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Encyclopedia > 2000 Summer Olympics
Games of the XXVII Olympiad

Host city Sydney, Australia
Nations participating 199
Athletes participating 10,651
(6,582 men, 4,069 women)
Events 300 in 28 sports
Opening ceremony September 15
Closing ceremony October 1
Officially opened by Governor-General Sir William Deane
Athlete's Oath Rechelle Hawkes
Judge's Oath Peter Kerr
Olympic Torch Cathy Freeman
Stadium Stadium Australia

The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Image File history File links Sydney_2000_Logo. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... Rechelle Hawkes was captain of the Australian Women’s Hockey team (known as the Hockeyroos) for eight years and is one of only two Australian females to win three Olympic gold medals at three separate Games (Sydney 2000, Atlanta 1996 and Seoul 1988). ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... Catherine Astrid Salome Freeman also known as just Cathy Freeman OAM (born 16 February 1973) is an Australian sprinter who is particularly associated with the 400 m race. ... Athens Olympic Stadium The Olympic Stadium is the name usually given to the big centrepiece stadium of the Summer Olympic Games. ... Telstra Stadium, formerly Stadium Australia, is a multi-purpose stadium located in Homebush, Sydney, Australia which opened in March 1999. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... NSW redirects here. ...

Contents

Bidding process

See also: 2000 Summer Olympics bids

Sydney won the right to host the games on 23 September 1993 after being selected over Beijing, Berlin, Istanbul and Manchester, by the final vote, in an election in Monte Carlo. The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Peking redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Location of Istanbul on the Bosphorus Strait, Turkey Coordinates: , Country Turkey Region Province Istanbul Founded 667 BC as Byzantium Roman/Byzantine period AD 330 as Constantinople Ottoman period 1453 as Constantinople (internationally) and various other names in local languages Turkish Republic period 1923 as Constantinople, officially renamed as Istanbul in... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ...

2000 Summer Olympics bidding results
City NOC Name R1 R2 R3 R4
Sydney Australia 30 30 37 45
Beijing China 32 37 40 43
Manchester United Kingdom 11 13 11 -
Berlin Germany 9 9 - -
Istanbul Turkey 7 - - -

This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Peking redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Location of Istanbul on the Bosphorus Strait, Turkey Coordinates: , Country Turkey Region Province Istanbul Founded 667 BC as Byzantium Roman/Byzantine period AD 330 as Constantinople Ottoman period 1453 as Constantinople (internationally) and various other names in local languages Turkish Republic period 1923 as Constantinople, officially renamed as Istanbul in... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ...

Costs

In 2002 the Auditor-General of New South Wales reported that the Sydney Games cost $AUD6.6 billion, with a net cost to the public between $AUS 1.7 and 2.4 billion.[1][2] ISO 4217 Code AUD User(s) Australia 6 countries and territories Kiribati Nauru Tuvalu Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Norfolk Island Inflation 4. ...


It has been estimated that the economic impact of the 2000 Olympics was that $AUS 2.1 billion has been shaved from public consumption. Economic growth was not stimulated to a net benefit and in the years since 2000, foreign tourism to NSW grew by less than tourism to Australia as a whole. A "multiplier" effect on broader economic development is not realised as a simple "multiplier" analysis fails to capture is that resources have to be redirected from elsewhere: the building of a stadium is at the expense of other public works such as extensions to hospitals. Building sporting venues does not add to the aggregate stock of productive capital in the years following the Games: "Equestrian centres, softball compounds and man-made rapids are not particularly useful beyond their immediate function."[3]


Preliminary matches- from September 13

Although the Olympic Games Opening Ceremony was not scheduled until 15 September, the football competitions began with preliminary matches on 13 September. Among the pre-ceremony fixtures, host nation Australia lost 1-0 to Italy at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Soccer redirects here. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “MCG” redirects here. ...


Day 1 - 15 September, the Opening Ceremony

The cover for the DVD of the 2000 Sydney Summer Olympics showing fireworks in the background and the lighting of the Olympic Flame by Cathy Freeman (who subsequently won the 400 m title).

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (515x728, 96 KB)This is a DVD cover of the Opening Ceremony of the Sydney 2000 Summer Olypic Games Licensing This image is of a DVD cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (515x728, 96 KB)This is a DVD cover of the Opening Ceremony of the Sydney 2000 Summer Olypic Games Licensing This image is of a DVD cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Catherine Astrid Salome Freeman also known as just Cathy Freeman OAM (born 16 February 1973) is an Australian sprinter who is particularly associated with the 400 m race. ... 400 m is a common track running event. ...

Cultural display highlights

The opening ceremony began with a tribute to the Australian pastoral heritage of the muster (or "roundup", in which the stockmen gather together the livestock from the vast areas of an Australian outback sheep or cattle station), symbolising the drawing together of people from across the world. This was introduced by a lone rider, Steve Jefferys, and his rearing Australian Stock Horse Ammo. At the cracking of Jefferys' stockwhip, a further 120 riders entered the Stadium, their stock horses performing intricate steps, including forming the five Olympic Rings, to a special Olympics version of the theme which Bruce Rowland had previously composed for the 1982 film The Man from Snowy River. Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... For the restaurant chain, see Outback Steakhouse; for the station wagon, see Subaru Outback. ... Steve Jefferys was the lone rider in the Sydney Olympics Opening Ceremony. ... The Australian Stock Horse (or Stockhorse), has been especially bred for Australian climatic conditions. ... A whip is a cord or strap, usually with a stiff handle, used for delivering blows to human beings or animals as a means of control or punishment or torture. ... Among the recognizable Olympic symbols: The Olympic flag: A white flag with the Olympic Rings on it in five colours. ... Bruce Rowland is a well-known Australian composer. ... For other uses, see The Man from Snowy River. ...


The Australian National Anthem was sung, the first verse by Human Nature and the second by Julie Anthony. The National Anthem booth at the 2005 Floriade, Canberra - on the J. Verbeeck fairground organ. ... Human Nature is an Australian pop vocal group. ... Julie Anthony is an Australian entertainer who is perhaps best known as the singer of the Australian National Anthem Advance Australia Fair. She sang the Australian National Anthem at the Opening Ceremony of the 2000 Sydney Olympics. ...


The ceremony continued, showing many aspects of the land and its people:- the affinity of the mainly coastal-dwelling Australians with the sea that surrounds the "Island Continent", the indigenous occupation of the land, the coming of the First Fleet, the continued immigration from many nations and the rural industry on which the economy of the nation was built, including a display representing the harshness of rural life based on the paintings of Sir Sidney Nolan. Two memorable scenes were the representation of the "Heart" of the country by 200 Aboriginal women from Central Australia who danced up "the mighty spirit of God to protect the Games" and the overwhelmingly noisy representation of the construction industry by hundreds of tap-dancing teenagers. Language(s) Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religion(s) Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group... The First Fleet is the name given to the 11 ships which sailed from Great Britain on May 13, 1787 to establish the first European colony in New South Wales. ... Sidney Nolan, The Trial, 1947: enamel on composition board; 90. ... Language(s) Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religion(s) Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group... Central Australia is a term used to describe the area of land surrounding and including Alice Springs in Australia. ... Construction on the North Bytown Bridge in Ottawa, Canada. ...


Because the wife of Juan Antonio Samaranch, the IOC President, was seriously ill and not able to accompany her husband to the Olympics, former Australian Olympic Champion swimmer, Dawn Fraser, accompanied Samaranch during the Australian cultural display, explaining to him some of the more obscure cultural references. Juan Antonio Samaranch Don Juan Antonio Samaranch i Torelló, Marquis of Samaranch (es: Don Juan Antonio Samaranch i Torelló, marqués de Samaranch) (born July 17, 1920 in Barcelona) is a Spanish sports official and was president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) from 1980 to 2001. ... Dawn Lorraine Fraser AO, MBE, (born September 4, 1937) is an Australian champion swimmer. ...


Formal presentation

A record 199 nations entered the stadium, the only missing IOC member being Afghanistan (suspended due to the Taliban regime's prohibition against practicing any kind of sports). Most remarkable was the entering of North and South Korea as one team, using a specially designed unification flag: a white background flag with a blue map of the Korea peninsula; the two teams would compete separately, however. Four athletes from East Timor also marched in the parade of nations. Although the country-to-be had no National Olympic Committee then, they were allowed to compete under the Olympic Flag. The Governor-General, Sir William Deane, opened the games. Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... The Taliban (Pashto: - , also anglicised as Taleban) are a Sunni Islamist and Pashtun nationalist movement[2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance and NATO countries. ... A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... North Korea, officially the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK; Korean: Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk; Hangul: 조선민주주의인민공화국; Hanja: 朝鮮民主主義人民共和國), is a country in eastern Asia, covering the northern half of the peninsula of Korea. ... The Unification Flag is used to represent all of Korea when North and South Korea participate together in sporting events. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, tone, style, and voice). ... The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Olympic Flag was carried around the arena by eight former Australian Olympic champions: Bill Roycroft, Murray Rose, Liane Tooth, Gillian Rolton, Marjorie Jackson, Lorraine Crapp, Michael Wenden and Nick Green. During the raising of the Olympics Flag, the Olympic Hymn was sung by the Millennium Choir of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia. This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, tone, style, and voice). ... Bill Roycroft (born March 17, 1915 in Flowerdale, Victoria) is a former Olympic Games equestrian champion who competed for Australia in five Olympic Games: 1960 Summer Olympics, 1964 Summer Olympics, 1968 Summer Olympics, 1972 Summer Olympics, and 1976 Summer Olympics. ... Iain Murray Rose (born: January 6, 1939) in Nairn but he moved to Australia with his family as a toddler. ... Liane Tooth (born March 13, 1962 in Sydney, New South Wales) is a retired field hockey forward, who twice won the golden medal with the Australian Women’s Hockey Team, best known as the Hockeyroos, at the Summer Olympics: in Seoul (1988) and in Atlanta, Georgia (1996). ... Gillian Rolton is a former Australian Olympics equestrian champion. ... Marjorie Jackson-Nelson, AC, CVO, MBE (born September 13, 1931) is the Governor of South Australia and a former Australian athlete. ... Lorraine Crapp (born October 17, 1938 in Sydney, New South Wales) is a former Olympics swimming champion from Australia. ... Michael Wenden is a former Australian Olympics swimming champion. ... Nick Green is a former Australian Olympics rowing champion. ... The Olympic Hymn, also known informally as the Olympic Anthem, is a musical piece composed by Spyros Samaras with words taken by a poem of the Greek poet and writer Kostis Palamas. ... The Church of Greece (Greek: Ekklēsía tês Helládos, IPA: /eklisia tis elaðos/) is one of the fifteen autocephalous Eastern Orthodox churches which make up the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ...


The opening ceremony concluded with the lighting of the Olympic Flame. Former Australian Olympic champion Herb Elliott brought the Olympic Flame into the stadium. Then, celebrating 100 years of women's participation in the Olympic Games, former Australian women Olympic champions: Betty Cuthbert and Raelene Boyle, Dawn Fraser, Shirley Strickland (later Shirley Strickland de la Hunty), Shane Gould and Debbie Flintoff-King brought the torch through the stadium, handing it over to Cathy Freeman, who lit the flame in the cauldron within a circle of fire. The planned spectacular climax to the ceremony was delayed by the technical glitch of a computer switch which malfunctioned, causing the sequence to shut down by giving a false reading. This meant that the Olympic flame was suspended in mid-air for about four minutes, rather than immediately rising up a water-covered ramp to the top of the stadium. When it was discovered what the problem was, the program was overridden and the cauldron continued its course, and the ceremony concluded with a spectacular fireworks display.[4] The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... Herb Elliott at the 1954 Public Schools Association Athletics Herbert (Herb) James Elliott AC MBE (born February 25, 1938) is a former Australian athlete, one of the worlds greatest middle distance runners. ... Statue of Betty Cuthbert outside the Melbourne Cricket Ground Elizabeth (Betty) Cuthbert (born April 20, 1938 in Merrylands[1], New South Wales) is an Australian athlete, and a four-fold Olympic champion. ... Raelene Boyle MBE (1951 - ), Australian athlete, represented Australia at four Olympic Games as a sprinter, winning three silver medals. ... Dawn Lorraine Fraser AO, MBE, (born September 4, 1937) is an Australian champion swimmer. ... Shirley Barbara Strickland (July 18, 1925 – February 11, 2004), later Shirley Strickland de la Hunty, was an Australian athlete. ... Shane Gould (born November 23, 1956) is an Australian former swimmer who won three gold medals, a silver and bronze in 1972 Summer Olympics. ... Debra Flintoff-King (born on April 20, 1960) was an Australian hurdler, who won the second womens 400 m hurdles event at the 1988 Summer Olympics. ... Catherine Astrid Salome Freeman also known as just Cathy Freeman OAM (born 16 February 1973) is an Australian sprinter who is particularly associated with the 400 m race. ...


Some significant participants

The young girl singer, who featured in the early part of the opening ceremony, was Nikki Webster. Other musical performers were Olivia Newton-John and John Farnham (who sang the duet "Dare to Dream" while walking among the athletes), Vanessa Amorosi (who sang "Heroes Live Forever" while a huge cloth was lowered down to cover the athletes - with sporting images and the image of a white dove of peace then being displayed on the cloth) and Tina Arena (who sang "The Flame"). There was also a massed Millennium Marching Band of 2000 musicians - with 1000 Australian musicians, the remaining 1000 musicians being from other countries around the world. (the massed band was so large that six conductors were required for the segment). Nikki Webster (born April 30, 1987) is an Australian pop performer. ... Olivia Newton-John AO OBE (born 26 September 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated English-born Australian pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... John Peter Farnham (born July 1, 1949) is an English-born Australian pop singer. ... Vanessa Joy Amorosi (born 8 August 1981) is an Australian singer and recording artist. ... Filippina Lydia Arena (born 1 November 1967) is an Australian singer, songwriter and musical theatre actress. ... Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ...


The English-language announcer for the Opening Ceremony was Australian actor John Stanton, while the Channel 7 narrator for the Indigenous section of the display was actor Ernie Dingo. John Stanton (born October 28, 1944, in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia), is a well-known Australian actor. ... Ernie Dingo (born 31 July 1956) is a Yamatji from the Maheleny region of Western Australia. ...


Events

Day 2 - 16 September

Gold medalist Nancy Johnson (centre) of the U.S., raises her hands with silver medalist Cho-Hyun Kang (left), of Korea, and bronze winner Jing Gao (right), of China, during the first medal ceremony of the 2000 Olympic Games.
Gold medalist Nancy Johnson (centre) of the U.S., raises her hands with silver medalist Cho-Hyun Kang (left), of Korea, and bronze winner Jing Gao (right), of China, during the first medal ceremony of the 2000 Olympic Games.

The first medals of the Games were awarded in the women's 10 metre air rifle competition, which was won by Nancy Johnson of the United States. Gold medalist Nancy Johnson (center) of the U.S., raises her hands with silver medalist Cho-Hyun Kang (left), of Korea, and bronze winner Jing Gao (right), of China, during the medal ceremony for the womens 10 meter air rifle competition at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia... Gold medalist Nancy Johnson (center) of the U.S., raises her hands with silver medalist Cho-Hyun Kang (left), of Korea, and bronze winner Jing Gao (right), of China, during the medal ceremony for the womens 10 meter air rifle competition at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia... Air guns are weapons that propel a bullet using compressed air or another gas, possibly liquefied. ...


The Triathlon made its Olympic debut with the women's race. Set in the surroundings of the iconic Sydney Opera House, Brigitte McMahon representing Switzerland swam, cycled and ran to the first gold medal in the sport, beating the favoured home athletes. This article is about a type of athletic competition. ... The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Brigitte McMahon (born March 25, 1967) is an athlete from Switzerland. ...


The first star of the Games was Ian Thorpe. The 17-year-old Australian first set a new world record in the 400 m freestyle final before competing in an exciting 4 x 100 m freestyle final. Swimming the last leg, Thorpe passed the leading Americans and arrived in a new world record time, two tenths of a second ahead of the Americans. In the same event for women, the Americans also broke the world record, finishing ahead of the Netherlands and Sweden. Ian James Thorpe OAM (born 13 October 1982 in Sydney, New South Wales), also known as the Thorpedo or Thorpey, is a former Australian freestyle swimmer. ...


Samaranch had to leave for home, as his wife was severely ill. Upon arrival, his wife had already died. Samaranch returned to Sydney four days later. The Olympic flag was flown at half-staff during the period as a sign of respect to Samaranch's wife.


Day 3 - 17 September

Canadian Simon Whitfield sprinted away in the last 100 metres of the men's triathlon, becoming the inaugural winner in the event. Simon St. ...


On the cycling track, Robert Bartko beat fellow German Jens Lehmann in the individual pursuit, setting a new Olympic Record. Leontien Zijlaard-van Moorsel set a world record in the semi-finals the same event for women. Cycling is the use of bicycles, unicycles, tricycles, quadricycles and other similar wheeled human powered vehicles (HPVs) as a means of transport, a form of recreation or a sport. ... Robert Bartko (born December 23, 1975 in Potsdam) is a road bicycle and track cyclist from Germany, who was born in the former East Germany. ... Jens Lehmann (born 19 December 1967) is a German professional cyclist and double Olympic champion. ... Leontien van Moorsel (born March 22, 1970, Boekel) is a Dutch cyclist. ...


In the swimming pool, American Tom Dolan beat the world record in the 400 m medley, successfully defending the title he won in Atlanta four years prior. Dutchwoman Inge de Bruijn also clocked a new world record, beating her own time in the 100 m butterfly final to win by more than a second. Tom Dolan (born September 16, 1974) is a swimmer from the United States who won a gold medal and silver medal at the 2000 Summer Olympics and a gold medal at the 1996 Summer Olympics. ... Medley is a combination of four different swimming styles into one race. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Inge de Bruijn (born August 24, 1973 in Barendrecht, Zuid-Holland) is a former Dutch swimmer, and a four-time Olympic champion. ...


Day 4 - 18 September

The main event for the Australians on the fourth day of the Games was the 200 m freestyle. Dutchman Pieter van den Hoogenband had broken the world record in the semi-finals, taking it from the new Australian hero Ian Thorpe, who came close to the world record in his semi-final heat. As the final race finished, Van den Hoogenband's time was exactly the same as in the semi-finals, finishing ahead of Thorpe by half a second. Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... Pieter Cornelis Martijn van den Hoogenband (born March 14, 1978 in Geldrop, near Eindhoven) is a Dutch swimmer and a triple Olympic champion. ... Ian James Thorpe OAM (born 13 October 1982 in Sydney, New South Wales), also known as the Thorpedo or Thorpey, is a former Australian freestyle swimmer. ...


China won the gold medal in the men's team all-around gymnastics competition, after being the runner-up in the previous two Olympics. The other medals were taken by Ukraine and Russia, respectively. Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ...


Zijlaard-van Moorsel lived up to the expectations set by her world record in cycling in the semis by winning the gold medal. Cycling is the use of bicycles, unicycles, tricycles, quadricycles and other similar wheeled human powered vehicles (HPVs) as a means of transport, a form of recreation or a sport. ...


Day 9 - 23 September

By rowing in the winning coxless four, Steve Redgrave of Great Britain became a member of a select group who had won gold medals at five consecutive Olympics. Image:Stevebook. ...


The swimming 4 x 100-metre medley relay of B.J. Bedford, Megan Quann (Jendrick), Jenny Thompson and Dara Torres became the first women's relay under 4-minutes, swimming 3:58 and setting a world record, claiming the gold medal for the United States.


Day 10 - 24 September

Rulon Gardner, never a NCAA champion or a world medalist, beat Alexander Karelin of Russia to win gold in the super heavyweight class, Greco-Roman wrestling. Karelin had won gold in Seoul, Barcelona and Atlanta. Before this fight he had never lost in international competition, had been unbeaten in all competitions in 13 years, and had not surrendered a point in a decade. Rulon Gardner (born August 16, 1971 in Afton, Wyoming) is an amateur wrestler in the Greco-Roman discipline from the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Alexandr Alexandrovich Karelin, or simply Alexander Karelin, (Russian: Александр Александрович Карелин; born September 19, 1967 in Novosibirsk, Russian SFSR) was a dominant Greco-Roman wrestler for the Soviet Union and later, after its dissolution, for Russia. ... This article is about Greco-Roman wrestling. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ...


Day 11 - 25 September

Track and field events at the Olympic stadium during the 2000 Olympics
Track and field events at the Olympic stadium during the 2000 Olympics

Australian Cathy Freeman won the 400 metre final in front of a jubilant Sydney crowd at the Olympic Stadium, ahead of Lorraine Graham of Jamaica and Katharine Merry of Great Britain. Freeman's win made her the first competitor in Olympic Games history to light the Olympic Flame and then go on to win a Gold Medal. Image File history File links Sydney Olympic stadium, during the 2000 summer olympics in homebush bay (track & field events). ... Image File history File links Sydney Olympic stadium, during the 2000 summer olympics in homebush bay (track & field events). ... This page is for Telstra Stadium, Sydney. ... Catherine Astrid Salome Freeman also known as just Cathy Freeman OAM (born 16 February 1973) is an Australian sprinter who is particularly associated with the 400 m race. ... This page is for Telstra Stadium, Sydney. ... Katharine Merry (born September 21, 1974 at Dunchurch, Rugby), is a former English female sprinter. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ...


Day 13 - 28 September

The Canadian flag at athletes' village is lowered to half-staff as Canadian athletes pay tribute to former prime minister Pierre Trudeau after hearing of his passing in Montreal (Because of the time difference, it was September 29 in Sydney when Trudeau died). Flag Ratio: 1:2 (1965-Present) The National Flag of Canada (), popularly known as the Maple Leaf Flag (French: lUnifoli the one-leaved), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre, featuring a red stylized 11-pointed maple leaf. ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ...


Day 15 - 30 September

Cameroon won a historic gold medal over Spain in the Men's Olympic Football Final at the Olympic Stadium. The game went to a penalty shootout. Soccer redirects here. ...


Day 16 - 1 October

The Closing Ceremony commenced with Christine Anu singing a stirring rendition of her hit song, Island Home. She performed with several aboriginal dancers atop the Geodome Stage in the middle of the stadium, around which several hundred umbrella and lampbox kids created an image of aboriginal dreamtime.


The Geodome Stage was used throughout the ceremony, which is a flat stage which is mechanically raised into the shape of a Geode.

Olympic colours on the Sydney Harbour Bridge.
Olympic colours on the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch declared at the Closing Ceremony, Image File history File links Olympic_fireworks. ... Image File history File links Olympic_fireworks. ...

"I am proud and happy to proclaim that you have presented to the world the best Olympic Games ever."

Yvonne Kenny was the soprano who sang the Olympic Hymn at the Closing Ceremony. The ceremony featured performing artists such as Jimmy Barnes, Midnight Oil, Kylie Minogue, Slim Dusty, Christine Anu, Nikki Webster, John Paul Young, Melbourne-based singer Vanessa Amorosi, Tommy Emmanuel CGP, and pop duo Savage Garden. Yvonne Kenny is an Australian opera singer. ... The Olympic Hymn, also known informally as the Olympic Anthem, is a musical piece composed by Spyros Samaras with words taken by a poem of the Greek poet and writer Kostis Palamas. ... Jimmy Barnes is a popular Australian rock singer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kylie Ann Minogue, OBE (pronounced ,[1]mɪnoʊg;[2] born 28 May 1968) is an Australian Grammy and BRIT award-winning pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... David Gordon Slim Dusty Kirkpatrick, AO, OBE (June 13, 1927—September 19, 2003) was an iconic Australian country music singer-songwriter. ... Christine Anu (born 1970) is an Australian pop singer from Cairns, Queensland. ... Nikki Webster (born April 30, 1987) is an Australian pop performer. ... John Paul Young John Paul Young (June 21, 1950–) is an Australian singer. ... Vanessa Joy Amorosi (born 8 August 1981) is an Australian singer and recording artist. ... Tommy Emmanuel, CGP (born May 31, 1955) is an Australian guitarist, best known for his fingerpicking style. ... For the eponymous debut album, see Savage Garden (album). ...


The Games were then handed over to the city of their birthplace, Athens, where they would again take place in 2004. The ceremony concluded with a huge fireworks display on Sydney Harbour. For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge located on Port Jackson Port Jackson is the natural harbour of Sydney, Australia, also known as Sydney Harbour and is the largest natural harbour in the world. ...


Sports

See the medal winners, ordered by sport:

Archery at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney consisted of four events. ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, 46 events in athletics were contested, 24 for men and 22 for women. ... Baseball had its third appearance as an official medal sport at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney. ... Final results for the Basketball competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics. ... Final results for the Badminton competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics: Mens Singles Mens Doubles Womens Singles Womens Doubles Mixed Doubles Categories: Badminton at the Olympics | 2000 Summer Olympics events ... The boxing competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney was held over a period of sixteen days at the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre in Darling Harbour. ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics, 2 different Canoe/Kayak disciplines were contested: Flatwater and Slalom. ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics, 3 different Bicycle racing disciplines were contested: Road cycling, Track cycling, and Mountain biking. ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics, 8 Diving events were held: MENS EVENTS 10m Platform 3m Springboard Synchronized Diving, 10m Platform Synchronized Diving, 3m Springboard WOMENS EVENTS 10m Platform 3m Springboard Synchronized Diving, 10m Platform Synchronized Diving, 3m Springboard Categories: Diving at the Olympics | 2000 Summer Olympics events ... Final results for the Equestrian events at the 2000 Summer Olympics: // Medals Individual Three-Day Event Team Three-Day Event Individual Dressage Team Dressage Individual Jumping Team Jumping Category: ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics, ten fencing events were contested. ... The football tournament at the 2000 Summer Olympics was the 20th official Olympic Games football tournament. ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics, 3 different gymnastics disciplines were contested: Artistic gymnastics, Rhythmic gymnastics, and Trampolining. ... Final results for the Team Handball competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics: Men´s Tournament Womens Tournament Categories: 2000 Summer Olympics events ... Final results for the Field Hockey competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics: // Mens Tournament Group A Group B Mens Classification Matches 9th-12th place Mens Classification Matches 5th-8th place Mens Semifinals Mens Classification Match 11th-12th place Mens Classification Match 9th-10th place... Final results for the Judo events at the 2000 Summer Olympics: // MENS EVENTS Extra-Lightweight (-60 kg) Half-Lightweight (60-66 kg) Lightweight (66-73 kg) Half-Middleweight (73-81 kg) Middleweight (81-90 kg) Half-Heavyweight (90-100 kg) Heavyweight (+100 kg) WOMENS EVENTS Extra-Lightweight (-48... Final results for the Modern Pentathlon at the 2000 Summer Olympics The team event was abolished from this convention and the womens individual match was newly introduced. ... Final results for the Rowing events at the 2000 Summer Olympics: The event is probably most noted for Steve Redgraves winning his fifth Olympic gold medal in as many games in the British mens coxless four. ... Final results for the Sailing events at the 2000 Summer Olympics: // MENS EVENTS Sailboard (Mistral) Single-Handed Dinghy (Finn) Double-Handed Dinghy (470) WOMENS EVENTS Sailboard (Mistral) Single-Handed Dinghy (Europe) Double-Handed Dinghy (470) OPEN EVENTS Single-Handed Dinghy (Laser) High Performance Dinghy (49er) Two-Person Keelboat... Final results for the Shooting events at the 2000 Summer Olympics: // MENS EVENTS 10 m Air Pistol 10 m Air Rifle 10 m Running Target 25 m Rapid Fire Pistol 50 m Pistol 50 m Rifle (3 Positions) 50 m Rifle (Prone) Trap Petr Malek (left), of the Czech... Final results for the Softball competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics: Categories: 2000 Summer Olympics events ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia, 32 swimming events were contested. ... Final results for the Synchronized Swimming competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics: Duet Team Categories: 2000 Summer Olympics events ... Final results for the Table Tennis competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics: Mens Singles Mens Doubles Womens Singles Womens Doubles Categories: 2000 Summer Olympics events ... Final results for the Taekwondo events at the 2000 Summer Olympics: MENS EVENTS -58 kg 58-68 kg 68-80 kg +80 kg WOMENS EVENTS -49 kg 49-57 kg 57-67 kg +67 kg Categories: 2000 Summer Olympics events ... Final results for the Tennis competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics: Andre Agassi (U.S.) was defending his title in the mens singles as was Lindsay Davenport (U.S.) in the womens singles event. ... The Triathlon at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia was the debut of the triathlon at the Olympic Games. ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics, four volleyball events were contested. ... Final results for the Water Polo competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics: Mens Tournament Womens Tournament Categories: 2000 Summer Olympics events ... Final results for the Weightlifting events at the 2000 Summer Olympics. ... At the 2000 Summer Olympics, 2 different Wrestling disciplines were contested: Freestyle Wrestling and Greco-Roman Wrestling. ... Wheelchair racing at the 1988 Summer Olympics featured as a demonstration sport at the [[Olympic Stadium] on September 30, 1988. ...

Medal count

These are the top medal-collecting nations for the 2000 Games. (Host country is highlighted) This is the full table of the medal count of the 2000 Summer Olympics. ...

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 United States United States 37 24 31 92
2 Russia Russia 32 28 28 88
3 China China 28 16 15 59
4 Australia Australia 16 25 17 58
5 Germany Germany 13 17 26 56
6 France France 13 14 11 38
7 Italy Italy 13 8 13 34
8 Netherlands Netherlands 12 9 4 25
9 Cuba Cuba 11 11 7 29
10 Great Britain Great Britain 11 10 7 28

Marion Jones, winner of three golds and two bronzes for the United States, relinquished her medals in October 2007 after confessing that she had taken tetrahydrogestrinone (THG) from September 2000 through July 2001. The IOC has formally stripped Jones of her 5 medals. She has also been banned from competing for two years by the IAAF. [5] [6] [7] [8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Marion Jones, also known as Marion Jones-Thompson (born October 12, 1975 in Los Angeles, California), is a former American track and field athlete of Belizean descent. ... Tetrahydrogestrinone (often referred to as THG or the clear) is an anabolic steroid. ... The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) is the international governing body for the sport of athletics (known in the US as track and field). It was founded in 1912 at its first Congress in Stockholm, Sweden by representatives from 17 national athletics federations as the International Amateur Athletics Federation. ...


Participating nations

Participating countries
Participating countries

199 National Olympic Committees (NOCs) participated in the Sydney Games, two more than in 1996. In addition, there were four Timorese Individual Olympic Athletes at the 2000 Summer Olympics. Eritrea, Micronesia and Palau made their Olympic debut this year. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 46 KB) Countries which participated in the 2000 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 46 KB) Countries which participated in the 2000 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, commonly known as East Timor, is an island nation in Southeast Asia, consisting of the eastern half of the island of Timor, the nearby islands of Atauro and Jaco, and Oecussi-Ambeno, a political exclave of East Timor situated on the western side of... IOC Flag Four athletes from East Timor competed as Individual Olympic Athletes at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia under the IOC country code IOA. // Medals Results by event Athletics Mens marathon Calisto da Costa Final - 2:33:11 (71st place) Womens Marathon Aguida Amaral Final - 3...


Afghanistan was the only 1996 participant that did not participate in 2000.

Image File history File links Flag_of_Albania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Algeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_American_Samoa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Andorra. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Angola. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Antigua_and_Barbuda. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Armenia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Aruba. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Azerbaijan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Bahamas. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bangladesh. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Barbados. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belize. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Benin. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bermuda. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bhutan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bolivia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina. ... Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina competed at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney under the IOC country code BIH. Results by medal Results by event Swimming Mens 100m Freestyle Zeljko Panic Heat - 52. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Botswana. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_British_Virgin_Islands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brunei. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Burkina_Faso. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Burundi. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cambodia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cameroon. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cape_Verde. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Cayman_Islands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Central_African_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chad. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chinese_Taipei_for_Olympic_games. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Colombia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Comoros_(1996-2001). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Congo_Kinshasa_1997. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_the_Congo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Cook_Islands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Costa_Rica. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cote_d'Ivoire. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cyprus. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Djibouti. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Dominica. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Dominican_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ecuador. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_El_Salvador. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Equatorial_Guinea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Eritrea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ethiopia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Fiji. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Gabon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_The_Gambia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Georgia_(1990-2004). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ghana. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Grenada. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guam. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guatemala. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guinea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guinea-Bissau. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guyana. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Haiti. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Honduras. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hong_Kong. ... Flag of Hong Kong Hong Kong competed at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney under the IOC country code HKG. // [edit] Medal count [edit] Results by event [edit] Athletics Mens 100 m Wai Hung Chiang Round 1 - 10. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iceland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Indonesia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iraq,_1991-2004. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Jamaica. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Jordan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kazakhstan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kenya. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_North_Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kuwait. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kyrgyzstan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Laos. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Latvia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lebanon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lesotho_(1987-2006). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Liberia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Libya. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Liechtenstein. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania_1989-2004. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Luxembourg. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Macedonia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Madagascar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malawi. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malaysia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Maldives. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mali. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malta. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mauritania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mauritius. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Micronesia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Moldova. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Monaco. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mongolia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Morocco. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mozambique. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Myanmar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Namibia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nauru. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nepal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands_Antilles. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Niger. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nigeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Oman. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palau. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... Flag of Palestine Palestine competed at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney under the IOC country code PLE. Medal Count Results by event Swimming Womens 50m Freestyle Samar Nassar Preliminary Heat - 30. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Panama. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Papua_New_Guinea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Paraguay. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Peru_(state). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Puerto_Rico. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Qatar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links Flag_Rwanda_1962. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Saint_Kitts_and_Nevis. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Saint_Lucia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Saint_Vincent_and_the_Grenadines. ... Flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Saint Vincent and the Grenadines competed at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia under the IOC country code VIN. // Medal Count Results by event Athletics Mens Marathon Pamenos Avorsant Ballantyne Final - 2:19:08 (31st place) Womens 100m Natasha Laren... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sao_Tome_and_Principe. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Samoa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_San_Marino. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Saudi_Arabia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Senegal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Seychelles. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sierra_Leone. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Singapore. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Solomon_Islands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Somalia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sri_Lanka. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sudan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Suriname. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Swaziland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Syria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tajikistan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tanzania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Togo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tonga. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Trinidad_and_Tobago. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tunisia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uganda. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Arab_Emirates. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uruguay. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uzbekistan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Vanuatu. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Venezuela_1930-2006. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Vietnam. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States_Virgin_Islands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Yemen. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_FR_Yugoslavia. ... Flag of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia competed at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia under the IOC country code YUG. // Medal Count Results by event Swimming Mens 50m Freestyle Nebojsa Bikic Preliminary Heat - 23. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zambia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Image File history File links Olympic_flag. ... IOC Flag Four athletes from East Timor competed as Individual Olympic Athletes at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia under the IOC country code IOA. // Medals Results by event Athletics Mens marathon Calisto da Costa Final - 2:33:11 (71st place) Womens Marathon Aguida Amaral Final - 3...

Venues

Sydney Olympic Park

Telstra Stadium, formerly Stadium Australia, is a multi-purpose stadium located in Homebush, Sydney, Australia which opened in March 1999. ... Sydney International Aquatic Centre is a swimming venue in Sydney, Australia. ... State Sports Centre is a multi-use indoor arena in Sydney, Australia. ... NSW Tennis Centre is a tennis venue in Sydney, Australia. ... State Hockey Centre is a multi-use stadium in Sydney, Australia. ... The Dome is an indoor sporting arena located in Sydney, Australia. ... The Sydney Superdome is a large entertainment complex located in Homebush in Sydney, Australia. ... For the old Sydney Showground located in Moore Park, see Sydney Showground. ...

Sydney

The Dunc Gray Velodrome is located at Bass Hill approximately 5 kilometers south of the Sydney suburb of Bankstown. ... The Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, is located in Sydneys Darling Harbour near the Central Business District. ... The Sydney Entertainment Centre is an entertainment venue located in Haymarket, Sydney, Australia. ... The Dunc Gray Velodrome is located at Bass Hill approximately 5 kilometers south of the Sydney suburb of Bankstown. ... The Sydney International Regatta Centre, located in Penrith, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, is a rowing and kayaking venue which was created for the 2000 Summer Olympics. ... Blacktown Olympic Centre is a softball stadium in Doonside, a suburb in western Sydney, Australia. ... The Penrith Whitewater Stadium as an artificial whitewater hosted the canoe/kayak slalom events at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney. ... Bondi Beach Bondi Beach (with a long i) is a hugely popular beach and suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... The Sydney Football Stadium (colloquially known as SFS, and formerly known as Aussie Stadium 2002-2007[1]) was built in 1988 to be the premium rectangular field in Sydney, Australia. ...

Outside of Sydney

Canberra Stadium, originally known as Bruce Stadium, is a stadium primarily used for football in Canberra, the capital of Australia. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Hindmarsh Stadium is a football stadium located in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... “MCG” redirects here. ... The Brisbane Cricket Ground is a major sports stadium in the Queensland capital of Brisbane. ...

Media coverage

Most of the footage used by international broadcasters of the Opening and Closing Ceremony was directed out of SOBO (Sydney Olympic Broadcasting Organisation) by Australian director Peter Faiman. Peter Pete Faiman is an Australian television producer. ...


The games were covered by the following broadcasters:

Running up to the games an Australian comedy satire, The Games, was broadcast in Australia (it was also broadcast, at a later date, in New Zealand). It featured a spoof of the issues and events that the top-level organisers and bureaucrats suffered in the lead up to the games. The Seven Network is an Australian television network, owned by the Seven Media Group. ... Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ; Irish for Radio and Television of Ireland) is the national publicly-funded broadcaster of Ireland. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about the television network. ... Sveriges Television (SVT) is a national publicly-funded television broadcaster based in Sweden. ... Radio-Canada redirects here. ... The Sports Network (commonly known as TSN) is a Canadian English language cable television specialty channel and is Canadas leading English language sports television channel. ... NHK Broadcasting Center in Shibuya, Tokyo NHK (, Nippon Hōsō Kyōkai), or the Japan Broadcasting Corporation, is Japans public broadcaster. ... For other uses, see KBS. Korean Broadcasting System (KBS) is South Koreas premier public broadcaster and one of four major Korean television networks. ... Current logo The Arbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen Rundfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Cooperative association of public-law broadcasting institutions of the Federal Republic of Germany), or simply ARD, is a joint organization of Germanys regional public broadcasting agencies. ... Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen (Second German Television), ZDF, is a public service German television channel based in Mainz. ... Logo France télévisions headquarters in Paris France Télévisions is the French public national television broadcaster. ... The title of this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... For the article on the defunct Venezuelan television channel, see Televisa Venezuela. ... TV Azteca is the second largest Mexican television network. ... The TVNZ Television Centre in Central Auckland. ... // TV Globo Rio de Janeiro History In July of 1957 the President of the Republic, Juscelino Kubitschek, approved the concession of TV for the Radio Globe and, in 30 of December of the same year, the National Advice of Telecommunications published decree granting canal 4 of Rio De Janeiro to... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Games was a TV mockumentary, spoofing the Sydney Olympics in 2000. ...


NBC presented over 400+ hours on their main and sister stations, CNBC and MSNBC. The downside of the American coverage was that it was presented on tape delay rather than live due to the 15-hour time difference. The lone exception was the gold medal game in Men's Basketball, which featured the U.S. defeating France 85-75. The game was televised live in primetime on Saturday, September 30(EDT), which was the afternoon of Sunday, October 1 in Australia. In their 2004 coverage, NBC and its sister networks presented live coverage throughout the morning and afternoon, while showing marquee events pre-taped in prime time. This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A poignant part of the media coverage happened in the Canadian broadcast. On September 28, the CBC was airing the Olympics, when the network's chief correspondent, Peter Mansbridge, broke in and said: Peter Mansbridge Peter Mansbridge (born July 6, 1948) is a Canadian journalist and anchor of The National, CBC Televisions flagship nightly newscast. ...

"Hello from Toronto, I'm Peter Mansbridge. Sad news to report from Montreal...Pierre Elliott Trudeau, prime minister of Canada from 1968 to 1984 with one brief interruption in 1979, has passed away..."

People in Canada who wanted to see the Olympics between then and the closing ceremonies had to turn to TSN because the CBC was broadcasting news coverage related to the death and state funeral of the former prime minister. Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Justin Trudeau breaking down into tears after giving his eulogy The death and state funeral of Pierre Trudeau took place in September 2000. ...


Organization

SOCOG organisational structure circa 1998 - five groups and 33 divisions reporting to the CEO are organised primarily along functional lines with only a limited number of divisions (eg Interstate Football and Villages) anticipating a venue focussed design.
SOCOG organisational structure circa 1999 - functional divisions and precinct/venue streams are organised in a matrix structure linked to the Main Operations Centre (MOC). Some functions such as Project Management (in the Games Coordination group) continue to exist largely outside this matrix structure.

SOCOG organisational structure circa 1998 - five groups and 33 divisions reporting to the CEO are organised primarily along functional lines with only a limited number of divisions (eg Interstate Football and Villages) anticipating a venue focussed design. ... SOCOG organisational structure circa 1998 - five groups and 33 divisions reporting to the CEO are organised primarily along functional lines with only a limited number of divisions (eg Interstate Football and Villages) anticipating a venue focussed design. ... SOCOG organisational structure circa 1999 - functional divisions and precinct/venue streams are organised in a matrix structure linked to the Main Operations Centre (MOC). ... SOCOG organisational structure circa 1999 - functional divisions and precinct/venue streams are organised in a matrix structure linked to the Main Operations Centre (MOC). ...

Bodies responsible for the Olympics

A number of quasi-government bodies were responsible for the construction, organisation and execution of the Sydney Games. These included:

  • SOCOG the Sydney Organising Committee for the Olympic Games, primarily responsible for the staging of the Games
  • OCA the Olympic Coordination Authority, primarily responsible for construction and oversight
  • ORTA the Olympic Roads and Transport Authority
  • OSCC the Olympic Security Command Centre
  • OIC the Olympic Intelligence Centre
  • JTF Gold the Australian Defence Force Joint Taskforce Gold
  • SOBO the Sydney Olympic Broadcasting Organisation (nominally part of SOCOG)

These organisations worked closely together and with other bodies such as: Olympic Security Command Centre (OSCC) was formed in 1995 to plan for and conduct security of the 2000 Sydney Olympic and Paralympic Games. ... JTFGold Olympic logo Joint Task Force (JTF) Gold was the Australian Defence Force unit formed to provide security and general support for the 2000 Summer Olympics which was held in Sydney, Australia. ... The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is the military organisation responsible for the defence of Australia. ...

The Sydney Millennium Mascots, Syd, Milli, and Olly were designed by Matt Hatton and Jozef Szekeres. Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... The Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) is the national Olympic committee in Australia for the Olympic Games movement. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


These bodies are often collectively referred to as the "Olympic Family".


Organization of the Paralympics

Organization of the 2000 Summer Paralympics was the responsibility of SPOC the Sydney Paralympic Organizing Committee. However much of the planning and operation of the Paralympic Games was outsourced to SOCOG such that most operational programmes planned both the Olympic and Paralympic Games. See also: 2000 Summer Olympics External links Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games - archived websites in PANDORA Categories: Summer Paralympic Games | Australian sport | 2000 in sports ... SPOC is an acronym that stands for: Single Point Of Contact Sydney Paralympic Organising Committee, responsible for the 2000 Summer Paralympics This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


Other Olympic events

Organisation of the Olympic Games included not only the actual sporting events but also the management (and sometimes construction) of the sporting venues and surrounding precincts, the organisation of the Sydney Olympic Arts Festival and Olympic torch relay. The route the relay took is shown here:


Phases of the Olympic project

The staging of the Olympics were treated as a project on a vast scale, with the project broken into several broad phases: A project is a temporary endeavour undertaken to create a product or service[1]. // The word project comes from the Latin word projectum from projicere, to throw something forwards which in turn comes from pro-, which denotes something that precedes the action of the next part of the word in...

  • 1993 to 1996 – positioning
  • 1997 – going operational
  • 1998 – procurement/venuisation
  • 1999 – testing/refinement
  • 2000 - implementation
  • 2001 - post implementation and wind-down

Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article is about the year. ...

SOCOG organisational design

The internal organisation of SOCOG evolved over the phases of the project and changed, sometimes radically, several times.


In late 1998 the design was principally functional. The top two tiers below the CEO Sandy Hollway consisted of five groups (managed by Group General Managers and the Deputy CEO) and twenty divisions (managed by divisional General Managers), which in turn were further broken up into programmes and sub programmes or projects. Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ...


In 1999 functional areas (FAs) broke up into geographic precinct and venue teams (managed by Precinct Managers and Venue Managers) with functional area staff reporting to both the FA manager and the venue manager. Ie, SOCOG moved to a matrix structure. The Interstate Football division extant in 1998 was the first of these geographically based venue teams.


Volunteer program

The origins of the volunteer program for Sydney 2000 dates back to the bid, as early as 1992.


On December 17, 1992, a group of Sydney citizens, interested in the prospect of hosting the 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games, gathered for a meeting at Sports House, at Wentworth Park in Sydney. December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


In the period leading up to 1999, after Sydney had won the bid, the small group of volunteers grew from approximately 42 to around 500. These volunteers became known as Pioneer Volunteers. The Pioneer Volunteer program was managed internally by SOCOG's Volunteer Services Department in consultation with prominent peak groups like The Centre for Volunteering (Volunteering NSW) and TAFE. Some of the Pioneer Volunteers still meet every four months, an unseen legacy of the games which brought together a community spirit not seen before. In Australia, Technical and Further Education or TAFE institutions are those which offer a wide range of post-secondary education and training, generally in vocational fields (such as hospitality, tourism, construction, woodwork, secretarial skills, community work, etc), often at a level of difficulty below that of a corresponding or related...


During the Olympic games tens of thousands of volunteers helped everywhere at the Olympic venues and elsewhere in the city. They were honoured with a parade like the athletes had a few days before.


The official mascots

The official mascots chosen for the 2000 Summer Olympics were:[18] Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ...

  • Olly the Kookaburra — 'Olly' was named for 'Olympics'
  • Syd the Platypus — 'Syd' was named for 'Sydney', the host city for the Games.
  • Millie the Echidna — 'Millie' was named for 'Millennium'

There was also an unofficial mascot, Fatso the Fat-Arsed Wombat, popularized by comedy team The Dream with Roy and HG. Species Dacelo gaudichaud Dacelo leachii Dacelo novaeguineae Dacelo tyro For other uses, see Kookaburra (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Platypus (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Tachyglossus aculeatus (Shaw, 1792) The Short-beaked Echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), also known as the Spiny Anteater because of its diet of ants and termites, is one of four living species of echidna and the only member of the genus Tachyglossus. ... Fatso the Fat-Arsed Wombat was an unofficial mascot of the Sydney 2000 Summer Olympics created and promoted by sports/comedy television program The Dream which covered the event. ... The Dream with Roy and HG was a sports/comedy talk show, broadcast every night during the Sydney 2000, Salt Lake 2002 and Athens 2004 Olympics, presented by Australian comedic duo Roy and HG. Their telecasts became one of the most popular events of the Games, with Olympians from all...


The Bronze Medals

Until the end of 1991,[19] Australia minted both a: Image File history File links Australian_1_cent_coin. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ...

In 1992, these coins began to be removed from circulation. People were urged to exchange them for coins still in circulation. The Australian 1 cent coin was the lowest-valued Australian circulation coin until it was withdrawn from circulation in 1992. ... Binomial name Acrobates pygmaeus (Shaw, 1793) The Feathertail Glider (Acrobates pygmaeus), also known as the Pygmy Gliding Possum, Pygmy Glider, Pygmy Phalanger and Flying Mouse,[3] is the worlds smallest gliding mammal, and is named for its long feather-shaped tail. ... The Australian 2 cent coin was the second least valued coin until it was withdrawn from circulation in 1992. ... Binomial name Gray, 1827 The Frill-necked Lizard, or Frilled Lizard also known as the Frilled Dragon, (Chlamydosaurus kingii) is so called because of the large ruff of skin which usually lies folded back against its head and neck. ... Image File history File links Australian_2_cent_coin. ... Coins of the Australian dollar were introduced on 14 February 1966. ...


Both the 1 cent coins and 2 cent coins were melted down and turned into bronze medals for the 2000 Olympics.[20] [21] A bronze medal is a medal awarded to the third place finisher of contests (typically athletics competitions) such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. ...




Award

  • The International Olympic Committee awarded Sydney and its inhabitants with the "Pierre de Coubertin Trophy" in recognition of the collaboration and happiness shown by the people of Sydney during the event to all the athletes and visitors around the world.

New South Wales Police Force Olympic Commendation and Citation

  • The New South Wales Police Force was granted use of the Olympic Rings in the New South Wales Police Force Olympic Commendation and the New South Wales Police Force Olympic Citation for having staged the "safest" games ever.

The New South Wales Police Force (NSWPOL)(NSW Police Force; previously New South Wales Police Service & New South Wales Police) is the primary law enforcement agency in the State of New South Wales, Australia. ...

Fictional references

  • Australian mockumentary series The Games was a satirical look at the preparations for the event.
  • The James Bond character in the film Die Another Day, Miranda Frost, won a gold medal in fencing. It was referred to by Madonna's character Verity, who told Bond that she won the gold by default (after her opponent died[citation needed] of a steroid overdose orchestrated by Gustav Graves) in Sydney.

This article is about the spy series. ... For the theme song of the same movie, performed by Madonna, see Die Another Day (song). ... Miranda Frost is a fictional character in the James Bond film Die Another Day. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... Sir Gustav Graves is a fictional villain in the twentieth James Bond film Die Another Day. ... For the member of the Irish folk band The Clancy Brothers, see Tom Clancy (singer) and for the American Celticist, see Thomas Owen Clancy. ... Rainbow Six is a techno-thriller novel written by Tom Clancy. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Sydney 2000 - Auditor Slams Costs liebreich.com, 2003-04-23
  2. ^ Auditor-General’s Report to Parliament 2002 Volume Two archived Auditor's report, pages 10-11. 'Olympic Co-ordination Authority ... OCA’s current report on the actual result ... Total net impact in AUD$ million: ... 1,326.1'
  3. ^ Saulwick, Jacob. "No medals for economic benefits of the Games", Business Day, Sydney Morning Herald, 12 April 2008. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.  The article is based largely on a recent study by James Giesecke and John Madden from the Centre of Policy Studies at Monash University.
  4. ^ Information given by Ric Birch, Director of Ceremonies, during an interview at the end of the official DVD of the 2000 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony
  5. ^ BBC Sport
  6. ^ ABC News
  7. ^ Guardian Unlimited
  8. ^ msnbc
  9. ^ ESPN Track and Field News
  10. ^ Blogsport
  11. ^ FoxNews.com
  12. ^ The Irish Times
  13. ^ Wikio sports
  14. ^ Marion Jones stripped of Medals Philadelphia Daily News
  15. ^ Marion Jones stripped of Medals Philadelphia Daily News - Sports
  16. ^ Detroit Free Press
  17. ^ Jones stripped of Sydney medals
  18. ^ A Brief History of the Olympic and Paralympic Mascots. Bejing2008 (2004-08-05). Retrieved on 25 October 2006.
  19. ^ Australian Decimal Coins
  20. ^ "Other Olympic and Paralympic Products" — on page 17 (just before page 18) of the Gold Corporation — 2001 Annual Report — Publication by the Parliament of Western Australia
  21. ^ Australians add local color to medals for Olympic Games — Publication date: August 28, 2000

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ric Birch, born in Australia, was a former Rock and Roll entertainer. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... See also: 2000 Summer Olympics External links Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games - archived websites in PANDORA Categories: Summer Paralympic Games | Australian sport | 2000 in sports ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... The International Olympic Committee (IOC) allocates three-letter country codes to all National Olympic Committees and other groups competing in the Olympic Games. ...

External links

The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ... An all-time medal count for all Olympic Games from 1896 to 2006, including Summer Olympic Games, Winter Olympic Games and a combined total of both, is tabulated below. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... This article includes lists of all Olympic medalists since 1896, organized by each Olympic sport or discipline. ... The Olympic symbols are the icons, flags and symbols used by the International Olympic Committee to promote the Olympic Games. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Olympisch Stadion in 1928 The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were celebrated in 1928 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad originally programmed to celebrated between September 21 to October 6, 1940 were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, but the Games were given back to the IOC, because the Second Sino-Japanese War broke out in... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were celebrated in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were celebrated in Munich, in what was then West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... London 2012 redirects here. ... The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, is a major international sports and cultural festival to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2020 Summer Olympics The International Olympic Committee has yet to begin the selection process for the host city; the site of the Games of the XXXII Olympiad—as they will be officially known—is expected to be announced in mid 2013. ... The 2024 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2028 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1924 in Chamonix, France. ... The II Olympic Winter Games were held in 1928 in Sankt-Moritz, Switzerland. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... The 1936 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1936 in the villages of Garmisch and Partenkirchen in Bavaria, Germany. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Sapporo, Japan. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... The V Olympic Winter Games were held in St. ... The 1952 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1952 in Oslo, Norway. ... The VII Olympic Winter Games were held in 1956 in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... Sign outside Olympic Village at Squaw Valley The 1960 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California, United States (located in the Lake Tahoe basin). ... The 1964 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1968 Grenoble, France and opened on February 6. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in February 13 through February 24, 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1984 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia. ... The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and opened by Governor General Jeanne Sauvé. The Olympics were highly successful financially as they brought in million-dollar profits. ... The 1992 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1992 in Albertville, France. ... The 1994 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, is an international winter multiple sports event that will be celebrated from February 7 to February 23, 2014. ... The 2018 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXIII Olympic Winter Games, will be celebrated in 2018, and are an international winter sports athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ... The 2022 Winter Olympics, formally called the XXIV Olympic Winter Games is an event that the International Olympic Committee has yet to organize. ... The Youth Olympic Games (YOG)[1] are planned to be an international multi-sport event held every four years in staggered summer and winter events complementing the current Olympic Games,[2] and will feature athletes between the ages of 14 and 18. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...

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The cover for the DVD of the 2000 Sydney Summer Olympics showing fireworks in the background and the lighting of the Olympic Flame by Cathy Freeman (who subsequently won the 400 m title).
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