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Encyclopedia > 25th century BC

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Events

The ruined pyramid of Userkaf at Saqqara. He was the founder of the Fifth Dynasty of Egypt
The ruined pyramid of Userkaf at Saqqara. He was the founder of the Fifth Dynasty of Egypt

hi hi hi hi Image File history File links PyramidOfUserkaf. ... Image File history File links PyramidOfUserkaf. ... Mesopotamia refers to the region now occupied by modern Iraq, eastern Syria, southeastern Turkey, and Southwest Iran. ... Sumer (or Å umer, Sumerian ki-en-gir[1], Egyptian Sanhar[2]) was one of the early civilizations of the Ancient Near East, located in the southern part of Mesopotamia (southeastern Iraq) from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in... Sumer (or Å umer, Sumerian ki-en-gir[1], Egyptian Sanhar[2]) was one of the early civilizations of the Ancient Near East, located in the southern part of Mesopotamia (southeastern Iraq) from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... NY redirects here. ... The Holy of Holies, Hypogeum, Malta The Hypogeum in Ħal-Saflieni, Paola, Malta, is an subterranean structure excavated c. ... Paola may refer to: As a placename: Paola, California, a place in California, United States Paola, Florida, a place in Florida, United States Paola, Italy, a place in Italy Paola, Kansas, a city located in Miami County, Kansas, United States Paola, Malta (formerly Pawla), a town in the south of... View of the Etruscan necropolis of Banditaccia, in Cerveteri, Italy. ... The Fourth dynasty of Egypt was the second of the four dynasties considered forming the Old Kingdom. ... Known rulers, in the History of Egypt, for the Fifth Dynasty. ... The Sixth Dynasty of Egypt is considered by many authorities as the last dynasty of the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt, although The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt (ed. ... Mesopotamia refers to the region now occupied by modern Iraq, eastern Syria, southeastern Turkey, and Southwest Iran. ... Kish, an ancient city in Sumer, now in Iraq Kish, an Iranian island and city in the Persian Gulf Kish, a person in Bible The Kish Bank is a shallow in the Irish Sea, a fishing ground. ... Kurdistan (literally meaning the land of Kurds[1]; old: Koordistan, Curdistan, Kurdia, also in Kurdish: Kurdewarî) is the name of a geographic and cultural region in the Middle East, inhabited predominantly by the Kurds. ... The ancient Elamite Empire lay to the east of Sumer and Akkad, in what is now southwestern Iran. ... There are several references to Awan: Awan was an Elamite dynasty of Iran. ... The word Kings is the plural of king, a male ruler. ... Sumer (or Å umer, Sumerian ki-en-gir[1], Egyptian Sanhar[2]) was one of the early civilizations of the Ancient Near East, located in the southern part of Mesopotamia (southeastern Iraq) from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... Mesopotamia refers to the region now occupied by modern Iraq, eastern Syria, southeastern Turkey, and Southwest Iran. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... A Celtic cross. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Approximate extent of the Corded Ware horizon with adjacent 3rd millennium cultures (after EIEC). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Illyria (disambiguation) Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... Amorite (Hebrew ’emōrî, Egyptian Amar, Akkadian Amurrū (corresponding to Sumerian MAR.TU or Martu) refers to a Semitic people who occupied the middle Euphrates area from the second half of the third millennium BC and also appear in the Tanakh. ... This article is about the land called Canaan. ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ...


Significant persons

An emperor is a (male) monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. ... Yellow Emperor The Yellow Emperor (黄帝 Huáng Dì) is a Chinese mythical character, a culture hero said in legend to be the ancestor of all Chinese people. ... Sketch of a statue of Menkaura and his queen The Pyramid of Menkaure, Giza Menkaura (or Men-Kau-Re; Mycerinus in Latin; Mykerinos in Greek) was a pharaoh of the Fourth dynasty of Egypt (ca. ... Pharaoh is a title used to refer to any ruler, usually male, of the Egyptian kingdom in the pre-Christian, pre-Islamic period. ... Shepseskaf was the last Egyptian Pharaoh of the Fourth dynasty. ... Known rulers, in the History of Egypt, for the Fifth Dynasty. ... Userkaf was the founder of the Fifth dynasty. ... Sahure was the second king of ancient Egypts 5th Dynasty. ... Neferirkare Kakai was Pharaoh of Egypt during the Fifth dynasty. ... praenomen or throne name nomen or birth name Shepseskare Isi, also spelt Shepseskare, (in Greek known as Sisiris), was Pharaoh of Egypt during the Fifth dynasty, and is thought to have reigned from around 2426 BC – 2419 BC. He is the most ephemeral ruler of this Dynasty and some Egyptologists... Eannatum was a Sumerian king of Lagash who established one of the first verifiable empires in history. ... Lagash or Sirpurla was one of the oldest cities of Sumer and later Babylonia. ... Entemena, son of En-anna-tum I, reestablished Lagash as a power in Sumer. ... Uruk (Sumerian Unug, Biblical Erech, Greek Orchoë and Arabic وركاء Warka), was an ancient city of Sumer and later Babylonia, situated east of the present bed of the Euphrates, on the line of the ancient Nil canal, in a region of marshes, about 140 miles (230 km) SSE from Baghdad. ... For other uses, see UR. Ur seen across the Royal tombs, with the Great Ziggurat in the background, January 17, 2004 Ur was an ancient city in southern Mesopotamia, located near the mouth (at the time) of the Euphrates and Tigris rivers on the Persian Gulf and close to Eridu. ... nomen or birth name Neferefre (in Greek possibly identified with Cheris), was Pharaoh of Egypt during the Fifth dynasty. ... praenomen or throne name nomen or birth name Nyuserre Ini, also spelt as Neuserre Izi or Niuserre Izi (in Greek known as Rathoris), was Pharaoh of Egypt during the Fifth dynasty, reigning from ca. ...

Deaths

  • Mahalalel, son of Kenan, (3365 BC - 2470 BC) according to the Hebrew Calendar.

Mahalalel or Mahalaleel (Hebrew מהללאל Mahalalel or Mahălal’ēl) was a patriarch named in the Hebrew Bible. ... Kenan or Qenan (Cainan seems to be an improper rendering of this word; it is separate from the word transliterated Cainan later in the Torah; the rendering Cainan is based off the Greek renderings, Kaïvav as found in Luke 3:36, 37) (Hebrew: קֵינָן, Standard Tiberian  ; possession; smith) was a... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ...

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

  • Harappan civilisation, at its peak, covered an area of around 480,000 km². Its heartland lay in the Indus river valley in Pakistan, but settlements spread as far as the Makran coast, Baluchistan, Afghanistan, eastern Punjab, Kutch and Saurashtra. They included cities like Harappa, Mohenjo-daro, Kalibangan, Dholavira, ports like Lothal, Sutkagen-dor and Sotka-koh and numerous villages as well. They used irrigation to farm and constructed cities. The two main cities had sewage systems, bronze, trade tokens (early coins), and hieroglyphs. There were even baths at one of the villages, besides the great baths of brick in each city. Geometry of shrines and altars tends to identify these with the cities of the Yajur Veda: they might easily be a thousand years older than this conservative date.
  • Cycladic marble figures depict the use of both the musical pipe and the kithara form of lyre. (Archaeology of the Olympics 1988)
  • Earliest surviving ski is left in a peat bog at Hoting, Sweden, about this time. (Encyc. Americana)
  • Sumerians use domestic asses on war chariots (Standard of Ur), not gurs as early interpreters claimed. (Clutton-Brock)
  • Agriculture at Prieta Huaca includes cotton and bottle-gourds. (Bailey 1973)
  • In 2500 B.C., there were many happenings in the Indus Valley. They used irrigation to farm because of the surplus of people. The huge population made it hard to find food, they made cities. The 2 main cities were very full w/ goods + smarts. They had sewage systems, bronze, and hieroglyphs. There were even baths at one of the villages! By 2000 BC, the 2 civilizations were dead. The reason of the collapse might be because the Indus River Valley ran out of water to supply the villagers.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sumer - MSN Encarta (1521 words)
Several centuries later, as the Ubaidian settlers prospered, Semites from Syrian and Arabian deserts began to infiltrate, both as peaceful immigrants and as raiders in quest of booty.
Sometime before the 25th century bc the Sumerian Empire, under the leadership of Lugalanemundu of Adab (flourished about 2525-2500 bc), was extended from the Zagros to the Taurus mountains and from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea.
In the late 19th century, a series of excavations was undertaken at Lagash by French archaeologists working under the direction of the Louvre and at Nippur by Americans under the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania.
egyptians (20821 words)
century BC the city-states in the valley of the Yellow River were captured by the Manchurian nomadic tribes and were united into an agricultural society under the Shang dynasty.
Situated on the northwestern fringes of the Shang domain, the culture of Chou was a mixture of the basic elements of Shang ideology and the certain martial traditions of the Hun nomads of the north and west.
centuries BC, brief periods of stability were achieved through the organization of the interstate alliances and confederations under the domination of the strongest member.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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