BP – 1100 BP
Islamic calendar 1135 BH – 1134 BH
Japanese calendar
 - Imperial Year Kōki 181
(皇紀181年)
 - Jōmon Era 9521
Julian calendar -434
Korean calendar 1854
Thai solar calendar 64
v  d  e

These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 6th century BC started on January 1, 600 BC and ended on December 31, 501 BC. // Monument 1, an Olmec colossal head at La Venta The 5th and 6th centuries BC were a time of empires, but more importantly, a time... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 5th century BC started on January 1, 500 BC and ended on December 31, 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... The 4th century BC started the first day of 400 BC and ended the last day of 301 BC. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC Events and Trends Establishment of the Roman Republic March 12, 515 BC - Construction is completed on the... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and trends September 13, 509 BC - The temple of Jupiter on Romes Capitoline Hill is... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 499 BC 498 BC 497 BC 496 BC 495 BC 494 BC 493 BC 492 BC 491... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC 489 BC 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC 484 BC 483 BC 482 BC 481... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC - 420s BC 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC 476 BC 475 BC 474 BC 473 BC 472 BC 471... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC - 420s BC - 410s BC 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC 466 BC 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC 461... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 459 BC 458 BC 457 BC 456 BC 455 BC 454 BC 453 BC 452 BC 451... This page indexes the individual years pages. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC 484 BC - 483 BC - 482 BC 481 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC 484 BC 483 BC _ 482 BC _ 481 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 486 BC 485 BC 484 BC 483 BC 482 BC _ 481 BC _ 480 BC... 479 pr. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC Years: 483 BC 482 BC 481 BC 480 BC 479 BC - 478 BC - 477 BC 476 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC Years: 482 BC 481 BC 480 BC 479 BC 478 BC - 477 BC - 476 BC 475 BC... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (538x750, 40 KB) Map of the Persian invasion of Greece (480 BC-479 BC). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (538x750, 40 KB) Map of the Persian invasion of Greece (480 BC-479 BC). ... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... Ab urbe condita (related with Anno urbis conditae: AUC or a. ... Dates are marked by the letters ԹՎ or the like, often with a line over, indicating tvin (in the year) followed by one to four letters, each of which stands for a number based on its order in the alphabet. ... The Baháí calendar, also called the Badí‘ calendar, used by the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years of 365 days, and leap years of 366 days. ... The Buddhist calendar is used on mainland southeast Asia in the countries of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar (formerly Burma) in several related forms. ... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar, akin to the Hebrew calendar & Hindu Calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ... The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian calendar, is used by the Coptic Orthodox Church. ... The Ethiopian calendar (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ዘመን አቆጣጠር yeĪtyōṗṗyā zemen āḳoṭaṭer) or Ethiopic calendar is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia, as well as in Eritrea before it became independent. ... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... There is disagreement as to the meaning of the Indian word Samvat. ... The Indian national calendar (sometimes called Saka calendar) is the official civil calendar in use in India. ... Kali Yuga is also the title of a book by Roland Charles Wagner. ... The Holocene calendar, Human Era count or Jōmon Era count (Japan) uses a dating system similar to astronomical year numbering but adds 10,000, placing a year 0 at the start of the Jōmon Era (JE), the Human Era (HE, the beginning of human civilization) and the aproximate... The Iranian calendar (Persian: ‎) also known as Persian calendar or the Jalāli Calendar is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: گاه‌شماری هجري قمری ‎ Gāhshomāri-ye hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to... Koinobori, flags decorated like koi, are popular decorations around Childrens Day This mural on the wall of a Tokyo subway station celebrates Hazuki, the eighth month. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Japanese era name. ... Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... The traditional Korean calendar is directly derived from the Asian calendar. ... The Thai solar, or Suriyakati (สุริยคติ), calendar is used in traditional and official contexts in Thailand, although the Western calendar is sometimes used in business. ...

Events

By place

Greece

Xerxes I (خشایارشاه), was a Persian king (reigned 485 - 465 BC) of the Achaemenid dynasty. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... A recent view of the ceremonial court of the thermae–gymnasium complex in Sardis, dated to 211—212 AD Sardis, also Sardes (Lydian: Sfard, Greek: Σάρδεις, Persian: Sparda), modern Sart in the Manisa province of Turkey, was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, the seat of a proconsul under... Thraciae veteris typvs. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Greek city-states Achaemenid Persia Commanders Leonidas † Xerxes the Great Strength 300 Spartans 700 Thespians[1] 6,000 other Greek allies1 Estimates vary (See below) Casualties 298 Spartans 700 Thespians[1] 1,400 Greek allies 20,000 (Herodotus)[2] 1 Out of the initial 7,000-strong Greek army... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Sparta (Doric: Spártā, Attic: SpártÄ“) is a city in southern Greece. ... Thespiae (Greek Θεσπιαι, Thespiai) was an ancient Greek city in Boeotia. ... Look up Spartan, spartan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Leonidas (Greek: - Lions son, Lion-like) was a king of Sparta, the 17th of the Agiad line, one of the sons of King Anaxandridas II of Sparta, who was believed to be a descendant of Heracles. ... For the famous battle, see Battle of Thermopylae. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Sparta was an important Greek city-state in the Peloponnesus. ... Cleombrotus I was a Spartan king from 380 BC until 371 BC. Cleombrotus lead the Spartan army in the Battle of Leuctra. ... Pausanias (Greek = Παυσανίας) was a Spartan general of the 5th century BCE. He was the nephew of Leonidas I and served as regent after his uncles death, as Leonidas son, Pleistarchus was still under-age. ... Pleistarchus (d. ... Leonidas (Greek: - Lions son, Lion-like) was a king of Sparta, the 17th of the Agiad line, one of the sons of King Anaxandridas II of Sparta, who was believed to be a descendant of Heracles. ... For the famous battle, see Battle of Thermopylae. ... Phocis (Greek, Modern: Φωκίδα, Ancient/Katharevousa: -s, also Phokida, Phokis) is an ancient district of central Greece. ... Euboea or Negropont (Modern Greek: Εύβοια Evia, Ancient Greek Εúβοια Eúboia; see also List of traditional Greek place names), is the largest island of the Greek archipelago. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Thebes (in Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva, Katharevousa: — ThÄ“bai or Thíve) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... Alexander I was ruler of Macedon from 495 BC to 450 BC. He was the son of Amyntas I of Macedon. ... Xerxes I (خشایارشاه), was a Persian king (reigned 485 - 465 BC) of the Achaemenid dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pydna is also an rocket station of the American Army in Germany, see Pydna (rocket station) Pydna (in Greek: Πύδνα, older transliteration: Púdna), also Pidna was a Greek city in Ancient Macedonia, the most important in Pieria. ... The Struma (Bulgarian: Струма, Greek: Strimonis, Turkish: Karasu (meaning black water in Turkish)) is a river in Bulgaria and Greece. ... Crestonia (Crestonice) was an ancient region immediately north of Mygdonia. ... Bisaltia (Bisaltica) was an ancient region extending from the river Strymon and Lake Cercinitis on the east to Crestonia on the west. ... Athens (ancient Greek: αἱ Ἀθῆναι (plural), evolving into the modern αι Αθήναι in Greek until recently, and η Αθήνα nowadays (IPA : singular see below: Origin of the name ) is both the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... This article is about a military rank. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... Aristides (530 BC–468 BC) was an Athenian statesman, nicknamed the Just. He was the son of Lysimachus, and a member of a family of moderate fortune. ... Athens (ancient Greek: αἱ Ἀθῆναι (plural), evolving into the modern αι Αθήναι in Greek until recently, and η Αθήνα nowadays (IPA : singular see below: Origin of the name ) is both the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... Look up Archon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Xanthippus was a Greek (possibly Spartan) mercenary general hired by the Carthaginians to aid in their war against the Romans during the First Punic War. ... Coordinates 37°45′ N 23°26′ E Country Greece Periphery Attica Prefecture Piraeus Population 13,552 source (2001) Area 87. ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Combatants Greek city-states Persia Commanders Eurybiades of Sparta Themistocles of Athens Adeimantus of Corinth Unknown Strength 333 ships 500 ships Casualties Half of Fleet (Herodotus) Unknown The naval Battle of Artemisium took place, according to tradition, on the same day as the Battle of Thermopylae on August 11, 480... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Artemisium is a cape north of Euboea, Greece. ... Euboea or Negropont (Modern Greek: Εύβοια Evia, Ancient Greek Εúβοια Eúboia; see also List of traditional Greek place names), is the largest island of the Greek archipelago. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... For the famous battle, see Battle of Thermopylae. ... For the famous battle, see Battle of Thermopylae. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Athens (ancient Greek: αἱ Ἀθῆναι (plural), evolving into the modern αι Αθήναι in Greek until recently, and η Αθήνα nowadays (IPA : singular see below: Origin of the name ) is both the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... The Greek island of Salamis (Greek, Modern: Σαλαμίνα Salamina, Ancient/Katharevousa: Σαλαμίς Salamis) is the largest island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile (2 km) off-coast from Piraeus. ... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Greek city-states Persia, Halicarnassus Commanders Eurybiades of Sparta Themistocles of Athens Adeimantus of Corinth Aristides of Athens Xerxes I of Persia, Ariamenes †, Artemisia Strength 366-380 ships a 1,000-1,207 ships [1]b Casualties 40 ships 500 ships a Herodotus gives 378 of the alliance, but... Athens (ancient Greek: αἱ Ἀθῆναι (plural), evolving into the modern αι Αθήναι in Greek until recently, and η Αθήνα nowadays (IPA : singular see below: Origin of the name ) is both the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Athens (ancient Greek: αἱ Ἀθῆναι (plural), evolving into the modern αι Αθήναι in Greek until recently, and η Αθήνα nowadays (IPA : singular see below: Origin of the name ) is both the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... The Greek island of Salamis (Greek, Modern: Σαλαμίνα Salamina, Ancient/Katharevousa: Σαλαμίς Salamis) is the largest island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile (2 km) off-coast from Piraeus. ... A Greek trireme. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Italian Full rigged ship Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large watercraft capable of offshore navigation. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Italian Full rigged ship Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large watercraft capable of offshore navigation. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... The Greek island of Salamis (Greek, Modern: Σαλαμίνα Salamina, Ancient/Katharevousa: Σαλαμίς Salamis) is the largest island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile (2 km) off-coast from Piraeus. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Mardonius was a Persian commander during the Persian Wars with Greece in the 5th century BC. He was the son of Gobryas and the son-in-law of Darius I of Persia, whose daughter Artozostra he had married. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ...

Roman republic

Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus Roman provinces on the eve of the assassination of Julius Caesar, c. ... Veii - or Veius - was in ancient times, an important Etrurian city 18 km NNW of Rome, Italy. ...

Sicily

  • Xerxes encourages the Carthaginians to attack the Greeks in Sicily. Under the Carthaginian military leader, Hamilcar, Carthage sends across a large army.
  • The Greek city of Himera in Sicily, in its quarrel with Acragas, enlists Carthaginian support. With the help of Gelon, the tyrant of Syracuse, and Theron of Acragas, the Carthaginians are defeated at the Battle of Himera. After the defeat, Hamilcar kills himself.

Hamilcar was a traditional name among the ruling families of Carthage. ... Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in North Africa located in modern day Tunis and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... Himera is located on the northern coast of Sicily. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Map of central Mediterranean Sea, showing location of Agrigentum (modern Agrigento). ... Gelo (d. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Syracuse (Italian Siracusa, Sicilian Sarausa, Greek , Latin Syracusae) is an Italian city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse. ... The Battle of Himera (480 BC), supposedly fought on the same day as the more famous Battle of Salamis (according to Herodotus 7. ...

By topic

Arts

Archaic is a generic adjective that can refer to several things from the past. ... A sculpture is a three-dimensional object, which for the purposes of this article is man-made and selected for special recognition as art. ... Transitional were a post punk band with riot grrl and new wave influences. ...

Births

A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC - 400s BC - 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC Years: 411 BC 410 BC 409 BC 408 BC 407 BC - 406 BC - 405 BC 404 BC... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about Attica in Greece. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC - 410s BC - 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 416 BC 415 BC 414 BC 413 BC 412 BC - 411 BC - 410 BC 409 BC 408... Philolaus (circa 480 BC – circa 405 BC) was a Greek mathematician and philosopher. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC - 400s BC - 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC Years: 410 BC 409 BC 408 BC 407 BC 406 BC - 405 BC - 404 BC 403 BC...

Deaths


  Results from FactBites:
 
Protagoras: 480-411 BC (352 words)
480-411 BC Protagoras was born at Abdera around 480 BC (The exact date is unknown).
In 415 BC Protagoras was forced to flee from Athens because of his teachings.
A few years later, in about 411 BC, he was on a voyage to Sicily where he drowned.
Room XIX (261 words)
Attic kylix with red figures by Duris, 490-480 BC, cat.
Attic kylix with red figures by Duris, 480 BC, cat.
Kylix attica a figure rosse della maniera di Douris, circa 480 BC, cat.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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