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Encyclopedia > 28 Days Later
28 Days Later
Directed by Danny Boyle
Produced by Andrew Macdonald
Written by Alex Garland
Starring Cillian Murphy
Naomie Harris
Brendan Gleeson
Christopher Eccleston
Megan Burns
Music by John Murphy
Cinematography Anthony Dod Mantle
Editing by Chris Gill
Distributed by Fox Searchlight Pictures
Release date(s) Flag of the United Kingdom 1 November 2002
Flag of the United States 27 June 2003
Running time 113 min.
Country Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Language English
Budget £5,000,000
Followed by 28 Weeks Later
Official website
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris and Christopher Eccleston. Set in Great Britain, just after the turn of the 21st century, the story depicts the breakdown of society following the accidental release of a highly contagious virus and focuses upon the struggle of four survivors to cope with the ruination of the life they once knew. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Danny Boyle (born 20 October 1956) is an English director and film producer, best known for his work on films such as Trainspotting and 28 Days Later. ... Andrew Macdonald is a British film producer, best known for his collaborations with screenwriter John Hodge and director Danny Boyle, including Shallow Grave (1994), Trainspotting (1996) and A Life Less Ordinary (1997). ... Alex Garland (born 1970) is a British novelist and screenwriter. ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor active since 1996. ... Harris as Sophie in the 2004 film After the Sunset Naomie Melanie Harris (born September 6, 1976 in London) is an English actress. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor. ... Megan Burns (born June 25, 1986) is a British musician and former award-winning actress from Liverpool, England. ... John Murphy is a prominent British film composer from the city of Liverpool. ... Fox Searchlight Pictures logo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... 28 Weeks Later is a 2007 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film, and sequel to the 2002 film 28 Days Later. ... The year 2002 in film involved some significant events. ... Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... Danny Boyle (born 20 October 1956) is an English director and film producer, best known for his work on films such as Trainspotting and 28 Days Later. ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor active since 1996. ... Harris as Sophie in the 2004 film After the Sunset Naomie Melanie Harris (born September 6, 1976 in London) is an English actress. ... Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor. ... 20XX redirects here. ... This article is about biological infectious particles. ...


A critical and commercial success, the film is widely recognized for images of a deserted London, and was shot almost entirely on digital video. The film spawned the 2007 sequel, 28 Weeks Later, as well as the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Digital video is a type of video recording system that works by using a digital, rather than analog, of the video signal. ... 28 Weeks Later is a 2007 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film, and sequel to the 2002 film 28 Days Later. ...

Contents

Plot

The film opens with British animal rights activists breaking into a science laboratory to free chimpanzees being used for medical research. The chimps, dosed with a so-called "Rage virus", attack and infect the activists and a researcher. Type species Simia troglodytes Blumenbach, 1775 distribution of Species Pan troglodytes Pan paniscus Chimpanzee, often shortened to chimp, is the common name for the two extant species of apes in the genus Pan. ...


Twenty-eight days later, a bicycle courier named Jim (Cillian Murphy) awakens from a coma in a deserted hospital. Upon leaving, he discovers that London is completely deserted and rife with signs of catastrophe. After seeking refuge in a church, Jim is chased by some people but is rescued by two survivors, Selena (Naomie Harris) and Mark (Noah Huntley), who rush him to their hideout in the London Underground. They tell Jim that while he was comatose, a virus spread uncontrollably among the populace, turning most people into mindless, blood-spewing monsters (referred to as "the Infected") and resulting in societal collapse, possibly on a global scale. For other uses, see Courier (disambiguation). ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor active since 1996. ... For other uses, see Coma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Harris as Sophie in the 2004 film After the Sunset Naomie Melanie Harris (born September 6, 1976 in London) is an English actress. ... Noah Huntley is an actor, probably most famous for his minor role in the feature film 28 Days Later. ... The London Underground is an underground railway system - also known as a rapid transit system - that serves a large part of Greater London, United Kingdom and some neighbouring areas. ...


Jim takes Selena and Mark to his parents' house, but they discover that his parents have committed suicide. That night, some of the Infected break in and attack the survivors. Upon realising that Mark has been bitten, Selena brutally hacks him to death with a machete. She explains to Jim that infection is spread through blood and takes only seconds to overwhelm its victims, rendering them deadly to others. She warns that should he become infected, she will kill him too, "in a heartbeat." For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


The next day, journeying through the derelict city, Selena rules out the idea that she and Jim could fall in love, asserting that nothing remains but the fight to survive. Still, Selena, a chemist, continues to help the recovering coma patient, feeding and advising him. Soon, they encounter two more survivors, Frank (Brendan Gleeson) and his teenage daughter Hannah (Megan Burns), still residing in an otherwise abandoned apartment tower. Invited to spend the night, Selena and Jim privately debate whether they should stick with Frank and Hannah. Selena states that if they slow her down, she will abandon them, while Jim says he wouldn't because they're good people; Selena warns Jim that caring about others more than personal survival is a sure way to get killed. The mortar and pestle is an international symbol of pharmacists and pharmacies. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Megan Burns (born June 25, 1986) is a British musician and former award-winning actress from Liverpool, England. ...


The next morning, Frank informs Jim and Selena that supplies, particularly water, are dwindling, and has them listen to a prerecorded, looped radio broadcast transmitted by soldiers at a blockade near Manchester, who claim to have "the answer to infection." The four survivors decide to take Frank's cab in search of the blockade, and they form a bond during their trip. Selena's steely resolve against feeling anything for her companions begins to soften. Conversely, Jim's experiences on the trip begin to toughen him up: he slays an infected child. This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ...


When they reach the seemingly deserted blockade, Frank becomes infected and is immediately shot by soldiers, who commandeer the cab and take Selena, Jim and Hannah to a fortified mansion under the command of Major Henry West (Christopher Eccleston). Hannah is in shock, and a distraught Selena and worried Jim reach out to each other romantically. Jim soon learns that West's "answer to infection" entails waiting for the Infected to starve to death (they never actually eat), while giving hope for community survival to his men by forcing sexual servitude on female survivors. Shocked by this violent plan, Jim attempts to escape with Selena and Hannah, but is subdued, along with "resident philosopher" Sergeant Farrell, who had tried to help. While Jim and Farrell are tied up for the night, Farrell theorises that there is no worldwide epidemic, but rather that Great Britain has been quarantined. The next day, the two prisoners are led off into the woods to be executed. Meanwhile, Selena and Hannah are trapped as the soldiers circle, wanting to begin the rapes — albeit under a veneer of politesse — and Selena manoeuvres to stall for time. Major is a military rank of the British Army which is used by both the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor. ... At the Drive-In (ATDI) was a post-hardcore band from El Paso, Texas from 1993 until 2001 and was one of the most influential bands of the genre. ...

Selena (Naomie Harris) and a bloody Jim are reunited
Selena (Naomie Harris) and a bloody Jim are reunited

While escaping his captors after Farrell is shot, Jim spots the contrails of a jet aircraft flying high overhead and realizes that indeed, someone in the outside world is still functioning. He then improvises a plan to rescue his friends, first luring West out to the blockade, then running back to assault the soldiers' headquarters. He unleashes Mailer, an infected soldier that West kept chained outside for observation. While Mailer attacks and infects many of the soldiers, Jim kills others. Finally, covered in blood, Jim viciously attacks the soldier detaining Selena, leading her to believe that he may be infected. Raising her machete, she hesitates before striking Jim. He quips, "That was longer than a heartbeat," and the two kiss passionately. With Hannah in tow, they run to Frank's cab, but West appears, shooting Jim in the stomach. West is then killed by Mailer, allowing the trio to escape. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Harris as Sophie in the 2004 film After the Sunset Naomie Melanie Harris (born September 6, 1976 in London) is an English actress. ...


In a series of rapid edits, Selena and Hannah are shown rushing the wounded Jim into a deserted hospital, where Selena performs life-saving emergency procedures. Another twenty-eight days later, a bandaged Jim is shown waking up in recovery again, this time on one side of a double bed in a remote cottage. He goes downstairs, where Selena is sewing large swaths of fabric. At Hannah's alert, the three of them rush a huge cloth banner outside, adding the final letter to the word "HELLO", an attempt to signal a military jet which was previously observed flying overhead. As the approaching jet flies over the landscape, the Infected lie in the streets dying of starvation. After the jet zooms past the three waving survivors and their distress sign, Selena wonders aloud, "Do you think he saw us this time?"


Alternative endings

The DVD extras include three alternative endings, all of which end with Jim dying. Two were filmed, while the third, a more radical departure, was only storyboarded.


Jim dies at the hospital

In this ending, after Jim is shot, Selena and Hannah still rush him to the deserted hospital, but the scene is extended. Selena, with Hannah's assistance, attempts to perform life-saving procedures but cannot revive Jim. Selena is heartbroken, and Hannah, distraught, looks to her for guidance. Selena tells Hannah that they will go on; they pick up their guns and walk away from Jim's lifeless body. Selena and Hannah, fully armed, walk through the operating room doors, which gradually stop swinging.


On the DVD commentary, Boyle and Garland explain that this was the original ending of the film's first cut, which was tested with preview audiences. It was ultimately rejected for seeming too bleak; the final exit from the hospital was intended to imply Selena and Hannah's survival, whereas test audiences felt that the women were marching off to certain death. Boyle and Garland express a preference for this alternate ending, calling it the "true ending". They comment that this ending brought Jim full circle, as he starts and finishes the story in bed in a deserted hospital.


This ending was added in the theatrical release of the film beginning on 25 July 2003, placed after the credits and prefaced with the words "...what if."[citation needed] The ending appears on some television broadcasts of the movie, such as those on Channel 4.[citation needed] is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the British television station. ...


Rescue coda without Jim

This ending, for which only a rough edit was completed, is an alternate version of the potential rescue sequence shown at the very end of the released film. Here, the scenes are identical, except that this ending was intended to be placed after the first alternative ending where Jim dies, so he is absent. When Selena is sewing one of the banner letters in the cottage, she is seen facetiously talking to a chicken instead of Jim. And only Selena and Hannah are seen waving to the jet flying overhead in the final shots.


"Radical Alternative Ending"

The "Radical Alternative Ending" was not filmed and is presented on the DVD as a series of illustrated storyboards with voiceovers by Boyle and Garland. This ending would have taken the story in a radically different direction from the film's midpoint. When Frank is infected at the military blockade near Manchester, the soldiers do not enter the story. Instead, Jim, Selena and Hannah are somehow able to restrain the infected Frank, hoping they will find a cure for the virus nearby as suggested in the radio broadcast. They soon discover that the blockade had protected a large medical research complex, the same one featured in the first scene of the film where the virus was developed. Storyboards are illustrations displayed in sequence for the purpose of previsualizing an animated or live-action film. ... VoiceOver is a feature built into Apple Computers Mac OS X v10. ...


Inside, the party is relieved to find a scientist self-barricaded inside a room with food and water. He won't open the door because he fears they will take his food, although he does admit that the "answer to infection is here." Unfortunately, he refuses to talk further because he doesn't want to make an emotional attachment to people who will soon be dead. After hours of failed attempts to break through the door or coax the man out, Jim eventually brings Hannah to the door and explains Frank's situation. The scientist reluctantly tells them that Frank can only be cured with a complete blood transfusion, and supplies them with the necessary equipment. After learning that he is the only match with Frank's blood type, Jim nobly sacrifices himself so that Frank can survive with his daughter. Just as his journey began, Jim is left alone in the abandoned medical facility, and Selena, Hannah and Frank move into the room with the scientist as a horde of the infected breach the complex. Strapped to the table as the chimp had been in the opening scene, the computer monitors showing death and destruction come to life around a thrashing, infected Jim.


Garland and Boyle explain that they conceptualised this ending to see what the film would be like if they did not expand the focus beyond the core four survivors. They ultimately decided against it because the idea of a total blood replacement as a cure was not credible.


Cast

Actor Role
Cillian Murphy Jim
Naomie Harris Selena
Noah Huntley Mark
Brendan Gleeson Frank
Megan Burns Hannah
Luke Mably Private Clifton
Stuart McQuarrie Sergeant Farrell
Ricci Harnett Corporal Mitchell
Leo Bill Private Jones
Junior Laniyan Private Bell
Ray Panthaki Private Bedford
Christopher Eccleston Major Henry West
Sanjay Rambaruth Private Davis
Marvin Campbell Private Mailer

On the DVD, director Boyle explains that, with the aim of preserving the suspension of disbelief, relatively unknown actors were cast in the film. Male lead Cillian Murphy had at the time starred primarily in small independent films, while female lead Naomie Harris had acted on British television as a child. However, actors Christopher Eccleston and Brendan Gleeson were somewhat well-known character actors. Eccleston, who went on to greater fame for his portrayal of the Ninth Doctor in the 2005 series of Doctor Who, had already appeared in films such as The Others, Gone in 60 Seconds, eXistenZ and Shallow Grave (another film directed by Boyle). Likewise, Gleeson had appeared in several films, including Braveheart, Lake Placid and The General. Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor active since 1996. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Harris as Sophie in the 2004 film After the Sunset Naomie Melanie Harris (born September 6, 1976 in London) is an English actress. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Noah Huntley is an actor, probably most famous for his minor role in the feature film 28 Days Later. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Megan Burns (born June 25, 1986) is a British musician and former award-winning actress from Liverpool, England. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Thomas Luke Mably (born 1 March 1976) is an English actor, most known by playing the role of prince Edvard in the 2004 comedy The Prince and Me, with Julia Stiles and Miranda Richardson. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Stuart McQuarrie (born 1963) is an actor who has starred in multiple acclaimed films, including Trainspotting and 28 Days Later. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Ray as Vincent in The Feral Generation. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Characters 28 Days Later franchise (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below. ... Cillian Murphy[1] (born 25 May 1976) is an Irish film and theatre actor active since 1996. ... Harris as Sophie in the 2004 film After the Sunset Naomie Melanie Harris (born September 6, 1976 in London) is an English actress. ... Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... The Ninth Doctor refers to the ninth official incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who episodes redirects here. ... This article is about the television series. ... The Others is a 2001 psychological horror/suspense film by the Spanish/Chilean director Alejandro Amenábar, starring Nicole Kidman. ... Gone in Sixty Seconds is a 2000 action film, starring Nicolas Cage, directed by Dominic Sena, and written by Scott Rosenberg. ... eXistenZ is a 1999 psychological thriller/science fiction film by Canadian director David Cronenberg. ... Movie Poster Shallow Grave is a 1994 British thriller film, directed by Danny Boyle and written by John Hodge. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Lake Placid is a 1999 horror film, directed by Steve Miner. ... Dunbar and Gleason as Noel Curley and Martin Cahill The General is a 1998 crime film about Dublin criminal Martin Cahill, who pulled off several daring heists in the early 1980s, and attracted attention from the Garda, IRA, and UVF. The film was directed by John Boorman, filmed in 1997...


Production

28 Days Later features scenes set in normally bustling parts of London such as Westminster Bridge, Piccadilly Circus, Horse Guards Parade and Oxford Street. In order to depict these locations as desolate, the film crew closed off sections of street for minutes at a time, usually in early morning to minimize disruption. Portions of the film were shot on a Canon XL1 digital video camera.[1] DV cameras are much smaller and more manoeuvrable than traditional film cameras, which would have been impractical on such brief shoots. Westminster Bridge and the Palace of Westminster, with a glimpse of Westminster Abbey behind the tower of Big Ben. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Horse Guards Parade, London Horse Guards Parade is a large parade ground off Whitehall in central London. ... Oxford Street, with Centre Point in the background Oxford Street in 1875, looking west from the junction with Duke Street. ... Digital video is a type of video recording system that works by using a digital, rather than analog, of the video signal. ...


The scenes of the M1 motorway completely devoid of traffic were also filmed within very limited time periods. A mobile police roadblock slowed traffic sufficiently to leave a long section of carriageway empty while the scene was filmed. The section depicted in the film was actually located at Milton Keynes, nowhere near Manchester.[citation needed] For the London scene where Jim walks by the overturned doubledecker bus, the film crew placed the bus on its side and removed it when the shot was finished, all within 20 minutes.[citation needed] The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... , Milton Keynes (often abbreviated MK) is a large town in northern Buckinghamshire, in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London, and roughly halfway between London and Birmingham. ...


Filming took place prior to the September 11, 2001 attacks, and in the audio commentary Boyle notes the parallel between the "missing persons" flyers seen at the beginning of the film and similar flyers posted in New York City in the wake of 9/11. Boyle adds that his crew probably would not have been granted permission to close off Downing Street for filming after the terrorist attacks in New York. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Downing Street Downing Street gates Downing Street is the street in London which contains the buildings that have been, for over two hundred years, the official residences of two of the most senior British cabinet ministers, the First Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Prime Minister of...


While travelling around London at the beginning of the film, Jim picks up a copy of the Evening Standard. The front page created by the filmmakers carries a single headline printed in large font: "EVACUATION", with the sub-heading "Mass exodus of British people causes global chaos." Above the main headline, there are three small subheadings with page numbers- "Who will stop them?", "Refugee Crisis Looms" and "Dangerous Animals". Below the headline, the front page contains a list of London's boroughs with evacuation information on the left side with the main body containing the following smaller headlines, in order: This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... A headline is text at the top of a newspaper article, indicating the nature of the article below it. ...

  • "Blair declares a state of emergency"
  • "Military ordered 'shoot to kill'"
  • "Government Check points overrun"
  • "UN to build giant refugee camps"
  • "Chaos at all London airports"
  • "Government call for calm"
  • "Military patrol waters around Britain"
  • "All roads around London grid-locked"

The character Jim was English in the original script, and several scenes were actually shot with Cillian Murphy using an English accent. Due to Murphy's request, he continued the shoot using his own Irish accent, dubbing over his English-accented lines in post-production.[citation needed] For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... A refugee camp is a camp built up by governments or NGOs (such as the ICRC) to receive refugees. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... English English is a term that has been applied to the English language as spoken in England. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


The mansion used in the film was Trafalgar Park near Salisbury. Many rooms in the house, including the Cipriani-painted music room and the main hall, were filmed with minimal set decoration. The scenes occurring upstairs were actually filmed downstairs, as the mansion's owner resided upstairs.[citation needed] Trafalgar House circa 1880. ... For other uses, see Salisbury (disambiguation). ... Giovanni Battista Cipriani (1727–1785), Italian painter and engraver, Pistoiese by descent, was born in Florence. ...


One month before the film was released in cinemas, various newspapers included a short panel comic book style promotion for the film, in which various scenes showed a chaotic London during those 27 days with people trying to escape the city en masse. A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ...


Style and inspiration

On the DVD commentary, Boyle and Garland frequently call it a post apocalyptic, horror and zombie film, commenting on scenes that were specific references to George A. Romero's original Dead trilogy. There are also marked similarities to another George Romero film, 1973's The Crazies. However, during the initial marketing of the film Boyle did try to distance the film from such labels. Boyle identified John Wyndham's The Day of the Triffids as Garland's original inspiration for the story[2]. Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... This article is about the undead. ... George Andrew Romero (born February 4, 1940) is an American director, writer, editor and actor. ... Living Dead is a blanket term for various films and series that all originated with the seminal 1968 zombie movie Night of the Living Dead created by George A. Romero and John A. Russo. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... John Wyndham (July 10, 1903 – March 11, 1969) was the pen name used by the often post-apocalyptic British science fiction writer John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris. ... The Day of the Triffids is a post-apocalyptic novel (categorised by author Brian Aldiss as a cosy catastrophe) written in 1951 by the English science fiction author John Wyndham. ...


Reception

The film was a considerable success at the box office and became highly profitable on a budget of about £5 million ($9.8 million). In the UK, it took £6.1 million ($12 million), while in the US it became a surprise hit, taking over $45 million despite a limited release at fewer than 1,500 screens across the country. The film garnered around $82.7 million worldwide. For details of notes and coins, see British coinage and British banknotes. ... USD redirects here. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


Critical views of the film were very positive (with a rating of 89% at RottenTomatoes [3]) the L.A. Times describing it as a "stylistic tour de force", and efilmcritic.com describing it as "raw, blistering and joyously uncompromising". Rotten Tomatoes () is a website devoted to reviews and news of movies and video games. ... The Los Angeles Times (also L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ...


Soundtrack and score

Main article: 28 Days Later: The Soundtrack Album

The film's score was composed by John Murphy and was released in a score/song compilation in 2003. A heavily edited version of the song "East Hastings" by the post-rock band Godspeed You! Black Emperor appears in the film, but the track is excluded from the soundtrack, because Boyle only got the rights to use it in the film. [4] John Murphy is a prominent British film composer from the city of Liverpool. ... East Hastings is a track by Godspeed You! Black Emperor. ... Godspeed You! Black Emperor (formerly punctuated Godspeed You Black Emperor!) is an avant-garde Canadian post-rock band based in Montreal, Quebec. ...


28 Days Later: The Soundtrack Album was released on 17 June 2003. It features most of John Murphy's original score and tracks from Brian Eno, Grandaddy and Blue States. Brian Eno's "An Ending (Ascent)" was used repeatedly in the film, effectively adding to the air of desolation. is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... Grandaddy was an indie rock group from Modesto, California, United States. ... Blue States is a trip hop/dream pop band headed up by Andy Dragazis. ...


Sequels

A sequel, 28 Weeks Later, was released on 11 May 2007.[5] Danny Boyle and Alex Garland took producing roles alongside Andrew Macdonald. The plot revolves around the arrival of American troops about seven months after the incidents in the original film, attempting to revitalise a nearly desolate Britain. The cast for this sequel includes Robert Carlyle, Rose Byrne, Jeremy Renner, Harold Perrineau, Catherine McCormack, Amanda Walker and Idris Elba. 28 Weeks Later is a 2007 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film, and sequel to the 2002 film 28 Days Later. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Danny Boyle (born 20 October 1956) is an English director and film producer, best known for his work on films such as Trainspotting and 28 Days Later. ... Alex Garland (born 1970) is a British novelist and screenwriter. ... Andrew Macdonald is a British film producer, best known for his collaborations with screenwriter John Hodge and director Danny Boyle, including Shallow Grave (1994), Trainspotting (1996) and A Life Less Ordinary (1997). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Robert Carlyle OBE (born April 14, 1961) is an acclaimed Scottish film actor best known for his performances as psychopaths or killers. ... Rose Judith Esther Byrne (born July 24, 1979) is an Australian actress. ... Jeremy Renner in Dahmer Jeremy Renner (born January 7, 1971 in Modesto, California) is an American actor. ... Actor Harold Perrineau played Augustus Hill in HBOs Oz. ... Catherine McCormack (born January 1, 1972 in Alton, Hampshire, England) is an English actress. ... Idris Elba (born September 6, 1972) is a British television, theatre, and film actor who has starred in both British and American productions. ...


Fox Atomic Comics, in association with HarperCollins, has published a graphic novel bridging the time gap between 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later, entitled 28 Days Later: The Aftermath, written by Steve Niles. Fox Atomic Comics was formed in 2006 as the graphic novel publishing arm of Fox Atomic. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Steve Niles is a comic book author, best known for his 2004 horror hit, 30 Days of Night, set in Barrow, Alaska. ...


In March of 2007, 28 Days Later director and 28 Weeks Later executive producer Danny Boyle was interviewed by an Irish radio station, where he claimed to be interested in making a third film in the series, 28 Months Later.[6] Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 28 Weeks Later is a 2007 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film, and sequel to the 2002 film 28 Days Later. ...


Parodies

The film has inspired a number of spoofs: In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...

  • Comedy short film 48 Hours Later (2003) follows the same plot of a man waking to a plague-infested world.[7]
  • Malaysian comedy short 28 Hours Later (2005) relocates the basic plot of 28 Days Later to Kuala Lumpur.[8]
  • "Team Tiger Awesome" created a series of videos called 28 Day Slater. Whilst the title is clearly a play on 28 Days Later, the plots actually parody Saved by the Bell and feature a fictional representation of Mario Lopez, who believes that he is Slater, his character from Saved by the Bell, during the month of February (a 28-day month).[9]
  • Another comedy short filmed by Galacticast called "28 Seconds Later" involves a montage of events happening between 28 second pauses.[10]
  • At the conclusion of the 2004 film Shaun of the Dead, a comedy that sends up the zombie film genre, a television broadcaster (voiced by the film's director) can be heard stating that "...initial reports that the virus was caused by rage infected monkeys has (sic) now been dismissed as complete bullshit". [11]

Nickname: Motto: Maju dan makmur (English: Progress and Prosper) Location in Malaysia Coordinates: , Country State Establishment 1857 Granted city status 1974 Government  - Mayor (Datuk Bandar) Datuk Abdul Hakim Borhan From 14 December 2006 Area  - Total 243. ... Saved by the Bell is an American sitcom that originally aired between 1989 and 1993. ... Mario López, Jr. ... Saved by the Bell is an American sitcom that originally aired between 1989 and 1993. ... Shaun of the Dead is a zombie-themed romantic comedy (or rom zom com as it dubs itself) or zombie comedy released in 2004. ...

References

  1. ^ Bankston, Douglas. "Anthony Dod Mantle, DFF injects the apocalyptic 28 Days Later with a strain of digital video.", American Cinematographer, 2003-07-01. Retrieved on 2007-05-01. 
  2. ^ Mark Kermode (2007). A capital place for panic attacks (html). Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved on 2007-05-12.
  3. ^ [1]Rotton Tomateos Score]
  4. ^ Kitty Empire (2002). Godspeed You! Black Emperor: Adjusting to Fame After 28 Days Later (html). Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
  5. ^ Gingold, Michael. "July 14: Fox sets HILLS II and more release dates", Fangoria, 2006-07-14. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  6. ^ http://www.moviehole.net/news/20070328_28_months_later.html
  7. ^ 48 Hours Later on IMDb
  8. ^ 28 Hours Later on IMDb
  9. ^ 28 Day Slater, episode 1: "The Job Interview", iFilm
  10. ^ 28 Seconds Later at the Galicast website
  11. ^ Interview: Director Edgar Wright on Shaun of the Dead. Cinema Confidential.

Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fangoria is a nationally-distributed US film fan magazine specializing in the genres of horror, psycho and exploitation films, in regular publication since 1979. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
28 Days Later Summary (5928 words)
It is another twenty-eight days later; as predicted by West, the Infected are slowly dying from starvation.
28 Days Later is not an actual zombie film in that "the Infected" are not undead zombies, but living humans driven insane by a highly communicable virus.
However, later in the film, a dejected soldier laments to Jim that because the characters are radio-isolated, as far as they know the infections in New York and Paris were contained and the rest of the planet survived, while the entire island of Great Britain has been quarantined.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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