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Encyclopedia > 2nd United States Congress

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The Second United States Congress was a meeting of the United States national legislature, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met at Congress Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from March 4, 1791 to March 3, 1793, during the last two years of the first administration of U.S. President George Washington. Image File history File links Exterior_view_of_Independence_Hall_(circa_1770s). ... Image File history File links Exterior_view_of_Independence_Hall_(circa_1770s). ... Exterior view of Independence Hall (circa 1770s). ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Exterior view of Independence Hall (circa 1770s). ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1969 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ...


The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the provisions of the United States Constitution. Both chambers had a Pro-Administration majority. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the...


Dates of sessions

March 4, 1791March 3, 1793 March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Previous congress: 1st Congress
Next congress: 3rd Congress March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A lame duck is an elected official who is no longer responsive to the electorate as a result of (a) a term limit which keeps him from running for that office again, (b) losing an election, or (c) the elimination of the officials office, but who continues to hold office... (Redirected from 1st United States Congress) Dates of Sessions 1789-1791 The first session of this Congress took place in New York City from March 4, 1789 to September 29, 1789. ... Dates of Sessions 1793-1795 The first session of this Congress took place in Philadelphia from December 2, 1793 to June 9, 1794. ...


Major events

Main article: Events of 1791; Events of 1792; Events of 1793

1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image of the United States Bill of Rights from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... North façade of the White House, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue. ... The French Revolution (1789–1799) was a pivotal period in the history of French, European and Western civilization. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain, Austria, Prussia, Spain, Russia, Sardinia France The French Revolutionary Wars occurred between the outbreak of war between the French Revolutionary government and Austria in 1792 and the Treaty of Amiens in 1802. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The name First Coalition (1793–1797) designates the first major concerted effort of multiple European powers to contain Revolutionary France. ... The Russo-Turkish War of 1787-1792 was a futile attempt by the Ottoman Empire to regain lands lost to Russia in the course of the Russo-Turkish War, 1768-1774. ...

Major legislation

Main article: List of United States federal legislation in the 2nd Congress

This is a partial list of notable United States federal legislation, in chronological order. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) None[1] Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Post Office Department was the former name of the United States Postal Service when it was a Cabinet department. ... The Postal Service Act was a piece of United States federal legislation that established the United States Post Office Department. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Coinage Act, passed by the U.S. Congress on April 2, 1792, established the U.S. Mint and regulated coinage of the United States. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English (de facto) Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The 1793 Fugitive Slave Law was written in response to a conflict between Pennsylvania and Virginia. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Judiciary Act of 1793 (1 Stat. ... The Anti-Injunction Act, 28 U.S.C. § 2283, prohibits any United States federal court from issuing an injunction against proceedings in any U.S. State court, except within three specifically defined exceptions. ...

Party summary

There were no political parties in this Congress. However, the members were informally grouped into factions of similar interest, as shown.


Senate

  • Anti-Administration: 13
  • Pro-Administration: 16 (majority)
  • vacant: 1

TOTAL members: 30 Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the...


House of Representatives

  • Anti-Administration: 30
  • Pro-Administration: 39 (majority)

TOTAL members: 69 Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the...


Leadership

President of the SenateVice PresidentJohn Adams
President of the Senate
Vice President
John Adams

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (610x768, 253 KB) http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (610x768, 253 KB) http://www. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was a Founding Father of the United States and American politician who served as the first Vice President of the United States (1789–1797), and the second President of the United States (1797–1801). ...

Senate

Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Minor parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal • • The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was a Founding Father of the United States and American politician who served as the first Vice President of the United States (1789–1797), and the second President of the United States (1797–1801). ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Richard Henry Lee Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... John Langdon John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was an American politician and one of the first two U.S. Senators from New Hampshire. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

House of Representatives

Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal • • The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the lower... Jonathan Trumbull Jr. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Members

This list is arranged by chamber, then by state. Senators are listed in order of seniority, and Representatives are listed by district.

See also: 2nd United States Congress - Political Parties
See also: 2nd United States Congress - State Delegations
See also: United States House election, 1790

Independence Hall // The Second United States Congress was a meeting of the United States national legislature, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ... Independence Hall // The Second United States Congress was a meeting of the United States national legislature, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ... The U.S. House election, 1790 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1790. ...

Senate

At this time, Senators were elected by the state legislatures every two years, with one-third beginning new six year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election. In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 1796; Class 2 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 1792; and Class 3 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 1794. The three classes of US Senators, each currently including 33 or 34 Senators (since Hawaii became the 50th state in 1959, and until another state is admitted), are a means used by the United States Senate for describing the schedules of Senate seats elections, and of the expiration of the...

President pro temporeRichard Henry Lee
President pro tempore
Richard Henry Lee
President pro temporeJohn Langdon
President pro tempore
John Langdon
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Kentucky
Maryland
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Pennsylvania
  • 3. Robert Morris (Pro-Adm.)
  • 1. vacant …contested election, remained vacant
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Vermont
Virginia

Richard Henry Lee From http://teachpol. ... Richard Henry Lee From http://teachpol. ... Richard Henry Lee Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... John Langdon John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was an American politician and one of the first two U.S. Senators from New Hampshire. ... Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 – November 26, 1807), an American lawyer and politician, was a revolutionary against British rule, a drafter of the United States Constitution, and third Chief Justice of the United States. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... William Samuel Johnson (October 7, 1727 - November 14, 1819) was a statesman and one of United States Founding Fathers. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Roger Sherman Roger Sherman (April 19 (O.S.), April 30 (N.S.), 1721 – July 23, 1793), was the only person to have signed all four basic documents of American sovereignty: the Continental Association of 1774, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Richard Bassett (April 2, 1745 – August 15, 1815) was an American lawyer and politician from Dover, in Kent County, Delaware. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... George Read, Sr. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... William Few (June 8, 1748—July 16, 1828) was an American politician and a Founding Father of the United States. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... James Gunn (March 13, 1753 - July 30, 1801) was a delegate to the Continental Congress and United States Senate for Georgia. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... John Edwards (1748–1837) was an American planter and statesman who player a key role in securing Kentucky statehood, and represented the new state in the United States Senate. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For other people with the same name, see John Brown. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... John Henry (November 1750–December 16, 1798) was a Governor of Maryland and member of the United States Senate. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Charles Carroll Charles Carroll of Carrollton (September 19, 1737–November 14, 1832) was a lawyer and politician from Maryland who was a delegate to the Continental Congress and later a United States Senator. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Richard Potts Richard Potts (July 19, 1753–November 26, 1808) was appointed to the United States Senate seat left open by the resignation of Maryland senator Charles Carroll of Carrollton, serving from January 10, 1793, until his resignation on October 24, 1796. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Caleb Strong (January 9, 1745 - November 7, 1819) was a U.S. political figure. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... George Cabot (December 3, 1752-April 18, 1823), a Delegate and a Senator from Massachusetts, and the Presiding Officer of the Hartford Convention, was born in Salem, Massachusetts. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... John Langdon John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was an American politician and one of the first two U.S. Senators from New Hampshire. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Paine Wingate (14 May 1739 - 7 March 1838) was an American politician. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Philemon Dickinson (April 5, 1739–February 4, 1809) was an American politician. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... John Rutherfurd (September 20, 1760 February 23, 1840) was an American politician and land surveyor. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Rufus King (March 24, 1755–April 29, 1827) was an American lawyer, politician, and statesman. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Aaron Burr, Jr. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Sen. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... This article is about Samuel Johnston, North Carolina governor. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Robert Morris Robert Morris, Jr. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Theodore Foster (29 April 1752 - 13 January 1828) was an American politician. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Joseph Stanton, Jr. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... This is an article about the Founding Father. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Ralph Izard Ralph Izard (January 23, 1741 or 1742–May 30, 1804) was a U.S. politician. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Moses Robinson (March 22, 1741 May 26, 1813) was an important political figure in Vermont. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Stephen Row Bradley (February 20, 1754 December 9, 1830) was an American politician. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Richard Henry Lee Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... John Taylor (December 19, 1753-August 21, 1824) of Caroline County, Virginia was a politician and writer. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... October 18 is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... James Monroe (1758-1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the...

House of Representatives

The names of members of the House of Representatives known to have been elected statewide at-large, are preceded by an "A/L," and the names of those known to have been elected from single member districts, are preceded by their district numbers. A district number with an "A/L" indicates more than one member may be elected from that district. The methodology used for the election of the others is undetermined.


Many of the congressional district numbers are linked to articles describing the district itself. Since the boundaries of the districts have changed often and substantially, the linked article may only describe the district as it exists today, and not as it was at the time of this Congress.

Speaker of the HouseJonathan Trumbull, Jr.
Speaker of the House
Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Kentucky
Maryland
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Vermont
Virginia

http://bioguide. ... http://bioguide. ... Jonathan Trumbull Jr. ... Connecticuts 1st congressional district is currently represented by Democrat John Larson, who has represented the district since 1999. ... James Hillhouse (October 20, 1754 - December 29, 1832), of New Haven, Connecticut, was a real estate developer responsible for much of the current look of New Haven, a politician, and a treasurer of Yale University. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Map Connecticut District 2 has been represented in the United States House of Representatives by Rob Simmons since 2001. ... Amasa Learned (November 15, 1750–May 4, 1825) was an American preacher, lawyer, and politician from New London, Connecticut. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Map Rosa DeLauro, a Democrat, represents Connecticuts Third District. ... Jonathan Sturges (August 23, 1740– October 4, 1819) was an American lawyer and jurist from Fairfield, Connecticut. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Jonathan Trumbull Jr. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... The Fifth Congressional District of Connecticut is represented in Congress by Nancy Johnson. ... Jeremiah Wadsworth (1743 - 1804) was a U.S. political figure and leader during the American Revolution. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Map of the Delaware Congressional District The Delaware at-large district of the United States House of Representatives is a Congressional district that includes the entire state of Delaware. ... John Middleton Jack Vining (December 23, 1758 – February 1802) was an American lawyer and politician from Dover, in Kent County, Delaware. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Map Represented by Jack Kingston. ... Abraham Baldwin Abraham Baldwin (November 23, 1754—March 4, 1807) was an American politician, Patriot, and Founding Father from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Map Represented by Sanford Bishop Categories: | ... Anthony Wayne (January 1, 1745 - December 15, 1796), was a United States Army general and statesman. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... John Milledge (1757–February 9, 1818) was an American politician. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Map Represented by Jim Marshall Category: ... Francis Willis January 5, 1745 - January 25, 1829) was a United States Representative from Georgia who served one term, during the Second Congress (March 4, 1791 - March 3, 1793. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 1 is a district of the United States Congress in Western Kentucky. ... Alexander Dalrymple Orr (November 6, 1761–June 21, 1835) was an American farmer and politician from Maysville, Kentucky. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 2 is a district of the United States Congress in Western-central Kentucky. ... Christopher Greenup Christopher Greenup (1750–April 27, 1818) was an American lawyer and politician from Frankfort, Kentucky. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Map The First Congressional District of Maryland elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. ... Philip Key (1750 – January 4, 1820) was a Representative from Maryland. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Map The Second Congressional District of Maryland elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. ... Josua Seney (March 4, 1756– October 10, 1798) was an American farmer and lawyer from Queen Annes County, Maryland. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... William Hindman (April 1, 1743 – January 19, 1822) was an American lawyer and statesman from Talbot County, Maryland. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Map The Third Congressional District of Maryland elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. ... William Pinkney William Pinkney (March 17, 1764–February 25, 1822) was an American statesman and diplomat, and the seventh U.S. Attorney General. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... John Francis Mercer (May 17, 1759–August 30, 1821) was an American lawyer, planter, and politician from Virginia and Maryland. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Map The Fourth Congressional District of Maryland elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. ... Samuel Sterett (1758—July 12, 1833) was a Representative from Maryland. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Map The Fifth Congressional District of Maryland elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. ... William Vans Murray (February 9, 1760–December 11, 1803) was an American lawyer, politician, and statesman from Cambridge, Maryland. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... The current 6th district Marylands Sixth Congressional District elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives from the northwest part of the state. ... Upton Sheredine (1740–January 14, 1800) was an American jurist and statesman from Baltimore, Maryland. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Massachusettss first congressional district is in western and central Massachusetts. ... Fisher Ames Fisher Ames (9 April 1758 - 4 July 1808) was a Representative of the United States Congress from Massachusetts. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Massachusetts Congressional District 2 is a congessional district in south central Massachusetts. ... Benjamin Goodhue (September 20, 1748-July 28, 1814) a Representative and a Senator from Massachusetts. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Massachusetts Congressional District 3 is a congessional district in central Massachusetts. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced , rhymes with merry) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American politician, a member of the Jeffersonian Republican Party. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Massachusetts Congressional District 4 is a congessional district in southern Massachusetts. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Massachusetts Congressional District 5 is a congressional district in northeastern Massachusetts. ... Shearjashub Bourne (June 14, 1746–March 11, 1806) was an American lawyer, jurist, and politician from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Massachusetts Congressional District 6 is a congessional district in northeastern Massachusetts. ... George Burr Leonard is a former United States Army Air Corps pilot, a former editor of Look Magazine, President of the Esalen Institute, and holds a fifth degree black belt in aikido. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Massachusetts Congressional District 7 is a congressional district in eastern Massachusetts. ... Artemas Ward (November 26, 1727 – October 28, 1800) was an American Major General in the American Revolutionary War and a Congressman from Massachusetts. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Massachusetts Congressional District 8 is a congressional district in eastern Massachusetts. ... George Thatcher (April 12, 1754– April 6, 1824) was an American lawyer, jurist, and statesman from the Maine district of Massachusetts. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... New Hampshires 1st district since 2003 New Hampshires first congressional district covers the south-eastern part of New Hampshire. ... Jeremiah Smith (November 29, 1759–September 21, 1842) was an American lawyer, jurist and politician from Exeter, New Hampshire. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... New Hampshires 1st district since 2003 New Hampshires second congressional district covers the north-western part of New Hampshire. ... Nicholas Gilman Nicholas Gilman, Jr. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Samuel Livermore (May 14, 1732–May 18, 1803) was a U.S. politician. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Elias Boudinot For other people with the same name, see Elias Boudinot (disambiguation). ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Abraham Clark (February 15, 1725—September 15, 1794) was an American politician and Revolutionary War figure. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Jonathan Dayton, (October 16, 1760–October 9, 1824), American politician, was the third Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and a signer of the United States Constitution. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Aaron Kitchell (July 10, 1744 - June 25, 1820) was a blacksmith and politician from Hanover, New Jersey. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... The 1st Congressional District of New York is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in eastern Long Island. ... Thomas Tredwell (February 6, 1743–December 30, 1831) was an American lawyer and politician from Plattsburg, New York. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The 2nd Congressional District of New York is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in central Long Island. ... John Laurance (1750 – November 11, 1810) was an American lawyer, statesman, and speculator from New York. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... The 3rd District of New York is generally the eastern half of Nassau County, with some parts as far west as Island Park and Long Beach. ... Egbert Benson (21 June 1746 - 24 August 1833) was an American lawyer, jurist, and politician from New York City. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... The 4th Congressional District of New York is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in west-central Nassau County. ... Cornelius Corneliusen Schoonmaker (June 1745 - 1796) was a United States Representative from New York. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... The 5th Congressional District of New York is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives that lies along the North Shore of Long Island. ... Peter Silvester (1734-15 October 1808) was an American politician who was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New York. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... New Yorks Sixth Congressional District is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in New York City. ... James Gordon (October 31, 1739 – January 17, 1810) was an Irish-born American merchant, soldier, and politician. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... John Baptista Ashe (1748 – 27 November 1802) was an American planter, soldier, and statesman from North Carolina. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... The Second Congressional district of North Carolina, in the central and eastern parts of the state, has existed probably since 1814, when elections for the 14th United States Congress were held. ... John Steele (16 November 1764 - 14 August 1815) was a U.S. Congressman from the state of North Carolina between 1790 and 1793. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Hugh Williamson Hugh Williamson (December 5, 1735–May 22, 1819) was an American politician. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... 4th congressional district of North Carolina The Fourth Congressional district of North Carolina, in the central region of the state, is best known as The Triangle. ... William Barry Grove (15 January 1764 - 30 March 1818) was a Federalist U.S. Congressman from the state of North Carolina from 1791 to 1803. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Sen. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... William Findley (c. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Thomas Fitzsimons (1741-1811) was an American merchant and statesman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Andrew Gregg (June 10, 1755 - May 20, 1835) was a U.S. political figure. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Thomas Hartley (September 7, 1748–December 21, 1800) was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician from York, Pennsylvania. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Daniel Hiester (1747-1804) An American political and military leader from the Revolutionary War period to the early 19th Century. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Israel Jacobs (born June 9, 1726; died circa December 10, 1796) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... John Wilkes Kittera (November, 1752– June 6, 1801) was an American lawyer and politician from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (January 1, 1750 - June 4, 1801), American politician, was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives of the United States House of Representatives, elected April 1, 1789. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Benjamin Bourne was born in Bristol, Rhode Island on September 9, 1755. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Robert Barnwell (1761-1814) was a South Carolina revolutionary and statesman who was a delegate to the Continental Congress and a United States Congressman. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Daniel E. Huger (February 20, 1742 – July 6, 1799) was an American planter and statesman from Berkeley County, South Carolina. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... William Loughton Smith (1758–December 19, 1812) was an American lawyer from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... General Thomas Sumter (August 14, 1734 - June 1, 1832) was a hero of the American Revolution and went on to become a longtime member of the Congress of the United States. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Thomas Tudor Tucker (June 25, 1745– May 2, 1828) was an American physician and politician from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... The U.S. state of Vermont is represented in the U.S. House of Representatives by a single at-large congressional district since the 1930 census, when Vermont lost its second seat in the House of Representatives. ... Israel Smith (April 4, 1759–December 2, 1810) was an American lawyer and politician who held a wide variety of positions in the state of Vermont. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nathaniel Niles (born April 3, 1741; died October 31, 1828 was a United States Representative from Vermont. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Virginias first congressional district is a United States congressional district in the state of Virginia. ... Alexander White (1738–September 19, 1804) was an American planter, lawyer, and politician from Frederick County, Virginia. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Virginias 2nd congressional district. ... For other people with the same name, see John Brown. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Official language(s) English (de facto) Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Virginias third congressional district is a United States congressional district in the state of Virginia. ... Andrew Moore (1752–April 14, 1821) was an American lawyer and politician from Lexington, Virginia. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Virginias fourth congressional district is a United States congressional district in the state of Virginia. ... Richard Bland Lee (January 20, 1761–March 12, 1827) was a planter, jurist, and politician from Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Virginias fifth congressional district is a United States congressional district in the state of Virginia. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth President of the United States (1809–1817). ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Virginias sixth congressional district is a United States congressional district in the state of Virginia. ... Abraham Bedford Venable (November 20, 1758– December 26, 1811) was an American planter, lawyer, and politician from Prince Edward County, Virginia. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Virginias 7th Congressional District. ... Samuel Griffin (1746-1810) a Representative from Virginia. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Virginias 8th Congressional District. ... Josiah Parker (11 May 1751-11 March 1810) was an American politician who was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Virginia in the First through Sixth United States Congresses. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Virginias ninth congressional district is a United States congressional district in the state of Virginia, covering much of the southwestern part of the state. ... William Branch Giles (12 August 1762–4 December 1830) was an American statesman. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Virginias 10th Congressional District. ... John Page (born 17 April 1744 in Gloucester County, Virginia; died 11 October 1808) was a figure in early United States history. ... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the...

Changes in Membership

Vermont and Kentucky were newly admitted as states and are first represented in this Congress. Official language(s) None[1] Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) English (de facto) Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...

See also: 2nd United States Congress - Membership Changes

Independence Hall // The Second United States Congress was a meeting of the United States national legislature, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ...

Senate

  • Anti-Administration: 4 seat net gain
  • Pro-Administration: no net change
  • deaths: 0
  • resignations: 3
  • contested elections; 1
  • new seats: 4
  • Total seats with changes: 8

Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the...

House of Representatives

  • Anti-Administration: 4 seat net gain
  • Pro-Administration: no net change
  • deaths: 0
  • resignations: 3
  • contested elections: 1
  • vacancies: 1
  • new seats: 4
  • Total seats with changes: 9

Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the...

Officers

Senate

The Secretary of the Senate, as an elected officer of the United States Senate, supervises an extensive array of offices and services to expedite the day-to-day operations of that body. ... Samuel Allyne Otis (1740-1814) was a politician from Massachusetts who was the secretary of the United States Senate for its first 17 years. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... ... James Mathers (died 1811) was the first sergeant-at-arms of the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... // Job description and selection Among his or her duties, the chaplains job is to open each session of the United States Senate with a prayer. ... The Most Reverend William White, 1795: Oil on Canvas The Most Reverend William White The Most Reverend William White (1748 – July 17, 1836) was the first and fourth Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, USA (1789; 1795-1836), the first Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania (1787-1836, and the... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington DC is the National Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

House of Representatives

The Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives is an employee of the United States House of Representatives. ... John James Beckley (August 4, 1757 – April 8, 1807) was the first U.S. Librarian of Congress, serving from 1802 to 1807. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... ... Joseph Wheaton was an elected United States House of Representatives officer from 1789 to 1809. ... Official language(s) None Capital Providence Largest city Providence Area  Ranked 50th  - Total 1,214* sq mi (3,144* km²)  - Width 37 miles (60 km)  - Length 48 miles (77 km)  - % water 32. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Doorkeeper of the United States House of Representatives office was abolished during the 104th Congress, Public Law 104-186. ... Gifford Dalley was a United States House of Representatives officer from 1789 to 1795. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The election of William Linn as Chaplain of the House on May 1, 1789, continued the tradition established by the Continental Congresses of each days proceedings opening with a prayer by a chaplain. ... Samuel Blair, a Presbyterian, was the second Chaplain of the United States House of Representatives, appointed to that post on January 4, 1790. ... Presbyterianism is a form of Protestant Christianity, primarily in the Reformed branch of Western Christendom, as well as a particular form of church government. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Ashbel Green, D.D. (1762 - 1848) was an American Presbyterian minister and academic. ... Presbyterianism is a form of Protestant Christianity, primarily in the Reformed branch of Western Christendom, as well as a particular form of church government. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

References

  • Remini, Robert V. (2006). The House. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.
  • Library of Congress (2006). Statutes at Large, 1789-1875. Retrieved on 2006-07-01.
  • Library of Congress (2006). Senate Journal, First Forty-three Sessions of Congress. Retrieved on 2006-07-01.
  • Library of Congress (2006). House Journal, First Forty-three Sessions of Congress. Retrieved on 2006-07-01.
  • U.S. Congress (2005). Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved on 2006-07-01.
  • U.S. House of Representatives (2006). Congressional History. Retrieved on 2006-07-01.
  • U.S. Senate (2006). Statistics and Lists. Retrieved on 2006-07-01.

United States Congress
Senate • Senators • Senate Leadership • Senate Committees • Senate elections
House • Representatives • House Leadership • House Committees • House elections • Districts
Congresses

1 (1789)
2 (1791)
3 (1793)
4 (1795)
5 (1797)
6 (1799)
7 (1801)
8 (1803)
9 (1805)
2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... Source: [1] File links The following pages link to this file: United States Senate Seal of the United States Senate Image:Bennie johnson. ... Seal of the U.S. Congress. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The Senate Committee on Budget (ca. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Members of the Committee on Financial Services sit in the tiers of raised chairs (R), while those testifying and audience members sit below (L). ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... Image File history File links seal of the US House of Representatives File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... (Redirected from 1st United States Congress) Dates of Sessions 1789-1791 The first session of this Congress took place in New York City from March 4, 1789 to September 29, 1789. ... Dates of Sessions 1793-1795 The first session of this Congress took place in Philadelphia from December 2, 1793 to June 9, 1794. ... Dates of Sessions 1795-1797 The first session of this Congress took place in Philadelphia from December 7, 1795 to June 1, 1796. ... Fifth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Sixth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Seventh United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Eighth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Ninth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ...

10 (1807)
11 (1809)
12 (1811)
13 (1813)
14 (1815)
15 (1817)
16 (1819)
17 (1821)
18 (1823)
(Redirected from 10th United States Congress) Tenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 11th United States Congress) Eleventh United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 12th United States Congress) Twelfth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 13th United States Congress) Thirteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 14th United States Congress) Fourteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 15th United States Congress) Fifteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 16th United States Congress) Sixteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 17th United States Congress) Seventeenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 18th United States Congress) Eighteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ...

19 (1825)
20 (1827)
21 (1829)
22 (1831)
23 (1833)
24 (1835)
25 (1837)
26 (1839)
27 (1841)
(Redirected from 19th United States Congress) Nineteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 20th United States Congress) Twentieth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 21st United States Congress) Twenty-first United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 22nd United States Congress) Twenty-second United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 23rd United States Congress) Twenty-third United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 24th United States Congress) Twenty-fourth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 25th United States Congress) Twenty-fifth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... -1... (Redirected from 27th United States Congress) Twenty-seventh United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ...

28 (1843)
29 (1845)
30 (1847)
31 (1849)
32 (1851)
33 (1853)
34 (1855)
35 (1857)
36 (1859)
(Redirected from 28th United States Congress) Twenty-eighth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... (Redirected from 29th United States Congress) Twenty-ninth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Thirtieth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... This is a list of members of the Thirty-First United States Congress. ... Thirty-second States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Senators Stephen Adams (D-MS) Philip Allen (D-RI) David Rice Atchison (D-MO) Charles Gordon Atherton (D-NH) George Edmund Badger (Whig-NC) James Asheton Bayard (D-DE) John Asheton Bell (Whig-TN) Judah Philip Benjamin (Whig-LA) Solon Philip Borland (D-AR) Lawrence Philip Brainerd (Free Soil-VT... // Dates of Sessions 1855-1857 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 3, 1855 to August 18, 1856. ... Sessions of the 35th Congress, (1857-1859) Rusk was elected in place of Mason March 14, 1857. ... Thirty Sixth Congress of the United States - 1859-61 Congressional Profile Total Membership, House of Representatives: 238 Representatives, 5 Delegates Total Membership, Senate: 64 (prior to admission of Oregon), 66 (after admission) Leadership Speaker of the House: William Pennington, Republican-New Jersey President of the Senate: John C. Breckinridge Senate...

37 (1861)
38 (1863)
39 (1865)
40 (1867)
41 (1869)
42 (1871)
43 (1873)
44 (1875)
45 (1877)
Dates of Sessions 1861-1863 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from July 4, 1861 to August 6, 1861. ... The Thirty-Eighth Congress of the United States began on March 4, 1863 and ended on March 3, 1865. ... The Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States began on March 4, 1865 and ended on March 3, 1867. ... // Dates of Sessions 1867-1869 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from March 4, 1867 to December 1, 1867. ... Dates of Sessions 1869-1871 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from March 4, 1869 to April 10, 1869. ... Dates of Sessions 1871-1873 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from March 4, 1871 to April 20, 1871. ... {{move}} // Dates of Sessions December 1, 1873 to March 3, 1875. ... // Forty-fourth United States Congress Dates of Sessions December 6, 1875 to March 3, 1877. ... Dates of Sessions 1877-1879 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from October 15, 1877 to December 3, 1877. ...

46 (1879)
47 (1881)
48 (1883)
49 (1885)
50 (1887)
51 (1889)
52 (1891)
53 (1893)
54 (1895)
The Forty-sixth United States Congress was a meeting of the United States national legislature, including the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ... Dates of Sessions 1881-1883 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 5, 1881 to August 8, 1882. ... Dates of Sessions 1883-1885 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 3, 1883 to July 7, 1884. ... Dates of Sessions 1885-1887 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 7, 1885 to August 5, 1886. ... Senators Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (R-RI) William Boyd Allison (R-IA) William Brimage Bate (D-TN) James Burnie Beck (D-KY) James Henderson Berry (D-AR) Joseph Clay Blackburn (D-KY) Henry William Blair (R-NH) Rufus William Blodgett (D-NJ) Thomas Mead Bowen (R-CO) Joseph Emerson Brown (D... The Fifty-first United States Congress, dominated by the Republican Party and held between 1889 and 1891, was responsible for a number of pieces of landmark legislation, many of which asserted the authority of the federal government. ... Dates of Sessions 1891-1893 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 7, 1891 to August 5, 1892. ... The 53rd United States Congress served from 1893 to 1895. ... Dates of Sessions 1895-1897 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 2, 1895 to June 11, 1896. ...

55 (1897)
56 (1899)
57 (1901)
58 (1903)
59 (1905)
60 (1907)
61 (1909)
62 (1911)
63 (1913)
// Dates of Sessions March 4, 1897, to March 3, 1899 Major Political Events Officers Senate House of Representatives Speaker of the House Thomas Brackett Reed Members of the Fifty-fifth United States Congress Senate Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (R-RI) William Vincent Allen (Pop-NE) William Boyd Allison (R-IA) Augustus... // Dates of Sessions March 4, 1899, to March 3, 1901 Major Political Events Vice President Garret A. Hobart had died right before the convening of the first session so William P. Frye served as acting President Pro Tempore Officers Senate President Pro Tempore William P. Frye Senate Republican Conference Chairman... // Dates of Sessions March 4, 1901, to March 3, 1903 Major Political Events Officers Senate President Pro Tempore William P. Frye Senate Republican Conference Chairman William B. Allison House of Representatives Speaker of the House David B. Henderson House Democratic Floor Leader James D. Richardson House Republican Floor Leader Sereno... Dates of Sessions 1903-1905 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from November 9, 1903 to December 7, 1903. ... Dates of Sessions 1905-1907 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 4, 1905 to June 30, 1906. ... Senators Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (R-RI) William Boyd Allison (R-IA) Levi Boyd Ankeny (R-WA) Augustus Octavius Bacon (D-GA) Joseph Weldon Bailey (D-TX) John Hollis Bankhead (D-AL) Albert Jeremiah Beveridge (R-IN) William Edgar Borah (R-ID) Jonathan Edgar Bourne (R-OR) Frank Bosworth Brandegee (R... // Dates of Sessions 1909-1911 First session: March 15, 1909 - August 5, 1909. ... // Dates of Sessions 1911-1913 Major Political Events New Mexico was admitted to the Union on 6 January 1912; Arizona was admitted on 14 February 1912, the last of the 48 contiguous states to join the Union. ... // Dates of sessions 1913-1915 First session: April 7, 1913 – December 1, 1913 Second session: December 1, 1913 – October 24, 1914 Third (lame duck) session: December 7, 1914 – March 3, 1915 In addition, the Senate was called into special session by President Woodrow Wilson and met from March 4, 1913...

64 (1915)
65 (1917)
66 (1919)
67 (1921)
68 (1923)
69 (1925)
70 (1927)
71 (1929)
72 (1931)
Senators Henry Fountain Ashurst (D-AZ) John Hollis Bankhead (D-AL) John Crepps Beckham (D-KY) William Edgar Borah (R-ID) James Henry Brady (R-ID) Frank Bosworth Brandegee (R-CT) Robert Foligny Broussard (D-LA) Nathan Philemon Bryan (D-FL) Edwin Chick Burleigh (R-ME) Thomas Benton Catron (R... This article needs to be wikified. ... Dates of Sessions Major Political Events Officers Senate House of Representatives Speaker of the House - Frederick H. Gillett Members of the Sixty-sixth United States Congress Senate Henry F. Ashurst, Democrat, Arizona Lewis H. Ball, Republican, Delaware John H. Bankhead, Democrat, Alabama. ... Dates of Sessions 1921-1923 Major Political Events Officers Senate President pro tempore - Albert B. Cummins House of Representatives Speaker of the House - Frederick H. Gillett Members of the Sixty-seventh United States Congress Senate Henry F. Ashurst, Democrat, Arizona Lewis H. Ball, Republican, Delaware Thomas F. Bayard, Jr. ... Dates of Sessions 1923-1925 Major Political Events Officers Senate President pro tempore - Albert B. Cummins House of Representatives Speaker of the House - Frederick H. Gillett Members of the Sixty-seventh United States Congress Senate Alva B. Adams, Democrat, Colorado Henry F. Ashurst, Democrat, Arizona Lewis H. Ball, Republican, Delaware... Sessions of the 69th Congress, (1925-1927) The Special Session was called by President Calvin Coolidge on February 14, 1925. ... Senators Henry Fountain Ashurst (D-AZ) Alben William Barkley (D-KY) Thomas Francis Bayard (D-DE) Hiram Francis Bingham (R-CT) Hugo Lafayette Black (D-AL) John James Blaine (R-WI) Coleman Livingston Blease (D-SC) William Edgar Borah (R-ID) Sam Gilbert Bratton (D-NM) Smith Wildman Brookhart (R... The 71st United States Congress met from 1929 to 1931. ... The 72nd Congress met from December 7, 1931 to March 3, 1933. ...

73 (1933)
74 (1935)
75 (1937)
76 (1939)
77 (1941)
78 (1943)
79 (1945)
80 (1947)
81 (1949)
The 73rd Congress met from March 9, 1933 to January 2, 1935. ... 74th Congress (1935-1937) Congressional Profile Total Membership: 435 Representatives, 2 Delegates, 3 Resident Commissioners Party Divisions: 322 Democrats, 103 Republicans, 7 Progressives, 3 Farmer-Labor Leadership & Officers Speaker of the House: Joseph W. Byrns (D-Tennessee) Died June 4, 1936. ... Senators Alva Blanchard Adams (D-CO) Charles Oscar Andrews (D-FL) Henry Fountain Ashurst (D-AZ) Warren Robinson Austin (R-VT) Nathan Lynn Bachman (D-TN) Josiah William Bailey (D-NC) John Hollis Bankhead (D-AL) William Warren Barbour (R-NJ) Alben William Barkley (D-KY) Alexander Grant Barry (R... Senators Democratic majority with 74 to 30 republicans. ... 77th Congress Party Divisions: Senate 66 Democrats 28 Republicans 1 Independent 1 Progressive House of Representatives 267 Democrats 162 Republicans 3 Progressives 1 American-Labor 1 Farmer-Labor 1 Independent Democrat Officers: Speaker of the House: Sam Rayburn (D-Texas) Majority Leader: John W. McCormack (D-Massachusetts) Minority Leader: Joseph... Senators George David Aiken (R-VT) Charles Oscar Andrews (D-FL) Warren Robinson Austin (R-VT) Josiah William Bailey (D-NC) Joseph Hurst Ball (R-MN) John Hollis Bankhead (D-AL) William Warren Barbour (R-NJ) Alben William Barkley (D-KY) Theodore Gilmore Bilbo (D-MS) Homer Truett Bone (D... Senators George David Aiken (R-VT) Charles Oscar Andrews (D-FL) Warren Robinson Austin (R-VT) Josiah William Bailey (D-NC) Raymond Earl Baldwin (R-CT) Joseph Hurst Ball (R-MN) John Hollis Bankhead (D-AL) Alben William Barkley (D-KY) Theodore Gilmore Bilbo (D-MS) Ralph Owen Brewster (R... 80th Congress (1947-1949) Congressional Profile Total Membership: 435 Representatives, 2 Delegates, 1 Resident Commissioner Party Divisions: 246 Republicans, 188 Democrats, 1 American-Labor Leadership & Officers Speaker of the House: Joseph W. Martin, Jr. ... 81st Congress (1949-1951) Congressional Profile Total Membership: 435 Representatives, 2 Delegates, 1 Resident Commissioner Party Divisions: 263 Democrats, 171 Republicans, 1 American-Labor Leadership & Officers Speaker of the House: Sam Rayburn (D- Texas) Majority Leader: John W. McCormack (D- Massachusetts) Minority Leader: Joseph W. Martin, Jr. ...

82 (1951)
83 (1953)
84 (1955)
85 (1957)
86 (1959)
87 (1961)
88 (1963)
89 (1965)
90 (1967)
Members of the Eighty-Second United States Congress 1951 - 1952 Fred George Aandahl (Representative), Republican, ND Watkins Moorman Abbitt (Representative), Democrat, VA Thomas Gerstle Abernethy (Representative), Democrat, MS Edwin Ross Adair (Representative), Republican, IN Hugh Joseph Addonizio (Representative), Democrat, NJ George David Aiken (Senator), Republican, VT Carl Bert Albert (Representative... The Eighty-third United States Congress was in session from 1953 to 1955. ... The Eighty-fourth United States Congress was in session from 1955 to 1957. ... // Dates of Sessions 1957-1958 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 3, 1957 to August 30, 1957. ... Senators George David Aiken (R-VT) Gordon Llewellyn Allott (R-CO) Clinton Presba Anderson (D-NM) Edward Lewis Bartlett (D-AK) James Glenn Beall (R-MD) Wallace Foster Bennett (R-UT) Alan Harvey Bible (D-NV) Henry Styles Bridges (R-NH) Styles Bridges (R-NH) Clarence Norman Brunsdale (R-ND... Sessions of the 87th Congress, (1961-1963) Categories: United States Congress by session ... Dates of Sessions January 3, 1963-January 3, 1965 Major Political Events Senator Robert C. Byrd makes a record breaking fillibuster in that it lasts 14 hours and 13 minutes. ... // 1965-1966 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 4, 1965 to October 23, 1965. ... The Ninetieth United States Congress was in session from 1967 to 1969. ...

91 (1969)
92 (1971)
93 (1973)
94 (1975)
95 (1977)
96 (1979)
97 (1981)
98 (1983)
99 (1985)
The Ninety-first United States Congress was in session from 1969 to 1971. ... Dates The first session convened on 21 January 1971, and adjourned on 17 December 1971. ... The Ninety-third United States Congress was in session from 1973 to 1975. ... The Ninety-fourth United States Congress was in session from 1975 to 1977. ... Ninety-fifth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Ninety-sixth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Ninety-seventh United States Congress Members of the 97th United States Congress: States Alabama Senators Howell T. Heflin (D) Jeremiah Denton (R) Representatives 1. ... Ninety-Eighth United States Congress Members of the 98th United States Congress: States Alabama Senators Howell T. Heflin (D) Jeremiah A. Denton Jr. ... // Alabama Senators Howell T. Heflin (D) Jeremiah A. Denton Jr. ...

100 (1987)
101 (1989)
102 (1991)
103 (1993)
104 (1995)
105 (1997)
106 (1999)
107 (2001)
108 (2003)
// Dates of Sessions January 3, 1987 to March 3, 1989 Major political events Bicentennial of the United States Constitution Major Legislation Officers Senate Majority leadership Minority leadership House of Representatives Members States Alabama Senators Howell T. Heflin (D) Richard C. Shelby (D) Representatives 1. ... // Party summary Senate House of Representatives Dates of Sessions 1989-1990 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 3, 1989 to November 22, 1989. ... -1... The 103rd United States Congress met from January 5, 1993 to January 3, 1995 // Dates of Sessions 1993-1995 First: Second: Major legislation See also: List of United States Federal Legislation#103rd United States Congress Party summary Senate House of Representatives Officers Senate House of Representatives Members Alabama Senators Howell... Members of the 104th United States Congress: // States Alabama Senators Howell T. Heflin (D) Richard C. Shelby (R) Representatives 1. ... Members of the 105th United States Congress: // States Alabama Senators Richard C. Shelby (R) Jefferson B. Sessions III (R) Representatives 1. ... // Leadership Senate House of Representatives States Members of the 106th United States Congress: Alabama Senators Richard C. Shelby (R) Jefferson B. Sessions III (R) Representatives 1. ... 2001-2003 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 3, 2001 to December 20, 2001 The second session took place in Washington, DC from January 23, 2002 to November 22, 2002 President George W. Bush addressing a joint session of Congress, regarding the September... 108th U.S. Congress being sworn in, January 7, 2003. ...

current:
109 (2005)
future:
110 (2007)
111 (2009)
112 (2011)
113 (2013)
The 109th United States Congress is the current meeting of the United States legislature, composed of the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ... The 110th United States Congress is the next meeting of the Legislature of the United States federal government. ... The 111th United States Congress term will be from 2009 to 2011. ... The 112th United States Congress term will be from 2011 to 2013. ... The 113th United States Congress term will be from 2013 to 2015. ...


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Educational Resources - United States House of Representatives, 110th Congress, 2nd Session (124 words)
Educational Resources - United States House of Representatives, 110th Congress, 2nd Session
How laws are enacted once they have been passed.
A list of Early Congressional Documents from the Constitutional Convention and the Continental Congress.
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