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Encyclopedia > 20th Century Fox
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
20th Century Fox logo
Type Subsidiary of News Corporation
Founded 1935
Headquarters Century City, California, USA
Industry Motion picture
Parent Fox Filmed Entertainment (News Corporation)
Website foxmovies.com
foxstudios.com

Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. Located in the Century City area of Los Angeles, California, USA, just west of Beverly Hills, the studio is a subsidiary of News Corporation, the media conglomerate controlled by Rupert Murdoch. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x405, 55 KB)20th logo from 1994-on File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... In business, a subsidiary is a company controlled by another company or corporation. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... A holding company is a company that owns part, all, or a majority of other companies outstanding stock. ... Fox Filmed Entertainment is the parent company of Twentieth Century Fox. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A major film studio is a movie production and distribution company that releases a substantial number of films annually and consistently commands a significant share of box-office revenues in a given market. ... A film studio is a controlled environment for the making of a film. ... View of the Century City skyline from the Getty Center. ... d Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Beverly Hills is a city in the western part of Los Angeles County, California. ... In business, a subsidiary is a company controlled by another company or corporation. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ...

Contents

History

Fox Plaza, Century City headquarters.

The company is the result of a 1935 merger of two entities, Fox Film Corporation founded by William Fox in 1915, and Twentieth Century Pictures, begun in 1933 by Darryl F. Zanuck, Joseph Schenck, Raymond Griffith and William Goetz. William Fox, a pioneer in creating the theater "chain", began producing films in 1914. In 1917 he introduced Theda Bara, one of the most popular screen actresses of the time. Always more of an entrepreneur than a showman, Fox concentrated on acquiring and building theaters; pictures were secondary. With the introduction of sound Fox acquired the rights to a German sound-on-film process which he dubbed "Movietone" and in 1926 began offering films with a music-and- effects track. The following year he began the weekly "Fox Movietone News" feature, which ran until 1963. The growing company needed space, and in 1926 Fox acquired three-hundred acres in the open country west of Beverly Hills and built "Movietone City", the best-equipped studio of its time. Fox Plaza in Century City, Los Angeles, California as viewed from the intersection of Olympic and Beverly Glen Blvds. ... Fox Plaza in Century City, Los Angeles, California as viewed from the intersection of Olympic and Beverly Glen Blvds. ... Fox Plaza (which was used as Nakatomi Plaza) Fox Plaza is a tall skyscraper (492 ft, 34 floors) in Century City, Los Angeles, California, a local landmark. ... Century City is a 176-acre commercial and residential district in western Los Angeles, California. ... The Fox Film Corporation was an American company which produced motion pictures, formed in 1915 when founder William Fox merged two companies he had established in 1913: Greater New York Film Rental, a distribution firm, which was part of the Independents; and Fox (or Box, depending on the source) Office... William Fox (born Wilhelm Fried in January 1, 1879–May 8, 1952) was the founder of Fox Film Corporation, now 20th Century Fox. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... See also: 1932 in film 1933 1934 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events British Film Institute founded. ... Darryl Francis Zanuck (September 5, 1902–December 22, 1979) was a producer, writer, actor and director who played a major part in the Hollywood studio system as one of its longest survivors (the length of his career being rivalled only by that of Adolph Zukor). ... Joseph M. Schenck, born December 25, 1878 - died October 22, 1961, was a pioneer executive who played a key role in the development of the United States film industry. ... Raymond Griffith (January 23, 1895 - November 25, 1957) one of the great silent movie comedians. ... William Goetz William Goetz (March 24, 1903 – August 15, 1969) was a Hollywood film producer and studio executive. ... Theda Bara was the stage name of Theodosia Burr Goodman (July 29, 1885 - April 13, 1955), a silent film actress. ...


When rival Marcus Loew died in 1927, Fox offered to buy the Loew family's holdings; Loew's Inc. controlled more than two-hundred theaters as well as the MGM studio (whose films are currently distributed internationally by Fox -- see below). When the family agreed to the sale, the merger of Fox and Loew's Inc. was announced in 1929. But MGM studio-boss Louis B. Mayer, not included in the deal, fought back; using political connections, he called on the Justice Department's anti-trust unit to block the merger. Fate favoured Mayer; Fox was badly injured in a car crash and by the time he recovered the 1929 stock market crash had taken most of his fortune, putting an end to the Loew's merger. Marcus Loew Marcus Loew (May 7, 1870–September 5, 1927) was an American business magnate and a pioneer of the motion picture industry who formed Loews Theatres and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, MGM. Born into a poor Jewish family in New York City, circumstances dictated he go to work at... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Over-extended and close to bankruptcy, Fox was stripped of his empire and even ended up in jail. Fox Film, with more than five-hundred theatres, was placed in receivership; a bank-mandated reorganisation propped the company up for a time, but it was clear a merger was the only way Fox Film could survive.


Twentieth Century Pictures foundation

Twentieth Century Pictures was an independent Hollywood motion picture production company created in 1932 by Joseph Schenck, the former president of United Artists, Darryl F. Zanuck from Warner Brothers, William Goetz from Fox Films, and Raymond Griffith. Financial backing came from Schenck's older brother Nicholas Schenck and the father-in-law of Goetz, Louis B. Mayer, the head of MGM Studios. Company product was distributed by United Artists, and was filmed at various studios.


Zanuck was named president and Goetz served as vice-president. Successful from the very beginning, their 1934 production, The House of Rothschild was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture. In 1935, they produced the classic film Les Miserables, from Victor Hugo's novel, which was also nominated for Best Picture. That same year, they merged with the financially strapped Fox Film Corporation to create 20th Century-Fox Film Corp. which eventually dropped the hyphen in 1985, around the same time the studio was taken over by Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation. The House of Rothschild is a 1934 film which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... Les Misérables is a 1935 film based upon the famous Victor Hugo novel of the same name. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced in French) (26 February 1802 — 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ...


Twentieth Century/Fox merger

Two years later, Joe Schenck and Fox management agreed to a merger. Although Twentieth Century was the senior partner in the merger, it was still a dwarf compared to Fox. With this in mind, observers of this mouse-and-elephant combination expected that the new company would be called "Fox-Twentieth Century." However, the new company was called Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, which began trading on May 31, 1935. (The hyphen was dropped in 1985.) Schenck and Zanuck retained their roles as chief executive and head of production, respectively. See also: 1934 in film 1935 1936 in film 1930s in film years in film film Events Judy Garland signs a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ...


Aside from the theater chain and a first-rate studio lot, Zanuck and Schenck felt there wasn't much else to Fox. The studio's biggest star, Will Rogers, died in a plane crash weeks after the merger. Its leading female star, Janet Gaynor, was fading in popularity. Promising leading men James Dunn and Spencer Tracy had been dropped because of heavy drinking. Zanuck quickly signed young actors who would carry Twentieth Century-Fox for years: Tyrone Power, Don Ameche, Henry Fonda, ice-skater Sonja Henie, and Betty Grable. And also on the Fox payroll he found two players whom he would build into the studio's leading assets, Alice Faye and seven-year-old Shirley Temple. William Penn Adair Will Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was an American comedian, humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, and actor. ... Janet Gaynor Janet Gaynor [1] (October 6, 1906 – September 14, 1984) was an actress who, in 1928, was the first winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress. ... James Howard Dunn (born November 2, 1905; died September 3, 1967) was an American film actor. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Tyrone Edmund Power, Jr. ... Dominic Felix Ameche (May 31, 1908 – December 6, 1993) was an American actor. ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Sonja Henie (April 8, 1912 - October 12, 1969) was a Norwegian figure skater and actress. ... Betty Grable (December 18, 1916 – July 2, 1973) was an American dancer, singer, and actress. ... Alice Faye, from her official Website, http://www. ... Shirley Jane Temple (born April 23, 1928) later known as Shirley Temple Black, is an American former child actress. ...


Favoring popular biographies and musicals, Zanuck built Fox back to profitability. Thanks to record attendance during World War II, Fox passed RKO and mighty MGM to become the third-most profitable studio. While Zanuck went off for eighteen months' war service, junior partner William Goetz kept profits high by emphasizing light entertainment; the studio's—indeed the industry's—biggest star was creamy blonde Betty Grable. But when Zanuck returned in 1943 he intended to make Fox's output more serious-minded. During the next few years, with pictures like Wilson, Gentleman's Agreement, The Snake Pit, Boomerang and Pinky, Zanuck established a reputation for provocative, adult films. Fox also specialized in adaptations of best-selling books and Broadway musicals, including the Rodgers and Hammerstein films, beginning with the musical version of State Fair in 1945, and continuing on years later with Carousel in 1956, The King and I, and The Sound of Music. They also distributed, but did not make, the Cinemascope version of Oklahoma! and the 1958 film version of South Pacific. William Goetz William Goetz (March 24, 1903 – August 15, 1969) was a Hollywood film producer and studio executive. ... As a surname, Wilson is derived from William, an old Germanic name. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... The Snake Pit is a 1948 film which tells the story of a woman who finds herself in an insane asylum, and cant remember how she got there. ... This article is about the wooden implement. ... Pinky may refer to: Pinky VRS , Pinky tells the Real Story Videophone and Video Relay Service Pinky finger, the smallest finger on a human hand Pinky Street, (or Pinky:St) collectable figures made by the Japanese company Vance Pinky (candy), made by a Japanese company Pinky (2001 animated shortfilm) Pinky... Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... A state fair is a competitive and recreational gathering of a U.S. states population. ... Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... This article is about the 1956 film, for the musical on which the film was based, see The King and I The King and I is a 1956 musical film made by 20th Century Fox, directed by Walter Lang and produced by Charles Brackett and Darryl F. Zanuck. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... Template:Deletion REDIRECT Oklahoma! ... This article is about the 1958 film . ...


After the war, audiences drifted away, and the arrival of television hastened the process. Fox held on to its theaters until a court-mandated divorce; they were spun off as Fox National Theaters in 1953. That year, with attendance at one-half 1946's level, Fox gambled on an unproven gimmick. Noting that the two movie sensations of 1952 had been Cinerama, which required three projectors to fill a giant curved screen, and "Natural Vision" 3-D, which got its effects of depth by requiring the use of polarized glasses, Fox mortgaged its studio to buy rights to a French anamorphic projection system which gave a slight illusion of depth without glasses. In February, 1953, Zanuck announced that henceforth all Fox pictures would be made in CinemaScope. To convince theater owners to install this new process, Fox agreed to help pay conversion costs (about $25,000 per screen); and to ensure enough product, Fox gave access to CinemaScope to any rival studio choosing to use it. Seeing the box-office for the first two CinemaScope features, The Robe and How to Marry a Millionaire, Warners, MGM, Universal and Columbia quickly adopted the process. Cinerama is the trademarked name for a widescreen process which works by simultaneously projecting images from three synchronized 35 mm projectors onto a huge, deeply-curved screen, subtending 146° of arc, and for the corporation which was formed to market it. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... A cinema presenting The Robe The Robe is a 1953 Biblical epic film that tells the story of a Roman tribune who commands the unit that crucifies Jesus. ... How to Marry a Millionaire is a 1953 film, directed by Jean Negulesco and starring Lauren Bacall, Marilyn Monroe, and Betty Grable as fortune hunters. ...


CinemaScope brought a brief up-turn in attendance, but by 1956 the numbers again began to slide. That year Darryl Zanuck announced his resignation as head of production. Officially attributed to burn-out, rumors persisted that his wife had threatened divorce (in community-property California) after discovering Zanuck's affair with actress Bella Darvi. Zanuck moved to Paris, setting up as an independent producer; he did not set foot in California again for fifteen years. Bella Darvi (October 23, 1928 – September 11, 1971) was an actress of Polish parentage, although promotional materials refer to her as French. ...


Production and financial problems

His successor, producer Buddy Adler, died a year later. President Spyros Skouras (who had succeeded Schenck in 1942) brought in a series of production executives, but none had Zanuck's success. By the early 1960s Fox was in trouble. A remake of Theda Bara's Cleopatra had begun in 1959 with Joan Collins in the lead; as a publicity gimmick producer Walter Wanger offered one million dollars to Elizabeth Taylor if she would star; Taylor accepted, and costs for Cleopatra began to escalate. Maurice Buddy Adler (1909 - 1960) was a United States movie producer. ... Spyros P. Skouras (born March 28, 1893–August 16, 1971) was an American movie executive who was the chairman of the Twentieth Century Fox from 1942 to 1962. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... The 1917 Cleopatra was directed by J. Gordon Edwards and starred Theda Bara in the title role. ... Joan Henrietta Collins OBE (born May 23, 1933) is a Golden Globe Award winning English actress and bestselling author. ... Walter Wanger (July 11, 1894 - November 18, 1968) was an important American film producer. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Meanwhile, another remake—this one of the 1940 Cary Grant hit My Favorite Wife was rushed into production in an attempt to turn over a quick profit to help keep Fox afloat. The unoriginal romantic comedy, titled Something's Got to Give paired Fox's most bankable star of the 1950's - Marilyn Monroe - with Dean Martin, but with a troubled star and belligerent director (George Cukor) causing delays on a daily basis, it quickly descended into a costly debacle. As Cleopatra's budget passed the ten-million dollar mark, Fox sold its back lot (now the site of Century City) to Alcoa in 1961 to raise cash. After several months of very little progress, Marilyn Monroe was fired from Something's Got to Give, although somewhat controversially Elizabeth Taylor's highly disruptive reign on the Cleopatra set continued unchallenged. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Archibald Alec Leach (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986), better known by his screen name, Cary Grant, was an English born film actor. ... My Favorite Wife is a 1940 screwball comedy film that tells the story of Ellen Wagstaff Arden (Irene Dunne), a young mother who returns home after seven years of being stranded on a tropical island only to discover that that very afternoon her beloved husband Nick (Cary Grant) has had... Romantic comedy films are a sub-genre of comedy films as well as of romance films. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... Century City is the name of: A neighborhood in Los Angeles, California, USA. See: Century City, Los Angeles, California. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Cleopatra is a 1963 film directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. ...


With few pictures on the schedule, Skouras wanted to rush Zanuck's big-budget war epic The Longest Day into release as another source of quick cash. This offended Zanuck, still Fox's largest shareholder. After it became clear that Something's Got to Give would not be able to progress without Monroe in the lead (Martin had refused to work with anyone else), Skouras finally relented and re-signed her. But days before filming was due to resume, she was found dead at her Los Angeles home and the unfinished scenes from Something's Got to Give were shelved. They wouldn't see the light of day for nearly 40 years. The Longest Day is a 3-hour-long 1962 war film with a very large cast, based on the 1959 book The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan, about D-Day, the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, during World War II. // The movie was adapted by Romain Gary, James... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


At the next board meeting Zanuck spoke for eight hours, convincing directors that Skouras was mis-managing the company and that he was the only possible successor. He was installed as chairman; then named his son Richard Zanuck as president. This new management group seized Cleopatra and rushed it to completion, shut down the studio, laid off the entire staff to save money, axed the long-running Movietone Newsreel and made a series of cheap, popular pictures that luckily restored Fox as a major studio. The biggest boost to the studio's fortunes came from the tremendous success of The Sound of Music (1965), a handsomely produced adaptation of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway musical, which became one of the all-time greatest box office hits. Richard Darryl Zanuck (born December 13, 1934) is an American movie producer. ...


Zanuck stayed on as chairman until 1971 but his last years saw several expensive flops, resulting in Fox posting losses from 1969 to 1971. Following his removal, and after an uncertain period, new management brought Fox back to health. Under president Dennis Stanfill and production head Alan Ladd, Jr., Fox films connected with modern audiences. Stanfill used the profits to acquire resort properties, soft-drink bottlers, Australian theaters, and other properties in an attempt to diversify enough to offset the boom-or-bust cycle of picture-making. Alan Ladd Jr. ...


Rupert Murdoch

Main article: Rupert Murdoch

With financial stability came new owners, and in 1978 control passed to the investors Marc Rich and Marvin Davis. Three years later, Rich sold his shares to Rupert Murdoch's Australian media group, News Corporation. In 1984, Davis sold his half of Fox to News Corp., giving Murdoch's company complete control. To run the studio, Murdoch hired Barry Diller from Paramount; Diller brought with him a plan which Paramount's board had refused: a studio-backed, fourth free to air commercial television-network. Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... Marc Rich (born Marc David Reich on December 18, 1934) is an international commodities trader. ... Marvin Davis (August 31, 1925 in Newark, New Jersey – September 25, 2004 in Beverly Hills, California) was the billionaire former owner of Twentieth Century Fox and Pebble Beach, the Beverly Hills Hotel, and the Denver Broncos NFL team. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... Barry Diller at the Web 2. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ...


But to gain FCC approval of Fox's purchase of Metromedia's television holdings (once the stations of the old DuMont network), Murdoch had to become an American citizen. He did so in 1985, and in 1986, the new Fox Broadcasting Company took to the air. Over the next twenty years the network and owned-stations group have expanded to become extremely profitable for News Corp. The film studio has prospered too, although Fox has backed away from its reputation for literary adaptations and adult themes to concentrate on "popcorn" movies such as the Star Wars trilogies (1977-1983 and 1999-2005), and others. 1970s logo for WTCN-TV (now KARE) in Minneapolis, which included the corporate logo for Metromedia; this logo was also used by KTTV in Los Angeles Metromedia Producers Corporation logo Metromedia (also often MetroMedia) was a media company that owned radio and television stations in the United States from 1956... The DuMont Television Network was the worlds first commercial television network, beginning operation in the United States in 1946. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... Star Wars is an epic science fantasy saga and fictional universe created by George Lucas during the late 1970s. ...


Since January 2001, this company has been the international distributor for MGM/UA releases, and as of 2006, the worldwide video distributor for the MGM/UA library. In the 1980s, Fox -- through a joint venture with CBS, called CBS/Fox Video, had distributed certain UA films on video, thus UA has come full circle by switching to Fox for video distribution. CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... CBS/Fox Video was a home video company formed and established in 1982. ...


Fox Film

The Fox Film Corporation was an American company which produced motion pictures, formed in 1915 when founder William Fox merged two companies he had established in 1913: Greater New York Film Rental, a distribution firm, which was part of the Independents; and Fox (or Box, depending on the source) Office Attractions Company, a production company. (see vertical integration) Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... // Events June 18 : The Motion Picture Directors Association (MPDA) was formed by twenty-six film directors in Los Angeles, California. ... William Fox (born Wilhelm Fuchs in January 1, 1879–May 8, 1952) founded the Fox Film Corporation in 1915 and the Fox West Coast Theatres chain. ... Corporate redirects here. ... // Events The Squaw Man, the first Hollywood feature film, is made. ... It has been suggested that Vertical expansion be merged into this article or section. ...


The company's first film studios were set up in Fort Lee, New Jersey but in 1917, William Fox sent Sol M. Wurtzel to Hollywood, California to oversee the studio's new West Coast production facilities where a more hospitable and cost effective climate existed for filmmaking. On July 23, 1926, the company bought the patents of the Movietone sound system from Theodore Case for recording sound on to film. Map highlighting Fort Lees location within Bergen County. ... Sol M. Wurtzel (September 12, 1881 - April 9, 1958) was an American motion picture producer. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // August - Warner Brothers debuts the first Vitaphone film, Don Juan. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... The Movietone sound system is method of recording sound for moving pictures which guarantees synchronisation between the sound and the picture. ... Theodore Case (1888 Auburn, New York – 1944) began working on his sound-on-film process in 1916. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ...


After the Crash of 1929, William Fox lost control of the company in 1930, during a hostile takeover. Under new president Sidney Kent, the new owners merged the company with Twentieth Century Pictures to form 20th Century Fox in 1935. The 1929 stock market crash devastated economies worldwide The Wall Street Crash refers to the stock market crash that occurred on October 29, 1929, when share prices on the New York Stock Exchange collapsed, leading eventually to the Great Depression. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ...


Among Fox's notable films:


1920s

  • Lights of New York (1922, with Technicolor sequences)
  • Madness of Youth (1923, with Technicolor sequences)
  • Fig Leaves (1926, with Technicolor sequences)
  • Yankee Senor (1926, with Technicolor sequences)
  • Hell's Four Hundred (1926, with Technicolor sequences)
  • Joy Girl (1927, with Technicolor sequences)
  • Seventh Heaven (1927) (1927/28 Academy Award winner, Best Actress Janet Gaynor)
  • Sunrise (1927), one of the first films in the sound-on-film system Fox Movietone; only the musical score was heard. 1927/28 Academy Award winner, Best Actress Janet Gaynor)
  • None But the Brave (1928, with Technicolor sequences)
  • Street Angel (1928)(1927/28 Academy Award winner, Best Actress Janet Gaynor)
  • In Old Arizona (1928, Fox's first all-talkie, Academy Award winner) (1928/29 Academy Award winner, Best Actor Warner Baxter)
  • Fox Movietone Follies of 1929 (1929, with Multicolor sequences)
  • Married in Hollywood (1929, with Multicolor sequences)
  • Sunny Side Up (1929, with Multicolor sequences)
  • Hearts in Dixie (1929, black and white)

Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... For other uses, see Seventh Heaven (disambiguation) Seventh Heaven is a 1927 silent film that was one of the first films to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture (then called Best Picture, Production). The film was written by H.H. Caldwell (titles), Benjamin Glazer, Katherine Hilliker (titles... Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (aka Sunrise) is a 1927 American film directed by F.W. Murnau. ... Movietone was created ever since silent movies came out, and was the primary source of news and current events for moviegoers until the first black and white television set came out in the late 1940s. ... Released in 1965, None But the Brave was the first, and only, film to be directed by Frank Sinatra. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Street Angel is a 1928 film about a woman who finds herself destitute and on the streets. ... In Old Arizona is a 1929 Western film, directed by Raoul Walsh, nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture. ... Multicolor is a subtractive natural color process for motion pictures. ... Multicolor is a subtractive natural color process for motion pictures. ... Fried egg Sunny Side Up, a 1929 film directed by David Butler starring Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell, noted for its use of an almost wandering mobile camera in a way highly atypical of the early sound period. ... Multicolor is a subtractive natural color process for motion pictures. ... Hearts in Dixie (1929), is one of the first all-talkie, big-studio production to boast a predominately African-American cast. ...

1930s

Multicolor is a subtractive natural color process for motion pictures. ... Happy Days (1929) is an 80 minute musical film, notable for being the first movie shown entirely in widescreen anywhere in the world (French director Abel Gances Napoléon (1927) had some widescreen segments). ... High Society Blues is a 1930 film starring Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell. ... Just Imagine was a humorous science-fiction movie musical presented by 20th Century Fox in 1930, directed by David Butler, to console audiences distressed by the Great Depression. ... The Big Trail was a 1930 film starring John Wayne in his first leading role and was also the first widescreen movie, appearing decades before The Robe. ... Cheer Up and Smile is a 1930 American musical film directed by Sidney Lanfield. ... Multicolor is a subtractive natural color process for motion pictures. ... East Lynne is a novel of 1861 by Mrs. ... Spoiler warning: Charlie Chan Carries On (1930) is the fifth novel in the Charlie Chan series by Earl Derr Biggers. ... William Penn Adair Will Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was an American comedian, humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, and actor. ... Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm is a 1932 film based on the 1903 childrens classic novel by Kate Douglas Wiggin. ... Tess of the Storm Country is a 1932 English-language remake of the 1922 silent film of the same name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Cavalcade is a historical view of English life from New Years Eve 1899 through 1933, from the point of view of of well-to-do Londoner residents Jane and Robert Marryot (played by Diana Wynyard and Clive Brook). ... A state fair is a competitive and recreational gathering of a U.S. states population. ... Stand Up and Cheer! is a 1934 motion picture about the Depression Era in the United States, and the efforts undertaken to boost the morale of the citizenry. ... Bright Eyes is a 1934 musical film, starring Shirley Temple and produced by 20th Century Fox (then called Fox Pictures). David Butler directed and co-wrote the movie. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Dantes Inferno (1935) is a motion picture that draws for inspiration on The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri. ...

See also

This is a list of notable films produced and/or distributed by the U.S. film studio Twentieth Century Fox. ...

20th Television/20th Century Fox Television

20th Television is Fox's television syndication division. 20th Century Fox Television is the studio's television production division. 20th Century Fox Television is the television production division of the 20th Century Fox movie studio, a subsidiary of News Corporation. ... 20th Television (also referred to as Twentieth Television) is a U.S. television distribution company that was formed in 1992 by 20th Century Fox Film Corporation. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ...


The 20th Century Fox logo and fanfare

The distinctive Art Deco skyline 20th Century Fox logo originated as the 20th Century Pictures logo, with the name "Fox" substituted for "Pictures, Inc.".


The music accompanying the Fox logo was composed in 1933 by Alfred Newman, longtime head of Fox's music department. [1] In 1954, an extended version was created for CinemaScope films, and debuted on the film The Robe. The current version is a re-recording conducted by David Newman in 1997. [2] (MP3 file of extended version) Alfred Newman (March 17, 1900 – February 17, 1970) was a major American composer of music for films. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... A cinema presenting The Robe The Robe is a 1953 Biblical epic film that tells the story of a Roman tribune who commands the unit that crucifies Jesus. ... David Newman (b. ...


The fanfare used in The Simpsons Movie was revived using Ralph Wiggum's rendition, "dadadada...dadadada...dadadada!" The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ... Ralph Wiggum is a fictional character on the animated series The Simpsons, voiced by Nancy Cartwright. ...


Popular culture references and spoofs

  • "Twentieth Century Fox" is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their self-titled debut album (1967), referring to a foxy lady.
  • 21st Century Fox was the title of an album by Samantha Fox, as well as many articles about both the film studio and various attractive women in many publications.
  • In the 1993 Mel Brooks movie Robin Hood: Men in Tights (which was released by Fox), Robin and his Merry Men enlist "12th Century Fox," a messenger service that uses foxes, to call the villagers for help.
  • The animated science-fiction TV series Futurama, set around the year 3000, closed with a logo for "30th Century Fox." An episode later explained the powerful spotlights at 30th Century Fox were used to blind pilots so that Fox cameramen could film the resulting planecrashes.

A pun (also known as paronomasia) is a figure of speech, or word play which consists of a deliberate confusion of similar words within a phrase or phrases for rhetorical effect, whether humorous or serious. ... This page is about the rock band. ... The Doors is the debut album by the band The Doors, released in 1967. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... This article is about the English model and singer; for the American erotic actress, see Samantha Fox (porn star). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Robin Hood: Men In Tights (1993) is a film parody of the story of Robin Hood, particularly parodying Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. ... Futurama is an Emmy Award-winning animated American sitcom created by creator of The Simpsons Matt Groening and developed by Groening and David X. Cohen for the Fox network. ...

Bibliography

  • Custen, George F., Twentieth Century's Fox: Darryl F. Zanuck and the Culture of Hollywood; New York: BasicBooks, 1997; ISBN 0-465-07619-X

See also

The current version of the article or section reads more like an advertisement than an encyclopedic article. ... Fox Searchlight Pictures logo. ... 20th Century Fox Animation is the animation division of film studio 20th Century Fox. ... Fox Entertainment Group is an American entertainment industry company that owns film studios and terrestrial, cable, and direct broadcast satellite television properties. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... The Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) is responsible for establishing format standards and promoting and further developing business opportunities for Blu-ray Disc. ... This is a list of Hollywood movie studios. ... This group of articles compose an alphabetical list of films with entries in Wikipedia (or films of significance which have references in Wikipedia even if no articles yet appear, such as Academy Award winning films, for example). ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... 20th Century Fox Television is the television production division of the 20th Century Fox movie studio, a subsidiary of News Corporation. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... 20th Century Fox Studio Classics refers to a collection of DVDs released by 20th Century Fox. ... Fox Interactive is a video game publisher and developer mainly concerned with titles based on 20th Century Fox properties, such as The Simpsons, Family Guy , Futurama , the Alien and Predator film franchises, ID4: The Game, Buffy the Vampire Slayer , The X-Files and the Die Hard series of films. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
20th Century Fox: Datenschutzrichtlinie (1608 words)
In diesen Datenschutzrichtlinien legt Fox dar, auf welche Weise Fox auf dieser Webseite, durch SMS oder andere Kommunikationsmittel übermittelte personenbezogene Daten ("PII", d.h.
Fox lässt Sie entscheiden, ob Ihre PII für andere Zwecke als denjenigen, für welchen sie von Ihnen zur Verfügung gestellt wurden, genutzt werden sollen.
Fox wird Ihre PII dazu nutzen, Ihnen Informationen über ausgewählte, auf Ihre Interessen zugeschnittene Werbemaßnahmen und Veranstaltungen zu übermitteln.
20th century Fox Studios (1320 words)
Founded in 1913 by William Fox, the studio had begun producing the famous Movietone Newsreels (the precursor of today's network newscasts) even before they moved to their current location.
Fox had opened their studios in Century City in 1928, on land which used to be the personal ranch of Western movie star
The twin Century Plaza Towers were featured on TV in both "Remington Steele" and "Moonlighting", and the fountains on Avenue of the Stars have been seen in many films and TV shows.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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