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Encyclopedia > 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy and irregularities
The neutrality of this article is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.

Concerns were raised, following the 2004 election, on various aspects of the voting process: whether voting had been made accessible to everyone entitled to vote, whether the votes cast had been correctly counted, and whether these irregularities decisively affected the reported outcome of the election. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ...


Among the issues raised were allegations or complaints regarding obstacles to voter registration, improper purges of voter lists, voter suppression, accuracy and reliability of voting machines (especially electronic voting), problems with absentee and provisional ballots, areas with more votes than signatures of voters in election poll books, areas with more votes than registered voters[1], and possible partisan interference by voting machine companies and election officials. Although a recount was conducted in Ohio, many of the alleged improprieties (such as long lines or tampering) could not be addressed in a recount. Voter registration is the requirement in some democracies for citizens to check in with some central registry before being allowed to vote in elections. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A voting machine is a device to record and register votes to be counted as per any voting system, with or without printing a ballot for the voter to verify. ... Electronic voting machine used in all Brazilian elections and plebiscites. ... Absentee may refer to one of the following: Absentee (band) is a band in the UK The Absentee is a novel by Maria Edgeworth, published in 1812 in Tales of Fashionable Life. ... In U.S. elections, when someone shows up at a polling place to cast a vote, but is not on the list of people who may vote there (is not registered in that precinct, or his registation is otherwise invalid or inaccurate), he may be allowed to cast a provisional... This article details the vote recount effort and related legal challenges that took place after the 2004 U.S. election with a focus on states that had a high discrepancy between unadjusted exit poll results and official results in the US presidential race. ...

Contents

Issues

Map showing reported problems by percentage, and their state distribution. [1]

The concerns included: 2004 us election controversy intro image I made this. ... 2004 us election controversy intro image I made this. ...

  • Exit Polls: The November 3rd 12:23 am election-day exit poll results conducted for the National Election Pool (NEP) by Edison Media Research and Mitofsky International [2] predicted John Kerry winning the popular vote by 5 million, while the official results gave George W. Bush the win with a popular margin of 3 million, an 8 million vote (6.5%) difference.
  • Voting Machines: With the passage of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA), passing 347-58 in the House and 92-2 in the Senate and signed by President George W. Bush on October 21, 2002, [3] many states were given significant compensation to upgrade their voting apparatus to new electronic systems manufactured by several different vendors such as Diebold Election Systems, ES&S, and Sequoia Voting Systems. Several of these systems were identified as containing significant vulnerabilities by numerous reports: the RABA Trusted Agent Report for the State of Maryland [4], the SAIC Report [5], and Professor Avi Rubin's (of Johns Hopkins University Computer Sciences Department) Analysis of an Electronic Voting System, [6] among others. It is unclear how many of these security risks had been fixed by Election Day.
  • Voter Suppression: There are reports, some documented through video, of long lines at certain precincts in urban areas that favored Kerry. [7]. Few experts believed the problems were enough to overturn Bush's victory and little evidence of fraud has emerged. [7] A report issued by the DNC stated that the difference in wait times was racially based. According to the DNC report, the average wait time across the state of Ohio for an African-American was 52 minutes, as compared to 18 minutes for whites. [8] Remarks were made by DNC Chairman Howard Dean. [9] Speculations as to the cause of the delay include more efficient voting in suburban areas (machines in suburban areas were more heavily used), suburban voters were less easily discouraged from voting, or poorer districts were provided inferior and less equipment per capita. [7] The DNC report believed differences in the voting experience between African-American voters and white voters caused voter disenfranchisement by the state of Ohio since African-Americans tend to lean heavily towards the Democratic party. The report did not "challenge or question the results of the election in any way." [8]

An exit poll is a poll of voters taken immediately after they have exited the polling stations. ... Mitofsky International is a survey research company founded by Warren J. Mitofsky in 1993. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Diebold Elections Systems is a subsidiary of Diebold that makes and sells voting machines. ... Election Systems & Software (ES&S) is an American company that provides voting services. ... Sequoia Voting Systems is a company based in California. ... The acronym DNC can mean: Democratic National Committee, the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Disfranchisement or disenfranchisement is the revocation of, or failure to grant, the right of suffrage (the right to vote) to a person or group of people. ...

Voting machine security and HAVA

Main article: 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy, voting machines

In response to the 2000 presidential election controversy in Florida, where problems with punch-card voting systems led to Bush v. Gore [citation needed] Congress passed a law called the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) which appropriated $3.8 billion to replace punch-card and lever voting systems with computerized electronic voting systems. [10] The passage of HAVA acted as a catalyst to bring electronic voting machines, which had been in use for at least a decade, to a significant portion of the nation. [citation needed] It is estimated that around 40 million votes were cast using electronic voting machines in the 2004 U.S. election. [11][12][13] After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Holding In the circumstances of this case, any manual recount of votes seeking to meet the December 12 “safe harbor” deadline would be unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


As the use of these machines became mainstream, several reports were released that highlighted insecurities in them. [14] The electronic voting machine industry joined the Information Technology Association of America, an industry organization that represents hundreds of the top technology companies in the U.S., [15] and created the "Election Technology Council" in order to address these concerns. The Information Technology Association of America is an industry trade group for several information technology companies. ...


Many voting machines do not provide an auditable paper trail. [16] Votes tallied on an electronic voting machine can be electronically altered, possibly without detection. [17][18][19] Without a voter-verifiable paper trail, proper auditing of results produced by the voting machine is difficult if not impossible. [20] According to a team of security experts, even a small alteration of the machine could have been enough to change the result in battleground states. [21] Some computer scientists have said these machines are not tamper resistant and that open-architecture voting machines would make the process more transparent. [22] In the field of computer security, system hardware is said to be tamper-resistant if it is difficult to modify or subvert, even for an assailant who has physical access to the system. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ...


Government agencies that purchased voting machines were usually denied access to the manufacturer's proprietary software, and the official certifications were routinely bypassed by the failure to perform manufacturer-prescribed tests, the failure to apply instructions intended to safeguard their integrity once purchased, or the use of uncertified software and updates. [23][24][25] When software was available for review, there were concerns that most agencies lacked the technical expertise to find problems or audit changes to the software. [citation needed] In several cases, agencies and experts examining the machines expressed dismay at their quality and security. [26] Proprietary software is software that has restrictions on using and copying it, usually enforced by a proprietor. ...


At least one voting machine began counting backwards to zero when it reached 32,000 votes. The manufacturer, ES&S, allegedly had known of this issue for two years but had failed to fix the bug. [27] In two cases, a certifying company (Ciber Inc.) recommended voting machines for certification without testing core firmware or attempting to verify any of the crucial security aspects of the machines. [28][29][30][31][32] Product certification or product qualification is the cornerstone of all bounding and the process of certifying that a certain product has passed performance and/or quality assurance tests or qualification requirements stipulated in regulations such as a building code and nationally accredited test standards, or that it complies with a... In computing, firmware is software that is embedded in a hardware device. ...


Some managers and/or affiliates of each of these also have criminal records, including cases of computer fraud, embezzlement, and bid rigging. [33][34][35][36] In addition, voting machine companies have been accused of major security and law violations. Employees (including senior executives) have been found to have had multiple prior convictions including bans for bid rigging, embezzlement, and drug trafficking, [37][38][39] installing uncertified and untested versions of software on touchscreen voting machines, and tampering with computer files. [40][33] According to internal email messages at the manufacturers, data files used in the machines are not password protected to prevent manual editing. [31][41] Podium touchscreen Touchscreens, touch screens, touch panels or touchscreen panels are display overlays which have the ability to display and receive information on the same screen. ...


The top three voting machine companies (ES&S, Diebold, and Sequoia) account for over 90% of voting machines in use. [42][43]

Two groups are trying to create new programs for electronic voting machines are The Open Vote Foundation and the Open Voting Consortium. [44][45]

Exit polls

Main article: 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy, exit polls

Exit poll interviews of voters leaving the polling place have been used in other countries to expose election fraud. In the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, for example, exit poll discrepancies were an indication of possible election fraud. [46][47][48][49][50][51] A re-vote was eventually ordered and the election result was overturned. After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ... An exit poll is a poll of voters taken immediately after they have exited the polling stations. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ...


The National Election Pool (NEP), a consortium of news organizations responsible for conducting most exit polls for the 2004 election, hired Edison Media Research and Mitofsky International (Edison/Mitofsky) to conduct the polls. The stated goal of NEP's and Edison/Mitofsky's exit polling and subsequent analysis is to accurately predict election winners, not to detect fraud. Accordingly, they adjust the final (published) exit poll results to match actual vote counts.


According to blogger Mark Blumenthal, in the 2004 election, pre-adjustment exit poll results were most likely leaked onto the Internet during Election Day via CNN. [52] These results, based on unadjusted exit polls, indicated that Kerry was leading Bush. [53] According to an internal review of 1,400 precincts, Kerry's vote in the exit poll was higher than that in the vote count by an average of 1.9 percent. At one point during the day, Kerry's lead over Bush was estimated to be 3% of the popular vote. [54] Differences between vote counts and pre-adjustment exit poll results were larger in battleground states.


A preliminary report [55] from the California Institute of Technology purported to show no discrepancy in the exit poll data. Another analysis [56] from Steven Freeman, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, gained initial media attention by asserting that the odds were less than 1 in 250 million that the difference between unadjusted exit poll data and actual vote counts was due to chance, although he later revised these odds to 1 in 662,000. His paper has attracted criticism [53] from polling statisticians for not having incorporated large enough design effects, which would mean that the paper overstated the odds against these anomalies occurring by chance, and for other statistical failings. [57] The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... The University of Pennsylvania (or Penn[3][4]) is a private, nonsectarian research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


Initial exit poll results indicated that Bush made substantial gains among Hispanics, especially in his home state of Texas, but some of these apparent gains now seem to have evaporated. [58] A correction [59][60] reported by the Press reduced Bush's support substantially, turning an 18-point Bush margin among Texan Hispanics into a narrow Kerry lead. Nationwide figures reported later by NBC reduced Bush's gains further, while other surveys have produced mixed results. A poll by the William C. Velasquez Institute [61] indicated that Bush's gains among Hispanics since 2000 were not statistically significant, but the University of Pennsylvania's larger National Annenberg Election Survey showed a significant increase in Bush's support. [62] The University of Pennsylvania (or Penn[3][4]) is a private, nonsectarian research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


In a 77-page report issued in January 2005, the polling company, Edison/Mitofsky, denied the possibility that fraud caused differences between exit poll results and vote tallies. [63] Edison/Mitofsky believes "Kerry voters were more likely to participate in the exit polls than Bush voters" and that this willingness was the cause of the error in the exit poll results. Edison/Mitofsky said their evaluation does not support the hypothesis that discrepancies were higher in precincts using electronic voting equipment. 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15...


A group called US Count Votes responded with its own report [64], saying: ["The Edison/Mitofsky report] gives no consideration to alternative explanations involving election irregularities [and] fails to substantiate their hypothesis that the difference between their exit polls and official election results should be explained by problems with the exit polls. They assert without supporting evidence that (p. 4), "Kerry voters were more likely to participate in the exit polls than Bush voters." In fact, data included within the report suggest that the opposite might be true."


Their report also states that Edison/Mitofsky did not adequately investigate whether the type of voting machine was a factor in discrepancies. Several professors of statistics and other analytical fields contributed to the US Count Votes report. The report recommended that a national database of precinct-level election results be compiled to support rigorous statistical analysis.


US Count Votes have since produced a further report (Executive Summary [65], Full Report [66]), which claims that Edison/Mitofsky's data gives support to the idea that the exit polls were more accurate than the official vote tallies, and that a thorough investigation and exhaustive recounts in key states would be appropriate.


Vote suppression

Main article: 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy, vote suppression

The term "voter suppression" is used to describe methods of discouraging or impeding people from voting. The government agency or private entity doing so believes that the would-be voters thus turned away would have been more likely to vote for an opponent. For example, Representative Dennis Kucinich (D-OH) described alleged voter suppression in his state (Ohio): After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Dennis John Kucinich (Kučinić in Croatian) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ...

Dirty tricks occurred across the state, including phony letters from Boards of Elections telling people that their registration through some Democratic activist groups were invalid and that Kerry voters were to report on Wednesday because of massive voter turnout. Phone calls to voters giving them erroneous polling information were also common.

Dennis Kucinich, [67] Dennis John Kucinich (Kučinić in Croatian) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ...

Voting technology irregularities - In 2004, the issue of long lines and unequal voting machine distribution (among other issues) received increased attention in Ohio.In many places, voters had to wait several hours to vote. [68] These waits have been attributed to an overall increase in voter registration without the mandated proportional increase in voting machines in some precincts (some precints lost voting machines while gaining registered voters); misdirection of voters, and poorly trained staff.[69] [70] [71] [1] Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ...


"Ballot spoilage" was also a major issue, and was predominately reported in African American precincts.[72] [73] [74] These precincts were allocated a disproportionately high proportion of punch-card voting machines compared to other precincts.[citation needed] High turnout and a very high percentage of the voters voting the same (Democrat) resulted in an anomolously high concentration of reported "broken" punch-card machines; machines in which the metal pin that punches out the chad can no longer push the chad through the whole because too many chads had built up beneath it - resulting in ballots without a vote for president. [citation needed]


This problem first surfaced in Florida in the previous presidental election. In that election, punch-card machines were likewise distributed in disproportionally high amounts in African American precincts.[75] [76] Public recognition of the potential for abuse by allocating these machines disproportionately resulted in nation-wide efforts by citizen groups to discontinue the use of these machines.[77] In 2004, the punch-card ballots were still widely used in some states. For example, more than 90,000 votes cast in Ohio were discounted, many allegedly due to "hanging" chads. [78] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Voter registration irregularities - Allegations of voter registration fraud were made by both parties in many states during the 2004 election. Some of the controversies involved the procedure by which workers are paid per registration. In Colorado at least 719 cases of potentially fraudulent forms were submitted. [79] Colorado Secretary of State Donetta Davidson issued a statement saying:

I have a message for those that finance direct participation in abuse - I'm saying abuse. They could be out there legally doing it and there's no problem. If there is abuse in their process, we're going after them.

—Donetta Davidson

In Nevada, former field registrars for the Republican party and for the Republican party-funded group "Voters Outreach of America" claimed that they had been instructed to "dispose of" any voter registrations they received from Democrats. A Republican official described the allegations as an "outright lie", and that there was "no way anyone would issue instructions to destroy valid registrations, even from Democrats". [80], [81], [82]


Months prior to the election, the Citizens Alliance for Secure Elections filed suit against the Cuyahoga County (Ohio) Board of Elections, claiming that they botched or failed to file the registration of at least 10,000 voters. Cuyahoga County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ...


Provisional ballot irregularities - During the election, a record number of provisional ballots - ballots for people who believed they had registered but were not on the voter roles - were filled out in that county. Of those, 33% (8,099) were ultimately thrown out, more than three and a half times the normal Ohio rate of 9%.[83] [84] [citation needed] Shortly after the ballots had been counted, the People for the American Way filed a lawsuit seeking to have provisional ballots re-examined, demanding that provisional ballots be accepted regardless of the precinct they were filed in, in accordance with Ohio state law and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and that registration be checked against voter registration cards, rather than just electronic voting lists.[85] People for the American Way (PFAW) is a prominent liberal advocacy organization in the United States, founded by television producer Norman Lear in 1980. ... The United States Voting Rights Act of 1965 outlawed requiring would-be voters to take literacy tests and provided for federal registration of African American voters in areas that had less than 50% of eligible voters registered. ...


Absentee ballot irregularities - Absentee ballots were also an issue. In Broward County, Florida, over 58,000 absentee ballots sent to the Postal Service to be sent out to voters were never received by the Postal Service, according to the Postal Service and county election officials. [86] Broward County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... A British pillar box The postal system is a system by which written documents typically enclosed in envelopes, and also small packages containing other matter, are delivered to destinations around the world. ...


Tire slashing - In Wisconsin, the son of Rep. Gwen Moore (D) and four volunteers for the Kerry / Edwards campaign slashed tires on 25 vans rented by Republicans to aid in voter turnout. Republican campaign workers were able to replace the vans in time to take voters to the polls. Spokesman for the Democratic Party of Wisconsin, Seth Boffeli, said the five were paid employees of Kerry's campaign, but were not acting on behalf of the campaign or party.[87] All five were arrested and faced felony charges. [87]. Four of the five, including Rep. Moore's son, were sentenced to 4 to 6 months in jail.[88]. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Gwendolynne Sophia Moore (born April 18, 1951) a Democrat from Wisconsin, is a Congresswoman representing Wisconsins 4th Congressional district (map). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Allegations of racial discrimination and other bias

Some critics allege that the pattern of voter disenfranchisement is by design, having disproportionately affected racial minorities and/or urban precincts. For example, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights estimated that, in Florida in 2000, 54 percent of the ballots discarded as "spoiled" were cast by African Americans, who represented only 11 percent of the voters. [89] People for the American Way and the NAACP catalogued a number of voting problems with discriminatory impacts through early 2004.[90] The Commission on Civil Rights (USCCR) is an independent federal agency of the United States government. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... People for the American Way (PFAW) is a prominent liberal advocacy organization in the United States, founded by television producer Norman Lear in 1980. ...


The 2004 election continued the trend that African Americans were much more likely to vote for Democratic candidates. As a result, a disproportionate reduction in the African-American vote would tend to hurt Democratic candidates. BBC journalist Greg Palast, a self-described progressive, alleged that if the election had been conducted without improprieties, Kerry would have won the presidency. [91][92][93][94][95] The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ... Greg Palast is a New York Times-bestselling author and a journalist for the British Broadcasting Corporation as well as the British newspaper The Observer. ...


Jesse Jackson, a prominent African-American activist and founder of the Rainbow Coalition, remarked on Election Day: "Suppose 500 black folks came into a white neighborhood to challenge votes. It would be totally unacceptable. We will not surrender in the face of this madness." [96] [97].


In August 2004, the NAACP and other civil rights leaders charged that the Republican Party was mounting a campaign to keep African Americans and other minority voters away from the polls in November.[98]


International election monitoring

A small team of international election monitors from the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) were invited to monitor the U.S. election. The OSCE observers were granted access to polling stations in a number of states, although sometimes only in specific counties. The monitors criticised partisan election officials and the long lines at polling places, but said that electronic voting machines generally appeared to run smoothly.

As for electronic voting, [election monitor] Gould said he preferred Venezuela's system to the calculator-sized touch pads in Miami. "Each electronic vote in Venezuela also produces a ticket that voters then drop into a ballot box," Gould said. "Unlike fully electronic systems, this gives a backup that can be used to counter claims of massive fraud." The United States is also nearly unique in lacking a unified voter registration system or national identity card, Gould said, adding that he would ideally require U.S. voters to dip a finger in an ink bowl or have a cuticle stained black after voting. "In El Salvador, Namibia and so many other elections, the ink was extremely important in preventing challenges to multiple voting," Gould said. "In Afghanistan it didn't work so well, because they used the dipping ink for the cuticles, so it wiped right off."

—Thomas Crampton, International Herald Tribune[99][100]

Allegations of a media 'lockdown'

Since reports of irregularities surrounding the 2004 Presidential vote first started to surface, there has been an ongoing complaint by progressive and liberal figures and media watchdog groups that the "mainstream" media has not given enough coverage to the issue, or has in fact intentionally minimized coverage and public awareness. [101][102] Although numerous publications have covered the voting process leading up to, during and following the election, the allegation of a "media lockdown" has persisted and grown as the majority of the coverage and insight into the election irregularities has taken place in alternative media outlets (independent/local media, internet media, etc.).[103] In light of numerous troublesome occurrences, most notably the exit polls withheld from public scrutiny by various media corporations who own the data, allegations of corporate or government manipulation and suppression of the media continue.[104][103][105]


Rep. John Conyers (D-MI), in an open letter to supporters, alluded to such a media lockdown: [citation needed] John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ...

For this challenge to Ohio's electors to have occurred, I owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to the internet activists, who spread the story of my efforts and supported me in every way possible. I am also thankful to the alternative media, including talk radio and blogs that gave substantial attention and investigation to these matters when all but a handful in the mainstream media refused to examine the facts. (Microsoft Word file[106])

—John Conyers

Other controversies and allegations

There have been incidents of irregularity, confusion or possible malfeasance in official handling of ballots with address errors, missing birthdates or other discrepancies, where such handling has been alleged to be contrary to standing law. Please see the In the news section for a list of reports detailing reported irregularities and unresolved aspects of the election.


In Cleveland, a mistake in precinct poll coordination led to hundreds of presidential votes being cast for a third party candidate instead of the intended candidate. [107] Another article [108] alleges that Democratic results on election night were withheld until Republican results had moved ahead.


Some analysts have suggested that a discrepancy between the loss margins of minor Democratic Supreme Court candidate C. Ellen Connally and Kerry/Edwards indicates vote manipulation: one would expect a minor candidate to receive fewer votes, relatively speaking, than the major candidate for the party. In some areas, this situation was reversed. [109] C. Ellen Connally was the Democratic Party nominee for Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court in 2004. ...


Blackboxvoting.ORG[110] reports that the following voting irregularities are directly foreseeable: "There are some who are using election-manipulation techniques to transfer a block of power to their friends. This is a business plan, or a form of organized crime, depending on how alarmed you are ... Manipulation of elections includes the following attack points."

  1. Strategic redistricting, ignoring normal timelines for re-evaluation.
  2. Orchestrated vote suppression: Hiring "challengers" to confront voters in targeted areas; moving polling places at the last minute, "losing" the voter registration records for a percentage of targeted voters, booting up equipment late, or not having enough equipment in minority districts.
  3. Casting and counting the vote on manipulatable and insecure systems.

Blackboxvoting.ORG[111] has alleged[112] it was "under attack around the time of the 2004 election, repeatedly, using various methods, very aggressively." The attack "was not random. It was clearly a targeted attack using a variety of methods..."

Also, it was reported that in Ohio, postcards telling voters to vote on November 3rd, a day after the true presidential election were circulated. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


In one instance, Chad Staton of Defiance, Ohio, charged with filing 124 false voter registration forms, said he committed the felonies in exchange for crack cocaine from Georgianne Pitts of Toledo, who was working for NAACP Voter Fund. [113] The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ...


Voter's rights advocacy organizations

Blackboxvoting.org

Black Box Voting has launched a fraud audit into Florida and Ohio. Three investigators (Bev Harris, Andy Stephenson, and Kathleen Wynne) were in Florida requesting hand counts on selected counties that had not fully complied with blackboxvoting.org's Nov. 2 Freedom of Information requests. Blackboxvoting.org accuses Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell of failing to properly account for provisional ballots, and refusing to allow citizens to see pollbooks. John Kenneth Blackwell John Kenneth Blackwell (born February 28, 1948), currently serves as the secretary of state for the U.S. state of Ohio and is the Republican nominee for Governor of Ohio in the 2006 election. ...


The director of blackboxvoting.org, Bev Harris, has filed a lawsuit against Palm Beach County, Florida Elections Supervisor Theresa LePore, which accuses her of stonewalling or ignoring requests for public records. The information was obtained from her successor, Arthur Anderson.[114][115] Theresa LePore butterfly ballot from Palm Beach, 2000 election Theresa LePore is the former elections supervisor for Palm Beach County, Florida. ...


Electronic Frontier Foundation

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation electronic voting machines may have serious security problems that aren't being addressed. Most of the machines use "black box" software that hasn't been publicly reviewed for security. Few machines provide voter-verifiable paper ballots which can be used to detect vote fraud. A recent analysis by several academic researchers outlines the many and varied ways that anyone from a technically proficient insider to an average voter could disrupt a poorly designed e-voting system to defraud an election. EFF has filed numerous lawsuits concerning voting irregularities. EFF Logo The EFF uses the blue ribbon as symbolism for their Free Speech defense. ...


The Election Protection Coalition

Hearings were held November 13 and 15, 2004, in Columbus, Ohio. The hearings were organized by the Election Protection Coalition and allowed citizens to enter their concerns regarding voter suppression and other irregularities into the public record.


Lynn Landes' investigation of Associated Press exit polls reporting

Journalist Lynn Landes' investigation states that the Associated Press (AP) is the "sole source of raw vote totals for the major news broadcasters on Election Night" and that they have refused to explain where this information will be sourced, and "refused to confirm or deny that the AP will receive direct feed from voting machines and central vote tabulating computers across the country." Lynn Landes is one of the nations leading freelance journalists on voting technology. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


She notes that if so, a remote computer could also access these same machines (the manufacturers already requested they not be connected during some elections, see above), that the manufacturers pride themselves on "accessibility" and that many of the AP executives have Republican ties and as a sole source may not be as non-partisan as is believed. She also points out there are significant ownership ties between conservative newspapers and voting machine manufacturers. [116]


Verified Voting and TrueMajority campaigns

Over a thousand computer scientists, academics, lawyers, elected officials and regular citizens have signed verifiedvoting.org's petition[117] to require voting machines with a verifiable paper trail. TrueMajority founder Ben Cohen (of Ben & Jerry's fame) notes, "The fledgling technology already has failed widely-publicized tests. One hacker was able to open a locked machine and start changing votes. It took him less than a minute. Another hacker was able to intercept and change vote totals being sent to headquarters." [118] TrueMajority is a organization with a progressive point of view. ... Ben Cohen (born 1951) is a co-founder of Ben & Jerrys, along with Jerry Greenfield. ... Ben & Jerrys factory in Waterbury, Vermont Ben & Jerrys is a brand of ice cream, frozen yogurt, sorbet, and novelty products, manufactured by Ben & Jerrys Homemade Holdings, Inc. ...


Political party efforts

Democratic Party

Several Democratic members of the House Committee on the Judiciary have written to the GAO requesting a formal investigation. Their first letter was written three days after the election, on November 5 [119], and this was followed by a second letter on November 8 listing further matters which had since come to light [120]. The investigation by the GAO is ongoing. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the audit, evaluation, and investigative agency of the United States Congress. ...


Numerous Democratic politicians have responded to the irregularities reported in the 2004 Presidential election. The Democratic National Committee (DNC)'s Voting Rights Institute has initiated an investigation of the Ohio irregularities. Senator Chris Dodd (D-CT) promised on January 6 that HAVA (the 'Help Americans Vote Act') would be 'fixed' in the 109th Congress. Senator Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) is expected to introduce the 'Federal Election Integrity Act' in February 2005. 'FEIA' is aimed at preventing election officials from participating in campaigns they oversee. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) agreed to join Senator Boxer (D-CA) in re-introducing legislation in the Senate requiring a paper audit for all electronic voting machines currently in service in the U.S.


Third party candidates

Green Party candidate David Cobb, in conjunction with his Libertarian opponent Michael Badnarik, raised the funds needed for a recount of the Ohio presidential vote in four days. Their request was filed with the required fees on November 19, and the recount was begun on December 13. Observers from the Green Party claimed that there were irregularities in the conduct of this recount [121], and Cobb filed a federal complaint on December 30 asking for a recount to be reconducted using uniform standards.


Cobb and Badnarik also requested a recount in New Mexico, but were asked to pay the estimated cost of $1.4 million up front. They instead challenged this requirement in court, and appealed an initial ruling that upheld this fee.


They also requested a recount in Nevada, but withdrew this request due to financial and other demands which they considered unreasonable.


Independent candidate Ralph Nader filed a request for a recount of the votes with New Hampshire's Secretary of State. Nader's request cited "irregularities in the vote reported on the AccuVote Diebold Machines in comparison to exit polls and trends in voting in New Hampshire" and added: "These irregularities favor President George W. Bush by 5 percent to 15 percent over what was expected." [122] The state conducted a partial recount which was completed Nov. 30, finding no significant discrepancies. [123].


According to Nader, the current situation with voting machines warrants investigation. Several elements make voting machines "probative" for investigation, according to Nader, a consumer affairs lawyer: proprietary ownership, secret code, vested interests, a high-value reward, and lack of any real consequences, or likelihood of getting caught, for vote manipulation. "We are told that shenanigans are just politics," said Nader at a press conference on Nov. 10. "Well, it's not politics. It's taking away people's votes."


State and Federal government agencies

Master list of Election-related litigation[124]


U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary (Democratic Staff)

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee requested an investigation by the GAO, asked Ohio election's chief J. Kenneth Blackwell for explanations of many irregularities, and held two Public Congressional Forums about voting irregularities in Ohio on December 8 and 13. Among the attendees were Jesse Jackson, Cliff Arnebeck, David Cobb, Bob Fitrakis and (at the first forum) Steve Freeman. Warren Mitofsky and Ken Blackwell were invited to the first forum but declined to attend. U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Gao is a city in Mali on the River Niger with a population of about 38,000 people. ... John Kenneth Blackwell John Kenneth Blackwell (born February 28, 1948), currently serves as the secretary of state for the U.S. state of Ohio and is the Republican nominee for Governor of Ohio in the 2006 election. ...


Relevant excerpts from the hearings are available at the article 2004 U.S. presidential election recounts and legal challenges. This article details the vote recount effort and related legal challenges that took place after the 2004 U.S. election with a focus on states that had a high discrepancy between unadjusted exit poll results and official results in the US presidential race. ...


A 100-page status report on their investigations was released on January 5, 2005, prior to the Jan. 6 joint meeting of Congress to receive the electoral college votes.


For letters and press releases, see House Committee on the Judiciary, Democratic Members.


Government Accountability Office

In November 2004, the Government Accountability Office began investigating vote counting in the election. [125] The GAO report found problems with electronic voting machines, which could have resulted in lost or miscounted votes. The report did not make any specific accusations of fraud in the 2004 election. [126] The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the audit, evaluation, and investigative agency of the United States Congress. ...


California State Voting Panel and State Department

In October of 2004 the state of California issued an order stating that 15,000 brand new touch-screen voting machines would not be used in next week's presidential election. These electronic machines were manufactured by Diebold Inc., a North Canton, Ohio-based company that also specializes in automated teller machines and electronic security.

California election officials say there are serious flaws with the machines and that Diebold repeatedly misled the state about them. "[Diebold] literally engaged in absolutely deplorable behavior and, to that extent, put the election at risk, jeopardizing the outcome of the election," said California Secretary of State Kevin Shelley. [127][128]

California Attorney General Bill Lockyer announced before the election in September that he will sue e-voting technology maker Diebold on charges that it defrauded the state because of their aggressive marketing and overstated claims, and sold the state poor-quality equipment that did not produce a paper trail and was full of security vulnerabilities. In December 2004, Diebold settled the case by agreeing to pay $2.6 million and to implement "certain reforms". [129] Kevin Francis Shelley (born November 16, 1955 in San Francisco, California) is a California politician, who was the 28th California Secretary of State from January 6, 2003, until his resignation on March 4, 2005. ... Bill Lockyer William Lockyer (born May 8, 1941) is the current Attorney General and head of the Department of Justice for the U.S. state of California, as well as California State Treasurer-elect. ...


Moss v. Bush

Main article: Moss v. Bush

On November 2, 2004, the American people went to the polls to select the electors for President of the United States. Under the electoral college system George W. Bush garnered 286 electors while John Kerry received 251. Between November 2 and November 12, ballots were counted and certified by each state's secretary of state. One month later on December 13, 2004 the Electors met to vote for President of the United States and transmit the certificates of vote to the Congressional Archivist. Each state had until December 22, 2004 to transmit these records. Moss v Bush was a lawsuit filed in the Ohio Supreme Court on 13 December 2004 (Supreme Court of Ohio Case No. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Within this period a civil case citing numerous statistical anomalies in Ohio's official canvass report alleged that election irregularities had altered the outcome of the election. The case, Moss v. Bush, was initially filed on December 13, 2004 in Ohio Supreme Court but was dismissed without prejudice because of a legally incorrect challenge. It was refiled and accepted. The Plaintiffs requested an expedited trial in order to meet the deadline of January 6 when Ohio's electoral votes were to be congressionally certified. The presiding judge, Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas Moyer, denied that request. On January 6, 2005, congress certified Ohio's electoral votes. The Plaintiffs then requested that the case be withdrawn since the certification rendered the case moot. The judge accepted the request. Moss v Bush was a lawsuit filed in the Ohio Supreme Court on 13 December 2004 (Supreme Court of Ohio Case No. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ohio Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Ohio, with final authority over interpretations of Ohio law and the Ohio Constitution. ... Thomas J. Moyer was born on April 18, 1939 in Sandusky, Ohio. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The 2004 electoral vote challenge in Congress

During the congressional certification of electoral votes, Senator Boxer (D) and Representative Jones (D) filed a formal objection to the certification of Ohio's electoral votes and a debate ensued in both chambers of congress. This was the second challenge to a state's electoral votes in United States history, the first was in 1877. A similar objection occurred in 2001 with Rep. Maxine Waters (D) challenging Florida's votes. In that instance no Senator joined the objection so it could not be legally recognised. Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... Stephanie Tubbs Jones (born September 10, 1949) is a Democratic politician who currently serves as a member of the United States House of Representatives, for the 11th District of Ohio. ... Maxine Waters Maxine Waters (born Maxine Moore Carr on August 15, 1938), United States politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1991, representing the 35th District of California (map). ...


Numerous Democratic members of Congress spoke on the importance of election reform, announced initiatives for constitutional protection of the vote, and called for election integrity protection against conflicts of interest, listing problems with the process of the vote in Ohio and other states. Numerous Republican members of Congress spoke against the objection, calling it an obstruction of the democratic process and pointing out that Bush won Ohio's vote by over 118,000 votes according to the recount. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-TX) denounced the objection, calling Boxer and Jones the "X-Files Wing" of the Democratic Party. [130] The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... Thomas Dale Tom DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Sugar Land, Texas. ...


Part of the evidence that was used for debate and discussion was the House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Staff 101-page report titled "What Went Wrong in Ohio". The report was entered into the Congressional Record on January 6.


The objection was rejected by a vote of 1-74[131] (Yea-Nay) in the Senate and by a vote of 31-267[132] in the House, as both supporters and challengers anticipated.


Debate continues regarding election reform, with a number of bills aimed at eliminating some of these irregularities expected in the 109th Congress. Community concern about the integrity of US election procedures is continuing and may bring about reform in several states.

For more information, see 2004 U.S. presidential election recounts and legal challenges.

This article details the vote recount effort and related legal challenges that took place after the 2004 U.S. election with a focus on states that had a high discrepancy between unadjusted exit poll results and official results in the US presidential race. ...

See also

(Note: the presence of any link above involving election irregularities is for those seeking further information on those irregularities in a general sense. It is not an opinion on this specific election.)
For a detailed timeline of events surrounding the 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy, see Timeline of the 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy and irregularities. All news, including recent news, has been moved to the abovenamed article.
(Information relating to voting machines, exit polls or vote suppression may need to be reflected in their relevant pages)

Presidential election results map. ... The exit polls were conducted by Edison Media Research and Mitofsky International for the National Election Pool. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ... This article details the vote recount effort and related legal challenges that took place after the 2004 U.S. election with a focus on states that had a high discrepancy between unadjusted exit poll results and official results in the US presidential race. ... Moss v Bush was a lawsuit filed in the Ohio Supreme Court on 13 December 2004 (Supreme Court of Ohio Case No. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... During the 2004 U.S. presidential election, there were numerous problems with the election process in Florida, including but not limited to missing/uncounted votes, machine malfunction, machine shortage, turnout reaching above 100 percent, and abnormal statistical discrepancies such as 77 percent Democratic precincts voting 77 percent Republican, and the... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Cliff Arnebeck is the Chair of Legal Affairs Committee of Common Cause Ohio and a National Co-Chair and attorney for The Alliance for Democracy. ... John Kenneth Blackwell (born February 28, 1942) is an American politician of the Republican party, who currently (as of 2005) serves as the secretary of state for the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... David Cobb appealing for votes at the annual Fighting Bob Fest in Baraboo, Wisconsin, September 2004 David Keith Cobb (born December 24, 1962 in San Leon, Texas) is an American ex-lawyer and activist, and was the 2004 presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States (GPUS). ... John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ... Thomas Charles Feeney III, usually known as Tom Feeney (born May 21, 1958), is a Republican politician from the state of Florida. ... Bob Fitrakis is a Professor of Political Science in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Department at Columbus State Community College, as well as the Editor of The Free Press (freepress. ... Bev Harris is the executive director of Black Box Voting, Inc. ... Jesse Jackson Jesse Louis Jackson (born October 8, 1941) is an American politician, civil rights activist, and Baptist minister. ... Stephanie Tubbs Jones (born September 10, 1949) is a Democratic politician who currently serves as a member of the United States House of Representatives, for the 11th District of Ohio. ... Common Cause is a U.S. nonpartisan citizens lobbying group (both professionally on Capitol Hill and grassroots advocacy in the states). ... The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the audit, evaluation, and investigative agency of the United States Congress. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... A voting machine is a device to record and register votes to be counted as per any voting system, with or without printing a ballot for the voter to verify. ... Electronic voting machine used in all Brazilian elections and plebiscites. ... An exit poll is a poll of voters taken immediately after they have exited the polling stations. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Electoral fraud is illegal interference with the process of an election. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ...

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  112. ^ Harris, Bev (2005-12-14). This site was under attack. blackboxvoting.org. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  113. ^ Mahr, Joe. "Voter fraud case traced to Defiance County registrations volunteer", The Blade (newspaper), 2004-10-19. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  114. ^ Palm Beach County fails audit. Black Box Voting (2005-06-08). Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  115. ^ "A Corrupted Election", Independent News, 2004-03-03. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  116. ^ Could the Associated Press (AP) Rig the Election?. Ecotalk (2004-10-22). Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  117. ^ Resolution on Electronic Voting. Verified Voting Foundation. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  118. ^ Zetter, Kim. "The Computer Ate My Vote", Wired News, 2004-02-16. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  119. ^ Conyers, John; Jerrold Nadler, Robert Wexler (2004-11-05). Letter to the Comptroller General. House Committee on the Judiciary, Democratic Members. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  120. ^ Conyers, John; Jerrold Nadler, Robert Wexler, Robert C. Scott, Melvin Watt, Rush Holt (2004-11-08). Letter to the Comptroller General. House Committee on the Judiciary, Democratic Members. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  121. ^ The 2004 Recount in Ohio: County Reports. David Cobb (?). Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  122. ^ Nader/Camejo Challenge Electronic Voting Results in New Hampshire. Nader for President 2004 (2004-11-05). Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  123. ^ Nader-Camejo Hand Recount in New Hampshire Ends With No Significant Discrepancies. Nader for President 2004 (2004-11-30). Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  124. ^ Voting Cases and Investigations. FindLaw (2006-05-19). Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
  125. ^ "GAO to Probe Vote Counting", Wired News, 2004-11-24. Retrieved on 2006-05-19.
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2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Great Hall interior. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining until the end of the year. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... eWeek:the Enterprise Newsweekly is a weekly magazine published by Ziff Davis Media, featuring editorials, reviews, labs and rumors. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Washington Times[1] is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... {{Infobox_Company | company_name = CNET Networks| company_logo = | company_type = [[Publicly traded NASDAQ: CNET foundation = 1993| location = San Francisco, California, USA| key_people = Shelby W. Bonnie, Co-founder, Chairman, and CEO| num_employees = 2,080 (2006)| industry = Internet Information Provider| homepage = [1] ==CNET Networks, Inc. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... {{Infobox_Company | company_name = CNET Networks| company_logo = | company_type = [[Publicly traded NASDAQ: CNET foundation = 1993| location = San Francisco, California, USA| key_people = Shelby W. Bonnie, Co-founder, Chairman, and CEO| num_employees = 2,080 (2006)| industry = Internet Information Provider| homepage = [1] ==CNET Networks, Inc. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... In These Times is a biweekly magazine of news and opinion published in Chicago. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Common Dreams NewsCenter is based in Portland, Maine, and was founded in 1997. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... EFF Logo The EFF uses the blue ribbon as symbolism for their Free Speech defense. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... WJXT Channel 4 is an independent television station serving Jacksonville, Florida and surrounding communities. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Scoop is a New Zealand internet news site with a readership averaging 110 000 Unique Browsers a week and 360 000 Unique Browers a month (audited by Nielsen NetRatings). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Portal:Currentevents September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Scoop is a New Zealand internet news site with a readership averaging 110 000 Unique Browsers a week and 360 000 Unique Browers a month (audited by Nielsen NetRatings). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Seattle Weekly is the third most popular newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States, with a circulation of over 100,000. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Institute for Southern Studies is a liberal non-profit 501(c) organization that advocates progressive political causes in the American South. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Current logo of The Register. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... {{Infobox_Company | company_name = CNET Networks| company_logo = | company_type = [[Publicly traded NASDAQ: CNET foundation = 1993| location = San Francisco, California, USA| key_people = Shelby W. Bonnie, Co-founder, Chairman, and CEO| num_employees = 2,080 (2006)| industry = Internet Information Provider| homepage = [1] ==CNET Networks, Inc. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... CounterPunch is a biweekly newsletter published in the United States that covers politics from a radical left-wing point of view. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Common Dreams NewsCenter is based in Portland, Maine, and was founded in 1997. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... This article is about the U.S publication. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Irish Times is Irelands newspaper of record, launched in the late 1850s. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Sacramento Bee is a daily newspaper published in Sacramento, California, in the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Mitofsky International is a survey research company founded by Warren J. Mitofsky in 1993. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Common Dreams NewsCenter is based in Portland, Maine, and was founded in 1997. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... PBS re-directs here; for alternate uses see PBS (disambiguation) PBS logo The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is a non-profit public broadcasting television service with 349 member TV stations in the United States. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... AlterNet is a popular news website that was created in 1998. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Z Magazine is an independent monthly magazine focusing on political, cultural, social, and economic life in the United States and considered to be very left-wing. ... The University of Chicago Press is the largest university press in the U.S. It is operated by the University of Chicago and publishes a wide variety of academic titles, including The Chicago Manual of Style, several academic journals including Critical Inquiry, and a wide array of texts covering academic... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non_governmental organization devoted to defending civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... This article is about the U.S publication. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining for the year. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non_governmental organization devoted to defending civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... KLAS (Channel 8 analog, 7 digital) is the CBS station serving the Las Vegas, Nevada market. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... KLAS (Channel 8 analog, 7 digital) is the CBS station serving the Las Vegas, Nevada market. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Mercs sections vary by day of the week, but Business, Sports, and The Valley are standard daily fare. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... WTOL is the CBS television affiliate in Toledo, Ohio. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... This article is about the U.S publication. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... People for the American Way (PFAW) is a prominent liberal advocacy organization in the United States, founded by television producer Norman Lear in 1980. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... MSNBC, a combination of Microsoft and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news Website. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Commission on Civil Rights (USCCR) is an independent federal agency of the United States government. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Greg Palast is a New York Times-bestselling author and a journalist for the British Broadcasting Corporation as well as the British newspaper The Observer. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Greg Palast is a New York Times-bestselling author and a journalist for the British Broadcasting Corporation as well as the British newspaper The Observer. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Free Press is a non-partisan, non-profit organization founded by media critic Robert McChesney to promote more democratic media policy in the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 1990 Boing Boing logo, from a t-shirt Boing Boing (originally bOING bOING) is a publishing entity, first established as a magazine, later becoming an award winning group blog. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 1990 Boing Boing logo, from a t-shirt Boing Boing (originally bOING bOING) is a publishing entity, first established as a magazine, later becoming an award winning group blog. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The International Herald Tribune (www. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The International Herald Tribune (www. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Boston Globe is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting (FAIR), founded in 1986, is an American organization that works against and documents bias in the media, censorship, and erroneous reporting. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Common Dreams NewsCenter is based in Portland, Maine, and was founded in 1997. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... ZNet, of Z Communications, founded in 1995, is a large website updated many times daily to convey information and provide community, generally focusing on politics from a left-wing perspective. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting (FAIR), founded in 1986, is an American organization that works against and documents bias in the media, censorship, and erroneous reporting. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Truthout. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Democracy Now! logo. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Blade is a daily newspaper in Toledo, Ohio, first published on December 19, 1835. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Wired News, online at Wired. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ... Jerrold Lewis Nadler (born June 13, 1947) is an American politician from New York City. ... Rep. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ... Jerrold Lewis Nadler (born June 13, 1947) is an American politician from New York City. ... Rep. ... Robert C. Scott Robert Cortez Scott (b. ... Rep. ... Two members of the United States Congress have been named Rush Holt, father and son: Rush D. Holt, Sr. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... FindLaw is a legal resource website owned by the Thomson Corporation. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Wired News, online at Wired. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the audit, evaluation, and investigative agency of the United States Congress. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) provides printed (and now electronic) copies of documents produced by and for all federal agencies, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and EPA. Court... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ...

External links

News/comment

  • FAIR Extra, March/April 2005, "America’s Broken Electoral System: Get over it, says mainstream press"
  • Christopher Hitchens, Vanity Fair, March 2005, "Ohio's Odd Numbers";
  • Status Report of the House Judiciary Committee Democratic Staff, 5 January 2005, "Preserving Democracy: What Went Wrong in Ohio" - prepared at the request of Rep. John Conyers (D)
  • Tim Radford and Dan Glaister, The Guardian, February 16, 2004, "Hi-tech voting machines 'threaten' US polls: Scientist warns that electronic votes cannot be safeguarded"
  • FreePress.org - 'Powerful Government Accountability Office report confirms key 2004 stolen election findings', Bob Fitrakis, Harvey Wasserman (October 26, 2005)
  • Mark Hertsgaard, Mother Jones, Recounting Ohio (November/December 2005)
  • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "4 Kerry campaign workers reach plea deal in tire slashings, fifth acquitted" (January 20, 2006)
  • Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Rolling Stone, Was the 2004 Election Stolen? (June 1, 2006)
  • Farhad Manjoo, Salon, Was the 2004 Election Stolen? No. -- Critique of Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s Rolling Stone Article (June 3, 2006)

Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting (FAIR), founded in 1986, is an American organization that works against and documents bias in the media, censorship, and erroneous reporting. ... Christopher Hitchens Christopher Eric Hitchens (born in Portsmouth, England April 13, 1949) is an author, journalist and literary critic. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Bob Fitrakis is a Professor of Political Science in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Department at Columbus State Community College, as well as the Editor of The Free Press (freepress. ... Harvey Wasserman is the author and co-author of a dozen books, and a safe energy activist and journalist/historian, fighting for a renewable green future and the restoration of democracy to the United States of America. ... Mother Jones Magazine is a leftist magazine named after labor organizer Mary Harris Jones (May 1, 1830 - November 30, 1930), better known as Mother Jones. ... The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is a daily morning broadsheet printed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... Robert Francis Kennedy Jr. ... Rolling Stone is an American magazine devoted to music, politics and popular culture. ... Screenshot of Salon. ...

Organizations

  • House Judiciary Committee Democrats [2], Correspondence [3]
  • votergate.tv
  • verifiedvoting.org
  • Caltech/MIT voting technology project

Multimedia

  • Video of the January 6 Congressional debate regarding Ohio's challenged Electoral votes. [4]
  • Video of the experiences of African Americans trying to vote in Ohio on Election Day. (clip1: video, wmv) (clip2: video, wmv)
  • U.S House Committee on the Judiciary Open Congressional Forum in Ohio: rtsp://cspanrm.fplive.net/cspan/project/c04/c04120804_conyers.rm (real media)
  • U.S House Committee on the Judiciary Open Congressional Forum in Ohio (Highlights) (wmv)
  • Sworn testimony of David Cobb to House Judiciary [5] (mp3)
  • Sworn testimony of Clint Curtis to House Judiciary (rm) (wmv)
  • The Counter-Inaugural Committee's press conference as broadcast on C-SPAN including Brian Anders of the Washington Peace Center, Gael Murphy of Code Pink and United for Peace and Justice, Basav Sen of Mobilization for Global Justice, David Lytel of ReDefeatBush and Shahid Buttar of the Counter-Inaugural Committee. Lytel reviews what is expected on January 6th in Washington. (video)
  • 'Stolen Election' - Video made by members of DU (Democratic Underground) RealPlayer
  • 11/08/04 Olbermann segment online
  • Ohio Public Radio: Excerpts of March 23, 2005 Ohio Voting Hearing exchanges between Rep. Stephanie Tubbs-Jones (D-OH) and J. Kenneth Blackwell, SoS OH. [6]

Interviews and Testimony

  • Kenneth Blackwell responds to charges of misconduct in Ohio in House Judiciary Testimony[7]
  • Cliff Arnebeck on American Dream Radio (audio)
  • Cliff Arnebeck on Pacifica Radio (audio)
  • Cliff Arnebeck on CSPAN (video)
  • Jesse Jackson on MSNBC (video, 18 Mb)
  • Kenneth Blackwell on MSNBC (video, 23 Mb)
  • Kenneth Blackwell takes questions from reporters (real media)
  • Election 2004 Vote Fraud: Alex Jones Interviews Bev Harris of blackboxvoting.org
  • Q&A interview about 2004 election irregularities with author Mark Crispin Miller
  • Robert Kennedy, Jr. speaking about his Rolling Stone article with Tucker Carlson on MSNBC's 'The Situation' (streaming Flash), (wmv)

Cliff Arnebeck is the Chair of Legal Affairs Committee of Common Cause Ohio and a National Co-Chair and attorney for The Alliance for Democracy. ... American Dream Radio is a left-leaning Internet Radio station with a particular interest in corporate interest peddling. ...

Resources

  • American Center for Voting Rights report, Vote Fraud, Intimidation & Suppression In The 2004 Presidential Election - August 2, 2005
  • Bev Harris's website and book "Black Box Voting"
  • Election 2004: Theories and Countertheories
  • "What Happened in Ohio" (opinion) by William Raspberry, Washington Post, January 10, 2005.
  • Election 2004 Vote Fraud News Archive from Prisonplanet.com.
  • Voters Unite Listing of All Reported Irregularities
  • Common Dreams report "Evidence Mounts That The Vote May Have Been Hacked" by Thom Hartmann, Common Dreams NewsCenter, November 6, 2004.
  • "Florida ballot papers go missing", BBC News, October 28, 2004.
  • BreakForNews.com - 2004 election fraud
  • EIRS Database of Voting Incidents
  • November 2nd Truth
  • Election Law Coverage 2004: Lawsuits from FindLaw.
  • Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe Election Observation Mission (Preliminary Statement on US Election), The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe Parliamentary Assembly, November 4, 2004.
  • OSCE/ODIHR Election Observation Mission Final Report, The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe Parliamentary Assembly, March 31, 2005.
  • Voting Hearings, Events, and Publications from Electronic Privacy Information Center.
  • U.S. Elections 2004 – Voting Irregularities News from U.S. Politics Today.

 
 

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