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Encyclopedia > 2010 Winter Olympics
XXI Olympic Winter Games
2010 Winter Olympics logo

The 2010 Winter Olympics logo was unveiled on
April 23, 2005 and is named Ilanaaq the Inunnguaq.
Ilanaaq is the Inuktitut word for friend
Image File history File links Soccerball_current_event. ... Sport from childhood. ... Womens Australian rules football is a team sport. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Inuksuit at the Foxe Peninsula (Baffin Island) An inuksuk (plural inuksuit) [1] (from the Inuktitut: ᐃᓄᒃᓱᒃ, plural ᐃᓄᒃᓱᐃᑦ; alternatively inukshuk in English [2] or inukhuk in Inuinnaqtun [3]) is a stone landmark used as a milestone or directional marker by the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic. ... Inuktitut (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ, literally like the Inuit) is the language of the Inuit people. ...

Host city Vancouver, BC, Canada
Nations participating (Unknown)
Athletes participating (Unknown)
Events 86 in 7 sports
Opening ceremony February 12
Closing ceremony February 28
Officially opened by (Unknown)
Stadium BC Place Stadium

The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games or the 21st Winter Olympics, will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Both the Olympic and Paralympic Games are being organized by the Vancouver Organizing Committee (VANOC). For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Athens Olympic Stadium The Olympic Stadium is the name usually given to the big centrepiece stadium of the Summer Olympic Games. ... A view of the deflated roof A view of the deflation of the roof An inside view of the deflated roof BC Place Stadium is Canadas first domed stadium and is the largest air-supported stadium in the world[1]. It is located on the north side of False... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... See also: 2010 Winter Olympics The 2010 Winter Paralympics will be held in the area surrounding Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, including the towns of Burnaby and Whistler. ...


The 2010 Winter Olympics will be the third Olympics hosted by Canada, and the first by the province of British Columbia. Previously, Canada was home to the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal and the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary. The villages of Whistler and Garibaldi bid for the games in 1976 but failed to win. These will also be the first games to be held in an NHL market since the league allowed its players to participate starting in 1998. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and opened by Governor General Jeanne Sauvé. The Olympics were highly successful financially as they brought in million-dollar profits. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... Location of Whistler within the Squamish-Lillooet District in British Columbia, Canada Coordinates: , Country Canada Province British Columbia Regional District Squamish-Lillooet Settled 1914 by Mrytle and Alex Philip Incorporated 1975 Government  - Mayor Ken Melamed  - Manager Bill Barratt  - Governing body Whistler Town Council  - MP Blair Wilson  - MLA Joan McIntyre Area... The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... NHL redirects here. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ...


Following Olympic tradition, current Vancouver mayor Sam Sullivan received the Olympic flag during the closing ceremony of the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, which was also attended by Governor General Michaëlle Jean and Premier of British Columbia, Gordon Campbell. The flag was raised on February 28, 2006, in a special flag raising ceremony, and will be on display at Vancouver's city hall until the Olympic opening ceremony. At the same time, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said in a statement that the Olympic flame had begun its journey to Vancouver.[1] Sam Sullivan, CM (born 1960) is the Mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The Olympic symbols are the icons, flags and symbols used by the International Olympic Committee to promote the Olympic Games. ... The Closing Ceremony of the 2006 Winter Olympics took place on February 26, 2006 beginning at 20:00 CET (19:00 UTC) at the Stadio Olimpico in Turin, Italy. ... Torino redirects here. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... Michaëlle Jean, CC CMM COM CD , (born September 6, 1957, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti) is the current Governor General of Canada. ... Categories: Stub | British Columbia premiers ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ...


The Call for Volunteers program was launched on February 12, 2008 to find 25,000 volunteers.[2] is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Training

The TerraNW program is set up to facilitate international snow sports teams seeking training venues, logistical support and community resources in the Pacific Northwest Region prior to the 2010 Winter Olympic Games. TerraNW.org has a full list of regional venues to accommodate athletes preparing for the Winter Olympics.


Bidding

The Canadian Olympic Association chose Vancouver as the Canadian candidate city over Calgary, which sought to re-host the games and Quebec City, which had lost the 2002 Olympic bid in 1995. On the first round of voting on November 21, 1998, Vancouver-Whistler had 26 votes, Quebec City with 25 and Calgary 21. On December 3, 1998, the second and final round of voting occurred between the two leading contenders, which saw Vancouver win with 40 votes compared to Quebec City's 32. The win allowed Vancouver to prepare its bid and begin lobbying efforts internationally. Three cities made the shortlist with their bids to host the 2010 Winter Olympics (formally known as XXI Olympic Winter Games), which were awarded to Vancouver, British Columbia, on July 2, 2003. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


After the bid bribing scandal that took place with the 2002 Winter Olympics at Salt Lake City (which saw Quebec City asking for compensation (CDN$8 million) for their failed 2002 bid[3]), 1999 saw many of the rules around the bidding process change. The IOC created the Evaluation Commission which was appointed on October 24, 2002. Prior to the bidding for the 2008 Summer Olympics, often host cities would fly members of the IOC to their city where they toured the city and were provided with gifts from the city. The lack of oversight and transparency often led to allegations of money for votes. Afterward, changes brought forth by the IOC bidding rules were tightened, and more focused on technical aspects of candidate cities. The team analysed the candidate city features and provided its input back to the IOC. The bid books from the three candidate cities were submitted in January 2003 and inspections occurred before May 2003, when the final report was submitted. The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in...


Vancouver's residents were asked in a referendum whether they accepted the responsibilities of the host city should it win its bid. Sixty-four percent of residents accepted the proposal. The referendum was held only in Vancouver, though the infrastructure tab was to be picked up by the province as a whole.


Furthermore, this victory was helped by a media campaign which saw those who supported the Olympic bid outspend those who were against the bid by 88:1.[citation needed] Regardless, it was the first time such a referendum was successful. In neighbouring Washington state to the south, both the state legislature and Governor Gary Locke passed a resolution in support of Vancouver's bid, and sent it to the IOC.[4] For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Brad Owen, D since January 13, 1997 Speaker of the House of Representatives Frank Chopp, D since January 14, 2001 Members 147 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Washington State Capitol, Olympia... This is a list of governors of the U.S. state of Washington. ... Gary F. Locke, born January 21, 1950) was the Democratic governor of Washington (1997-2005), and the first American governor of Chinese descent in United States history. ...


Vancouver won the bidding process to host the Olympics by a vote of the International Olympic Committee on July 2, 2003 at the 115th IOC Session held in Prague, Czech Republic. The result was announced by IOC President Jacques Rogge. Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... Jacques Rogge Count Jacques Rogge (born May 2, 1942 in Ghent, Belgium) is by profession an orthopedic surgeon. ...


Vancouver faced two other finalists shortlisted that same February: PyeongChang, South Korea and Salzburg, Austria. Pyeongchang had the most votes of the three cities in the first round of voting, in which Salzburg was eliminated. In the run-off, all but two of the members who had voted for Salzburg voted for Vancouver. Pyeongchang County (Pyeongchang-gun) is a county in Gangwon Province, South Korea. ... This article is about the capital of the Austrian state of Salzburg. ...


Two years earlier, Canada had put in a bid for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Toronto, but lost out to Beijing. British Columbia had refused to support Toronto's bid that,[citation needed] had it succeeded, would have ended Vancouver's chances of hosting the 2010 games as the IOC preferred to rotate the Games among continents. The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in...

2010 Winter Olympics bidding results
City NOC Name Round 1 Round 2
Vancouver, British Columbia Flag of Canada Canada 40 56
PyeongChang Flag of South Korea South Korea 51 53
Salzburg Flag of Austria Austria 16 -

For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Pyeongchang County (Pyeongchang-gun) is a county in Gangwon Province, South Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... This article is about the capital of the Austrian state of Salzburg. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ...

Construction

The Olympic Flag outside the Vancouver City Hall. This particular flag was replaced with a replica after it was stolen.
The Olympic Flag outside the Vancouver City Hall. This particular flag was replaced with a replica after it was stolen.

The initial problem Vancouver faced in winning the bid for the 2010 Winter Olympics was fundraising for construction of venues. The Bid Committee, and subsequently VANOC, arranged for commitments of investment on a 50/50 basis by the federal and provincial governments, primarily for amounts to cover venue construction costs. It later began to achieve sponsorships and donations from private corporations and institutions. Such commitments were made enthusiastically as a chance to build on the world prestige Vancouver already gained as host of the 1986 World's Fair and to improve on the technological advances made during that event, like the expansion of the SkyTrain transit system. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (959x533, 91 KB) Summary Vancouver City Hall with the Olympics flag. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (959x533, 91 KB) Summary Vancouver City Hall with the Olympics flag. ... The statue of George Vancouver outside of Vancouver City Hall. ... Expo 86 logo The 1986 World Exposition on Transportation and Communication, or simply Expo 86, was a Worlds Fair held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada during the summer of 1986. ... The platform at Metrotown Station in Burnaby is one of the busiest in the SkyTrain system. ... Where most trains have a driver’s cab, ART Mark II trains give passengers a large picture window through which they can see where the train is going. ...


The expansion was a pledge of the BC government, and not the responsibility of VANOC. Construction of the rapid transit link between Richmond, the adjacent international airport and downtown Vancouver is now underway and is expected to be completed by late 2009. The BC government also indicated it would pay for a C$600 million upgrade of the Sea-to-Sky Highway to accommodate increased traffic between Vancouver and Whistler, although this highway upgrade has been overdue for more than a decade and will still not meet the basic needs of the corridor.[citation needed] “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... RAV redirects here. ... Vancouver International Airport (IATA Airport Code: YVR; ICAO Airport Code: CYVR), is located about 15 kilometres driving distance from downtown Vancouver, British Columbia on Sea Island in Richmond. ... British Columbia provincial highway 99 is the major nouth-south artery through the Greater Vancouver Regional District. ...


The three main venues -- constructed at a cost of $580 million, about 23 percent above the 2003 bid forecasts -- have already had their work largely completed. The $40-million Hillcrest/Nat Bailey stadium park, which will host curling, will be finished later this year. The Vancouver Olympic Committee (VANOC) spent $16.6 million on upgrading facilities at Cypress, which will host the freestyle (aerials, moguls, ski cross) and snowboarding events. The athletes' villages in Whistler and Vancouver are still under construction, as are the main media centre in Coal Harbour and its Whistler counterpart.[citation needed]


As of 2004, the operational cost of the 2010 Winter Olympics is estimated to be in the range of C$1.4 billion. In 2006, VANOC CEO John Furlong estimated it would be about C$1.7 billion, all raised from non-government sources, primarily through sponsorships and the auction of national broadcasting rights. C$580 million is the taxpayer-supported budget to construct or renovate venues throughout Vancouver and Whistler, C$200 million is expected to be spent for security, of which the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is the lead agency. C$ redirects here. ... RCMP redirects here. ...


Logo and mascots

Main article: 2010 Winter Olympics mascots

The 2010 Winter Olympics logo was unveiled on April 23, 2005 and is named Ilanaaq the Inunnguaq. Ilanaaq is the Inuktitut word for friend. The logo is based on the Inukshuk built for the Northwest Territories Pavilion at Expo 86 and donated to the city of Vancouver after the event. It is now used as a landmark on English Bay beach. Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Inuksuit at the Foxe Peninsula (Baffin Island) An inuksuk (plural inuksuit) [1] (from the Inuktitut: ᐃᓄᒃᓱᒃ, plural ᐃᓄᒃᓱᐃᑦ; alternatively inukshuk in English [2] or inukhuk in Inuinnaqtun [3]) is a stone landmark used as a milestone or directional marker by the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic. ... Inuktitut (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ, literally like the Inuit) is the language of the Inuit people. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The mascots for the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games were introduced on November 27, 2007.[5] After the unveiling, many people were displeased with the look of the new mascots because they represented a small population of Vancouver. [6] Inspired by traditional First Nations creatures, the mascots include: is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... First Nations is a term of ethnicity that refers to the indigenous peoples in what is now Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis people. ...

  • Miga - A mythical sea bear, part orca and part kermode bear.
  • Quatchi - A sasquatch.
  • Sumi - An animal guardian spirit who wears the hat of the orca whale, flies with the wings of the mighty Thunderbird and runs on the strong furry legs of the black bear.
  • Mukmuk - A Vancouver Island marmot, Mukmuk is not an official mascot but acts as their sidekick.

Miga and Quatchi are mascots for the Olympic Games, while Sumi is the mascot for the Paralympic Games. The Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) is a member of the World Bank group. ... Binomial name Orcinus orca Linnaeus, 1758 Orca range (in blue) The Orca or Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) is the largest species of the oceanic dolphin family (Delphinidae). ... Trinomial name Ursus americanus kermodei The Kermode bear is a genetically-unique subspecies of bear found in the central coast of British Columbia. ... It has been suggested that Evidence regarding Bigfoot be merged into this article or section. ... Depiction of a Thunderbird on a Totem Pole The mythological Thunderbird is a mythical creature common to Indigenous spirituality in North America . ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ... Species See text. ...


Sports

Eighty-Six winter sports events have been announced as part of the 2010 Winter Olympics. The eight sports categorized as ice sports are: bobsled, luge, skeleton, ice hockey, figure skating, speed skating, short track speed skating, and curling. The three sports categorized as alpine, skiing and snowboarding events are: alpine, freestyle and snowboarding. The four sports categorized as Nordic events are: biathlon, cross country skiing, ski jumping, and nordic combined. Historic bobteam from Davos around 1910 Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-02-04, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... A luge is small one- or two-person sled on which one sleds supine and feet-first. ... United States Air Force Major Brady Canfield, 2003 U.S. skeleton champion, shows his takeoff form. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... Speed skating, or long track speedskating, long track speed skating, is an Olympic sport where competitors are timed while crossing a set distance. ... Short track speed skating (also Shorttrack speedskating) is a form of competitive ice speed skating. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... Freestyle skiing began in the 1930s, when Norwegian skiers began performing acrobatics during alpine and cross-country training. ... Snowboarder dropping a cornice. ... Several biathletes in the shooting area of a competition Biathlon (not to be confused with duathlon) is a term used to describe any sporting event made up of two disciplines. ... Cross-country skiing (aka XC skiing) is an adventure and fitness activity as well as a competitive winter sport popular in many countries with large snowfields, primarily in Europe and Canada. ... Ski jumping is a sport in which skiers go down an inrun with a take-off ramp (the jump), attempting to go as far as possible. ... The Nordic combined is a winter sport in which athletes compete in both cross-country skiing and ski jumping. ...

  • Alpine skiing
  • Biathlon
  • Bobsleigh
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Curling
  • Figure skating
  • Freestyle skiing
  • Ice hockey
  • Luge
  • Nordic combined
  • Short track speed skating
  • Skeleton
  • Ski jumping
  • Snowboarding
  • Speed skating


The opening and closing ceremonies and the events categorized as ice sports (excluding bobsleigh, luge and skeleton) will be held in Vancouver and Richmond. The sports categorized as "Nordic events" will be held in the Callaghan Valley located just to the west of Whistler. All alpine skiing events will be held on Whistler Mountain (Creekside) and sliding events (bobsleigh, luge and skeleton) will be held on Blackcomb Mountain. Cypress Mountain (located in Cypress Provincial Park in West Vancouver) will host the 2010 freestyle skiing (aerials, moguls, and ski cross), and all 2010 snowboard events (half-pipe, parallel giant slalom, snowboard cross). The curling competition of the Vancouver 2010 Olympics will be held at Hillcrest Park, in downtown Vancouver. ... This article is about the ski resort. ... This article is about the ski resort. ... Cypress Provincial Park is a provincial park in West Vancouver on the North Shore of Greater Vancouver. ... Cypress Provincial Park is a Provincial Park on the North Shore of Greater Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The westernmost end of West Vancouver. ...


Vancouver 2010 will also be the first winter Olympics in which both men's and women's hockey will be played on a narrower, NHL-sized ice rink, measuring 200 ft × 85 ft (61 m × 26 m), instead of the international size of 200 ft × 98.5 ft (61 m × 30 m). The games will be played at General Motors Place, home of the NHL's Vancouver Canucks. This change is expected to save $10 million (CAD) in construction costs and allow an additional 35,000 spectators to attend Olympic hockey games.[7][8] NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... General Motors Place (nicknamed The Garage and GM Place), sponsored by General Motors Canada, is an indoor arena at 800 Griffiths Way in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The Vancouver Canucks are a professional ice hockey team based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


Additional events

There were a number of events proposed to be included in the 2010 Winter Olympics.[9] On November 28, 2006, the IOC Executive Board at their meeting in Kuwait voted to include skicross in the official program.[10][11] The Vancouver Olympic Committee (VANOC) subsequently approved the sport to be officially part of the Games program.[12] is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Skicross (also known as skiercross or skier-X) is a relatively new type of skiing competition. ...


Events up for inclusion but were ultimately rejected included:[13]

Several biathletes in the shooting area of a competition Biathlon (not to be confused with duathlon) is a term used to describe any sporting event made up of two disciplines. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... Bobsleigh is a winter sport in which teams make timed runs down narrow, twisting, banked purpose-built iced tracks in a gravity-powered, steerable sled. ... United States Air Force Major Brady Canfield, 2003 U.S. skeleton champion, shows his takeoff form. ... A luge is small one- or two-person sled on which one sleds supine and feet-first. ... Ski jumping is a sport in which skiers go down an inrun with a take-off ramp (the jump), attempting to go as far as possible. ...

Controversy

Women's Ski Jumping

The IOC voted in 2006 not to include women's ski jumping in the 2010 Games, on the grounds that the sport was not yet developed enough and did not meet basic criteria for inclusion. The members of the Canadian Women Ski Jumping Team filed a grievance with the Canadian Human Rights Board citing gender discrimination. So far the IOC has yet to comment or change its decision.[1]


According to lobby group Women's Ski Jumping USA, a group composed of "some of the top women ski jumpers", will file a Statement of Claim with the Supreme Court of British Columbia suing the Vancouver Olympic Organizing Committee for excluding women ski jumpers from the Vancouver games. [14]


Venues

For the first time, the Winter Olympics will be held by the sea and some venues, such as the Richmond Olympic Oval, are at sea level. Also, for the first time ever the Opening Ceremony for a Winter Olympics will be held indoors. A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics for short but more correctly The Olympic Winter Games, are the cold-weather counterpart to the Summer Olympic Games. ... The Richmond Olympic Oval is a facility currently under construction in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada. ... Part of the ceremony of the Changing of the Guard in Whitehall, London. ...


Vancouver is also the warmest city ever to host a Winter Olympics.[15] In February, when the Games will be held, Vancouver has an average temperature of 4.8 degrees Celsius (40.6 degrees Fahrenheit).


Greater Vancouver

Vancouver

A forest of cranes tower over the Olympic village being constructed on the southeastern shore of False Creek near downtown Vancouver.
A forest of cranes tower over the Olympic village being constructed on the southeastern shore of False Creek near downtown Vancouver.

A view of the deflated roof A view of the deflation of the roof An inside view of the deflated roof BC Place Stadium is Canadas first domed stadium and is the largest air-supported stadium in the world[1]. It is located on the north side of False... The Vancouver Olympic Village is located in section 2A of Southeast False Creek The Vancouver Olympic Village (VOV) is an Olympic Village to be built for the 2010 Winter Paralympics and 2010 Winter Olympics hosted in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Canada Place with a rendering of the expansion currently under construction. ... Inside GM Place before a Canucks game General Motors Place, also known as GM Place and The Garage, is an indoor arena at 800 Griffiths Way in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The Pacific Coliseum. ... Hillcrest Park is located in the Riley Park-Little Mountain neighbourhood of Vancouver, British Columbia. ...

University of British Columbia

The UBC Winter Sports Centre is a to-be-constructed 6,650-seat arena located in Vancouver, British Columbia on the campus of the University of British Columbia. ...

Richmond

The Richmond Olympic Oval is a facility currently under construction in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada. ...

West Vancouver

Cypress Provincial Park is a provincial park in West Vancouver on the North Shore of Greater Vancouver. ...

Whistler

The Vancouver Olympic Village is located in section 2A of Southeast False Creek The Vancouver Olympic Village (VOV) is an Olympic Village to be built for the 2010 Winter Paralympics and 2010 Winter Olympics hosted in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... This article is about the ski resort. ... Callaghan Valley The Callaghan Valley is a vast wilderness area 12 kilometres south of Whistler Village and about 5 km south of Function Junction, just west of Highway 99. ...

Broadcasting

Vancouver 2010 will be broadcast worldwide by a number of television broadcasters. As rights for the 2010 games have been packaged with those for the 2012 Summer Olympics, broadcasters will be largely identical for both events. Confirmed broadcasters include: London 2012 redirects here. ...

Flag of Australia Australia
Nine Network
Flag of Brazil Brazil
TV Record had been awarded the broadcasting for only free to air television.[16].
Flag of Canada Canada
CTV, TQS, TSN, RDS, RIS, Rogers Sportsnet, OMNI Television, OLN, CTV Newsnet, Rogers radio stations, as well as third-party broadcasters APTN and ATN, Discovery Channel, BNN, and The Biography Channel.
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
BBC
Flag of Hong Kong Hong Kong
Cable TV
Flag of Japan Japan
NHK
Flag of Mexico Mexico
Televisa and TV Azteca
Flag of New Zealand New Zealand
TVNZ
Flag of the Philippines Philippines
Solar Sports
Flag of South Korea South Korea
SBS
Flag of the United States United States
NBC Universal

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Nine Network, or Channel Nine, is an Australian television network based in Willoughby, a suburb on the North Shore of Sydney. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Rede Record is a Brazilian television network. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... CTV is a Canadian English language television network. ... TQS is a Canadian French language privately owned television network based in Quebec. ... The Sports Network (commonly known as TSN) is a Canadian English language cable television specialty channel and is Canadas leading English language sports television channel. ... Réseau des sports (commonly known as RDS), is a Canadian French language cable television specialty channel showing sports and sport-related shows. ... Réseau Info-Sports (RIS), is a Canadian French language category 1 digital cable specialty channel. ... Sportsnet redirects here. ... OMNI Television is a Canadian television brand owned and operated by Rogers Communications. ... OLN (Outdoor Life Network) is a Canadian cable television specialty channel. ... CTV Newsnet is a Canadian 24-hour headline news cable television channel which went onair on October 17, 1997. ... Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, or APTN, is a Canadian television network which airs and produces programming made by, for, and about Aboriginal peoples in Canada. ... Asian Television Network, often referred to as just ATN, is a Canadian licensed television broadcaster providing premium programming in several South Asian languages to communities across Canada. ... Discovery Channel Canada is a Canadian cable specialty television channel devoted to science and nature programming. ... Business News Network (BNN), (formerly known as Report on Business Television or ROBTv) is a Canadian cable television specialty channel, which airs business news and analysis. ... The Biography Channel is a Canadian category 1 digital cable television channel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hong_Kong. ... Cable TV Hong Kong (Hong Kong Cable/HKCTV), previously known as Wharf Cable before October 1998, is owned and operated by i-CABLE Communications Limited. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... NHK Broadcasting Center in Shibuya, Tokyo NHK (, Nippon Hōsō Kyōkai), or the Japan Broadcasting Corporation, is Japans public broadcaster. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... For the article on the defunct Venezuelan television channel, see Televisa Venezuela. ... TV Azteca is the second largest Mexican television network. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Current TVNZ logo Television New Zealand (TVNZ) is the main broadcaster of television in New Zealand, established in 1980 through the merger of Television One and TV2 (formerly South Pacific Television). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... Solar Sports or the Solar Sports Network is a Philippine sports channel owned by Solar Entertainment Corporation. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... SBS (formerly Seoul Broadcasting System) KSE: 034120 is one of four major national South Korean television and radio networks. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... NBC Universal is a media and entertainment conglomerate formed in May 2004 by the combination of General Electrics NBC with Vivendi Universal Entertainment, part of Vivendi Universal. ...

Torch Relay

The clock counting down to the opening of the Olympics in downtown Vancouver
The clock counting down to the opening of the Olympics in downtown Vancouver

The Olympic Torch Relay is the transfer of the Olympic flame from Ancient Olympia, Greece - where the first Olympic Games were held thousands of years ago - to the stadium of the city hosting the current Olympic Games. The flame arrives just in time for the Opening Ceremony. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 1. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Part of the ceremony of the Changing of the Guard in Whitehall, London. ...


For the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games, the flame will first be lit in Olympia in late 2009. It will then travel from Greece, over the North Pole to Canada's high Arctic and on to the West Coast and Vancouver. The Olympic Torch will be carried by thousands of Canadians of all ages and cultural backgrounds: on foot, dog sled, snowmobile, horse, plane and virtually every means of transport known to the people of Canada.[17] The torch relay is said to be the longest in winter Olympic history and will travel across all of Canada on its journey to Vancouver. For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ...


For the first time in Olympic history the Olympic flame will be lit indoors,[citation needed] as BC Place is a covered stadium. This has caused some speculation on how this will be accomplished, as such a large flame burning for the required 15 days would cause environmental issues inside the stadium. Possible solutions to the problem include installing a special ventilation system to house the flame or even building a new retractable roof over BC place. It has yet to be officially stated how this problem will be solved.


Opposition

Members of the Native Warriors Society pose with the stolen Winter Olympics flag. They stole the flag to protest the Olympics, and to honour the death of Harriet Nahanee.
Members of the Native Warriors Society pose with the stolen Winter Olympics flag. They stole the flag to protest the Olympics, and to honour the death of Harriet Nahanee.

Opposition to the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver[18] has been expressed by hundreds of activists and politicians, including Lower Mainland Mayors Derek Corrigan and Richard Walton. Many of the public Olympic events held to date in Vancouver have been attended by protesters.[19] Non-violent environmental protests at Eagleridge Bluffs in West Vancouver resulted in the arrest of over 20 people and jail time for two local women, Betty Krawczyk and Harriet Nahanee.[20] Protesters have also vandalized branches of the Royal Bank of Canada, an Olympic sponsor, in Ottawa, Vancouver and Victoria.[21] Harriet Hahanee at Eagleridge Bluffs Harriet Nahanee (born 1935 – February 24, 2007) was a Indigenous/Aboriginal rights activist, residential school survivor, and environmental activist. ... The Lower Mainland is the name that residents of British Columbia apply to the region surrounding the City of Vancouver. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Derek Corrigan is the current mayor of Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. ... This article is about the District of North Vancouver. ... Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... The westernmost end of West Vancouver. ... Betty Krawczyk (born 1928) is a Louisiana-born, British Columbia, Canada based environmental activist, author and former political candidate. ... Harriet Hahanee at Eagleridge Bluffs Harriet Nahanee (born 1935 – February 24, 2007) was a Indigenous/Aboriginal rights activist, residential school survivor, and environmental activist. ...


There are several reasons for the opposition, which are reflected in the documentary film Five Ring Circus.[22] These issues include: Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ...

  • Large expense to taxpayers (estimated at CAN$580 million[23])
  • Destruction of the natural environment (such as Eagleridge Bluffs[24])
  • Loss of affordable housing . The Anti-Poverty Committee has promised that they would target VANOC officials in their homes and businesses,[25] and on 22 May 2007, "evicted" the British Columbia Cabinet and VANOC officials by trashing their offices in downtown Vancouver.[26]

On another front, local First Nations people as well as Canadian Inuit expressed annoyance concerning the choice of an inukshuk as the symbol of the Games, with some Inuit leaders such as Nunavut Commissioner Peter Irniq complaining that the inukshuk is a culturally important symbol to them. He stated that the "Inuit never build inuksuit with head, legs and arms," he says. "I have seen inuksuit build more recently, 100 years maybe by non-Inuit in Nunavut, with head, legs and arms. These are not called inuksuit. These are called inunguat, imitation of man," he said. Local First Peoples also expressed annoyance that the design did not reflect West Coast native culture such as that of the Squamish or Haida, but rather that of the Inuit, who are indigenous to the Arctic far from Vancouver. One chief also said that the design lacked dignity, comparing it to Pac-Man. However, other First Nations and Inuit leaders praised the design.[27] The First Nations governments of the Squamish, Musqueam, Lil'wat and Tsleil-Waututh (the "Four Host Nations"), on whose traditional territory the games will be held, signed a protocol in 2004[28] in support of the games.[29] This article is about the natural environment. ... Distribution of U.S. Median Home Values Affordable housing is a term used to describe dwelling units whose total housing costs are deemed affordable to a group of people within a specified income range. ... The Anti-Poverty Committee (APC) is a criminal organisation based in Vancouver, British Columbia that campaigns against poverty and homelessness. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Executive Council of British Columbia (informally and more commonly, the Cabinet of British Columbia) is the cabinet of the Canadian province. ... First Nations is a term of ethnicity that refers to the indigenous peoples in what is now Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis people. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... An inukshuk on the flag of Nunavut An inukshuk (Inuktitut: inuksuk / ᐃᓄᒃᓱᒃ, plural inuksuit / ᐃᓄᒃᓱᐃᑦ) is a stone landmark used as a milestone or directional marker by the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic. ... For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ... Peter T. Irniq (born 1947) is an Inuit Canadian and served as the second Commissioner of Nunavut from April of 2000 to April of 2005. ... A squamish is a strong and often violent wind occurring in many of the fjord of British Columbia, akin to the Williwaw of the Alaska Panhandle. ... This article is about the people. ... Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ... The Squamish First Nation are a major Salishan-speaking people of southwestern British Columbia. ... The Musqueam are the only Indian band whose reserve lies within the boundaries of the City of Vancouver. ... The Lilwat First Nation, aka the Lilwat Nation or the Mount Currie Indian Band, is a First Nations government located in the southern Coast Mountains region of the Interior of the Canadian province of British Columbia. ... The Tsleil-Waututh First Nation, also known as the Burrard Band, are a Squamish-speaking people, and are closely related to but politically separate from the nearby reserves of the Squamish and Musqueam First Nations. ...


See also

See also: 2010 Winter Olympics The 2010 Winter Paralympics will be held in the area surrounding Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, including the towns of Burnaby and Whistler. ... A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics for short but more correctly The Olympic Winter Games, are the cold-weather counterpart to the Summer Olympic Games. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... 1976 Montreal Summer Games Most numismatists agree that the first true numismatic collection was the Olympic Five and Ten Dollar coins for the 1976 Montreal Olympics. ...

Footnotes and references

  1. ^ The Prime Minister congratulates our athletes and coaches on their performance in Turin (February 26, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  2. ^ Search on for 25,000 volunteers for 2010 Olympics (February 12, 2008). Retrieved on 2008-02-12.
  3. ^ http://www.canoe.ca/SlamOlympicScandalArchive/mar23_ioc.html IOC rejects Quebec City request
  4. ^ http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/governorlocke/press/press-view.asp?pressRelease=1390&newsType=1 Gov. Locke Congratulates Vancouver, B.C., on Winning Bid for 2010 Olympic Winter Games, Highlights Economic Benefits to Washington State
  5. ^ 2010 Vancouver Olympics' mascots inspired by First Nations creatures. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (2007-11-27). Retrieved on 2007-11-27.
  6. ^ What do you think of Sumi, Quatchi, and Miga?. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (2007-11-27). Retrieved on 2008-05-07.
  7. ^ http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Olympics/2010Vancouver/2006/06/08/1620669-sun.html VANOC shrinks Olympic ice
  8. ^ http://www.canada.com/topics/sports/story.html?id=8bbd29a3-1b09-411f-8efc-21c1ca6ca823&k=72793 VANOC saves $10 million by having Olympic hockey tourney played on NHL ice
  9. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/winter_sports/5071892.stm Ski-cross aims for Vancouver 2010
  10. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/winter_sports/6192816.stm Ski-cross gets approved for 2010
  11. ^ International Olympic Committee - News
  12. ^ International Olympic Committee - News
  13. ^ http://www.olympic.org/uk/news/olympic_news/full_story_uk.asp?id=1972 Olympic programme updates
  14. ^ "Women ski jumpers suing for 2010 Olympic spot". cbc.ca. http://www.cbc.ca/sports/amateur/story/2008/05/21/ski-jump-lawsuit.html
  15. ^ "Winter Olympics all wet?: Vancouver has the mildest climate of any Winter Games host city", Vancouver Sun, 2003-07-09. 
  16. ^ IOC signs 2010 - 2012 TV rights deal for Brazil, IOC press release, March 16, 2007
  17. ^ Vancouver 2010 - Torch Relays. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  18. ^ Watch-dog websites:
  19. ^ For example:
  20. ^ Mickleburgh, R.. "B.C. woman sent to jail over protest", Globe and Mail, 2007-03-06. Retrieved on 2007-03-28. 
  21. ^ Mackin, B.. "Anti-2010 vandals hit Ottawa Royal Bank", 24 Hours, 2008-02-06. 
  22. ^ Five Ring Circus. Documentary film (2007).
  23. ^ CTV.ca News Staff. "Vancouver 2010 Olympics to cost $1.6 billion", CTV Television Network, May 8, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-07. 
  24. ^ The Coalition to Save Eagleridge Bluffs at Horseshoe Bay. Retrieved on 2007-03-28.
  25. ^ "Protesters threaten Olympic officials", CTV.ca. Retrieved on 2007-05-17. 
  26. ^ "B.C. cabinet office trashed in Olympic protest", CBC. Retrieved on 2007-05-23. 
  27. ^ Vancouver Olympic emblem comes under fire
  28. ^ 4HN_Protocol_Final_Nov 24.pub
  29. ^ Four Host First Nations Society - Vancouver 2010 - About Us

is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Vancouver Sun is a daily newspaper first published in the Canadian province of British Columbia on February 12, 1912. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... CTV is a Canadian English language television network. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Official Venue Links

  • Official Website of Cypress Mountain, West Vancouver - Venue for 2010 Snowboard / Freestyle skiing events
  • City of Richmond: Olympic Skating Oval - venue for speed-skating events
The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ... An all-time medal count for all Olympic Games from 1896 to 2006, including Summer Olympic Games, Winter Olympic Games and a combined total of both, is tabulated below. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... This article includes lists of all Olympic medalists since 1896, organized by each Olympic sport or discipline. ... The Olympic symbols are the icons, flags and symbols used by the International Olympic Committee to promote the Olympic Games. ... The Summer Olympic Games or the Games of the Olympiad are an international multi-sport event usually Quadrennial, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Olympisch Stadion in 1928 The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were celebrated in 1928 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad originally programmed to celebrated between September 21 to October 6, 1940 were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, but the Games were given back to the IOC, because the Second Sino-Japanese War broke out in... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were celebrated in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were celebrated in Munich, in what was then West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ...  Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were celebrated in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... London 2012 redirects here. ... The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, is a major international sports and cultural festival to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2020 Summer Olympics The International Olympic Committee has yet to begin the selection process for the host city; the site of the Games of the XXXII Olympiad—as they will be officially known—is expected to be announced in mid 2013. ... The 2024 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2028 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1924 in Chamonix, France. ... The II Olympic Winter Games were held in 1928 in Sankt-Moritz, Switzerland. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... The 1936 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1936 in the villages of Garmisch and Partenkirchen in Bavaria, Germany. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Sapporo, Japan. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... The V Olympic Winter Games were held in St. ... The 1952 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1952 in Oslo, Norway. ... The VII Olympic Winter Games were held in 1956 in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... Sign outside Olympic Village at Squaw Valley The 1960 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California, United States (located in the Lake Tahoe basin). ... The 1964 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1968 Grenoble, France and opened on February 6. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in February 13 through February 24, 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1984 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia. ... The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and opened by Governor General Jeanne Sauvé. The Olympics were highly successful financially as they brought in million-dollar profits. ... The 1992 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1992 in Albertville, France. ... The 1994 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, is an international winter multiple sports event that will be celebrated from February 7 to February 23, 2014. ... The 2018 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXIII Olympic Winter Games, will be celebrated in 2018, and are an international winter sports athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ... The 2022 Winter Olympics, formally called the XXIV Olympic Winter Games is an event that the International Olympic Committee has yet to organize. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in...

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The Canadian Olympic Committee, as the NOC of the host country, has pledged to obtain the most gold medals of any country at the 2010 Winter Olympics, due to its failures to obtain a gold at both the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal and the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary.
Per Olympic tradition, current Vancouver mayor Sam Sullivan received the Olympic flag during the Closing Ceremony of the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, which was also attended by the premier of British Columbia, Gordon Campbell, himself a Vancouver native, and Governor General Michaëlle Jean.
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