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Encyclopedia > 2004 Summer Olympics
Games of the XXVIII Olympiad

Ancient victors were crowned with olive
wreaths (Greek: kotinos) — a tradition echoed
with this Games' medalists. The colours of
the logo come from the flag of Greece.
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flag Ratio: 2:3 (Naval Flag 1822-1828, Sea Flag 1828-1969; 1975-1978 (Flag Ratio 7:12), National Flag 1969-1975; 1978 to date) The flag of Greece (Greek: , popularly referred to as the Γαλανόλευκη or the Κυανόλευκη, the blue-white) is based on nine equal horizontal stripes of blue alternating...

Host city Athens, Greece
Nations participating 201[1]
Athletes participating 10,625[1]
Events 301 in 28 sports
Opening ceremony August 13
Closing ceremony August 29
Officially opened by President Costis Stephanopoulos
Athlete's Oath Zoi Dimoschaki
Judge's Oath Lazaros Voreadis
Olympic Torch Nikolaos Kaklamanakis
Stadium Olympic Stadium
The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with "priestesses" dancing.
The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with "priestesses" dancing.

The 2004 Summer Olympic Games, officially known as the Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, were celebrated in Athens, Greece, from August 13 to August 29, 2004. 10,625 athletes competed,[1] some 600 more than expected, accompanied by 5,501 team officials from 201 countries.[1] Athens 2004 marked the first time since the 1996 Summer Olympics that all countries with a National Olympic Committee were in attendance. There were 301 medal events in 28 different sports.[1] This article is about the capital of Greece. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of presidents of Greece. ... Kostantinos Stefanopoulos Konstantinos Stephanopoulos was born in Patras on 15 August 1926. ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... Zoi Dimoschaki (b. ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... Lazaros Voreadis (b. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... Nikolaos Kaklamanakis (Greek: Νίκος Κακλαμανάκης) is the Greek Gold-medal winner who lit the Olympic torch in the opening ceremony of the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens. ... Athens Olympic Stadium The Olympic Stadium is the name usually given to the big centrepiece stadium of the Summer Olympic Games. ... The Olympic Stadium (Greek: Ολυμπιακό Στάδιο) (also known as the Athens Olympic Stadium, and Spiridon Spiros Louis Stadium, named after the man to win the first Olympic marathon race) in 1896, is a stadium that is part of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. ... Download high resolution version (1472x860, 239 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1472x860, 239 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ...

Contents

Medal count

These are the top ten nations that won medals at these Games: This is the full table of the medal count of the 2004 Summer Olympics. ... For other uses, see Nation (disambiguation). ...

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 United States United States 36 39 27 102
2 China China 32 17 14 63
3 Russia Russia 27 27 38 92
4 Australia Australia 17 16 16 49
5 Japan Japan 16 9 12 37
6 Germany Germany 13 16 20 49
7 France France 11 9 13 33
8 Italy Italy 10 11 11 32
9 South Korea South Korea 9 12 9 30
10 Great Britain Great Britain 9 9 12 30

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ...

Bid and preparations

Athens was chosen as the host city during the 106th IOC Session held in Lausanne in September 5, 1997, after surprisingly losing the bid to organize the 1996 Summer Olympics to Atlanta nearly seven years before, on September 18, 1990, during the 96th IOC Session in Tokyo. Athens, under the direction of Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki, pursued another bid, this time for the right to organize the 2004 games. The success of Athens in securing the 2004 Games was based largely on Athens' appeal to Olympic history and the emphasis that it placed on the pivotal role that Greece and Athens played in the promotion of the Olympic Movement. After leading all voting rounds, Athens easily defeated Rome in the 5th and final vote. Cape Town, Stockholm, and Buenos Aires, the three other cities that made the IOC shortlist, were eliminated in prior rounds of voting. Six other cities submitted applications, but their bids were dropped by the IOC in 1996. These cities were Istanbul, Lille, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan, Seville, and Saint Petersburg.[2] Five cities made the shortlist with their bids to host the 2004 Summer Olympics (formally known as Games of the XXVIII Olympiad), which were awarded to Athens, on September 5, 1997. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Lausanne (pronounced ) is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, situated on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), and facing Évian-les-Bains (France) and with the Jura mountains to its north. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki (born Gianna Daskalaki on December 12, 1955 in Heraklion, Crete) is a Greek politician and business woman. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area [2]  - Total 2,454. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Location of Istanbul on the Bosphorus Strait, Turkey Coordinates: , Country Turkey Region Province Istanbul Founded 667 BC as Byzantium Roman/Byzantine period AD 330 as Constantinople Ottoman period 1453 as Constantinople (internationally) and various other names in local languages Turkish Republic period 1923 as Constantinople, officially renamed as Istanbul in... For other uses, see Lille (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... For other uses, see San Juan. ... For other uses, see Seville (disambiguation). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland...

2004 Host City Election — ballot results
City Country (NOC) R1 R2 R3 R4 R5
Athens Flag of Greece Greece 32 ... 38 52 66
Rome Flag of Italy Italy 23 ... 28 35 41
Cape Town Flag of South Africa South Africa 16 62 22 20 -
Stockholm Flag of Sweden Sweden 20 ... 19 - -
Buenos Aires Flag of Argentina Argentina 16 44 - - -

On 2004 November 13 the Greek embassy estimated the costs of hosting the Olympics at 8.954 billion Euros (about $11.2 billion in 2004) not including construction made regardless of the Games, but including 1.08 billion Euros ($1.35 billion) in security costs.[3] NBC Universal paid the IOC $793 million for U.S. broadcast rights,[4] the most paid by any country. NBC made it possible for the network to broadcast over 1200 hours of coverage during the games, triple what was broadcast in the U.S. four years earlier. Between all the NBC Universal networks (NBC, CNBC, MSNBC, Bravo, USA Network & Telemundo) the games were on television 24 hours a day, seven days a week. This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area [2]  - Total 2,454. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USD redirects here. ... NBC Universal is a media and entertainment conglomerate formed in May 2004 by the combination of General Electrics NBC with Vivendi Universal Entertainment, part of Vivendi Universal. ... This article is about the television network. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... This article is about the U.S. cable network. ... USA Network is a popular American cable television network with about 89 million household subscribers as of 2005. ... Telemundo is an American television network based in Hialeah, Florida. ...


Following the September 11, 2001 attacks, concerns about terrorism were much higher. Greece increased the budget for security at the Olympics to €970 million (US$1.2 billion). Approximately 70,000 police officers patrolled Athens and the Olympic venues during the Olympics. NATO and the European Union also provided minor support, after Athens asked for co-operation. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Terrorist redirects here. ... This article is about the military alliance. ...


When the International Olympic Committee expressed its concern over the progress of construction work of the new Olympic venues, a new Organizing Committee was formed in 2000 under President Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki. In the years leading up to the Games, Athens was transformed into a city that uses state-of-the-art technology in transportation and urban development. Some of the most modern sporting venues in the world at the time were built to host the 2004 Olympic Games. Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki (born Gianna Daskalaki on December 12, 1955 in Heraklion, Crete) is a Greek politician and business woman. ...


Construction of the venues

Inside the Athens Olympic Stadium
Inside the Athens Olympic Stadium

By late March 2004, some Olympic projects were still behind schedule, and Greek authorities announced that a roof it had initially proposed as an optional, non-vital addition to the Aquatics Center would no longer be built. The main Olympic Stadium, the designated facility for the opening and closing ceremonies, was completed only two months before the games opened, with the sliding over of a futuristic glass roof designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. The same architect also designed the Velodrome and other facilities. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3076x848, 243 KB) Summary Pics taken and stitched by me personally. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3076x848, 243 KB) Summary Pics taken and stitched by me personally. ... Santiago Calatrava Valls (born July 28, 1951) is an internationally recognized and award-winning Spanish architect and structural engineer whose principal office is in Zurich, Switzerland. ... Look up velodrome in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Sunset view of the Velodrome -left- and OAKA Arch & Plaza adjacent to the Olympic Stadium

Other facilities, such as the streetcar line linking venues in southern Athens with the city proper, were considerably behind schedule just two months before the games. The subsequent pace of preparation, however, made the rush to finish the Athens venues one of the tightest in Olympics history. The Greeks, unperturbed, maintained that they would make it all along. By July/August 2004, all venues were delivered: in August, the Olympic Stadium was officially completed and opened, joined or preceded by the official completion and openings of other venues within the Athens Olympic Sports Complex (OAKA), and the sports complexes in Faliro and Helliniko. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1211 KB) Sunset view of the Velodrome, Arch and Plaza of the OAKA Complex. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1211 KB) Sunset view of the Velodrome, Arch and Plaza of the OAKA Complex. ... A tram system, tramway, or street railway is a railway on which trams (streetcars, trolleys) run. ... The Athens Olympic Sports Complex is the central group of facilities for the 2004 Summer Olympics. ...

The OAKA Plaza and Arch adjacent to the Olympic Stadium
The OAKA Plaza and Arch adjacent to the Olympic Stadium

Late July and early August witnessed the Athens Tram and Light Rail become operational, and these two systems finally connected Athens with its waterfront communities along the Saronic Gulf, such as its port city of Piraeus, Agios Kosmas (site of the sailing venue), Helliniko (the site of the old international airport which now contained the fencing venue, the canoe/kayak slalom course, the 14,500-seater indoor basketball arena, and the softball and baseball stadia), and Faliro (site of the taekwondo, handball, indoor volleyball, and beach volleyball venues, as well as the newly-reconstructed Karaiskaki Stadium for football). The upgrades to the Athens Ring Road were also delivered just in time, as were the expressway upgrades connecting Athens proper with peripheral areas such as Markopoulo (site of the shooting and equestrian venues), the newly constructed Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, Schinias (site of the rowing venue), Maroussi (site of the OAKA), Parnitha (site of the Olympic Village), Galatsi (site of the rhythmic gymnastics and table tennis venue), and Vouliagmeni (site of the triathlon venue). The upgrades to the Athens Metro were also completed, and the new lines became operational by mid-summer. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1348 KB) View of the OAKA Plaza and Arch taken on the final day of the Games. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1348 KB) View of the OAKA Plaza and Arch taken on the final day of the Games. ... The Saronic Gulf or Gulf of Aegina in Greece forms part of the Aegean Sea and defines the eastern side of the isthmus of Corinth. ... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... The Karaiskaki Stadium is located near Piraeus in the Faliro area of Athens, Greece. ... The E. Venizelos Athens International Airport The Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport, which began operation in March 2001, serves the city of Athens in Greece. ... The Athens Metro is the underground public transport system of Athens, Greece, constructed by the Attiko Metro company (Αττικό Μετρό, literally Attican metro) and the ISAP (Ilektrikoi Sidirodromoi Athinon-Pireos) company (Ηλεκτρικοί Σιδηρόδρομοι Αθηνών-Πειραιώς Athens - Piraeus Electric Railways). The Athens Metro is one of the most impressive underground Mass Transit systems in the world because...

For the first time the Olympic Flame toured the world.
For the first time the Olympic Flame toured the world.

The lighting ceremony of the Olympic flame took place on March 25 in Ancient Olympia. For the first time ever, the flame travelled around the world in a relay to former Olympic cities and other large cities, before returning to Greece. Image File history File links Route_of_Olympic_Flame_Worldwide. ... Image File history File links Route_of_Olympic_Flame_Worldwide. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... For the first time, the Olympic Flame circumnavigated the globe, starting in Olympia in advance of the 2004 games. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... For the first time, the Olympic Flame circumnavigated the globe, starting in Olympia in advance of the 2004 games. ...


EMI released Unity, the official pop album of the Athens Olympics, in the leadup to the Olympics. It features contributions from Sting, Lenny Kravitz, Moby, Destiny's Child, Hikaru Utada and Avril Lavigne. EMI has pledged to donate US$180,000 from the album to UNICEF's HIV/AIDS program in Sub-Saharan Africa.[5] For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Sting in Budapest, 2000 Gordon Matthew Sumner, CBE (born October 2, 1951), usually known by his stage name Sting, is an English musician from Newcastle upon Tyne. ... Leonard Albert Lenny Kravitz (born May 26, 1964) is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer, and arranger whose retro style incorporates elements of rock, soul, funk, reggae, hard rock, psychedelic, folk, and ballads. ... Moby (born Richard Melville Hall, September 11, 1965) is an American DJ, songwriter, musician and singer. ... This article is about the group. ... Utada (宇多田ヒカル Utada Hikaru, born January 19, 1983) is a J-Pop star. ... Avril Lavigne Whibley,[7] better known by her birth name of Avril Lavigne (IPA: ), (born September 27, 1984) is a Canadian rock/punk-pop singer, musician and actress. ... UNICEF Logo Org type: Fund Acronyms: UNICEF Head: Ann Veneman Status: Active Established: 1946 Website: http://www. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Satellite image of Africa, showing the ecological break that defines the sub-Saharan area Sub-Saharan Africa is a geographical term used to describe the area of the African continent which lies south of the Sahara, or those African countries which are fully or partially located south of the Sahara. ...


At least 14 people died during the work on the facilities. Most of these people were not from Greece.[6]


Before the games, Greek hotel staff staged a series of one-day strikes over wage disputes. They had been asking for a significant raise for the period covering the event being staged. Paramedics and ambulance drivers had also been protesting, as they wanted the same Olympic bonuses promised to their security force counterparts. The Star of Life, a globally recognized symbol for Emergency medical services. ... For other uses, see Ambulance (disambiguation). ...


Mascots

The mascots were based on this clay model at the National Archaelogical Museum
The mascots were based on this clay model at the National Archaelogical Museum
A stuffed mascot.
A stuffed mascot.

Since the 1968 Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France it has been the tradition to have a mascot for the games; for 2004, the official mascots were sister and brother, Athiná and Phévos (pronounced in Greek, Athina and Fivos), named after Athena, the goddess of wisdom, strategy and war, and Phoebos, the god of light and music, respectively. They were inspired by the ancient daidala which were dolls that had religious links as well as being toys. Download high resolution version (600x800, 46 KB)Model at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. ... Download high resolution version (600x800, 46 KB)Model at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. ... Download high resolution version (600x800, 79 KB)Athena Soft toy, Athens 2004 Olympic mascot. ... Download high resolution version (600x800, 79 KB)Athena Soft toy, Athens 2004 Olympic mascot. ... The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1968 Grenoble, France and opened on February 6. ... Grenoble (Franco-Provençal: Grenoblo) is a city and commune in south-east France situated at the foot of the Alps where the Drac joins the Isère River. ... Athena from the east pediment of the Afea temple in Aegina After a sculpture of Athena at the Louvre. ... Phoebus is the Latin form of Greek Phoibos Shining-one, a by-name used in classical mythology for the god Apollo. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... Phoebus is the Latin form of Greek Phoibos Shining-one, a by-name used in classical mythology for the god Apollo. ... Daidala is a Greek festival of reconciliation that was held every four (seven?) years in honor of Hera at Plataea in Boeotia. ...


Online coverage

For the first time, major broadcasters were allowed to serve video coverage of the Olympics over the Internet, provided that they restricted this service geographically, to protect broadcasting contracts in other areas. For instance, the BBC made their complete live coverage available to UK high-speed Internet customers for free; customers in the U.S. were only able to receive delayed excerpts.[7] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


The International Olympic Committee forbade Olympic athletes, as well as coaches, support personnel and other officials, from setting up specialized weblogs and/or other websites for covering their personal perspective of the games. They were not allowed to post audio, video, or photos that they had taken. An exception was made if an athlete already has a personal website that was not set up specifically for the Games.[8] A weblog (now more commonly known as a blog) is a web-based publication consisting primarily of periodic articles (normally, but not always, in reverse chronological order). ...


NBC launched its own Olympic website, NBCOlympics.com. Focusing on the television coverage of the games, it did provide video clips, medal standings, live results. Its main purpose, however, was to provide a schedule of what sports were on the many stations of NBC Universal. The games were on TV 24 hours a day on one network or another. This article is about the television network. ...


Technology

As with any enterprise, the Organizing Committee and everyone involved with it rely heavily on technology in order to deliver a successful event. ATHOC maintained two separate data networks, one for the preparation of the Games (known as the Administrative network) and one for the Games themselves (Games Network). The technical infrastructure involved more than 11,000 computers, over 600 servers, 2,000 printers, 23,000 fixed-line telephone devices, 9,000 mobile phones, 12,000 TETRA devices, 16,000 TV and video devices and 17 Video Walls interconnected by more than 6,000 kilometers of cabling (both optical fiber and twisted pair). In information technology, a server is an application or device that performs services for connected clients as part of a client-server architecture. ... A computer printer, or more commonly a printer, produces a hard copy (permanent human-readable text and/or graphics) of documents stored in electronic form, usually on physical print media such as paper or transparencies. ... A stylised representation of a mobile phone A mobile phone is a device which behaves as a normal telephone whilst being able to move over a wide area ( cordless phone which acts as a telephone only within a limited range). ... Genera More than 150[1] Look up tetra in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band European networks National In much of Europe television broadcasting has historically been state dominated, rather than commercially organised, although commercial stations have grown in number recently. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... Optical fibers An optical fiber (or fibre) is a glass or plastic fiber designed to guide light along its length. ... 25 Pair Color Code Chart 10BASE-T UTP Cable Twisted pair cabling is a common form of wiring in which two conductors are wound around each other for the purposes of cancelling out electromagnetic interference known as crosstalk. ...

View of the ATHOC Technology Operations Center during the Games.
View of the ATHOC Technology Operations Center during the Games.

This infrastructure was created and maintained to serve directly more than 150,000 ATHOC Staff, Volunteers, Olympic family members (IOC, NOCs, Federations), Partners & Sponsors and Media. It also kept the information flowing for all spectators, TV viewers, Website visitors and news readers around the world, prior and during the Games. Between June and August 2004, the technology staff worked in the Technology Operations Center (TOC) from where it could centrally monitor and manage all the devices and flow of information, as well as handle any problems that occurred during the Games. The TOC was organized in teams (e.g. Systems, Telecommunications, Information Security, Data Network, Staffing, etc.) under a TOC Director and corresponding team leaders (Shift Managers). The TOC operated on a 24x7 basis with personnel organized into 12-hour shifts. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2298 KB) View of the ATHOC Technology Operations Center during the ATHENS 2004 Olympic Games. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2298 KB) View of the ATHOC Technology Operations Center during the ATHENS 2004 Olympic Games. ... Alternative meanings at IOC (disambiguation) The International Olympic Committee is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece, and organize this sports event every four years. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ...


Opening Ceremony

The widely praised [1] Opening Ceremony by avant garde choreographer Dimitris Papaioannou held on August 13, 2004 began with a twenty eight (the number of the Olympiads up to then) second countdown paced by the sounds of an amplified heartbeat. As the countdown was completed, fireworks rumbled and illuminated the skies overhead. After a drum corp and bouzouki players joined in an opening march, the video screen showed images of flight, crossing southwest from Athens over the Greek countryside to ancient Olympia. Then, a single drummer in the ancient stadium joined in a drum duel with a single drummer in the main stadium in Athens, joining the original ancient Olympic games with the modern ones in symbolism. At the end of the drum duet, a single flaming arrow was launched from the video screen (symbolically from ancient Olympia) and into the reflecting pool, which resulted in fire erupting in the middle of the stadium creating a burning image of the Olympic rings rising from the pool. The Opening Ceremony was a pageant of traditional Greek culture and history hearkening back to its mythological beginnings. The program began as a young Greek boy sailed into the stadium on a 'paper-ship' waving the host nation's flag to haunting music by Hadjidakis and then a centaur appeared, followed by a gigantic head of a cycladic figurine which eventually broke into many pieces symbolising the Greek islands. Underneath the cycladic head was a Hellenistic representation of the human body, reflecting the concept and belief in perfection reflected in Greek art. A man was seen balancing on a hovering cube symbolising man's eternal 'split' between passion and reason followed by a couple of young lovers playfully chasing each other while the god Eros was hovering above them. There followed a very colourful float parade chronicling Greek history from the ancient Minoan civilization to modern times. The Opening Ceremony of the 2004 Summer Olympics was held on August 13, 2004 at the Olympic Stadium in Maroussi, Greece, a suburb of Athens. ... Dimitris Papaioannou (born Athens, 1964) is a Greek avant-garde choreographer, director, dancer and artist who conceived and directed the critically lauded 2004 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony and its closing counterpart, in addition to directing the ceremonies for the beginning and end of the 2004 Paralympics. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Manos Hadjidakis (Μάνος Χατζιδάκις) (October 23, 1925 - June 15, 1994) is a Greek music composer. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... The Cyclades, from the Greek Κυκλάδες, (circular, modern Greek Kykládes; see also List of traditional Greek place names) form an island group south-east of the mainland of Greece. ... This article is about the Greek god Eros. ... The Minoan civilization was a bronze age civilization which arose on the island of Crete. ...


Although the National Broadcasting Company in the United States presented the entire opening ceremony from start to finish, a topless Minoan priestess was shown only briefly, the breasts having been pixelated digitally in order to avoid potential fines by the Federal Communications Commission (and because the "Janet Jackson" incident was still in recent memory). Also, lower frontal nudity of men dressed as ancient Greek statues was shown in such a way that the area below the waist was cut off by the bottom of the screen. In most other countries presenting the broadcast, there was no censorship of the ceremony. This article is about the television network. ... Minoan may refer to the following: The Minoan civilization The (undeciphered) Eteocretan language The (undeciphered) Minoan language The script known as Linear A An old name for the Mycenean language before it was deciphered and discovered to be a form of Greek. ... An example of pixelation. ... FCC redirects here. ... Janet Jackson covers her exposed breast immediately after Justin Timberlake tears off part of her wardrobe to expose it Super Bowl XXXVIII, which was broadcast live on February 1, 2004 from Houston, Texas, was noted for a controversial halftime show in which Janet Jacksons bare breast was exposed by... For other uses, see Censor. ...

The olympic flame at the Opening Ceremony.
The olympic flame at the Opening Ceremony.

Following the artistic performances, a parade of nations entered the stadium with over 10,500 athletes walking under the banners of 201 nations. The nations were arranged according to Greek alphabet making Finland, the Philippines, and Hong Kong among the last to enter the stadium. Based on audience reaction, the emotional high point of the parade was the entrance of the delegation from Afghanistan which had been absent from the Olympics and had female competitors for the first time. The Iraqi delegation also stirred emotions. Also recognized was the symbolic unified march of athletes from North Korea and South Korea under the Korean Unification Flag. The country of Kiribati made a debut appearance at these games and East Timor made a debut appearance under its own flag. After the Parade of Nations, during which the Dutch DJ Tiësto provided the music, the Icelandic singer Björk performed the song Oceania, written specially for the event by her and the poet Sjón. On this occasion, in observance of the tradition that the delegation of Greece opens the parade and the host nation closes it, the Greek flag bearer opened the parade and all the Greek delegation closed the parade. Download high resolution version (2024x1446, 1737 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2024x1446, 1737 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... This page contains special characters. ... The Unification Flag is used to represent all of Korea when North and South Korea participate together in sporting events. ... Tijs Verwest on the cover of his DVD Another day at Office (2003) Tijs Verwest (born January 17, 1969) is one of the worlds leading dance DJs and trance musicians. ... This article is about the musician. ... Oceania was formely planned to be the first single release from Björks Medúlla album. ... SJÓN Photo:Hordur Sveinsson Sjón is the pen name of Sigurjón Birgir Sigurðsson (born August 27, 1962). ...


The Opening Ceremony culminated in the lighting of the Olympic Cauldron by 1996 Gold Medalist Windsurfer Nikolaos Kaklamanakis. The gigantic cauldron, which was styled after the Athens 2004 Olympic Torch, pivoted down to be lit by the 35 year-old, before slowly swinging up and lifting the flame high above the stadium. Kaklamanakis would later win his silver medal in the men's mistral behind Israeli windsurfer Gal Fridman. Following this, the stadium found itself at the centre of a rousing fireworks spectacular. Nikolaos Kaklamanakis (Greek: Νίκος Κακλαμανάκης) is the Greek Gold-medal winner who lit the Olympic torch in the opening ceremony of the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens. ... Gal Fridman (Hebrew: גל פרידמן) (born 16 September 1975 in Karkur (near Hadera), Israel) is an Israeli windsurfer and an Olympic gold medalist. ...


Closing ceremony

Athens 2004 Olympics Closing ceremony
Athens 2004 Olympics Closing ceremony

The Games were concluded on August 29, 2004. The closing ceremony was held at the Athens Olympic Stadium, where the Games had been opened 16 days earlier. Around 70,000 people gathered in the stadium to watch the ceremony. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 227 KB) Summary Picture taken by me personally, while attending the closing ceremony. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 227 KB) Summary Picture taken by me personally, while attending the closing ceremony. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Olympic Stadium (Greek: Ολυμπιακό Στάδιο) (also known as the Athens Olympic Stadium, and Spiridon Spiros Louis Stadium, named after the man to win the first Olympic marathon race) in 1896, is a stadium that is part of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. ...


The initial part of the ceremony interspersed the performances of various Greek singers, and featured traditional Greek dance performances from various regions of Greece (Crete, Pontos, Thessaly, etc). The event was meant to highlight the pride of the Greeks in their culture and country for the world to see.


A significant part of the closing ceremony was the exchange of the Olympic flag of the Antwerp games between the mayor of Athens and the mayor of Beijing, host city of the next Olympic games. After the flag exchange a presentation from the Beijing delegation presented a glimpse into Chinese culture for the world to see. Beijing University students (who were at first incorrectly cited as the Twelve Girls Band) sang Mo Li Hua (Jasmine Flower) and the medal ceremony for the last event of the Olympiad, the men's marathon, was conducted, with Stefano Baldini from Italy as the winner. Peking University 博学审问慎思明辨 Peking University or Beijing University (pinyin Běijīng Dàxué), colloquially Beida (北大, pinyin běidà), is one of the most prestigious universities in China. ... The album cover of Eastern Energy. ... Mo Li Hua (茉莉花), which means Jasmine Flowers, is a traditional Chinese folk song. ... The mens marathon event at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place in August 29, 2004 in the streets of Athens, Greece. ... Stefano Baldini (born May 25, 1971 in Castelnovo di Sotto, Emilia-Romagna, Italy) is an Italian athlete and is the current Olympic and European champion in the marathon. ...


A flag-bearer from each nation's delegation then entered along the stage, followed by the competitors en masse on the floor.


Short speeches were presented by Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki, President of the Organising Committee, and by President Dr. Jacques Rogge of the IOC, in which he described the Athens Olympics as "unforgettable, dream Games". Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki (born Gianna Daskalaki on December 12, 1955 in Heraklion, Crete) is a Greek politician and business woman. ... Jacques Rogge Count Jacques Rogge (born May 2, 1942 in Ghent, Belgium) is by profession an orthopedic surgeon. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ...


It should be noted that Dr. Rogge had previously declared he would be breaking with tradition in his closing speech as President of the IOC and that he would never use the words of his predecessor Juan Antonio Samaranch, who used to always say 'these were the best ever games' (with the notable exception of Atlanta 1996). Dr. Rogge had described Salt Lake City 2002 as "superb games" and in turn would continue after Athens 2004 and describe Turin 2006 as "truly magnificent games". Juan Antonio Samaranch Don Juan Antonio Samaranch i Torelló, Marquis of Samaranch (es: Don Juan Antonio Samaranch i Torelló, marqués de Samaranch) (born July 17, 1920 in Barcelona) is a Spanish sports official and was president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) from 1980 to 2001. ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The Olympic Flame at Turin The XX Olympic Winter Games are currently being held in Turin (Torino), Italy. ...


The national anthems of Greece and China were played in a handover ceremony as both nations' flags were raised. The Mayor of Athens, Dora Bakoyianni, passed the Olympic Flag to the Mayor of Beijing, Wang Qishan. After a short cultural performance by Chinese actors, dancers, and musicians directed by eminent Chinese director Zhang Yimou, Rogge declared the 2004 Olympic Games closed. The Hymn to Freedom (Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν, Imnos is tin Eleftherian) is a poem written by Dionýsios Solomós in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas. ... The 1975 constitution, which Greece as a presidential parliamentary republic, includes extensive specific guarantees of civil liberties and vests the powers of the head of state in a president elected by parliament and advised by the Council of the Republic. ... Dora Bakoyianni (Ντόρα Μπακογιάννη, born 1954) is the Greek Foreign Affairs Minister and Mayor of Athens, Greece. ... The politics of China may also include or exclude, depending on context or point of view: The politics of the Peoples Republic of China (mainland China 1949-present) The politics of Hong Kong The politics of Macau The politics of the Republic of China (Taiwan) The politics of imperial... Wang Qishan (b. ... Zhang Yimou (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ;  ) (born November 14, 1951) is an internationally acclaimed Chinese filmmaker and one-time cinematographer. ...


A young Greek girl, Fotini Papaleonidopoulou, lit a symbolic lantern with the Olympic Flame and passed it on to other children before "extinguishing" the flame in the cauldron by blowing a puff of air. The ceremony ended with a variety of musical performances by Greek singers, including George Dalaras, Haris Alexiou, Anna Vissi, Sakis Rouvas, Eleftheria Arvanitaki, Alkistis Protopsalti, Marinella and Dimitra Galani, as thousands of athletes carried out symbolic displays on the stadium floor. The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... George Dalaras (Greek: Γιώργος Νταλάρας), also possibly spelled as Yorgos or Giorgos Ntalaras is regarded as the best contemporary Greek singer. ... Haris Alexiou (Greek: ) (born December 27, 1950 in Thebes, Greece as Harikleia Roupaka, Greek: ) is a Greek singer. ... Anna Vissi (Greek: Άννα Βίσση; born December 20, 1957) is a Cypriot-Greek singer, famous mainly in Greece, and her home country Cyprus, with success in the United States as well. ... Anastasios Sakis Rouvas (Greek: ) (born January 5, 1972 in the island of Corfu) is a popular Greek singer and athlete, as well as an actor, and a model, who has sold nearly 1. ... Eleftheria Arvanitaki is a Greek singer of Icarian descent, born in Piraeus. ... // [edit] Biography Marinella (born May 20, 1938 - ) is a popular Greek singer whose career has spanned several decades. ...


Sports

The sports featured at the 2004 Summer Olympics are listed below. Officially there were 28 sports as swimming, diving, synchronised swimming and water polo are classified by the IOC as disciplines within the sport of aquatics, and wheelchair racing was a demonstration sport. For the first time, the wrestling category featured women's wrestling and in the fencing competition women competed in the sabre. American Kristin Heaston, who led off the qualifying round of women's shotput became the first woman to compete at the ancient site of Olympia but Cuban Yumileidi Cumba became the first woman to win a gold medal there. There are a large number of sports that involve water. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... Kristen Heaston born November 23, 1975 in California, is a female American shot putter . ... Yumileidi Cumbá (born February 11, 1975 in Guantánamo) is a Cuban athlete competing in the shot put. ...


The demonstration sport of wheelchair racing was a joint Olympic/Paralympic event, allowing a Paralympic event to occur within the Olympics, and for the future, opening up the wheelchair race to the able-bodied. The 2004 Summer Paralympics were also held in Athens, from September 20 to 28. Silver 2004 The Paralympic Games are a multi-sport event for athletes with physical, mental and sensorial disabilities. ... Proteas: The official 2004 Summer Paralympics mascot The 2004 Summer Paralympics were held in Athens, Greece, from September 17 to September 28. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Matches in progress during the womens round of 64 at the Panathinaiko Stadium Archery at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held at Panathinaiko Stadium (Kallimarmaro). ... Athletics at the 2004 Summer Olympics were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium, except for the marathons (which were run from Marathonas to the Kallimarmaro Stadium), the road walk (through the streets of Athens), and the shot put, which was held at the Ancient Olympia Stadium. ... Badminton at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held at the Goudi Olympic Hall at the Goudi Olympic Complex where participants competed for 5 gold medals. ... Baseball at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held on two separate diamonds within the Helliniko Olympic Complex, from August 15 to August 25. ... Basketball at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place at the indoor arena in the Helliniko Olympic Complex for the preliminary rounds, with the latter stages being held in the Olympic Indoor Hall at the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. ... Boxing at the Kenyan boxer David Munyasia had tested positive for cathine and has been excluded from the event. ... Canoeing at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held at the Schinias Olympic Rowing and Canoeing Centre for the flatwater events and the Olympic Canoe/Kayak Slalom Centre at the Helliniko Olympic Complex for the canoe and kayak slalom disciplines. ... Cycling at the 2004 Summer Olympics was split into three categories: Road, held on the streets of Athens. ... Diving at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place in the Olympic Aquatic Centre part of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. ... The events of the Equestrian at the 2004 Summer Olympics featured three equestrian disciplines: dressage, eventing and jumping. ... Fencing at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place at the Fencing Hall at the Helliniko Olympic Complex. ... Hockey at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held at the Olympic Hockey Centre located within the Helliniko Olympic Complex. ... The football (soccer) tournament at the 2004 Summer Olympics started on August 11, (two days before the opening ceremony), and ended on August 28. ... Gymnastics at the 2004 Summer Olympics was divided into three sub-categories: artistic gymnastics, rhythmic gymnastics, and trampolining. ... Handball at the 2004 Summer Olympics had a mens and a womens team competitions with the preliminary rounds taking place in the Sports Pavilion at the Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex. ... Judo at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place in the Ano Liossia Olympic Hall and featured 368 players competing for 14 gold medals with seven different weight categories in both the mens and womens competitions. ... Competitors in the final round of the Mens Modern Pentathlon pull for the finish line at the Goudi Sports Complex on August 26, 2004. ... Team USA competes in the lightweight four rowing competition. ... Sailing at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place at the Agios Kosmas Olympic Sailing Centre with eleven events being contested. ... Jia Zhanbo (center) poses with Michael Anti (left) and Christian Planer (right) at the mens three position rifle award ceremony on August 22, 2004. ... Softball at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held at the Olympic Softball Stadium in the Helliniko Olympic Complex from August 14 to 23. ... Swimming at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place in the Olympic Aquatic Centre with the athletes competing in 32 events. ... Synchronized swimming at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held in the Olympic Aquatic Centre where 104 competitors challenged for 2 gold medals in the duet and team events. ... Table tennis at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place in the Galatsi Olympic Hall with 172 competitors looking to win one of the 4 gold medals. ... Taekwondo at the 2004 Summer Olympics were held in the Sports Pavilion at the Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex where 124 competitors competed for one of eight gold medals, four each for men and women. ... Tennis at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place on ten separate courts the Olympic Tennis Centre. ... The Triathlon at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held at the Vouliagmeni Olympic Centre, with 100 athletes competing for individual gold medals in the mens and womens event. ... Indoor Beach Volleyball at the 2004 Summer Olympics consisted of indoor volleyball held at the Peace and Friendship Stadium and beach volleyball held at the Olympic Beach Volleyball Centre, in the southern portion of the Roth Pavilion; both were located at the Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex. ... Water polo at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place at the Olympic Aquatic Centre where women competed for only the second time in the event at the Summer Olympics. ... Weightlifting at the 2004 Summer Olympics was held in the Nikaia Olympic Weightlifting Hall. ... Wheelchair racing at the 2004 Summer Olympics featured as a demonstration sport at the Athens Olympic Stadium on August 22, 2004. ... Wrestling at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place in the Ano Liossia Olympic Hall and was split into two disciplines, Freestyle and Greco-Roman which are further divided into different weight categories. ...

Participating NOCs

Participating nations
Participating nations

All National Olympic Committees (NOCs) participated in the Athens Games, as was the case in 1996. Two new NOCs had been created since 1996, and made their debut at these Games (Kiribati, and Timor-Leste), therefore along with the re-appearance of Afghanistan (missing the 2000 Summer Olympics) the total number of participating nations increased from 199 to 202. Yugoslavia competed in 2004 as Serbia and Montenegro (code changed from YUG to SCG) and Hong Kong as Hong Kong, China. The number in parentheses indicates the number of participants that NOC contributed.
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 46 KB) Countries which participated in the 2004 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 46 KB) Countries which participated in the 2004 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... Flag of East Timor Timor-Leste first participated in the Summer Olympics at the 2004 games in Athens, Greece. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Hong Kong (香港; Cantonese IPA: ; Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2; Yale: heūng góng; pinyin: Xiānggǎng; Wade-Giles: Hsiang-kang) is one of the two Special Administrative Regions of the Peoples Republic of China. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Albania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Algeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_American_Samoa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Andorra. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Angola. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Antigua_and_Barbuda. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Armenia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Aruba. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Azerbaijan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Bahamas. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bahrain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bangladesh. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Barbados. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... 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Image File history File links Flag_of_Mozambique. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Myanmar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Namibia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nauru. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nepal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands_Antilles. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Niger. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nigeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Oman. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palau. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... Categories: Olympic stubs | Nations at the 2004 Summer Olympics | Palestinian sport ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Panama. ... 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Image File history File links Flag_of_Saudi_Arabia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Senegal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Serbia_and_Montenegro. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Seychelles. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sierra_Leone. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Singapore. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Solomon_Islands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Somalia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sri_Lanka. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sudan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Suriname. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Swaziland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... 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Venues

Competition venues

The Athens Olympic Sports Complex is the central group of facilities for the 2004 Summer Olympics. ... The Agios Kosmas Olympic Sailing Centre hosted the sailing events at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. ... Ano Liossia Olympic Hall was the host to judo and wrestling at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. ... The Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Sports Complex is a complex consisting of two indoor arenas and a beach volleyball stadium that hosted Handball, Taekwondo, and Volleyball events at the 2004 Summer Olympics. ... The Galatsi Olympic Hall is an indoor arena located in Galatsi, a suburb of Athens, Greece. ... Goudi Olympic Complex is a sports arena in Athens, Greece. ... The Helliniko Olympic Complex is situated on the east coast of Greece south of Athens, approximately 30 kilometres from the Olympic Village, and was built for the staging of the 2004 Summer Olympics and consists of 5 separate venues. ... Marathon (Demotic Greek: Μαραθώνας, Marathónas; Attic/ Katharevousa: , ) is an ancient Greek city-state, a contemporary town in Greece, the site of the battle of Marathon in 490 BC, in which the heavily outnumbered Athenian army defeated the Persians. ... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ... The Markopoulo Olympic Equestrian Centre hosted the equestrian events at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. ... The Markopoulo Olympic Shooting Centre was the site of the shooting events at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. ... The Nikaia Olympic Weightlifting Hall is an indoor arena in Nikaia, near Piraeus. ... The Panathinaiko Stadium Archery matches in progress at the Panathinaiko Stadium during the 2004 Athens Olympics The Panathinaiko (Panathenaic) Stadium (also known as the Kallimarmaron, i. ... The Parnitha Olympic Mountain Bike Venue was the site of the Mountain Biking events at the 2004 Summer Olympics at Athens, Greece. ... Categories: Stub | Athens Olympic venues ... The Peristeri Olympic Boxing Hall is a indoor arena located in Peristeri, to the west of central Athens. ... The Schinias Olympic Rowing and Canoeing Centre was built to host the rowing and flatwater canoeing at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Greece. ... The Vouliagmeni Olympic Centre was the site of the mens and womens triathlon at the 2004 Summer Olympics at Athens, Greece. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ...

Association football venues

Kaftanzoglio is a football stadium located in Thessaloniki. ... Thessaloniki or Salonica (Greek: ) is Greeces second-largest city and the capital of Macedonia, the largest Region of Greece. ... The Karaiskaki Stadium is located near Piraeus in the Faliro area of Athens, Greece. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Pampeloponnisiako Stadium is a football stadium located in Patras, Greece. ... Patras (Demotic Greek: Πάτρα, Pátra, IPA: , Classical Greek: Πάτραι, Pátrai, Latin: ) is Greeces third largest city and the capital of the prefecture of Achaea, located in northern Peloponnese, 215 kilometers west of Athens. ... Pankritiko Stadium is a football stadium located at Heraklio on the island of Crete. ... For other uses, see Heraklion (disambiguation). ... Panthessaliko Stadium is a football stadium located at Volos, Greece. ... This article is about Volos, Greece. ...

Non-competition venues

  • Eleftherios Venizelos Athens International Airport
  • International Broadcast Centre IBC
  • Main Press Centre
  • Olympic Village
  • Olympic Youth Camp (Shoinias)
  • ORS (Olympic Rendezvous at Samsung)
  • Goudi Depot (VIP Transportation)
  • Hellenikon Depot (Press/VIP Transportation)
  • Dekelia Depot (Athletes Transportation)
  • Vari Depot (Judges/Referees Transportation)

For the airport in Athens, Georgia, United States, see Athens-Ben Epps Airport. ... ORS may refer to: The IATA airport code for Orcas Island Airport in Eastsound, Washington Ocean Rowing Society Office of Rehabilitation Services Office of Recovery Services Office of Retirement Services Omnificent Role-playing System (ORS) Online Resource Scheduler Operational Research Section of RAF Bomber Command Oral rehydration salt or oral... Samsung Group is one of the largest South Korean business groupings. ...

See also

Proteas: The official 2004 Summer Paralympics mascot The 2004 Summer Paralympics were held in Athens, Greece, from September 17 to September 28. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c d e Athens 2004. International Olympic Committee. www.olympic.org. Retrieved on 2008-01-19.
  2. ^ International Olympic Committee - Athens 2004 - Election
  3. ^ Cost of Athens 2004 Olympics Embassy of Greece, 2004-11-13
  4. ^ NBC Universal rings in Athens profits by Krysten Crawford, CNNMoney.com, August 30, 2004.
  5. ^ Unity Olympics Album. The Star Online eCentral.
  6. ^ Workers in peril at Athens sites, BBC News Online, July 23, 2004.
  7. ^ Pfanner, Eric. "Athens Games beating Sydney in TV race", International Herald Tribune, 2004-08-30. Retrieved on 2006-08-18. 
  8. ^ "You're Athletes, Not Journalists", Wired News, 2004-08-20. Retrieved on 2006-08-18. 

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
2004 Summer Olympics
  • IOC page on Athens
  • Athens 2004 Olympic Games coverage by Community-online.com
  • Costs of hosting the 2004 Olympics
  • Pictures from the opening ceremony
  • Pictures backstage from the opening ceremony
  • Open Directory Project - 2004 Athens Olympics directory category
  • Media coverage:BBC, CBC NBC, and Seven Network
  • Athens Athlete NOC pins
  • History of a stay during the Athens 2004 Olympic Summer Games
  • Athens 2004 Olympic pins
  • Apology letter to Athens from SI.com

The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ... An all-time medal count for all Olympic Games from 1896 to 2006, including Summer Olympic Games, Winter Olympic Games and a combined total of both, is tabulated below. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... This article includes lists of all Olympic medalists since 1896, organized by each Olympic sport or discipline. ... The Olympic symbols are the icons, flags and symbols used by the International Olympic Committee to promote the Olympic Games. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Olympisch Stadion in 1928 The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were celebrated in 1928 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad originally programmed to celebrated between September 21 to October 6, 1940 were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, but the Games were given back to the IOC, because the Second Sino-Japanese War broke out in... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were celebrated in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were celebrated in Munich, in what was then West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ...  Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... London 2012 redirects here. ... The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, is a major international sports and cultural festival to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2020 Summer Olympics The International Olympic Committee has yet to begin the selection process for the host city; the site of the Games of the XXXII Olympiad—as they will be officially known—is expected to be announced in mid 2013. ... The 2024 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2028 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1924 in Chamonix, France. ... The II Olympic Winter Games were held in 1928 in Sankt-Moritz, Switzerland. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... The 1936 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1936 in the villages of Garmisch and Partenkirchen in Bavaria, Germany. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Sapporo, Japan. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... The V Olympic Winter Games were held in St. ... The 1952 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1952 in Oslo, Norway. ... The VII Olympic Winter Games were held in 1956 in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... Sign outside Olympic Village at Squaw Valley The 1960 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California, United States (located in the Lake Tahoe basin). ... The 1964 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1968 Grenoble, France and opened on February 6. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in February 13 through February 24, 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1984 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia. ... The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and opened by Governor General Jeanne Sauvé. The Olympics were highly successful financially as they brought in million-dollar profits. ... The 1992 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1992 in Albertville, France. ... The 1994 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, is an international winter multiple sports event that will be celebrated from February 7 to February 23, 2014. ... The 2018 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXIII Olympic Winter Games, will be celebrated in 2018, and are an international winter sports athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ... The 2022 Winter Olympics, formally called the XXIV Olympic Winter Games is an event that the International Olympic Committee has yet to organize. ... The Youth Olympic Games (YOG)[1] are planned to be an international multi-sport event held every four years in staggered summer and winter events complementing the current Olympic Games,[2] and will feature athletes between the ages of 14 and 18. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


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Athens 2004 marked the first time since the 1996 Summer Olympics that all countries with a National Olympic Committee were in attendance.
By July/August 2004, all venues were delivered: in August, the Olympic Stadium was officially completed and opened, joined or preceded by the official completion and openings of other venues within the Athens Olympic Sports Complex (OAKA), and the sports complexes in Faliro and Helliniko.
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