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Encyclopedia > 2007 Lebanon conflict
2007 Lebanon conflict
Part of the War on Terrorism

The shelling of Nahr al-Bared
Date May 20 - September 7, 2007
Location Fighting: Nahr al-Bared, Tripoli, Ain al-Hilweh
Bombings: Beirut, Aley, Zouk Mosbeh
Attack on UNIFIL: Khiyam
Result Lebanese victory
Belligerents
Lebanese Armed Forces Fatah al-Islam
Jund al-Sham
Commanders
Michel Sulaiman
Francois al-Hajj
Shaker al-Abssi
Abu Youssef Sharqieh #
Abu Hureira 
Strength
72,100 troops 450 Fatah militants,
50 Jund militants,
unknown number of
al-Qaeda bombers
Casualties and losses
Northern casualties:
168 killed,
400-500 wounded
Southern casualties:
2 killed, 6 wounded
Fatah al-Islam casualties:
226 killed, 218 captured (Lebanese claim)
Jund al-Sham casualties:
5 killed
Bomber cells: 7 killed, 18 captured
Civilian casualties:
52 killed in the fighting,
12 killed in the bombings

International Red Cross:
2 killed
UNIFIL:
6 soldiers killed, 2 wounded The War on Terrorism (also known as the War on Terror) is campaign begun by the Bush administration which includes various military, political, and legal actions taken to ostensibly curb the spread of terrorism following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. ... Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... This page refers to Tripoli, the city in Lebanon. ... Ain al-Hilweh (variously, Ayn al-Hilweh, Ein al-Hilweh, etc. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... The Aley River is a Russian river. ... UNIFIL (United Nations Interim Forces In Lebanon) was created in 1978 by the United Nations to confirm Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon, restore the international peace and security, and help the Lebanese Government restore its effective authority in the area. ... Khiam (Arabic الخيام; sometimes spelled Khiyam) is a town located in South Lebanon Governorate, near the city of Nabatieh. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lebanon. ... The military of the Republic of Lebanon is officially known as the Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) (Arabic: القوات المسلحة اللبنانية ) and consists of three branches: The Lebanese Army The Lebanese Navy The Lebanese Air Force // The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include; defending Lebanon and its citizens against all aggression, confronting threats against... Image File history File links Flag_of_jihad. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_jihad. ... Jund al-Sham (Arabic جند الشام, The Greater Syrian Army) is the name given for an Islamist group which was behind a suicide bombing near a British school in Qatar (The Times (London), Mar 23 2005), and/or the name of a Salafi-influenced group in the Ein el-Hilweh camp refugee... General Michel Sulaiman (born 21st January 1948) is the current commander of the Lebanese Armed Forces. ... Shaker al-Abssi (Arabic: ), a veteran Palestinian guerrilla, is Fatah al-Islams leader. ... Abu Youssef Sharqieh is the leader of Jund Ash Sham and former Fatah official. ... Balian of Ibelin surrendering the city of Jerusalem to Saladin, from Les Passages faits Outremer par les Français contre les Turcs et autres Sarrasins et Maures outremarins, ca. ... Temporary grave of an American machine-gunner during the Battle of Normandy. ... Red Cross redirects here. ... A Sisu XA-180 used by Swedish UNIFIL forces in Lebanon The United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon, or UNIFIL, was created by the United Nations, with the adoption of Security Council Resolution 425 and 426 on March 19, 1978, to confirm Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon, restore international peace and...

Casualties sources: [1]

The 2007 Lebanon conflict began when fighting broke out between Fatah al-Islam, an Islamist militant organization, and the Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) on May 20, 2007 in Nahr al-Bared, an UNRWA Palestinian refugee camp near Tripoli. It was the most severe internal fighting since Lebanon's 1975–90 civil war. The conflict evolved mostly around the Siege of Nahr el-Bared, but minor clashes also occurred in the Ain al-Hilweh refugee camp in southern Lebanon and several terrorist bombings took place in and around Lebanon's capital Beirut. Fighting continued into early September and the LAF declared victory on September 7. Combatants NATO and allies, represented by Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and Pakistan Operation Enduring Freedom - Horn of Africa is the official name used by the US government for a component of its response to the September 11, 2001 attacks on... Combatants NATO, represented by Denmark Germany Greece Italy Norway Spain Turkey  Russia  Ukraine  Israel  Egypt Morocco Commanders Vice Admiral Roberto Cesaretti, Italian Navy Strength 480 ships and 84 planes Operation Active Endeavour is a naval operation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. ... Combatants Saudi Security Forces al-Qaeda Casualties 44 killed 218 wounded 129 killed 3,106+ arrested[1] Civilians: 100 killed (foreigners, Saudis) 510 wounded[1] The Insurgency in Saudi Arabia is an armed conflict in Saudi Arabia between radical Khawarij fighters, believed to be associated with al-Qaeda, against the... Belligerents Hezbollah Amal[1] LCP[2] PFLP-GC[3] Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah Imad Mughniyeh Dan Halutz Moshe Kaplinsky[4] Udi Adam Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[5] Up to 10,000 ground troops. ... Combatants Hamas Fatah Commanders Ismail Haniya Khaled Meshaal Mohammed Deif Mahmoud Abbas Mohammed Dahlan Strength Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades: 15,000 Executive Force: 6,000[1][2] National Security: 30,000 Police and Preventive Security: 30,000 General Intelligence: 5,000 Presidential Guard: 4,200 Al Aqsa Martyrs... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... This article is about political Islam For the religion of Islam, see Islam. ... Many organizations that are accused of being a terrorist organization deny using terrorism as a military tactic to achieve their goals, and there is no international consensus on the bureaucratic definition of terrorism. ... The military of the Republic of Lebanon is officially known as the Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) (Arabic: القوات المسلحة اللبنانية ) and consists of three branches: The Lebanese Army The Lebanese Navy The Lebanese Air Force // The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include; defending Lebanon and its citizens against all aggression, confronting threats against... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) was established to provide assistance to Palestinian refugees. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... List of Palestinian refugee camps with current population and year they were established: Gaza, 8 camps, 478,854 refugees 1948, Beach camp (Shati), 76,109 1949, Bureij, 30,059 1948, Deir el-Balah, 20,188 1948, Jabalia (Jabalyia, Abalyia), 103,646 1949, Khan Yunis, 60,662 1949, Maghazi, 22,536... This page refers to Tripoli, the city in Lebanon. ... Combatants Lebanese Front Syria LNM PLO Israel Commanders Bachir Gemayel Dany Chamoun Kamal Jumblatt Yasser Arafat Ariel Sharon The Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990) was a multifaceted civil war whose antecedents trace back to the conflicts and political compromises reached after the end of Lebanons administration by the Ottoman... Ain al-Hilweh (variously, Ayn al-Hilweh, Ein al-Hilweh, etc. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Background

Nahr al-Bared refugee camp

Main article: Nahr al-Bared

Lebanon is home to more than 350,000 Palestinian refugees, some 215,000 of whom live in camps,[2] including the descendants of those who fled from Israel during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. In 1962, Palestinians were categorized as foreigners in Lebanon, regardless of how long they had lived there. Non-Lebanese, which included the refugees, were restricted from working in over 70 skilled professions until 2005, when new legislation officially opened 50 such jobs to them. The civil war left Lebanon's government and the general Lebanese populace deeply suspicious of Palestinian refugees because of their involvement in the Lebanese war. But, under a 1969 Arab accord, later annulled by the Lebanese Parliament in the mid-1980s[3]but maintained in principle, the government has been reluctant to enter the camps. [4][5] The current residents of the camps are currently denied access to their homeland or neighboring Arab nations. Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... In the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, a Palestinian refugee is a refugee from Palestine created by the Palestinian Exodus, which Palestinians call the Nakba (نكبة, meaning disaster). History Most of the refugees had already fled by the time the neighboring Arab states intervened on the side of Palestinians and continued after... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen[2], Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially... Combatants Lebanese Front Syria LNM PLO Israel Commanders Bachir Gemayel Dany Chamoun Kamal Jumblatt Yasser Arafat Ariel Sharon The Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990) was a multifaceted civil war whose antecedents trace back to the conflicts and political compromises reached after the end of Lebanons administration by the Ottoman... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ...


The Nahr al-Bared Palestinian refugee camp is situated 16 km north of Tripoli near the coastal road and has been under scrutiny since February, when two buses were bombed in Ain Alak, a predominantly Christian village near Bikfaya. Fatah al-Islam militants based in the camp were blamed. About 30,000 displaced Palestinians live in the camp.[6] Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... In the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, a Palestinian refugee is a refugee from Palestine created by the Palestinian Exodus, which Palestinians call the Nakba (نكبة, meaning disaster). History Most of the refugees had already fled by the time the neighboring Arab states intervened on the side of Palestinians and continued after... This page refers to Tripoli, the city in Lebanon. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Bikfaya (also spelled Bickfaya, Beckfayya, or Bekfaya) is a picturesque town in the Matn District region of Mount Lebanon. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ...


Fatah al-Islam

Main article: Fatah al-Islam

The Islamist Fatah al-Islam group is alleged to have links with al-Qaeda and Lebanese government officials also believe it has ties to Syrian intelligence. Government officials have accused the latter of trying to undermine Lebanon's efforts in the establishment of an international tribunal to deal with the murderers of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri. [6] Syrian officials have denied these charges. Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Rafik Bahaeddine Al-Hariri — (November 1, 1944 – February 14, 2005), (Arabic: ) a self-made billionaire and business tycoon, was Prime Minister of Lebanon from 1992 to 1998 and again from 2000 until his resignation on 20 October 2004. ...


Timeline

2007 Lebanon conflict
Timeline
Combatants
Fatah al-Islam
Jund al-Sham
Lebanese Armed Forces
Locations
Tripoli
Nahr al-Bared
Ain al-Hilweh
Other articles
Bikfaya bombings
This box: view  talk  edit

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 518 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 647 pixel, file size: 1. ... This is a detailed timeline of the 2007 Lebanon conflict. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Jund al-Sham (Arabic جند الشام, The Greater Syrian Army) is the name given for an Islamist group which was behind a suicide bombing near a British school in Qatar (The Times (London), Mar 23 2005), and/or the name of a Salafi-influenced group in the Ein el-Hilweh camp refugee... The military of the Republic of Lebanon is officially known as the Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) (Arabic: القوات المسلحة اللبنانية ) and consists of three branches: The Lebanese Army The Lebanese Navy The Lebanese Air Force // The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include; defending Lebanon and its citizens against all aggression, confronting threats against... This page refers to Tripoli, the city in Lebanon. ... Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... Ain al-Hilweh (variously, Ayn al-Hilweh, Ein al-Hilweh, etc. ... The February 13, 2007 Lebanon bombings were two blasts on buses near Bikfaya, Lebanon which killed three and injured 21. ... This is a detailed timeline of the 2007 Lebanon conflict. ...

May 20: Start of the fighting in Tripoli and Nahr al-Bared

Fighting began early in the morning after a police raid on a house in Tripoli which was apparently being used by militants from Fatah al-Islam. The militant group subsequently began shooting at the Lebanese security forces who returned fire, triggering clashes in the vicinity of the Nahr al-Bared Palestinian refugee camp near Tripoli. The men reportedly resisted arrest and the violence spread to neighbouring streets. [7] Militants then attacked a Lebanese military post at the gate of the camp, slaughtering 27 soldiers during their sleep, seizing several vehicles and also killing an undetermined number of civilians that came to the rescue of the Lebanese army. Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... bjhgfshudgfgbfsfas Refugee camp for Rwandans located in what is now the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo following the Rwandan Genocide A camp in Guinea for refugees from Sierra Leone. ...


May 21-31: Nahr al-Bared under siege

Despite talks of a cease-fire, Fatah al-Islam militants continued battling the Lebanese army at the outskirts of the refugee camp while Lebanese tanks and artillery continued shelling their positions in the camp. By now the camp was totally surrounded by the Lebanese Army and more troops were coming in with tanks and APC's. Beirut's airport was the scene of several military aid shipments, mainly from the United States. The military supplies included ammunition for automatic rifles and heavy weapons, spare parts for military helicopters and night-vision equipment. Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... The Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) consists of three branches: Lebanese Army Lebanese Air Force Lebanese Navy // General overview The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include maintaining security and stability in the country, guarding the countrys borders, port security, relief operations, rescue operations, fire fighting, and fighting drug smuggling. ... Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are armoured fighting vehicles developed to transport infantry on the battlefield. ... Ammunition, often referred to as ammo, is a generic term meaning (the assembly of) a projectile and its propellant. ... Heckler & Koch G41 automatic rifles are legal in asutralia an america with lisence An automatic rifle is a term generally used to describe a self-loading rifle capable of firing either semi or fully-automatically from a magazine or belt of ammunition. ... Two American soldiers pictured during the 2003 Iraq War seen through an Image Intensifier Night vision is the ability to see in a dark environment. ...


June 1-2: First Lebanese Army attack

Tanks massed outside the Nahr al-Bared camp and started a ground offensive. The fighting was concentrated in the southern and northern entrances of the camp. [8] At least 19 people were killed, including three army soldiers. [9] Among the dead was also a senior leader of Fatah al-Islam, Abu Riyadh; he had been killed by a Lebanese army sniper.[10] After 48 hours of fighting the battle was over and the Army was repelled. Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... For other uses, see Sniper (disambiguation). ...

Location of events

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 553 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 650 pixel, file size: 96 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 553 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 650 pixel, file size: 96 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

June 3-4: Ain al-Hilweh violence

Fighting broke out between soldiers and Islamist militants at a second Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon. The violence in the Ain al-Hilweh camp, near the southern city of Sidon, involved Jund al-Sham militants and the Lebanese army. Four people - two soldiers and two militants - were killed when suspected militants fired a grenade at an army checkpoint. Army troops responded to the attack with gunfire. [11][12] Ain al-Hilweh (variously, Ayn al-Hilweh, Ein al-Hilweh, etc. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... Ain al-Hilweh (variously, Ayn al-Hilweh, Ein al-Hilweh, etc. ... View of the new city the Sea Castle. ... Jund al-Sham (Arabic جند الشام, The Greater Syrian Army) is the name given for an Islamist group which was behind a suicide bombing near a British school in Qatar (The Times (London), Mar 23 2005), and/or the name of a Salafi-influenced group in the Ein el-Hilweh camp refugee...


June 9-12: Second Lebanese Army attack

After mediators failed to convince the Islamists to surrender, the Lebanese Army attacked Nahr el-Bared once again. The troops advanced 50 meters before they had to stop after taking heavy casualties due to booby-trapped buildings and other Fatah al-Islam positions that the militants left behind. In all 29 people were killed within 24 hours: 11 soldiers, 16 militants and 2 civilians. Another 100 soldiers were wounded. Some of the fighting was close-quarters and almost hand to hand.


On June 11, two Lebanese Red Cross workers were killed outside Nahr al-Bared as they were evacuating civilians. On June 12, the Lebanese army continued their push and took two key positions from Fatah al-Islam within the camp, one of them on the coastal side of the camp. is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


June 16-19: Third Lebanese Army attack

The Lebanese Army continued the offensive and heavy bombardment hit the camp. On June 16 two Lebanese Gazelle helicopters fired four air-to-ground missiles at suspected militant positions inside the camp.[13] In 48 hours the Army managed to take another six Fatah al-Islam positions. At this time the only aim of the military was to destroy all of the militants positions on the outskirts of the camp, but the Army had no intention of going into the camp itself. On June 19, the Army finally managed to take all of the main positions of the Islamists. All of the buildings in the new (northern) part of the camp where the Fatah al-Islam fighters were dug in had been taken. Another seven soldiers were killed during this new round of fighting. is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gazelle is a French-designed helicopter, created by the company Sud Aviation, that later became Aérospatiale, and later still Eurocopter. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


June 21: Outer parts of the camp fall

On June 21, the Lebanese defence minister reported that all of the Fatah al-Islam positions on the outlaying areas of the camp, from which the militants were attacking soldiers, have been taken or destroyed. The only positions left are those in the center of the camp from where the militants pose no threat and thus the Army has no intention of attacking the center of the camp. With this it was declared that the Lebanese military operation to destroy Fatah al-Islam was over. But heavy fighting still continued in the days ahead. is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


June 24-25: Renewed fighting in Tripoli & Nahr el-Bared

On June 24, for the first time since May 20, fighting erupted at an apartment building after a military raid on an Islamist militant cell that left 12 people dead. Among the killed were 7 non-Fatah militants, 1 soldier, 1 policeman and 3 civilians. Another 14 soldiers were wounded.[14] On June 25, forces of the mainstream Fatah organization, headed by Mahmoud Abbas entered the Nahr el Bared camp to fight Islamic militants and killed three of them, a spokesman of Fatah said.[15] is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On June 28, the military found and engaged a group of Fatah al-Islam militants, in a cave in the mountains south of Tripoli, in fighting that killed 5 Islamists. [16] is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


June 30: Jund al-Sham disbanded

On June 30, the Usbat Al-Ansar source said that 23 members of Jund Al Sham in the Ain Al Helweh camp on the outskirts of the port city of Sidon have joined up with Usbat at a meeting, while the rest had laid down their weapons. Usbat Al Ansar detained three other members of the group on suspicion of hurling a grenade at an army checkpoint, in an incident that caused no casualties.[17] is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


July 12-24: Fourth Lebanese Army attack

On July 12, after a lull in the fighting, the Lebanese army launched a new assault, towards the center of the camp where the last battle positions of the Islamists were. They resumed with the bombardment of the camp and troops engaged the militants in heavy street fighting. 33 soldiers were killed and 93 wounded during the fighting among the ruins of the camp where the Islamist fighters were well dug in and large parts of the camp were also booby-traped.[18] is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On July 14, militants escalated the fighting by firing Katyusha rockets at towns surrounding the camp. One civilian was killed, and several were wounded. is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On July 16, the Army managed to take a hill in the southern part of the camp which represented a highly strategic positions. is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


By July 20, only 300 square yards had been left in the hands of the Islamists in the southern part of the camp. The army's advance was slowed down until they were able to defuse dozens of booby-traps left in the ruins of the camp by the Islamists. is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


July 25-August 13: Fifth Lebanese Army attack

Soldiers moved into the fighting area under cover from artillery fire, tank fire and gunfire. A witness said this was the heaviest shelling of insurgent positions he had ever seen. A Lebanese source said the army was ready to make the final push and capture the last 250 yards (230 m) still in hands of the insurgents. About 130 people are believed to be hold up in the area, about 70 fighters and 60 civilians. The militants answered with the firing of a handful of Katyusha rockets at Lebanese villages near the camp.[19] Katyusha multiple rocket launchers are a type of rocket artillery built and fielded by the Soviet Union beginning in the Second World War. ...


On July 28, a tiny enclave in the already recaptured part of the camp was captured and the militants inside, 8 people, were killed. The surprise attack was carried out by elite units. Cannons and armored vehicles were driven into the camp to demolish fortified houses, bunkers and tunnels. General Michel Sulaiman added, that victory was imminent and only days away.[20] is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The military was hoping to celebrate victory on August 1, which is Army Day in Lebanon. But there is no victory as of that day and all official ceremonies have been cancelled to respect the fallen soldiers.[21] is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On August 2, Abu Hureira, the deputy commander of Fatah al-Islam, was killed in Abu Samra during a shootout with Lebanese police when he tried to flee them whilst shooting at a checkpoint set up by the police.[22] is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On August 8, it was reported the advance of the Lebanese troops was troubled by the smell of rotting corpses of slain militants who are not buried even weeks after their death. It was said the smell was so bad the air was unbreathable.[23] is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


August 17-23: Sixth Lebanese Army attack

In the days leading up to the latest assault on the militants Gazelle attack helicopters bombed the Islamists positions and bunkers.[24] On August 17, the Army advances continued. A truce was made on August 24 to allow the 63 family members, 25 women and 38 children, of the Islamist fighters to leave the camp. This left a chance for a final assault on the militants by the army, and indications were that only 70 militants were left active in the camp, in reality almost 100 were still holed up. Air raids continued the next day. is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


August 30-September 3: Final Lebanese Army attack

Heavy fighting continued on August 30 after the evacuation of the civilians and almost a week of heavy bombing raids from attack helicopters. More street battles occurred as the troops advanced further into the winding streets of the camp. By this point most of the subterranean shelters had been taken by the army but still the militants held their positions in bunkers and among the ruins of the camp. All the time during the latest attack the militants were issuing calls for a cease-fire so that some 35 wounded militants could be evacuated. The army did not accept the cease-fire. On September 1, the army managed to take the homes of Shaker al-Abssi and his deputy Abu Hureira, who was killed in July during the fighting. However there was still no sign of Abssi himself. is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


September 2: Militant breakout and the fall of the camp

On September 2, militants attempted to escape from Nahr al-Bared. The fighting began when militants on the eastern and southern edge of the camp attacked army checkpoints. Militants also had help from outside the camp. The attack on the eastern edge of the camp started after a Mercedes car pulled up at an army checkpoint from outside around 04:00 AM and began firing at soldiers as fighters launched an attack from inside. At the same time militants attacked another checkpoint on the southern edge of the camp. Some of them were wearing army uniforms. Three militant groups attempted the breakout. One group tried to escape by sea and its members were killed or captured by the army. A second group tried to flee from the north of Nahr al-Bared and met the same fate. The leader of Fatah al-Islam, Shaker al-Abssi, was believed to be in the third group that followed the path of a river running between the southeastern part of the camp and the village of Ayun al-Samak in a remote mountainous region. Several members of that group were killed but most of them escaped. The whole militant leadership was thought to have escaped. It was later confirmed that al-Abssi actually fled the camp a day before the breakout. His fate remains unknown. The army said 35 militants managed to break the cordon and flee, but most of them were killed or captured in the coming days. The fighting lasted from dawn through early afternoon with troops engaging Fatah al-Islam fighters in buildings, fields and roads around the Nahr al-Bared camp. Up to 38 militants, five soldiers and one civilian were killed and 24 militants were captured. The camp finally fell by 11:00 AM. is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Shaker al-Abssi (Arabic: ), a veteran Palestinian guerrilla, is Fatah al-Islams leader. ...


Celebratory gunfire erupted in nearby villages as soon as the news of the army victory spread. Dozens of residents took to the streets of Mohammara, waving Lebanese flags and honking their horns as troop convoys poured into the area with soldiers flashing victory signs.


On September 3, Lebanese forces killed four militants and captured two in the area near the camp. The militants attacked soldiers looking for the fleeing fighters, wounding two of them and forcing the Lebanese soldiers to flee, but were finally killed by artillery fire which lasted for more than an hour. Six bodies of slain militants were found inside the camp.[25] is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sporadic fighting continued near the camp until September 7. Lebanon then declared victory.[26] is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bombings in and around Beirut

May 21: Fatah al-Islam claimed responsibility for two bombings that took place in Beirut.[27]. Then a spokesman for the group denied any responsibility for them.[28] The first bombing occurred shortly after midnight on May 21, killing a woman near the ABC shopping mall in Beirut's largely Christian eastern district of Ashrafieh. At least 10 people were hurt in the blast.[29] is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Ashrafieh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


On the same day, at approximately 11 PM local time in Beirut, a second large explosion was heard in the mainly Muslim district of Verdun, located in a shopping area. [30] At least seven people were wounded and the neighbouring buildings were severely damaged.[31] This article is about the Lebanese city. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


A third bombing, in a Christian neighborhood northeast of Beirut called Mansouriyeh, was foiled when authorities caught a Palestinian and an Egyptian carrying a bag full of explosives. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ...

Aftermath on a site of attack

May 23: A bomb went off near the main government building in Aley, a majority Druze town about 17 km northeast of Beirut. Reports said about five people were injured and a few buildings damaged by the blast. The security forces said the bomb was in a bag that had been left in front of a building close to a shopping district.[29] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Aley River is a Russian river. ... Religions Druzism Scriptures Rasail al-hikmah (Epistles of Wisdom), Quran Languages Arabic. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ...


May 27: In Beirut, two policemen and two civilians were injured when a grenade was thrown in a mainly Muslim section of the city. [32] is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... Grenade may refer to: The well-known hand grenade commonly used by soldiers. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


June 4: A bomb exploded in an empty passenger bus parked in a Christian neighborhood east of Beirut, wounding seven passers-by. The explosion occurred in the residential and industrial Bouchrieh suburb. [33] is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


June 7: A Lebanese man was killed and three other people wounded in a blast at a warehouse used to fill oxygen canisters in a Christian industrial area north of Beirut, police said. No group claimed responsibility for the explosion in the Zouk Mosbeh area, 20 km north of Beirut. A policeman said: "A medium-sized explosive charge had been put inside a car parked near the factory." He said that casualties were low because there were few people in the industrial zone at night. Lebanese soldiers and firefighters attended at least one large fire that was started by the blast. A building was badly damaged and several cars destroyed. [34] is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


June 13: A car bomb hit Beirut's seafront Corniche al-Manara, killing Walid Eido, a member of parliament with the Current for the Future bloc known for his opposition to the Syrian influence on Lebanon. His eldest son, Khaled, and two bodyguards were also killed, along with up to six other civilians. [35] is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Walid Eido (Arabic: ) (Beirut, 1942 - Beirut, June 13, 2007) was a Lebanese politician and member of the Current for the Future Lebanese political movement and an MP in the Lebanese Parliament. ... Image:Saad Hariri Current for the Future ([ar:تيار المستقبل], Tayyar Al Mustaqbal) is a Sunni Muslim political movement in Lebanon, led by Sunni Muslim Saad Hariri, younger son of the assassinated former Prime Minister of Lebanon, Rafik Hariri. ...


The blast may have been tied to the fighting in the north, or it may have been tied to the series of bombings and assassinations of anti-Syrian figures going back to Rafiq Hariri's killing. The 2005 Lebanon bombings were a series of bombings that occurred mainly in Beirut, Lebanon and its suburbs. ...


Attacks on United Nations peacekeepers

On June 24, a UNIFIL armored personnel carrier was hit by a car bomb on the border with Israel, killing six Spanish soldiers and wounding another two Spanish soldiers. Both the Lebanese government and Hezbollah condemned the attack. Intelligence gathered from captured militants indicated that the militants were planning to attack United Nations soldiers on the Israeli-Lebanese border. Also, Fatah al-Islam itself said that if the fighting continued it would conduct attacks on targets outside of northern Lebanon. Al-Qaeda also stated that it would target the U.N. troops on the border.[36] is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Sisu XA-180 used by Swedish UNIFIL forces in Lebanon The United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon, or UNIFIL, was created by the United Nations, with the adoption of Security Council Resolution 425 and 426 on March 19, 1978, to confirm Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon, restore international peace and... East German BRDMs on parade during celebrations of the 40th anniversary of East Germany in 1989 Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are light armoured fighting vehicles for the transport of infantry. ...


On July 16, a roadside blast damaged a UNIFIL vehicle near the southern city of Tyre. The UNIFIL vehicle damaged near Tyre was hit by an explosion near the Qasimiya bridge over the Litani river. "We can confirm an explosion in the area of Qasmiyeh bridge which slightly damaged a Unifil vehicle of the Tanzanian battalion," spokeswoman Yasmeena Bouziane said. [37] is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... The Litani River in red The Litani River (Arabic: نهر الليطاني; transliterated: Nahr al-Lytany) is an important waterway in southern Lebanon. ...


Casualties

At least 446 people, including 168 soldiers and 226 militants, had been killed in the fighting during the 105-day siege of the camp. Between 400 and 500 soldiers had been wounded and more than 215 militants had been captured. The military death toll is very significant for a small country like Lebanon, which has a total population of only four million people. On a per capita basis the death toll for Lebanon in three and a half months is more than three times the death toll of US soldiers in Iraq in the past four and a half years.[38]


Twelve Lebanese civilians were killed in terrorist bombings in and around Beirut, two soldiers and five militants were killed in the Ain al-Hilweh camp, seven non-Fatah Islamic militants were killed during a raid in Tripoli, and six U.N. soldiers were killed, while two were wounded in the bombing attack on the Israeli-Lebanon border.


54 civilians were killed in the fighting at the camp and in Tripoli, 47 of them Palestinians.


Most of the some 31,000 Palestinians that lived at the camp fled the fighting to other camps in the country.


Reactions

  • Fouad Siniora, Lebanon's prime minister, accused Fatah al-Islam of trying to destabilize the country.[39] Lebanese Interior Minister Hasan al-Sabaa described Fatah al-Islam as "part of the Syrian intelligence-security apparatus." Lebanon's national police commander, Maj. Gen. Ashraf Rifi, contradicted the Lebanese army and dismissed any purported al-Qaeda connection, saying Fatah al-Islam was controlled by Damascus. Lebanese Christian leader Samir Geagea said that Fatah al-Islam is an offshoot of Syrian intelligence and its terrorist activities must end.[40] Nayla Mouawad, Lebanese social affairs minister, said the militants have "Syrian allegiance and only take orders from Syria."[41] Lebanese Minister of Economy and Trade, Sami Haddad, told the BBC his government suspected Syria of masterminding the violence.[29] Haddad also asked for money and resources to help Lebanese forces battling the militants. "I take this opportunity to ask our friends all over the world — Arab governments and friendly Western governments — to help us both logistically and with military equipment," he declared.[41] The Lebanese Cabinet declared its "full support" for military efforts to end the fighting, said Mohamed Chatah, a senior adviser to Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. "Lebanese security forces are targeting militants and are not randomly shooting into the refugee camp," Chatah said.[41] The living conditions at the camp are partly to blame for the rise of Fatah al-Islam, according to Khalil Makkawi, a former Lebanese ambassador to the United Nations.[41] Lebanese President Emile Lahoud called on all Lebanese to unite around the army.[42] Druze leader Walid Jumblatt, a supporter of Lebanon's governing coalition, said there were "no proposals" for a military solution. "But we want the murderers handed over to Lebanese justice," he said. [43].
  • A Fatah al-Islam spokesman, Abu Salim, told Al-Jazeera television that the group was only defending itself. "We were forced and compelled to be in this confrontation with the Lebanese army," Abu Salim said in an interview on Arabic language network Al-Jazeera.[41] Fatah al-Islam's leader, Shaker al-Abssi, told Al-Arabiya TV in June that his group had no connection to al-Qaeda or Syria. He said, his group seeks to reform Palestinian refugee camps in accordance with Islamic law, or Sharia.[41] In a video message released by the Fatah al-Islam leader he ruled out surrender. "O advocates of the US plan, we tell you that Sunnis will be a spearhead in fighting the Jews, Americans and their allies," he said. [44]
  • Minutes after the violence erupted, Syria temporarily closed two border crossings with northern Lebanon because of security concerns.[6] Syrian leaders deny fomenting violence in Lebanon.[41] Syria's ambassador to the United Nations, Bashar Jaafari, has denied his country had any links to the group, and said some of them had been in jail in Syria for their support of al-Qaeda.[29]
  • The Palestine Liberation Organization and the Palestinian factions' union delegation to the Grand Serail stressed Palestinians should shoulder responsibility of the improvised action by Fatah al-Islam. The delegation comprised representatives from Hamas, The Democratic Front, Sa'iqa, Nidal Front, Islamic Jihad, Fatah al-Intifada, Palestinian Liberation Front and Abbas Zaki, the representative of the executive committee of the PLO.[42]
  • Hezbollah views extremist Sunni groups such as al-Qaeda and Fatah al-Islam as enemies[45] but in an address to mark the seventh anniversary of Israel's withdrawal from Lebanon, Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah, the leader of the Shia group Hezbollah, urged the Lebanese government not to storm the Nahr al-Bared refugee camp and attack Fatah al-Islam. He demanded the conflict solved politically. "The Nahr al-Bared camp and Palestinian civilians are a red line," Nasrallah said. "We will not accept or provide cover or be partners in this." Nasrallah also condemned attacks against the army and said: "The Lebanese army is the guardian of security, stability and national unity in this country. We should all regard this army as the only institution left capable of preserving security and stability in this country." [46] Nasrallah was skeptical of a U.S. military aid shipment to Lebanon and according to the Hezbollah leader, the Lebanese should not allow themselves to become entangled with al-Qaeda on behalf of the United States. "I wonder why all this care now for the Lebanese army," he said, referring to the 2006 conflict between Israel and Hezbollah. [47] "Are you willing to fight the wars of others inside Lebanon?" he asked his audience.
  • U.S. President George W. Bush said the Islamists needed to be stopped. "Extremists that are trying to topple that young democracy need to be reined in," he said.[29] The U.S. State Department dismissed any links between this week's violence and efforts to establish the international tribunal to try suspects for the 2005 assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri.[41]
  • Al-Qaeda released a statement saying: "Sons of Islam, o sons of the nation of Allah and Jihad, our brothers in the Nahr el-Bared camp in Lebanon are being subjected to the flagrant aggression of the army working for treason and apostasy, the Lebanese Army." They called on "every Muslim" to support Fatah al-Islam because it is seeking "a confrontation" with Israel.[48]
    • An Al-Qaeda linked group based in Lebanon, accused the Lebanese government of embarking on a "crusade" after depriving its Palestinian inhabitants of basic rights.[48]
    • Tawheed and Jihad in Syria, said Christians in Lebanon were part of a 'united crusader-Jewish front' directed against Muslims, and accused the "Lebanese army, government, intelligence branches and police" of being "the guard dogs of France and America." Calling upon its supporters to "support the jihad," the group also said: "We warn that if the Lebanese government does not lift its blockade, its sons living on Syrian territory will be considered moving targets," adding that it would carry out operations against Lebanese government officials citizens in Syria.[49]

Image File history File links Flag_of_Lebanon. ... Fouad Siniora (alternative spellings: Fouad Sanyoura, Fuad Siniora, Fouad Saniora, Fouad Seniora) (Arabic: ‎, Fuād As-SanyÅ«rah) is the Prime Minister of Lebanon, a position he assumed on 19 July 2005, succeeding Najib Mikati. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Hassan Sabeh (حسن سبع) is a Lebanese politician and currently the Interior Minister in the cabinet of Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. ... General Ashraf Rifi (Arabic: ; also spelled Achraf Rifi) (born April 1, 1954 in Tripoli, Lebanon) is the general director of the Lebanese Internal Security Forces (the national police). ... The Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) consists of three branches: Lebanese Army Lebanese Air Force Lebanese Navy // General overview The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include maintaining security and stability in the country, guarding the countrys borders, port security, relief operations, rescue operations, fire fighting, and fighting drug smuggling. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ... Christianity in Lebanon has a long history and has been closely connected with many recent conflicts in that country. ... Samir Farid Geagea (Arabic: سمير فريد جعجع, also Samir Ja`ja`) born October 25, 1952 is the leader of the right wing Lebanese Forces (LF) political party. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Nayla Moawad (Arabic: نائله معوض) (born 3 July 1940) is a Lebanese politician. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... Sami Haddad (Arabic: ) (born August 26, 1950) is the Lebanese minister of economy and trade. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Occident redirects here. ... This is the list of the Lebanese government that was formed by Fouad Siniora on 19 July 2005. ... Mohamad Bahaa Chatah (Arabic: ) is a Lebanese economist and diplomat. ... Fouad Siniora (alternative spellings: Fouad Sanyoura, Fuad Siniora, Fouad Saniora, Fouad Seniora) (Arabic: ‎, Fuād As-SanyÅ«rah) is the Prime Minister of Lebanon, a position he assumed on 19 July 2005, succeeding Najib Mikati. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... UN redirects here. ... Émile Lahoud General Émile Geamil Lahoud (Arabic: اميل لحود) (born January 12, 1936) is the current President of Lebanon. ... Religions Druzism Scriptures Rasail al-hikmah (Epistles of Wisdom), Quran Languages Arabic. ... Picture of Walid Jumblatt Walid Jumblatt (Arabic: وليد جنبلاط‎) (born August 7, 1949) is the current leader of the Progressive Socialist Party of Lebanon and the most prominent leader of the Druze community. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_jihad. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... This article is about the TV network and channel. ... This article is about the TV network and channel. ... Shaker al-Abssi (Arabic: ), a veteran Palestinian guerrilla, is Fatah al-Islams leader. ... Al-Arabiya is an Arabic-language satellite news channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates which began broadcasting in February 2003, launched with an investment of $300 million from the Saudi-owned MBC, the Lebanese Hariri Group, and others. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Shariah (Arabic: transliteration: ) is the body of Islamic religious law. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Syria. ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... UN redirects here. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... PLO redirects here. ... The Grand Serail (Arabic: السراي الكبير) is the headquarters of the Prime Minister of Lebanon. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement[1]) is a Palestinian Sunni Islamist[2][3] militant organization and political party. ... Democratic Front is the name of the current governing coalition in the Indian state of Maharashtra. ... As-Saiqa (also transliterated as al-Saika, Saeqa, etc, from Arabic: الصاعقة meaning storm or thunderbolt; also known as the Vanguard for the Popular Liberation War) is a Palestinian political and military faction created and controlled by Syria. ... Islamic Jihad (Arabic: ‎, Harakat al-Jihad al-Islami) is a terrorist Islamist group based in the Syrian capital, Damascus. ... Fatah al-Intifada (Arabic, Fatah Uprising, فتح الانتفاضة) is a Palestinian militant faction founded by Col. ... The Palestine Liberation Front (PLF) was founded to create a Palestinian state; it was headquartered first in Lebanon, and later in Tunisia. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, with an intent to destroy Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hezbollah. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... Sayyed Hasan Nasrallah (Arabic: ) (b. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... For other uses, see Hezbollah (disambiguation). ... Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... The Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) consists of three branches: Lebanese Army Lebanese Air Force Lebanese Navy // General overview The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include maintaining security and stability in the country, guarding the countrys borders, port security, relief operations, rescue operations, fire fighting, and fighting drug smuggling. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) consists of three branches: Lebanese Army Lebanese Air Force Lebanese Navy // General overview The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include maintaining security and stability in the country, guarding the countrys borders, port security, relief operations, rescue operations, fire fighting, and fighting drug smuggling. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Rafiq Bahaa Edine Hariri (born November, 1944) is a Lebanese billionaire businessman, and was Prime Minister of Lebanon until his resignation on October 20, 2004. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_jihad. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ...

References

  1. ^ Lebanon's army announces its Nahr al-Bared death toll | Ya Libnan | Lebanon News Live from Beirut
  2. ^ Lebanon’s New War(s)
  3. ^ Lebanon army advances into camp | International | Reuters
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ Refugees: Welcome to Cepal.ca
  6. ^ a b c BBC News (May 20, 2007). "Lebanese troops battle militants". Retrieved May 20, 2007.
  7. ^ Lebanon Violence, CNN, 2007-05-21.
  8. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Fresh clashes engulf Lebanon camp
  9. ^ Many dead in Lebanon camp battle.
  10. ^ Al Jazeera English - News - Lebanon Camp Offensive Continues
  11. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Fighting at second Lebanon camp
  12. ^ Naharnet News Desk
  13. ^ cnn.com: Lebanese target suspected militants inside refugee camp
  14. ^ Twelve die in Lebanese army raid on militant hideout in apartment - Haaretz - Israel News
  15. ^ Fatah mainstream kills 3 Fatal al-Islam militants in north Lebanon | Ya Libnan | Lebanon News Live from Beirut
  16. ^ Blacksmiths of Lebanon: More Fighting in the North
  17. ^ Jund Al Sham militants disband in south Lebanon camp | Ya Libnan | Lebanon News Live from Beirut
  18. ^ Islamists kill six Lebanese troops
  19. ^ http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L25461139.htm
  20. ^ Lebanese Commander to declare victory over terrorists soon | Ya Libnan | Lebanon News Live from Beirut
  21. ^ Al Jazeera English - News - More Troops Killed At Nahr Al-Bared
  22. ^ Lebanese authorities announce they killed Fatah Islam deputy commander - International Herald Tribune
  23. ^ Rotten corpses hamper army operations at Lebanon camp | Ya Libnan | Lebanon News Live from Beirut
  24. ^ Tripoli Daily News: Army tells militants that staying in camp is 'suicidal decision'
  25. ^ Lebanese Army hunts down fugitive terrorists | Ya Libnan | Lebanon News Live from Beirut
  26. ^ Lebanon declares victory against Fatah al-Islam, Jane's News, retrieved 2007-09-11
  27. ^ Deutsche Presse-Agentur via Monsters and Critics (May 22, 2007). "Fatah al-Islam claims responsibility for Beirut bombings (Extra)" Retrieved May 22, 2007.
  28. ^ "Fatah al-Islam spox denies claim to Beirut bombs", Reuters, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-01-22. 
  29. ^ a b c d e "Aid convoy under fire in Lebanon", BBC News Online, May 22, 2007
  30. ^ "Explosion rocks Beirut", Ynet, May 21, 2007
  31. ^ "Lebanese army battles Islamists in Palestinian camp", Reuters, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-01-21. 
  32. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Lebanon army 'hit by militants'
  33. ^ Report: Explosion rocks Beirut neighborhood, wounds seven - Haaretz - Israel News
  34. ^ Al Jazeera English - News - Fresh Assault On Lebanon Camp
  35. ^ Al Jazeera English - News - Beirut Bomb Kills Politician
  36. ^ Al Jazeera English - News - Lebanon Blast Kills Unifil Troops
  37. ^ Al Jazeera English - News - Army Advances Into Nahr Al-Bared
  38. ^ Lebanon's army announces its Nahr al-Bared death toll | Ya Libnan | Lebanon News Live from Beirut
  39. ^ Al Jazeera English (May 23, 2007). "Refugees flee Lebanon camp". Retrieved May 23, 2007.
  40. ^ Deutsche Presse-Agentur via Monsters and Critics. Fighting between militants, Lebanese army leaves 42 dead
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h "Refugees leave Lebanon camp; U.N. workers freed", CNN, May 23, 2007
  42. ^ a b "Lahoud calls on all Lebanese to unite around army", Al-Manar, May 21, 2007
  43. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Lebanon army 'hit by militants'
  44. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Lebanon army 'hit by militants'
  45. ^ Hezbollah to Lebanese army: Stay out of refugee camp - CNN.com
  46. ^ http://www.manartv.com.lb/NewsSite/NewsDetails.aspx?id=17777&language=en
  47. ^ BBC NEWS | Middle East | Hezbollah head warns against raid
  48. ^ a b Al-Qaeda: Help Fatah al-Islam attack Israel
  49. ^ 'Lebanon guard dog of America'.

Timeline of the War on Terrorism: // September 11 - September 11, 2001 attacks take place in New York City, Washington D.C., and Shanksville, United States and kill 2,993 people. ... War on Terrorism casualties: // Military casualties only United States: 4,540 killed, 4 POW/MIA, 11 ex-POW/MIA [1][2] United Kingdom: 260 killed, 25 ex-POW/MIA [1][2] Canada: 83 killed [2] Other Coalition forces: 244 killed, 1 ex-POW/MIA[1][2] Iraqi security forces: 9... // Military/diplomatic campaigns The War on Terror is broadly agreed to be taking place in the following theaters of operation. ... Criticism of the War on Terrorism addresses the issues, morals, ethics, efficiency, economics, and other questions surrounding the War on Terrorism. ... Abu Ghraib cell block The Abu Ghraib prison (Arabic: سجن أبو غريب; also Abu Ghurayb) is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km (20 mi) west of Baghdad. ... For other uses, see Axis of evil (disambiguation). ... President Bush makes remarks in 2006 during a press conference in the Rose Garden about Irans nuclear ambitions and discusses North Koreas nuclear test. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism The Salt Pit in Afghanistan Black site is a military term that has been used by United States intelligence agencies to refer to any classified facility whose existence or... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Declaration of Stephen Abraham, Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army Reserve, June 14th, 2007 This is the trailer where the Combatant Status... Painting of waterboarding from Cambodias Tuol Sleng Prison Enhanced interrogation techniques is a term that the Bush administration uses to describe techniques of aggressively extracting information from captives which they say are necessary in the War on Terror. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ghost detainee. ... Extraordinary rendition and irregular rendition are terms used to describe the extrajudicial transfer of a person from one state to another with the intent of legally torturing them outside of the jurisdiction of a state which prohibits it. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Statement of Alberto J Mora on interrogation abuse, July 7, 2004 Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a joint military prison and... The United States Military Commissions Act of 2006, Pub. ... An NSA electronic surveillance program that operated without judicial oversight mandated by Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) was named the Terrorist Surveillance Program by the George W. Bush administration[1] in response to the NSA warrantless surveillance controversy which followed the disclosure of the program. ... A bill to amend the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 to provide additional procedures for authorizing certain acquisitions of foreign intelligence information and for other purposes also known as the Protect America Act of 2007 (Pub. ... In American political and legal discourse, the unitary executive theory is a theory of Constitutional interpretation that is based on aspects of the separation of powers. ... The term unlawful combatant (also unlawful enemy combatant or unprivileged combatant/belligerent) denotes a person denied the privileges of prisoner of war (POW) designation, in accordance with the Geneva Conventions; one to whom protection is recognised as due is a lawful or privileged combatant. ... In the United States, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which President George W. Bush signed into law... A political and geographical map showing countries commonly considered part of the Middle East. ... Combatants Arab nations Israel Arab-Israeli conflict series History of the Arab-Israeli conflict Views of the Arab-Israeli conflict International law and the Arab-Israeli conflict Arab-Israeli conflict facts, figures, and statistics Participants Israeli-Palestinian conflict · Israel-Lebanon conflict · Arab League · Soviet Union / Russia · Israel, Palestine and the... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The North Yemen Civil War was a war fought between Royalist of the Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen and Republican factions of the Yemen Arab Republic in North Yemen from 1962 to 1970. ... Combatants Sultanate of Muscat and Oman (with British, Iranian and Jordanian assistance) Dhofar Liberation Front (DLF) Popular Front for the Liberation of Oman and the Arabian Gulf (PFLOAG) Popular Front for the Liberation of Oman (PFLO) Strength Sultan of Omans Armed Forces (10000) Firqats irregular groups (1800) Iranian army... Combatants Lebanese Front Syria LNM PLO Israel Commanders Bachir Gemayel Dany Chamoun Kamal Jumblatt Yasser Arafat Ariel Sharon The Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990) was a multifaceted civil war whose antecedents trace back to the conflicts and political compromises reached after the end of Lebanons administration by the Ottoman... The Libyan-Egyptian War was a short border war between Libya and Egypt in July 1977. ... Belligerents Iran Patriotic Union of Kurdistan Iraq Peoples Mujahedin of Iran Soldiers and volunteers from different Arab countries. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Combatants Saudi Security Forces al-Qaeda Casualties 44 killed 218 wounded 129 killed 3,106+ arrested[1] Civilians: 100 killed (foreigners, Saudis) 510 wounded[1] The Insurgency in Saudi Arabia is an armed conflict in Saudi Arabia between radical Khawarij fighters, believed to be associated with al-Qaeda, against the...

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Belligerents Israel Defense Forces Palestine Liberation Organization Commanders Ariel Sharon Yasir Arafat Strength 30,000 15,000 Casualties and losses 368 soldiers killed, 2,383 wounded 1000 PLO guerillas killed, 6000 captured. ... The War of the Camps was a subconflict within the Lebanese Civil War in which Palestinian refugee camps were besieged by the Shiite Amal militia. ... Combatants  Israel IDF Fatah (Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, Tanzim) Hamas Islamic Jihad Commanders Yedidia Yehuda [1] Mahmoud Tawallbe† Strength 1,000 200-250 Casualties 23 soldiers killed 52 killed (38 armed men, 14 civilians according to IDF; 30 militants, 22 civilians according to HRW) 685 persons arrested (mostly released) The... The February 13, 2007 Lebanon bombings were two blasts on buses near Bikfaya, Lebanon which killed three and injured 21. ... The 2006–2007 Lebanese political protests were a series of protests and sit-ins that began on 1 December 2006, led by groups in Lebanon that opposed the Western-backed government of Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. ... Belligerents Hezbollah Amal[1] LCP[2] PFLP-GC[3] Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah Imad Mughniyeh Dan Halutz Moshe Kaplinsky[4] Udi Adam Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[5] Up to 10,000 ground troops. ... A CH-54 Tarhe of the US Army 1st Cavalry Division carrying a BLU-82/B bomb The idea of the helicopter as a bomber has likely been around since helicopters first came into military service. ... List of wars - List of wars before 1000 - List of wars 1000-1499 - List of wars 1500-1799 - List of wars 1800-1899 - List of wars 1900-1944 - List of wars 1945-1989 - List of wars 1990-2002 - List of wars 2003-current- Ongoing wars 2003- Invasion of Iraq 2003...

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