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This article is about the decade starting at the beginning of 2000 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ 2000 From Wikipedia 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Popular culture also holds the year 2000 as the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd... 2000 and ending at the end of 2009 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. Predicted Events January January 1 Deadline by which goods in all member states of the European Union must be sold in metric units (this has already been completed everywhere, except in the UK). Road signs in the UK... 2009. For the century or millennium starting in 2000 (or, technically, 2001), see the links below.

These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. The individual century pages contain lists of decades and years. See history for different organizations of historical events. See Calendar and List of calendars for other groupings of years. For earlier time periods see cosmological timeline, geologic timescale, evolutionary timeline, pleistocene... Millennia:
(1st millennium – 2nd millennium – 3rd millennium – other millennia) Events The Black Death Mongol Empires in Asia The Renaissance in Europe The Protestant Reformation The agricultural and industrial revolutions The rise of nationalism and the nation state European discovery of the Americas and Australia and their colonization European... 2nd millennium - (2nd millennium – 3rd millennium – 4th millennium – other millennia) The third millennium is the third period of one thousand years in the Common Era. However, there are two opinions on the start and end dates. January 1, 2001 - December 31, 3000 For those who start counting their calendar... 3rd millennium - (3rd millennium – 4th millennium – 5th millennium – other millennia) The fourth millennium is a period of time which will begin on January 1, 3001 and will end on December 31, 4000. The year 3797 (or 3786 according to some) is the year Nostradamus claims will be the end... 4th millennium
These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. The individual century pages contain lists of decades and years. See history for different organizations of historical events. See Calendar and List of calendars for other groupings of years. For earlier time periods see cosmological timeline, geologic timescale, evolutionary timeline, pleistocene... Centuries:
(19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 20th century - (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2000-2099. The 21st century is the first century of the 3rd millennium... 21st century - (21st century - 22nd century - 23rd century - other centuries) The twenty-second century comprises the years 2101 to 2200. This is different from the century known as the twenty-one hundreds, which comprises the years 2100 to 2199. See also: Future Astronomical predictions for the 22nd century The Earth will experience... 22nd century
This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. See also centuries and history. Decade is also an album by Neil Young. During the 20th Century and continuing today it became popular to look at that centurys decades as historical entities in themselves. Particular... Decades:

1970s - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ 1970s From Wikipedia Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of... 1970s Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology Bulletin board system popularity Popularization of personal computers, Walkmans, VHS videocassette recorders, and compact disc (CD) players Introduction of the IBM PC Home video games become enormously popular, most notably Atari until the market crashes in 1983; the rise... 1980s Events and trends Technology Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft Windows operating system becomes virtually ubiquitous on IBM... 1990s - 2000s - Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s - 2010s - 2020s 2030s 2040s 2050s 2060s Years: 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 The Decade as a Whole This decade is expected to be called the... 2010s Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s - 2020s - 2030s 2040s 2050s 2060s 2070s Years: 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 The Decade as a Whole nfongfoerngroegneorgoeroeweouwehorw iw9 nowiefheuofhoufhoweifh hoeihfeohifwefioehiefrhefdjfhkeiuwi fiwuefhiewruiwhfjdfhieryuiefhwuifwfyhei7ufhewufye nfuef hewufiwefbwbfvyewtrgewgfyyeifgiewfgweiygfiweufei Categories... 2020s Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s 2020s - 2030s - 2040s 2050s 2060s 2070s 2080s Years: 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 The Decade as a Whole This decade is expected to be called the... 2030s

A year is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. By extension, this can be applied to any planet: for example, a Martian year is a year on Mars. Seasonal year A seasonal year is the time between successive... Years:

2000 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ 2000 From Wikipedia 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Popular culture also holds the year 2000 as the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd... 2000 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. By strict interpretation of the Gregorian Calendar, 2001 is also the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd millenium. Popular culture, however, often views the year 2000 as holding this distinction. 2001 is also the year... 2001 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated: International Year of Ecotourism and Mountains National Science Year in the United Kingdom Autism Awareness Year in the United Kingdom Events January Euro banknotes in circulation throughout the twelve countries of the European Union that... 2002 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Events January January 1 - Luíz Inácio Lula Da Silva becomes the 37th President of Brazil. Pascal Couchepin becomes President of the Confederation in... 2003 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... 2004 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Events January Iraqi police officers hold up their index fingers marked with purple indelible ink, a security measure to prevent double voting. Worldwide aid effort continues to develop in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. January 3... 2005 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. It has been designated: The International Year of Deserts and Desertification Predicted and scheduled events January January 1 - Deadline by which the small remainder of non-metric road distance signs in the Republic of Ireland must be changed... 2006 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. Predicted events January January 1 - Target date for the admission of Romania and Bulgaria to the European Union. January 1 - Changing of ISBN Numbering system to be 13 Digit Code. February February 4 - Super Bowl XLI to be... 2007 2008 is a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. Predicted events January January 15 _ NASAs MESSENGER spacecraft makes the first of three flybys of Mercury. February February 1 _ Sweden plans to cease analog television broadcasts February 3 _ Super Bowl XLII to be held... 2008 2009 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. Predicted Events January January 1 Deadline by which goods in all member states of the European Union must be sold in metric units (this has already been completed everywhere, except in the UK). Road signs in the UK... 2009

Contents

The decade as a whole

  • In keeping with naming decades (cf. Events and trends Technology Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft Windows operating system becomes virtually ubiquitous on IBM... 1990s "the Nineties", Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology Bulletin board system popularity Popularization of personal computers, Walkmans, VHS videocassette recorders, and compact disc (CD) players Introduction of the IBM PC Home video games become enormously popular, most notably Atari until the market crashes in 1983; the rise... 1980s "the Eighties", etc.), the decade of the 2000s lacks an accepted name. The most common name is "the Os", pronounced as "the ohs". A widely accepted term may not come about until the decade has ended. However no such term exists for the decades of the Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s Years: 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 Events and Trends Technology Lawrence Hargrave makes the first stable wing design for a heavier-than-air aircraft Orville and... 1900s and Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s - 1910s - 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s Years: 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 Events and trends Science Einsteins theory of general relativity Max von Laue discovers the diffraction of x-rays by... 1910s. Some other suggestions for the 2000s decade are:
    • "the Twenty-O's" (pronounced; twenty-ohs) or "the Oh's". For example, the year 2005 would be pronounced as "twenty-oh-five," instead of "two-thousand and five."
    • "the 0-0s", usually pronounced as "the oh-ohs". This pronunciation sounds like "uh oh", an expression of dismay; this similarity is no doubt intentional.
    • "the 2Ks", a term that is rooted in the slang of the times. K is shorthand for the Greek prefix Kilo (symbol: k) is a prefix in the SI system denoting 103 or 1,000. For example: kilogram is 1000 grams kilometre is 1000 metres kilowatt is 1000 watts kilojoule is 1000 joules Adopted in 1795, it comes from the Greek χίλιοι, meaning thousand. Kilo... kilo meaning 1000; hence, 2K means 2000. In popular culture, the years of the decade are already being named according to this slang. For example, the year 2003 is referred to as 2K3. The "2K" term probably has its popular origins in the heavily-hyped The year 2000 problem (also known as the Y2K problem and the millennium bug) was a flaw in computer program design that caused some date-related processing to operate incorrectly for dates and times on and after January 1, 2000. It turned into a major fear that critical industries (electricity... Y2K bug that began in 1999, and lasted into this decade.
    • "the Aughts" (or "Oughts"), keeping with the practice of the twentieth century.
    • "the Nillies", derived from the term "nil", meaning nothing or zero.
    • "the Noughties", referring to the nought, or zero, as the decade indicator; the word-play on "naughty" is intentional.
    • "the Twenty Hundreds", though this could be confused with a name for the century.
    • "the zeroes",
    • "the double-O's"
    • "the 0-Hundreds"
    • "the two thousands", simply 2000s instead of stressing the last two numbers of the first year of the decade e.g. 2000s instead of just 00's.
  • The United Nations General Assembly The United Nations General Assembly is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations. It is made up of all United Nations member states and meets in regular yearly sessions under a president elected from among the representatives. The first session was convened on... United Nations General Assembly declared the (mostly overlapping) decade of 2001-2010 as the "International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence for the Children of the World".

Events and trends

Technology

  • Boom in music downloading and MP3 (or, more precisely, MPEG-1/2 Audio Layer 3) is an audio compression algorithm capable of greatly reducing the amount of data required to reproduce audio, while sounding like a faithful reproduction of the original uncompressed audio to most listeners. History MPEG-1/2 Layer 2 encoding started in... MP3 audio In computer science, data compression or source coding is the process of encoding information using fewer bits, or information units, thanks to specific encoding schemes. For example, this article could be encoded with fewer bits if we accept the convention that the word compression is encoded as CP!. Compression only... data compression; rise of portable A digital audio player (DAP) is a device that stores, organizes and plays digital music files. It is more commonly referred to as an MP3 player (because of that formats ubiquity), but DAPs often play many additional file formats. Some formats are proprietary, such as MP3, Windows Media Audio... digital audio players, typified by Apple Computer, Inc. ( NASDAQ: AAPL) is a Silicon Valley company based in Cupertino, California, whose core business is computer technologies. Apple helped start the personal computer revolution in the 1970s with its Apple II and shaped it in the 1980s and since with the Macintosh. Apple is known for innovative... Apple Computer's The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. The correct title is iPod. A 4th Generation iPod, with earphones. The iPod has a multilingual interface, here using Dutch. The iPod family consists of a series of portable digital audio players (DAP) designed and marketed by Apple... iPod
  • A digital camera, as opposed to a film or video camera, uses an electronic sensor to transform images (or video) into electronic data. Modern digital cameras are typically multifunctional and the same device can take photographs, video, and/or sound. In 2005, digital cameras are starting to push traditional film... Digital cameras become very popular due to rapid decreases in size and cost while photo resolution steadily increases
  • Future energy development face great challenges due to an increasing world population, demands for higher standards of living, demands for less pollution and a much discussed end to fossil fuels. Failure would result in overpopulation and a Malthusian catastrophe. Most energy sources use energy from sunlight, either directly like solar... Future energy development
  • This article is about a type of web application. For information on records of web server activity, see server log. A weblog, Web log or simply a blog, is a web application which contains periodic posts on a common webpage. These posts are often but not necessarily in reverse chronological... Blogs, A portal may be: A grand entrance, as into a cathedral. A Web portal (a kind of Web site). A kind of remote procedure call interface. The structure through which a highway or railroad tunnel exits to the surface. Portal, Georgia is a small town in the United States. Marshal... portals, and A Wiki or wiki (pronounced wicky, weekee, or veekee; see pronunciation section below) is a website (or other hypertext document collection) that allows users to add content, as on an Internet forum, but also allows anyone to edit the content. Wiki also refers to the collaborative software used to create... wikis become common electronic dissemination methods for businesses to conduct Knowledge management (KM) is the organization, creation, sharing and flow of knowledge within organizations. Definition A widely accepted working definition of knowledge management applied in worldwide organizations is available from the WWW Virtual Library on Knowledge Management: Knowledge Management caters to the critical issues of organizational adaptation, survival, and competence... knowledge management
  • DVD is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for storing data, including movies with high video and sound quality. DVDs resemble compact discs: their physical dimensions are the same—12cm or 8cm—but are encoded in a different format and at a much higher... DVDs replace The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. Many VCRs have their own tuner and can be... VCR technology as the common standard at video stores.
  • Mobile Phones Huge Boom with technology such as 3G Internet access

War, peace and politics

  • Major controversy over Map The U.S. presidential election of 2000 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 7. The Republican candidate, George W. Bush won the election to the presidency, defeating Democratic candidate Al Gore. This election was the third time in United States history a candidate had won the necessary number... U.S. presidential election, 2000
  • The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. Nineteen members of al-Qaida, a militant Islamist group, hijacked four commercial aircraft. They crashed one into each tower of the World Trade Center... September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack on New York's World Trade Center and Virginia's Pentagon killing over 3000 people. A resultant change in stance towards international terrorism (See The War on terrorism or War on terror is a global effort by the governments of several countries (primarily the United States and its principal allies) to neutralize international groups it deems as terrorist (primarily radical Islamist terrorist groups, including al-Qaida) and insure rogue nations no longer support terrorist... War on Terror) has ripple effects on the USA's foreign policy and military strategy.
  • The United States, with support from the United Kingdom, Australia and the Northern Alliance, invaded Afghanistan in October 2001 as part of its War on Terrorism campaign. The military campaign, led by U.S. general Tommy Franks, was initially dubbed Operation Infinite Justice but quickly renamed Operation Enduring Freedom, due... 2001 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan to depose the Flag flown by the Taliban. It is white, with the shahadah written in black. The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students of Islam), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from... Taliban regime in response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks
  • 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: December 2 - Enron files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection five days after Dynegy canceled a US$8.4 billion buyout bid (as of 2003 this was the largest bankruptcy in the history of the United... December 2001 July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. Events 390 BC - Battle of the Allia: A Roman army is defeated by raiding Gauls, leading to the subsequent sacking of Rome. AD 64 - Great fire of Rome: A... July 18, 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Events January January 1 - Luíz Inácio Lula Da Silva becomes the 37th President of Brazil. Pascal Couchepin becomes President of the Confederation in... 2003: The The European Convention, sometimes known as the Convention on the Future of Europe, was a body established by the European Council in December 2001 as a result of the Laeken Declaration. Its purpose was to produce a draft constitution for the European Union for the Council to finalise and adopt... Convention on the Future of Europe proposing first The Treaty establishing a constitution for Europe is a proposed constitutional treaty for the European Union. Its main aim is to replace the overlapping set of existing treaties that provides the current constitution for the Union. Despite its name, it only covers the European Union, not Europe in the geographical... European constitution (i.e., of the The European Union or EU is an intergovernmental organisation of European countries, which currently has 25 member states. The Union was established under that name by the Treaty on European Union (commonly known as the Maastricht Treaty) in 1992. However, many aspects of the EU existed before that date through... EU)
  • The Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, commonly known as East Timor, is an island nation in Southeast Asia, consisting of the eastern half of the island of Timor, the nearby islands of Atauro and Jaco, and Oecussi-Ambeno, a political exclave of East Timor situated on the western side of... East Timor gains official independence from The Republic of Indonesia, the worlds largest archipelago, is located between the Southeast Asian peninsula and Australia, between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It is the most populous Muslim-majority nation in the world and the fourth most populous overall. It has had free elections since the Indonesian 1998... Indonesia on May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). There are 225 days remaining. Events 325 - The First Council of Nicaea is held; the first Ecumenical Council of the Christian Church. 526 - An Earthquake kills about 300,000 people in Syria and... May 20, 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated: International Year of Ecotourism and Mountains National Science Year in the United Kingdom Autism Awareness Year in the United Kingdom Events January Euro banknotes in circulation throughout the twelve countries of the European Union that... 2002
  • The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Note that International Criminal Court is sometimes initialized as ICCt... International Criminal Court exists as of 1 July 2002, used for judging A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. Every violation of the law of war is a war crime. War crimes include violations of established protections of the laws of war. but also... war crimes, This article is in need of attention. Please see its listing on Pages needing attention and improve it in any way you see fit. When the issues regarding this page have been resolved, remove this notice and the listing, but please do not remove this notice until the article has... crimes against humanity and Genocide has been defined as the deliberate killing of people based on their ethnicity, nationality, race, religion, or (sometimes) politics, as well as other deliberate actions leading to the physical elimination of any of the above categories. There is disagreement over whether the term genocide ought to be used for... genocide
  • For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... 2003 invasion of Iraq as a step in the American The War on terrorism or War on terror is a global effort by the governments of several countries (primarily the United States and its principal allies) to neutralize international groups it deems as terrorist (primarily radical Islamist terrorist groups, including al-Qaida) and insure rogue nations no longer support terrorist... war on terrorism
  • The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. The conflict has been widely described as ethnic cleansing, and frequently as genocide. In September... Darfur conflict in Foreign relations Main article: Foreign relations of Sudan Sudan has a territorial dispute with Egypt over the Halaib Triangle. States Main article: States of Sudan Sudan has 26 states or wilayat: Al Jazirah, Al Qadarif, Bahr al Jabal, Blue Nile, East Equatoria, Junqali, Kassala, Khartoum, Lakes, North Bahr al... Sudan
  • " Orange-clad supporters of Viktor Yushchenko gather in Independence Square in Kiev. Ukraines Orange Revolution of 2004-2005 was a series of protests and political events that took place throughout the country in response to allegations of massive corruption, voter intimidation and direct electoral fraud during Ukraines Presidential... Orange Revolution" in Ukraine (Україна, Ukrayina in Ukrainian; Украина in Russian) is a republic in eastern Europe which borders Russia to the east, Belarus to the north, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary to the west, Romania and Moldova to the southwest and... Ukraine leads to election of Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko ( Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the president of Ukraine. As leader of the Our Ukraine (Nasha Ukrayina) political coalition, he was the main opposition... Viktor Yushchenko as Prime Minister after initial election victory of incumbent Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych ( Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович1) (born July 9, 1950 in Yenakiieve, Donetska oblast) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21... Viktor Yanukovych is annulled due to vote-rigging
  • The Tulip Revolution refers to the overthrow of President Askar Akayev and his government in the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan after the parliamentary elections of February 27 and of March 13, 2005. The revolution sought the end of the rule of Akayev and his family and associates, who in... Revolution in Kyrgyzstan (Kyrgyz: Кыргызстан) is a country in Central Asia. It borders China, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. Its capital is Bishkek (formerly Frunze.) National motto: none Official languages Kyrgyz, Russian Capital Bishkek President Askar Akayev Prime Minister Nikolay Tanayev Area  - Total... Kyrgyzstan overthrows government of President Askar Akayevich Akayev (born 10 November 1944 in Kyzyl-Bairak, Kyrgyzstan) has been the President of Kyrgyzstan since it declared independence. Akayev was a non-political scientist and engineer until 1990, when he became President after elections in the Supreme Soviet. He was re-elected in 1991, and amid allegations... Askar Akayev
  • The Republic of North Ossetia in Russia The Beslan school hostage crisis (also referred to by the media as the Beslan school siege) began when armed multinational terrorists took hundreds of schoolchildren and adults hostage on September 1, 2004 at School Number One in the Russian town of Beslan in... Beslan school hostage crisis, in which multinational terrorists took a school in Map of North Ossetia Beslan (Russian: Бесла́н) is a town located in the Russia and is the administrative center of the Pravoberezhny District. The population in 2002 was about 33,600, making Beslan the third largest town in North Ossetia behind Vladikavkaz and Mozdok... Beslan, The Russian Federation ( Russian: Росси́йская Федера́ция, transliteration: Rossiyskaya Federatsiya or Rossijskaja Federacija), or Russia (Russian: Росси́я, transliteration: Rossiya or Rossija), is a country that stretches... Russia hostage and subsequently killed 344 people including children
  • The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States expands international influence, in particular in the A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. The Middle East is a... Middle East, as well as continuing to expand its military might. The US also hold a number of Wargaming can be one of number of ways of exploring the effects of warfare without actual combat. It can take the form of a hobby in which one or more players simulate battles or entire wars, or a model or computer simulation of possible scenarios in military planning, (this is... war games pertaining to the Categories: China geography stubs ... Strait of Taiwan in preparation for a possible war with the People's Republic of The Great Wall of China, stretching over 6,700 km, was erected beginning in the 3rd century BC to guard the north from raids by men on horses. China  listen? ( Traditional: 中國; Simplified: 中国; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo) is a nation located chiefly in continental East... China over a Taiwanese succession
  • While the US continues to enjoy international political, military and economic dominance, The Great Wall of China, stretching over 6,700 km, was erected beginning in the 3rd century BC to guard the north from raids by men on horses. China  listen? ( Traditional: 中國; Simplified: 中国; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo) is a nation located chiefly in continental East... China emerges as a viable world power, as well as an industrial powerhouse for numerous light goods

Economics

  • Globalization (or globalisation) is a term used to describe the changes in societies and the world economy that are the result of dramatically increased trade and cultural exchange. In specifically economic contexts, it refers almost exclusively to the effects of trade, particularly trade liberalization or free trade. Between 1910 and... Globalization
  • Major downturn in the value of Dot-com (also dotcom or redundantly dot.com) companies were the collection of start-up companies selling products or services using or somehow related to the Internet. They proliferated in the late 1990s dot-com boom, a speculative frenzy of investment in Internet and Internet-related technical stocks and enterprises... dot-com shares -- But Google enters the New York stock Exchange and quckly share price rise
  • The Great Wall of China, stretching over 6,700 km, was erected beginning in the 3rd century BC to guard the north from raids by men on horses. China  listen? ( Traditional: 中國; Simplified: 中国; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo) is a nation located chiefly in continental East... China continues to grow rapidly
  • Significant oil price rises

Culture and religion

  • Same-sex marriage (also called gay marriage, and—less frequently—homosexual marriage) refers to marriage between partners of the same gender (for other forms of same-sex unions that are different from marriages, see the articles linked in that section). Terminology The terms gay marriage and homosexual marriage... Same-sex marriage becomes a controversial issue in 2003 and 2004. In the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States, the Supreme Court of State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25.7%) Population (2000)  - Population 6,349,097 (13th)  - Density 312.68... Massachusetts declares that same-sex couples must be allowed to marry in that state, and President George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and currently the 43rd President of the United States. He is a member of the Bush political family, the son of former President George H.W. Bush, and the brother of Jeb Bush the Governor of Florida. Order: 43rd... George W. Bush pushes for a A constitutional amendment is an alteration to the constitution of a nation or a state. In jurisdictions with entrenched constitutions this requires a special procedure different from that used for enacting ordinary laws. Flexible constitutions A flexible constitution is one that may be amended by a simple act of the... constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage
  • Reality television is a genre of television programming in which the fortunes of real life people (as opposed to fictional characters played by actors) are followed. There are three main types of reality television program. In the first, the viewer and the camera are passive observers following people going about... Reality television becomes a well-established sector of the See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band Family watching television in the 1950s. Television is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound over a distance. The term has come to refer to all the aspects of television programming and transmission... television programming industry. Nightly news broadcasts continue to lose viewership to 24-hour internet news coverage. Changing television habits that involve increased use of the internet and the preponderance of The TiVo Personal video recorder is a consumer video component allowing users to capture television programming to internal hard drive storage. TiVo systems function similarly to VCRs, but use non-removable hard-disk storage, and contain much more sophisticated software to record programming - not only programs the user specifically requests... TiVo make marketers rethink the paradigm of the 30-second TV ad. Viral marketing and viral advertising refers to marketing techniques that seek to exploit pre-existing social networks to produce exponential increases in brand awareness, through processes similar to the spread of an epidemic. The term viral marketing was originally coined to describe various free email services practice of appending advertising... Viral marketing, and Product placement is a promotional tactic used by marketers in which characters in a fictional play, movie, television series, or book use a real commercial product. Typically either the product and logo is shown or favourable qualities of the product are mentioned. The product price is not mentioned nor are... Product placement within reality television shows and movies are some increasingly used alternatives.
  • World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. It is conventionally considered a continent, which, in this case, is more of a cultural distinction than a geographic one. ( National Geographic, however, officially recognises... Europe continues to become more This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. The word secular comes from a Latin word meaning happening once in an age. This offers the opportunity for a confusing variety of meanings. A dog is big compared to an ant but not compared to an elephant, and... secular; in contrast, Religion, sometimes used interchangeably with faith, is commonly defined as belief concerning the supernatural, sacred, or divine, and the practices and institutions associated with such belief. In its broadest sense some have defined it as the sum total of answers given to explain humankinds relationship with the universe. Religion... religious groups increase their political influence in the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States and the A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. The Middle East is a... Middle East

Other

  • 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. November 30, 2002 It is reported that the Provisional IRA may be about to make substantial concessions in order to re-start the stalled Northern Ireland... November 2002: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. It first appeared in November 2002 in Guangdong Province, China. SARS is now believed to be caused by the SARS virus. Around 10% of infected people die. After the Peoples Republic of China suppressed news of the outbreak... SARS virus outbreak, most notably in Hong Kong and Toronto
  • Major earthquake rocks the ancient city of Baikal-Amur Magistral in green; Trans-Siberian line in red The Baikal-Amur Mainline (Russian Байкало-Амурская Магистраль, Baikal-Amur Magistral, BAM) is a railway line in Russia... Bam, in Iran ( Persia: ایران) is a Middle Eastern country located in southwestern Asia that until 1935 was referred to in the West as Persia. The name Iran is a modern cognate of Aryan meaning Land of the Aryans. Iran borders Pakistan (909km of border) and Afghanistan (936km... Iran. Cost over 50,000 lives.
  • A The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. The earthquake generated a tsunami that was among the deadliest disasters in modern history. At a magnitude of 9.0, it was the largest earthquake... major earthquake and ensuing The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. A tsunami (pronounced or ) is a natural phenomenon consisting of a series of waves generated when water in a lake or the sea is rapidly displaced on a massive scale. Earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions and large meteorite impacts... tsunami causes devastation in The Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka (ශ්රී ලංකා in Sinhala / இலங்கை in Tamil) (known as Ceylon before 1972) is a tropical island nation off the southeast coast of the Indian subcontinent. The island was known in ancient times... Sri Lanka, The Republic of India is the second most populous country in the world, with a population of more than one billion, and is the seventh largest country by geographical area. India has grown significantly, both in population and in strategic importance in the last two decades. The Indian economy is... India, The Republic of Indonesia, the worlds largest archipelago, is located between the Southeast Asian peninsula and Australia, between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It is the most populous Muslim-majority nation in the world and the fourth most populous overall. It has had free elections since the Indonesian 1998... Indonesia, The Kingdom of Thailand is a country in southeast Asia, bordering Laos and Cambodia to the east, the Gulf of Thailand and Malaysia to the south, and the Andaman Sea and Myanmar to the west. Thailand is also known as Siam, which was the countrys official name until May... Thailand, The Federation of Malaysia is a country in Southeast Asia. It consists of two geographical regions divided by the South China Sea: West Malaysia, commonly known as Peninsular Malaysia/Malay Peninsula, shares a land frontier on the north with Thailand and is connected by a causeway and a bridge on... Malaysia, The Republic of Maldives is a country consisting territorially of a group of atolls in the Indian Ocean, south-southwest of India. National motto: n/a Official language Dhivehi Capital and largest city Malé 3° 15 N, 73° 00 E President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom Area  - Total  - % water Ranked... The Maldives and many other areas around the rim of the The Indian Ocean is the third-largest body of water in the world, covering about 20% of the Earths water surface. It is bounded on the north by southern Asia (the Indian subcontinent); on the west by the Arabian Peninsula and Africa; on the east by the Malay Peninsula... Indian Ocean. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. It has been designated: The World Year Of Physics 2005 The International Year of Microcredit The International Year for Sport and Physical Education Events January Worldwide aid effort continues to develop in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean... As of January 2005 the death toll is estimated to be nearly 290,000
  • Avian influenza (also known as bird flu) is a type of influenza virulent in birds. It was first identified in Italy in the early 1900s and is now known to exist worldwide. Infection The causative agent is the avian influenza (AI) virus. AI viruses all belong to the influenza virus... Bird flu spreads through Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. The name for the region was first coined in the 20th century. The subregion has 11 countries and the countries can be divided into the mainland and the archipelago. The mainland countries include: Cambodia Laos Myanmar (Burma) Thailand Vietnam... South East Asia
  • April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. Events 1453 - Mehmed II begins his siege of Constantinople (İstanbul), which would fall on May 29 1513 - Juan Ponce de Leon sets foot on Florida becoming the first... April 2, 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Events January Iraqi police officers hold up their index fingers marked with purple indelible ink, a security measure to prevent double voting. Worldwide aid effort continues to develop in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. January 3... 2005: Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. He was elected on October 16, 1978... Pope John Paul II dies at age 84.

People

World leaders

  • Alternative meaning: Prime Minister (band) A prime minister is the leading member of the cabinet of the top level government in a parliamentary system of government of a country, alternatively A prime minister is an official in a presidential system or semi-presidential system whose duty is to execute the... Prime Minister John Howard John Winston Howard (born July 26, 1939), is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia, coming to office on March 11, 1996 and winning re-election in 1998, 2001 and 2004. He is Australias second-longest serving Prime Minister, after his hero Robert Menzies... John Howard ( Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only one to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/ Oceania. It also includes a number of secondary islands, the largest of which is Tasmania, an Australian State. Australia is... Australia)
  • Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt (born April 11, 1953) is the current Prime Minister of Belgium. Early career Born in 1953 in Dendermonde, he became president of the Flemish Liberal Students Union (1972-1974) while studying law in Ghent. He quickly became the secretary of Willy De Clercq, who was at that... Guy Verhofstadt ( The Kingdom of Belgium ( Dutch: Koninkrijk België, French: Royaume de Belgique, German: Königreich Belgien) is a country in Western Europe, bordered by the Netherlands, Germany, Luxembourg, France, and the North Sea. Belgium is at a cultural crossroad between Germanic Europe and Romance Europe. It has Dutch speakers... Belgium)
  • President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. Etymologically, a president is one who presides, who sits in leadership (from Latin prae- before + sedere to sit). Originally, the term usually referred to the presiding officer of a ceremony or meeting (i.e. chairman); but... President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (born October 6, 1945) is a left-wing Brazilian politician. Lula gained election as the President of Brazil in 2002 and took office on January 1, 2003. Biography Lula was born as Luiz Inácio da Silva in a small city in the Brazilian... Luís Inácio Lula da Silva ( The Federative Republic of Brazil (República Federativa do Brasil in Portuguese) is the largest and most populous country in South America, and fifth largest in the world. Spanning a vast area between central South America and the Atlantic Ocean, it borders Uruguay, Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela... Brazil)
  • Prime Minister The Right Honourable Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, PC (born January 11, 1934) was the twentieth Prime Minister of Canada, serving from November 4, 1993, to December 12, 2003. Early life Born in Shawinigan, Quebec as the 18th of 19 children, Chrétien studied law at Laval University... Jean Chrétien ( Canada is an independent sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. Bordering the United States, its territorial claims extend north into the Arctic Ocean as far as the North Pole. Canada is a federation of ten provinces... Canada)
  • Prime Minister The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. He is leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and was re-elected with a minority government on June 28, 2004... Paul Martin ( Canada is an independent sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. Bordering the United States, its territorial claims extend north into the Arctic Ocean as far as the North Pole. Canada is a federation of ten provinces... Canada)
  • President Ricardo Froilán Lagos Escobar (born March 2, 1938) is the current President of Chile. He was elected in March 2000 (his term ends in March 2006.) He is a member of the Party for Democracy and the Socialist Party of Chile, and won with a narrow margin in the... Ricardo Lagos ( The Republic of Chile is a country located on the southwestern coast of South America. It is a long and narrow strip of land between the Andes mountains and the Pacific Ocean. It shares borders with Argentina to the east, Bolivia to the northeast and Peru to the north. National... Chile)
  • President Jiāng Zémín (born August 17, 1926) was the core of the third generation of Communist Party of China leaders, serving as General Secretary of the Communist Party of China from 1989 to 2002, as President of the Peoples Republic of China from 1993 to 2003... Jiang Zemin ( The Great Wall of China, stretching over 6,700 km, was erected beginning in the 3rd century BC to guard the north from raids by men on horses. China  listen? ( Traditional: 中國; Simplified: 中国; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo) is a nation located chiefly in continental East... China)
  • President Hú Jǐntāo (born December 21, 1942) became General Secretary of the Communist Party of China on November 15, 2002. He became President of the Peoples Republic of China, replacing Jiang Zemin, on March 15, 2003, following his election by the National Peoples Congress. Early... Hu Jintao ( The Great Wall of China, stretching over 6,700 km, was erected beginning in the 3rd century BC to guard the north from raids by men on horses. China  listen? ( Traditional: 中國; Simplified: 中国; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo) is a nation located chiefly in continental East... China)
  • Valéry Giscard d'Estaing ( The European Convention, sometimes known as the Convention on the Future of Europe, was a body established by the European Council in December 2001 as a result of the Laeken Declaration. Its purpose was to produce a draft constitution for the European Union for the Council to finalise and adopt... Convention on the Future of Europe)
  • President Hosni Mubarak, President of Egypt Muhammad Hosni Said Mubarak ( Arabic : محمد حسنى سيد مبارك ) (born May 4, 1928), usually known as Hosni Mubarak (Mubarak also spelled Moubarak), has been the President of the Arab Republic of Egypt... Hosni Mubarak ( The Arab Republic of Egypt, commonly known as Egypt, (in Arabic: مصر, romanized Mişr or Maşr, in Egyptian dialect) is a republic mostly located in northeastern Africa. Covering an area of about 1,020,000 km², it includes the Sinai Peninsula (considered part of... Egypt)
  • President Jacques (René) Chirac (born 29 November 1932) is a French politician. (  French pronunciation?) He was elected President of the French Republic in 1995 and 2002. As President, he is an ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra. In 1959, after completing studies at the École Nationale dAdministration... Jacques Chirac ( The French Republic or France ( French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. France is a democracy organised as a... France)
  • Chancellor ( Latin: cancellarius), an official title used by most of the peoples whose civilization has arisen directly or indirectly out of the Roman empire. At different times and in different countries it has stood and stands for very various duties, and has been, and is, borne by officers of various... Chancellor Gerhard Fritz Kurt Schröder [] (born April 7, 1944), a German politician, has been serving since 1998 as Chancellor of Germany. His political career has unfolded within the left-of-center Social Democratic Party of Germany (Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands, SPD) - for a time he also served as Party Chairman... Gerhard Schröder ( The Federal Republic of Germany ( German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is one of the worlds leading industrialised countries, located in the heart of Europe. Due to its central location, Germany has more neighbours than any other European country: these are Denmark in the north, Poland and the Czech Republic in the... Germany)
  • Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee (often wrongly spelt Behari; अटल िबहारी वाजपेयी in Sanskrit) (born December 25, 1924) was the Prime Minister of India in 1996 and again from 1998 until May 19, 2004. Vajpayee is a native of... Atal Behari Vajpayee ( The Republic of India is the second most populous country in the world, with a population of more than one billion, and is the seventh largest country by geographical area. India has grown significantly, both in population and in strategic importance in the last two decades. The Indian economy is... India)
  • Prime Minister Manmohan Singh (ਮਨਮੋਹਨ ਸਿੰਘ in Gurmukhi) (born September 26, 1932 in Gah, West Punjab -- now in Pakistan -- is the fourteenth prime minister of India. He is from the Indian National Congress party. A member of the Sikh faith, Singh was sworn in... Dr. Manmohan Singh ( The Republic of India is the second most populous country in the world, with a population of more than one billion, and is the seventh largest country by geographical area. India has grown significantly, both in population and in strategic importance in the last two decades. The Indian economy is... India)
  • President Megawati Sukarnoputri Diah Permata Megawati Setiawati Sukarnoputri (born 23 January 1947), was President of Indonesia from July 2001 to 20 October 2004. She was defeated for re-election in the 2004 Indonesian presidential election on 20 September. Some Indonesian sources spell her name Soekarnoputri or Soekarno Putri. Note that Sukarnoputri... Megawati Sukarnoputri ( The Republic of Indonesia, the worlds largest archipelago, is located between the Southeast Asian peninsula and Australia, between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It is the most populous Muslim-majority nation in the world and the fourth most populous overall. It has had free elections since the Indonesian 1998... Indonesia)
  • President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and his family Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (born September 9, 1949), Indonesian military commander and politician, is the current President of Indonesia. Susilo won the presidency in September 2004 in the second round of the Indonesian presidential election, in which he defeated incumbent President Megawati Sukarnoputri. He was... Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono ( The Republic of Indonesia, the worlds largest archipelago, is located between the Southeast Asian peninsula and Australia, between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It is the most populous Muslim-majority nation in the world and the fourth most populous overall. It has had free elections since the Indonesian 1998... Indonesia)
  • President President Khatami Hojjat ol-Eslam Seyyed Mohammad Khatami (Persian: حجت‌الاسلام سید محمد خاتمی; born October, 1943 in Ardakan) is the fifth and current President of Iran. He has been president since... Mohammad Khatami ( Iran ( Persia: ایران) is a Middle Eastern country located in southwestern Asia that until 1935 was referred to in the West as Persia. The name Iran is a modern cognate of Aryan meaning Land of the Aryans. Iran borders Pakistan (909km of border) and Afghanistan (936km... Iran)
  • President Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majid al-Tikrītī (Often spelt Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبدالمجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937... Saddam Hussein ( The Republic of Iraq is a Middle Eastern country in southwestern Asia encompassing the ancient region of Mesopotamia. It shares borders with Kuwait and Saudi-Arabia to the south, Jordan to the west, Syria to the north-west, Turkey to the north, and Iran to the east. Its current leadership... Iraq)
  • President Ghazi al-Yawer Ghazi Mashal Ajil al-Yawer (born 1958? in Mosul, Iraq) is the interim President of Iraq. He was originally a member of the Interim Iraq Governing Council created following the United Statess 2003 invasion of Iraq. As President of the Council, in 2004 he was appointed... Ghazi al-Yawer ( The Republic of Iraq is a Middle Eastern country in southwestern Asia encompassing the ancient region of Mesopotamia. It shares borders with Kuwait and Saudi-Arabia to the south, Jordan to the west, Syria to the north-west, Turkey to the north, and Iran to the east. Its current leadership... Iraq)
  • President Jalal Talabani (b. 1933) the founder and secretary general of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK). Jalal Talabani was also a member of the Interim Iraq Governing Council, created following the United Statess 2003 invasion of Iraq. Born in the village of Kelkan in Southern Kurdistan, Talabani joined the... Jalal Talabani ( The Republic of Iraq is a Middle Eastern country in southwestern Asia encompassing the ancient region of Mesopotamia. It shares borders with Kuwait and Saudi-Arabia to the south, Jordan to the west, Syria to the north-west, Turkey to the north, and Iran to the east. Its current leadership... Iraq)
  • President Vaira Vike-Freiberga Vaira Vīķe-Freiberga (Born December 1, 1937 in Riga, Latvia) is the current president of Latvia. She was elected president in 1999 and reelected in 2003. Biography Vaira Vīķe-Freibergas parents were World War II refugees. They left Latvia in... Vaira Vike-Freiberga ( The Republic of Latvia ( Latvian: Latvijas Republika), or Latvia ( Latvian: Latvija), is a country in Northern Europe. Latvia has land borders with its two fellow Baltic states — Estonia to the north and Lithuania to the south — and Russia and Belarus to the east. In the west Latvia shares... Latvia)
  • The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet1. The Taoiseach is appointed by the President upon the nomination of Dáil Éireann (the lower house of parliament), and must, while he or... Taoiseach Patrick Bartholemew Ahern ( Irish: Pádraig Parthalán Ó hEachtairn) (born September 12, 1951), commonly called Bertie Ahern is an Irish politician. He is currently the tenth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, leading a Fianna Fáil- Progressive Democrats coalition government. He is currently the third... Bertie Ahern ( The Republic of Ireland ( Irish: Poblacht na hÉireann) is the official description of an independent state which covers approximately five-sixths of the island of Ireland, off the coast of north-west Europe. It is the westernmost state of the European Union, and has a developed economy and... Ireland)
  • President Mary Patricia McAleese (born 27 June 1951) is the eighth, and current, President of Ireland. She was first elected president in 1997 and was re-elected, without contest, in 2004. Born in Belfast in Northern Ireland, prior to becoming president she was a barrister, journalist and academic. Background McAleese was... Mary McAleese ( The Republic of Ireland ( Irish: Poblacht na hÉireann) is the official description of an independent state which covers approximately five-sixths of the island of Ireland, off the coast of north-west Europe. It is the westernmost state of the European Union, and has a developed economy and... Ireland)
  • Prime Minister Ehud Barak Ehud Barak (Hebrew: אהוד ברק) (born February 12th, 1942) was the 10th Prime Minister of Israel from 1999 to 2001. Barak joined the Israel Defense Forces in 1959 and served for 35 years, rising to the rank of Lieutenant General, the highest in... Ehud Barak ( The State of Israel (Hebrew: מדינת ישראל, translit.: Medinat Yisrael; Arabic: دولة اسرائيل, translit.: Daulat Israil) is a country in the Middle East on the eastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea... Israel)
  • Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israeli Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. Ariel Sharon (Hebrew: אריאל שרון, born February 27, Israeli political and military leader, and has been the current Prime Minister of... Ariel Sharon ( The State of Israel (Hebrew: מדינת ישראל, translit.: Medinat Yisrael; Arabic: دولة اسرائيل, translit.: Daulat Israil) is a country in the Middle East on the eastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea... Israel)
  • Prime Minister Portrait of Silvio Berlusconi Silvio Berlusconi (born September 29, 1936) is currently (as of 2005) the Prime Minister of Italy. He is the leader of the Forza Italia political movement, a movement which was created for his entry into politics, and the owner of an Italian media empire. The Berlusconi... Silvio Berlusconi ( The Italian Republic or Italy ( Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a country in southern Europe. It comprises a boot-shaped peninsula and two large islands in the Mediterranean Sea, Sicily and Sardinia, and shares its northern alpine boundary with France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. The independent countries of San... Italy)
  • Emperor is also a Norwegian black metal band; see Emperor (band). An emperor is a monarch and sovereign ruler of an empire or any other imperial realm. Emperors are generally recognised to be above kings in honour. They may obtain their position hereditarily, or by force, such as a coup... Emperor His Imperial Majesty The Emperor Akihito His Imperial Majesty The Emperor Akihito (明仁), tennō heika (天皇陛下), (born December 23, 1933) is the 125th, and current Emperor (天皇 tennō) of Japan. Akihito is the eldest son and the fifth child of the Emperor Showa... Akihito ( Official language Japanese Capital Tokyo Largest City Tokyo Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 60th 377,835 km² 0.8% Population  - Total ( 2004)  - Density Ranked 10th 127,333,002 337/km² GDP  - Total (PPP, 2005)  - Total (nominal)  ... Japan)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Junichiro Koizumi (小泉 純一郎 Koizumi Junichirō, born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician and the 87th, and current, Prime Minister of Japan. Personal life and education He was born in Yokosuka City, on January 8, 1942, Kanagawa Prefecture to Junya Koizumi, a... Koizumi Junichiro ( Official language Japanese Capital Tokyo Largest City Tokyo Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 60th 377,835 km² 0.8% Population  - Total ( 2004)  - Density Ranked 10th 127,333,002 337/km² GDP  - Total (PPP, 2005)  - Total (nominal)  ... Japan)
  • President Vicente Fox Quesada (born July 2, 1942) is the current president of Mexico. He was elected in the 2000 presidential election, a historically significant election that made him the first president elected from an opposition party since Francisco I. Madero in 1910. His current term runs through 2006, re-election... Vicente Fox Quesada ( The United Mexican States or Mexico ( Spanish: Estados Unidos Mexicanos or México; regarding the use of the variant spelling Méjico, see section The name below) is a country located in North America, bordered to the north by the United States of America, to the southeast by... Mexico)
  • Queen Beatrix is a latin name for Blessed woman . Beatrix may refer to: Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands Asteroid 83 Beatrix Beatrix Potter, childrens author This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred... Beatrix ( Netherlands (disambiguation). The Netherlands ( Dutch: Nederland) is the European part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands ( Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden). The Netherlands is a parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarch, located in northwestern Europe. It borders the North Sea to the north and west, Belgium to the south, and Germany... The Netherlands)
  • Prime Minister Prime Minister of the Netherlands Jan Peter Balkenende (* May 7, 1956) is Prime Minister of The Netherlands since July 22, 2002. Ltr: Silvio Berlusconi, Romano Prodi, António Vitorino and Jan Peter Balkenende. Jan Peter Balkenende (legally Jan Pieter Balkenende) began his career on the staff of the research institute... Jan Peter Balkenende ( Netherlands (disambiguation). The Netherlands ( Dutch: Nederland) is the European part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands ( Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden). The Netherlands is a parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarch, located in northwestern Europe. It borders the North Sea to the north and west, Belgium to the south, and Germany... The Netherlands)
  • Prime Minister This entry is about the New Zealand Prime Minister. For others, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). The Right Honourable Helen Elizabeth Clark (born February 26, 1950) has served as Prime Minister of New Zealand since December 1999. Leader of the New Zealand Labour Party, she formed successive minority coalition governments with... Helen Clark ( For alternative meanings, see New Zealand (disambiguation). New Zealand is a country formed of two major islands and a number of Pacific Ocean. A common Māori name for New Zealand is Aotearoa, popularly translated as Land of the Long White Cloud. New Zealand also maintains responsibility for the... New Zealand)
  • President General Pervez Musharraf (born August 11, 1943, Delhi, India) became de facto ruler (using the title Chief Executive and assuming extensive power) of [[the office of President of Pakistan (becoming Head of State) on June 20, 2001. On May 12, 2000 the Supreme Court of Pakistan ordered Musharraf to hold... Pervez Musharraf ( The Islamic Republic of Pakistan (پاکستان in Urdu), or Pakistan, is a country located in South Asia. Pakistan borders India, Iran, Afghanistan, China and the Arabian Sea. With over 150 million inhabitants it is the sixth most populous country in the world. It also... Pakistan)
  • President Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسين... Yasser Arafat ( The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. The Palestinian... Palestinian Authority)
  • Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005... Mahmoud Abbas ( The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. The Palestinian... Palestinian Authority)
  • President Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin  listen? (Владимир Владимирович Путин in Cyrillic lettering) (born October 7, 1952) has been the President of Russia since December 31, 1999. Term of... Vladimir Putin ( The Russian Federation ( Russian: Росси́йская Федера́ция, transliteration: Rossiyskaya Federatsiya or Rossijskaja Federacija), or Russia (Russian: Росси́я, transliteration: Rossiya or Rossija), is a country that stretches... Russia)
  • This article treats the generic title monarch. For the origins of the word king and its English use, see Germanic king. For other meanings of the word, see Monarch (disambiguation) A monarch is a type of ruler or head of state. The word derives from Greek monos archein, meaning one... King King Fahd of Saudi Arabia King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz (born in Riyadh in 1923) is the king and prime minister of Saudi Arabia and leader of the House of Saud. Fahd suffered a major stroke in 1996 and since has been unable to perform his official duties; his half... Fahd bin Abdul Aziz ( The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a country on the Arabian Peninsula. It borders Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen, with the Persian Gulf to its north-east and the Red Sea to its west. National motto: None Official language Arabic Capital Riyadh King Fahd... Saudi Arabia)
  • Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic Zoran Djindjic, Zoran Ðinđić or in Cyrillic Зоран Ђинђић, (August 1, 1952 – March 12, 2003) was Serbian prime minister, opposition politician and philosopher by profession. Djindjic was born in Bosanski Šamac, a town on... Zoran Djindjic ( Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    - Kosovo and Metohia    - Vojvodina  - Montenegro Official language Serbian 1 Capital Belgrade Area  - Total  - % water 88,361 km² n/a Population  - Total ( 2002) census - without Kosovo  - Density 7.498.001 126.83/km²... Serbia)
  • Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong (Chinese: 吴作栋, Hanyu Pinyin: Wú Zuòdòng; born May 20, 1941), was the second Prime Minister of the Republic of Singapore from November 26, 1990 to August 12, 2004, having had succeeded Lee Kuan Yew.He served a total of 14 years. He is... Goh Chok Tong ( National motto: Majulah Singapura (English: Onward, Singapore) Official languages English, Mandarin Chinese, Malay, Tamil Capital Singapore Largest city Singapore Government President Prime minister Westminster (de jure) Dominant-party (de facto) Sellapan Rama Nathan Lee Hsien Loong Area  - Total  - Water (%) 697.1 km² (131st) 1.444 Population... Singapore)
  • Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong (Hanzi: 李显龙/李顯龍; born February 10, 1952) is the third Prime Minister of Singapore. He also serves as the Minister for Finance. Lee Hsien Loong is the eldest son of Singapores first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew and is married to Ho... Lee Hsien Loong ( National motto: Majulah Singapura (English: Onward, Singapore) Official languages English, Mandarin Chinese, Malay, Tamil Capital Singapore Largest city Singapore Government President Prime minister Westminster (de jure) Dominant-party (de facto) Sellapan Rama Nathan Lee Hsien Loong Area  - Total  - Water (%) 697.1 km² (131st) 1.444 Population... Singapore)
  • President President Thabo Mbeki Thabo Mvuyelwa Mbeki (born June 18, 1942) is the President of the Republic of South Africa. Born in the Transkei region of South Africa, Mbeki is the son of Govan Mbeki (1910 - 2001), a stalwart of the African National Congress (ANC) and the South African Communist Party... Thabo Mbeki ( The Republic of South Africa (pronunciation) is a large republic in Southern Africa. It is located at the southern tip of the continent, and borders Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and Swaziland. The small nation of Lesotho is entirely contained within South African territory. Its economy is the largest and most... South Africa)
  • Prime Minister Göran Persson ( The Kingdom of Sweden ( Swedish: Konungariket Sverige  listen?) is a Nordic country in Scandinavia, in Northern Europe. It is bordered by Norway on the west, Finland on the northeast, the Skagerrak Strait and the Kattegat Strait on the southwest, and the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia on... Sweden)
  • President Joseph Deiss (born January 18, 1946) is an economist and Swiss politician. He is married with three sons. Political Career He was elected to the Swiss Federal Council on March 11, 1999. He is affiliated to the Christian Democratic Peoples Party (CVP/PDC). In office, he heads the following... Joseph Deiss ( The Swiss Confederation or Switzerland is a landlocked federal state in Europe, with neighbours Germany, France, Italy, Austria and Liechtenstein. The country has a strong tradition of political and military neutrality, but also of international co-operation, and is home to many international organisations. Confoederatio Helvetica (CH), the Latin version... Switzerland)
  • President Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch.: 陳水扁, pinyin: Chén Shuǐbiǎn, Wade-Giles: Chen Shui-pien; Taiwanese Church Romanization: Tân Chúi-píⁿ) (born 9th Month, 1950), Taiwanese politician, has been the President of... Chen Shui-bian ( The Republic of China ( Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a multiparty democratic state that is composed of the... Republic of China on For the political entity commonly known as Taiwan, see Republic of China. Map of Taiwan The island of Taiwan (Traditional: 臺灣, Simplified: 台湾, Pinyin: Táiwān, Wade-Giles: Tai-wan, Taiwanese: Tâi-oân) is located off the coast of mainland China in the... Taiwan)
  • This article treats the generic title monarch. For the origins of the word king and its English use, see Germanic king. For other meanings of the word, see Monarch (disambiguation) A monarch is a type of ruler or head of state. The word derives from Greek monos archein, meaning one... Queen Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... Elizabeth II ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom, A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the 16 sovereign states that recognize Queen Elizabeth II as their Queen and head of state. In each state she acts as the monarch of that state and is titled accordingly. For example, in Australia she is known as Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth... et. al.)
  • Prime Minister The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair, commonly called Tony Blair (born 6 May 1953) has served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom since 1997, when he brought the Labour Party into power after 18 consecutive years of Conservative government. As of 6 February 2005, he is the Labour... Tony Blair ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • President Order: 42nd President Vice President: Al Gore Term of office: January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas First ... Bill Clinton ( The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States)
  • President George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and currently the 43rd President of the United States. He is a member of the Bush political family, the son of former President George H.W. Bush, and the brother of Jeb Bush the Governor of Florida. Order: 43rd... George W. Bush ( The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States)
  • Pope John Paul II has reigned since 22 Oct 1978. The Pope is the Catholic bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches (note that the name within the communion is simply the one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church). In addition to... Pope Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. He was elected on October 16, 1978... John Paul II ( The State of the Vatican City ( Latin: Status Civitatis Vaticanæ), is a landlocked enclave surrounded by the city of Rome in Italy, and the smallest independent state in the world (both in area and in population). The Vatican is the home of the Pope, and forms the territory of... Vatican City) (d. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Events January Iraqi police officers hold up their index fingers marked with purple indelible ink, a security measure to prevent double voting. Worldwide aid effort continues to develop in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. January 3... 2005)
  • Pope John Paul II has reigned since 22 Oct 1978. The Pope is the Catholic bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches (note that the name within the communion is simply the one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church). In addition to... Pope His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI, officially in Latin Benedictus XVI, born Joseph Alois Ratzinger (Latin: Iosephus Ratzinger) ( April 16, 1927), was elected Pope of the Roman Catholic Church on April 19, 2005. As such, he is Bishop of Rome, Sovereign of the Vatican City State and head of the Roman... Benedict XVI ( The State of the Vatican City ( Latin: Status Civitatis Vaticanæ), is a landlocked enclave surrounded by the city of Rome in Italy, and the smallest independent state in the world (both in area and in population). The Vatican is the home of the Pope, and forms the territory of... Vatican City)
  • President President Hugo Chávez Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (born July 28, 1954) is the President of Venezuela. A former paratroop lieutenant-colonel who led an unsuccessful coup détat in 1992, he was elected president in 1999. During his presidency, Venezuela has seen sweeping... Hugo Chávez ( The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (Spanish: República Bolivariana de Venezuela)1 is a country in northern South America.2 It borders the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean to the north, Guyana to the east, Brazil to the south, and Colombia to the west. Off the Venezuelan coast are... Venezuela)

State leaders by year: 1999 state leaders - Events of 2000 - 2001 state leaders - State leaders by year See also: List of religious leaders in 2000 List of international organization leaders in 2000 Africa Algeria President - Abdelaziz Bouteflika, President of Algeria (1999-present) Prime Minister - Ahmed Benbitour, Prime Minister of Algeria (1999–2000) Ali... 2000, 2000 state leaders - Events of 2001 - 2002 state leaders - State leaders by year See also: List of religious leaders in 2001 List of international organization leaders in 2001 Africa Algeria President - Abdelaziz Bouteflika, President of Algeria (1999–present) Prime Minister - Ali Benflis, Prime Minister of Algeria (2000–2003... 2001, 2001 state leaders - Events of 2002 - 2003 state leaders - State leaders by year See also: List of religious leaders in 2002 List of international organization leaders in 2002 List of colonial governors in 2002 List of foreign ministers in 2002 Africa Algeria President - Abdelaziz Bouteflika, President of Algeria (1999–... 2002, 2002 state leaders - Events of 2003 - 2004 state leaders - State leaders by year See also: List of religious leaders in 2003 List of international organization leaders in 2003 List of colonial governors in 2003 List of foreign ministers in 2003 Africa Algeria President - Abdelaziz Bouteflika, President of Algeria (1999–... 2003, 2003 state leaders - Events of 2004 - 2005 state leaders - State leaders by year See also: List of religious leaders in 2004 List of international organization leaders in 2004 List of colonial governors in 2004 List of foreign ministers in 2004 List of current national leaders Africa Algeria President - Abdelaziz Bouteflika... 2004, 2004 state leaders - Events of 2005 - 2006 state leaders - State leaders by year See also: List of religious leaders in 2005 List of international organization leaders in 2005 List of colonial governors in 2005 List of foreign ministers in 2005 List of current national leaders Africa Algeria President - Abdelaziz Bouteflika... 2005, 2006...


Entertainers

  • The Killers
  • Kasier Chiefs
  • Bloc Party
  • Gorillaz
  • Ben Affleck Benjamin Geza Affleck (born August 15, American actor. Acting Born in Berkeley, California, he grew up in the Boston, Massachusetts area. He currently lives in Santa Monica, California. He was a child actor, having roles on television series and made-for-television movies when young. He came to... Ben Affleck
  • For other persons named Jack Black, see Jack Black (disambiguation). Jack Black in Shallow Hal Jack Black (born August 28, 1969) is a film and television actor and musician. He was born in Santa Monica, California and attended the University of California, Los Angeles. He also had recurring roles on... Jack Black ( High Fidelity is also the title of a book by Nick Hornby and a film directed by Stephen Frears, based upon Hornbys book. High fidelity (or HiFi or hi-fi) is the reproduction of sound and image that is very faithful to the original. Hi-fi aims to achieve... High Fidelity, Shark Tale movie poster Shark Tale is a computer animated movie produced by DreamWorks SKG and was released on October 1, 2004. It stars the voices of Will Smith, Angelina Jolie, Renée Zellweger and Robert De Niro. The original title for this movie was Sharkslayer. The undersea underworld is... Shark Tale, The School of Rock (2003) is a comedy film starring Jack Black. The film was written specifically for Black by Mike White, and directed by Richard Linklater. Black plays Dewey Finn, a slacker and unsuccessful heavy metal/hard rock singer and guitarist. His antics on-stage get him kicked out... The School of Rock, This article is about a film. For information on continental glaciation, see Ice age. Ice Age is a feature-length computer-animated film created by Blue Sky Studios and released by 20th Century Fox in 2002. It was directed by Carlos Saldanha and Chris Wedge from a story by Michael... Ice Age)
  • Emily playing Violet Baudelaire in Lemony Snickets A Series of Unfortunate Events Emily Browning (born December 7, 1988) is a child actor. She was born in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She has starred in the horror film Darkness Falls. She also appeared alongside Orlando Bloom and Heath Ledger in the... Emily Browning
  • Ellen Lee DeGeneres (born January 26, 1958 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a popular American actress and stand-up comedian. Like many successful stand-up performers, her material was turned into the subject matter for her successful 1990s sitcom, Ellen (initially called These Friends of Mine). The show was hugely... Ellen DeGeneres ( Finding Nemo is a computer-animated movie produced by Pixar for The Walt Disney Company and released on May 30, 2003. Finding Nemo set a record as the highest grossing opening weekend for an animated feature, making $70 million (surpassed in 2004 by Shrek 2). It has now become the... Finding Nemo, The Ellen DeGeneres Show)
  • Johnny Depp John Christopher Depp II, widely known as Johnny Depp (born June 9, 1963 in Owensboro, Kentucky), is an American film actor. He appeared in the TV police drama 21 Jump Street, and in a number of movies where he distinguished himself as a quirky lead actor. He is... Johnny Depp ( Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl is a movie of adventure and romance set in the Caribbean during the seventeenth century. It is based on the Pirates of the Caribbean rides at Disneyland and Walt Disney World. This movie stars Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley... Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, Categories: Movie stubs | 2004 films | Drama films | Best Picture Oscar Nominee | Best Actor Oscar Nominee (film) ... Finding Neverland, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (movie))
  • Eminem is the stage name of Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), one of todays most controversial and popular hip hop musicians. He is perhaps best known for being one of the few successful white rappers in the industry, not to mention one of the most critically... Eminem
  • Ricky Gervais in The Office Ricky Gervais (born June 25, 1961) is a comic writer and performer who grew up in the English town of Reading. Gervais has recently enjoyed success with his award-winning BBC2 television programme The Office, which he co-wrote with Stephen Merchant. As well as... Ricky Gervais
  • This article is about the actor Thomas Jeffrey Hanks. See Thomas Hanks for information about the scientist. Tom Hanks in Forrest Gump. Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American actor famous for playing notable roles in many popular and critically acclaimed movies. He is well known for... Tom Hanks ( The Terminal (2004) is a movie about a man trapped in an airport terminal when he is denied entry into the United States, but cannot return to his country of origin due to a revolution. Directed by Steven Spielberg it features Tom Hanks, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Stanley Tucci and Chi... The Terminal, Castaway is a 1986 movie based on a book of the same name. The book was written by Lucy Irvine in 1984 about her experiences of staying for a year with her husband on an isolated island. The movie was directed by Nicolas Roeg. In 1981, Lucy Irvine from London... Castaway, Poster of the 2002 movie Catch Me If You Can Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. It was directed by Steven Spielberg and adapted by Jeff Nathanson loosely from the book by Frank Abagnale Jr. and Stan Redding. The movie states that... Catch Me If You Can, Lady Killers)
  • Peter Jackson in Wellington (New Zealand) Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961), is a film writer, director and producer born in Pukerua Bay, New Zealand to Bill and Joan Jackson. He first gained attention with his splatstick horror comedies, and came to prominence with his movie Heavenly Creatures, for... Peter Jackson ( Dust jacket of the 1968 UK edition The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy story by J. R. R. Tolkien, a sequel to his earlier work, The Hobbit. For more information on the fictional universe the story takes place in, including lists of characters and locations, see Middle... The Lord of the Rings trilogy)
  • Categories: 1948 births | Cinema actors | American actors | African-American actors | Best Supporting Actor Oscar Nominee | Actor stubs ... Samuel L. Jackson
  • Catherine Zeta-Jones as seen in the 2004 film The Terminal Catherine Zeta_Jones (born September 25, 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress. Born Catherine Jones in Swansea, West Glamorgan, Wales, her last name stems from two different grandmothers; one grandmother is named Catherine, while the other is Zeta... Catherine Zeta Jones
  • Nicole Kidman Nicole (Mary) Kidman (born June 20, 1967) is an Australian actress and singer. Early life Kidman is the daughter of Dr Antony David Kidman, and his wife Janelle Ann (nee Glenny). Her father was a cancer research specialist in Washington, D.C; because of which Nicole was born... Nicole Kidman
  • Brock Lesnar. Brock Edward Lesnar (born on July 12, 1977 in Webster, South Dakota) is a former professional wrestler with World Wrestling Entertainment. He put his WWE career on hold in 2004 to pursue a career in professional football. After failing to make the cut in the NFL, he is... Brock Lesnar
  • Madonna, Re-invention World Tour 2004 Madonna Louise Veronica Ciccone (born August 16, 1958), simply known by the stage name Madonna, is a pop singer considered by many to be the queen of popular music. She has had a long career that has been marked by success and controversy. Biography... Madonna
  • Moby at NASA Rewind, a 2004 rave on Manhattan Island. Moby is an American electronic musician. Mobys real name is Richard Melville Hall (born September 11, 1965 in Harlem, New York City) - he takes his performing name from his relative Herman Melville, author of Moby Dick. Music career Arguably... Moby
  • Keanu Reeves Keanu Charles Reeves (born September 2, 1964) is a Hollywood film actor. Although currently working in the United States, Reeves is a Canadian citizen and an avid ice hockey player/fan who was his High School teams MVP. Born in Beirut, Lebanon, his first name means cool... Keanu Reeves ( This article is about the film The Matrix. For other usages of the term, see Matrix. The Matrix is a film first released in the USA on March 31, 1999, written and directed by the Wachowski brothers (Andy and Larry). It stars Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, and... The Matrix series)
  • Julia Fiona Roberts (born on October 28, 1967 in Smyrna, Georgia, USA) is an Oscar-winning actress. Roberts first caught the attention of moviegoers with her performance in the film Mystic Pizza in 1988. The following year she was featured in Steel Magnolias as a young bride battling diabetes, garnering... Julia Roberts ( For alternate uses see Erin Brockovich (movie) Erin Brockovich-Ellis (born June 1960) is a woman who, despite lack of formal law school education, in 1993 was instrumental in constructing a case against the $30 billion Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E), of California, alleging contamination of drinking... Erin Brockovich, Oceans Eleven is the name of two American crime movies: the original of 1960, and the remake of 2001. The similar Oceans Twelve is a sequel to the remake. Spoiler warning: Plot or ending details follow. Oceans Eleven (1960) The original Oceans Eleven was directed by... Ocean's Eleven, The Perfect Storm is a book (ISBN 039304016X) written by Sebastian Junger and published by Little Brown and Company in 1997. The paperback edition (ISBN 0060977477) followed in 1999 from HarperCollins Perennial imprint. It is about the storm that hit North America in October 1991, and features the crew of... The Perfect Storm)
  • Conan O' Brien
  • Brad Pitt William Bradley Pitt, widely known as Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963), is an American film actor. He was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma and raised in Springfield, Missouri. In high school, Pitt was involved in sports, debating, student government, and school musicals. He dropped out of the University... Brad Pitt
  • Campaigning for John Kerry in 2004 Natalie Portman (born Natalie Hershlag on June 9, 1981) is an Israeli-American actress. Portman is a stage name taken from her grandmothers maiden name. Her ethnic background is Polish-Jewish. She was born in Jerusalem but her family soon relocated to the... Natalie Portman
  • Thom Yorke and Jonny Greenwood Radiohead is a British rock band from Oxford. Their current moniker, Radiohead, was taken from the song Radio Head by Talking Heads, whose album Remain in Light (1980) is a band favorite and major influence on their Kid A (2000). The band consists of Thom... Radiohead
  • Adam Sandler (born September 9, American actor, comedian, producer, and musician who was born in Brooklyn, New York, and raised in Manchester, New Hampshire. In the late 1980s, Sandler portrayed Smitty on The Cosby Show (1985-1989). He also was a writer for the MTV game show Remote Control, on... Adam Sandler
  • M. Night Shyamalan (born Manoj Nelliyattu Shyamalan, on August 6, 1970) is a screen writer and director. He is best known for the movies The Sixth Sense, Unbreakable, Signs, and The Village Hallmarks of Shyamalans films include unexpected plot twists, realistic treatment of horror or science fiction themes, and... M. Night Shyamalan
  • Will Smith For the geologist who invented fossil correlation, see William Smith. Willard Christopher Smith II (born September 25, 1968) is an American actor and rapper. He was born and raised in the Wynnefield section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the second of four children. He often uses the line West Philadelphia... Will Smith ( I, Robot is a science fiction film released on July 16, 2004, loosely based on Isaac Asimovs Robot Series. Specifically, the name comes from the short-story collection I, Robot, although the plot is not directly based on any particular story or group of stories. The film is 105... I, Robot film adaptation)
  • Jon Stewart Jon Stewart (born Jonathan Stuart Leibowitz on November 28, 1962 in Trenton, New Jersey) is an American comedian, actor, author, and producer, best known as host of The Daily Show. Due to the popularity of The Daily Show, Stewart has gained notoriety as the most trusted name in... Jon Stewart
  • Ben Stiller (born November 30, American comedian, actor, and film director. Born in New York City, Stiller is married to actress Christine Taylor. He is the son of Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara, who are both veteran comedians and actors. Stiller is possibly best known for his roles in the... Ben Stiller
  • U2 is an Irish rock band featuring Bono (Paul David Hewson) on vocals and guitar, The Edge (David Howell Evans) on guitar and pianos, vocals, and bass, Adam Clayton on bass and guitar, and Larry Mullen, Jr. on drums. U2 has been one of the most popular rock bands in... U2 (All That You Can't Leave Behind, How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb is the title of a an album by Irish rock music group U2. It was released on November 22, 2004. U2 lead singer Bono has described the album as our first rock and roll record. The album deals with the world at the crossroads... How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb)
  • Bruce Willis (born March 19, 1955 as Walter Bruce Willis) is an American actor. Born at a military base in Idar-Oberstein, Germany, he was raised in Penns Grove, New Jersey and moved to New York to become an actor. He first found fame with his starring role in the... Bruce Willis
  • Green Day is an American punk rock band consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt (born Michael Pritchard), and Tré Cool (born Frank Edwin Wright III). At the age of 12, Tré Cool became a member of the band The Lookouts. Their album attracted some attention, and Tré began performing... Green Day ( American Idiot is Green Days seventh album (not counting the previous release Shenanigans), which was released on September 21, 2004 by Warner Bros. Records. After the release of International Superhits, Green Days greatest hits album, the band was scared and inspired into writing American Idiot. Their writing process... American Idiot)
  • This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. Lindsay Lohan Publicity Still, c. 2004. Lindsay Morgan Lohan (born July 2, 1986, New York, New York) is an American actress and singer. Child actor Lohan began her career as a model for... Lindsay Lohan ( Mean Girls is a 2004 film written by and costarring Tina Fey. It stars Lindsay Lohan and featured several Saturday Night Live cast members, including Tim Meadows, Ana Gasteyer, and Amy Poehler. Its director, Mark Waters, younger brother of writer Daniel Waters, described the movie as Clueless meets Heathers [1... Mean Girls, Freaky Friday is the name of three different movies with similar plots made by the Walt Disney Company where a teenage girl and her mother switch bodies and learn to understand each other better. The second one includes a hockey game and the third one (2003) includes a wedding. The... Freaky Friday(Meh))

Sports figures

  • Lance Armstrong (born September 18, 1971) is an American cyclist from Plano, Texas. He is most famous for recovering from cancer to subsequently win the Tour de France a record six consecutive times -- 1999 to 2004. His success prompted some to nickname the event Tour de Lance. Armstrongs achievements... Lance Armstrong (U.S. A cyclist is a person who engages in cycling whether as a sport or rides a bicycle for recreation or transportation. The words bicyclist or biker are also used although biker is usually taken to mean someone who rides a motorbike. See also Bike trials riding Bicycle touring Challenge riding... cyclist)
  • David Beckham David Robert Joseph Beckham OBE (born May 2, 1975) is an English footballer born in Leytonstone, London. He is a midfielder for Real Madrid and captain of the English national team. He is noted for the quality of his crossing and ability to hit free-kicks and corners... David Beckham (English The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)
  • Bonds at the plate Photo: Agência Brasil Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964 in Riverside, California) is a professional baseball player for the San Francisco Giants; he is most famous for his home run hitting. He holds the record for most homers in a season with 73 and... Barry Bonds (U.S. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • Tom Brady, 2003 Super Bowl MVP. Thomas Edward Brady (born August 3, 1977) is an American football quarterback for the New England Patriots NFL franchise. Born and raised in San Mateo, California, Brady graduated from Junipero Serra High School, the same school that produced baseball slugger Barry Bonds and NFL... Tom Brady (U.S. This article deals with the history and development of the different sports around the world known as Football. For links to specific articles on each type of football, please see the list at the bottom of this article. Football is the name given to a number of different team sports... football player)
  • Kobe Bean Bryant (born August 23, 1978 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a National Basketball Association player for the Los Angeles Lakers; he is also the son of NBA player Joe Jellybean Bryant. Kobe Bryant in an explosive move over Tim Duncan. Bryant spent much of his childhood in Italy, where... Kobe Bryant (U.S. Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. Basketball is highly suited to viewing by spectators, as it is primarily an indoor sport, played in a relatively small playing area, or court, with... basketball player)
  • Vincent Lamar Carter (born January 26, 1977 in Daytona Beach, Florida) is a professional basketball player for the New Jersey Nets of the National Basketball Association. He attended the University of North Carolina for three years. He was then picked fifth overall in the 1998 NBA draft by the Golden... Vince Carter (U.S. Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. Basketball is highly suited to viewing by spectators, as it is primarily an indoor sport, played in a relatively small playing area, or court, with... basketball player)
  • Dale Earnhardt Jr. Dale Earnhardt Jr. (bottom) battles teammate Michael Waltrip at the Chevy Rock and Roll 400 in 2004. Ralph Dale Earnhardt Jr. (born October 10, 1974 in Kannapolis, North Carolina) is the son of NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt. He currently drives the #8 Budweiser Chevrolet Monte Carlo. Earnhardt... Dale Earnhardt Jr. (U.S. Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. Motor racing or motorsport may also mean motorcycle racing. It is one of the worlds most popular spectator sports and perhaps the most thoroughly commercialized. History The Start Auto racing began almost immediately after... racing driver)
  • Brett Lorenzo Favre (born October 10, 1969 in Kiln, Mississippi) has been the starting quarterback for the Green Bay Packers football team in the National Football League since 1992. Favre is considered one of the greatest players in the history of the NFL. Brett Favre Favre played college football at... Brett Favre (U.S. This article deals with the history and development of the different sports around the world known as Football. For links to specific articles on each type of football, please see the list at the bottom of this article. Football is the name given to a number of different team sports... football player)
  • Roger Federer (born August 8, 1981, Basel, Switzerland) is a Swiss professional tennis player who, in 2004, became the worlds top tennis player and the first man since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three (out of four) Grand Slam events in the same year. He is noted widely... Roger Federer (Swiss Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... tennis player)
  • Figo and his wife, the Swedish top-model Helen Svedin Luís Filipe Madeira Caeiro, a.k.a. Luís Figo, November 4, 1972 - in Cova da Piedade - Almada, Portugal, is a Portuguese international footballer, who plays as a midfielder. He won his first senior international cap in 1991; prior... Luis Figo (Portuguese The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)
  • Jeff Gordon Jeff Gordon (top) and Dale Earnhardt Jr. battle for position at the EA Sports 500 in 2004. Jeffrey Michael Gordon (born August 4, 1971 in Vallejo, California), a four-time NASCAR Winston Cup champion, drives the #24 Chevrolet Monte Carlo. His major sponsors include DuPont and Pepsi. Jeff... Jeff Gordon (U.S. Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. Motor racing or motorsport may also mean motorcycle racing. It is one of the worlds most popular spectator sports and perhaps the most thoroughly commercialized. History The Start Auto racing began almost immediately after... racing driver)
  • Dame Tanni Grey-Thompson (b. July 26, 1969, Cardiff) is a British wheelchair athlete, and considered to be the most successful in the country. Affected with spina bifida from birth, Thompson competes in wheelchair events over a wide range of distances, first competing in the 100 m at the Junior... Tanni Grey-Thompson (Welsh Silver 2004 The Paralympic Games are an official equivalent of the Olympics for athletes with physical disabilities. This includes mobility disabilities, amputees, visual disabilities and those with Cerebral Palsy. It is different from the Special Olympics. Sir Ludwig Guttmann organized a sports competition in 1948 which became known as the... paralympian)
  • Tim Henman, OBE (born September 6, 1974 in Oxford, England) is the first British tennis player since Roger Taylor in the 1970s to reach the semi-finals of the Wimbledon Mens Singles Championship, and is regarded by his fans (whose devotion is known as Henmania) as the UKs... Tim Henman (English Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... tennis player)
  • Inzamam-ul-Haq (born 3 March 1970) is a Pakistani cricketer. He is considered to be one of Pakistans best batsmen.He is currently the captain of the Pakistani team.Test Debut: Pakistan v England at Birmingham, 1st Test, 1992. His career highlights are: Becoming the second batsman to... Inzamam-ul-Haq (Pakistani Cricket (disambiguation). Cricket is a team game played between two teams of eleven players each. It originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the countries of the Commonwealth. In the countries of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far... cricket player)
  • Dame Kelly Holmes Dame Kelly Holmes (born: April 19, 1970) is a British middle distance athlete. Regarded as the best female middle distance runner Great Britain has ever produced, she won gold medals in the 800 metres and the 1,500 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics. Early life and... Kelly Holmes (English An athlete is a person possessing above average physical skills (strength, agility, and endurance) and thus seen suitable for physical activities, in particular, contests. An ancient Greek word for contest was athlos, and those competing in the games were called athletes. In more specific settings, an athlete is one who... athlete)
  • Pieter van den Hoogenband Pieter Cornelis Martijn van den Hoogenband (born March 14, 1978) is a Dutch swimmer, and a double Olympic champion. Born in Maastricht to Cees-Rijn van den Hoogenband and Astrid Verver, a former Dutch 800m freestyler silver medalist at the European Championships. Van den Hoogenband grew... Pieter van den Hoogenband (Dutch Swimming is the method by which humans (or other animals) move themselves through water. Swimming is a popular recreational activity, particularly in hot countries and in areas with natural watercourses. Swimming is also a competitive sport. There are many health benefits of swimming, yet basic swimming skills and safety precautions... swimmer)
  • Allen Iverson (born June 7, 1975 in Hampton, Virginia) is an American basketball player. He is an all-star guard for the Philadelphia 76ers. While attending Bethel High School, Iverson was a spectacular all-around athlete who was regarded not only as one of the top basketball players in the... Allen Iverson (U.S. Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. Basketball is highly suited to viewing by spectators, as it is primarily an indoor sport, played in a relatively small playing area, or court, with... basketball player)
  • LeBron James (born December 30, 1984 in Akron, Ohio) is an NBA basketball player for the Cleveland Cavaliers. Born to an unwed mother, James was raised by her and a succession of her boyfriends, many of whom had criminal records. The identity of Jamess father has always been a... LeBron James (U.S. Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. Basketball is highly suited to viewing by spectators, as it is primarily an indoor sport, played in a relatively small playing area, or court, with... basketball player)
  • Derek Jeter singles against the Kansas City Royals He was born in Pequannock, New Jersey and named after Boston Bruins hockey player Derek Sanderson. His father, Charles, is black; his mother, Dorothy, is white. He grew up in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and was reportedly voted most likely to play shortstop for... Derek Jeter (U.S. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • Oliver Kahn (born June 15, 1969 in Karlsruhe, Germany) is a German football goalkeeper. He stars for the German national team (since 1995) and Bayern München (since 1994). He is known as King Kahn for his prowess in the game. Kahn started his career at Karlsruher SC. In 2002... Oliver Kahn (German The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)
  • Nikolai Khabibulin (born January 13, 1973 in Sverdlovsk, USSR, now Russia), nicknamed the Bulin Wall, is a goaltender for the Tampa Bay Lightning. He is considered to be one of the best goalies in the NHL, as evidenced by his three appearances in the NHL All-Star Game. He is... Nikolai Khabibulin (Russian Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. It is known as the fastest team sport in the world, with players on skates capable of going high speeds along with shots of the puck sometimes... ice hockey player)
  • Anna Kournikova Anna Sergeyevna Kournikova (Russian: Анна Сергеевна Курникова, Ánna Sergéyevna Kúrnikova; born June 7, 1981) is a profitable sports personality who achieved fame first as a tennis player... Anna Kournikova (Russian Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... tennis player)
  • Brian Charles Lara (born May 2, 1969) is an outstanding West Indian cricketer. He is a talented left-handed batsman with an exceptional ability to build massive innings. Lara is the world record holder for the highest individual score in both first-class cricket (501 not out for Warwickshire against... Brian Lara (Trinidad & Tobago Cricket (disambiguation). Cricket is a team game played between two teams of eleven players each. It originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the countries of the Commonwealth. In the countries of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far... cricketer)
  • Ray Lewis (born May 15, 1975) is an American football linebacker for the NFLs Baltimore Ravens. He is widely considered one of the most dominant linebackers in the NFL today. Lewis played college football at the University of Miami. In 1996, he was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in... Ray Lewis (U.S. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. It is one of the more physically demanding sports, with a great deal of physical contact occurring on each play, and requiring rare athletic talent. However, it is also a complex game of... American football player)
  • Glenn Donald McGrath (born 9 February 1970) is an Australian cricket player, one of the best fast bowlers in the countrys cricketing history, and a primary contributor to Australias domination of world cricket during the 1990s and into the 2000s. As of December 19, 2004, he has taken... Glenn McGrath (Australian Cricket (disambiguation). Cricket is a team game played between two teams of eleven players each. It originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the countries of the Commonwealth. In the countries of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far... cricketer)
  • Donovan Jamal McNabb (born November 25, 1976 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American football player for the Philadelphia Eagles of the NFL. He attended Syracuse University. College highlights One of the most decorated athletes in Syracuse history, he was a four-year starter at quarterback and a key reserve on... Donovan McNabb (U.S. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. It is one of the more physically demanding sports, with a great deal of physical contact occurring on each play, and requiring rare athletic talent. However, it is also a complex game of... American football player)
  • Juan Pablo Montoya Juan Pablo Montoya (born September 20, 1975) is a Colombian Formula One motor racing driver. Montoya was born in Bogotá where his father, Pablo, worked as an architect and raced karts in his free time. Montoya began racing karts in 1981 at the young age of six... Juan Pablo Montoya (Colombian Formula One, abbreviated to F1 and also known as Grand Prix racing, is the highest class of single-seat open-wheel auto racing. It is a worldwide sport, involving an annual World Drivers Championship and World Constructors Championship, and is the most expensive sport in the world, as annual team... Formula One driver)
  • Randy Moss is considered one of the top NFL receivers. Randy Moss (born February 13, 1977 in Rand, West Virginia) is an American football receiver for the Minnesota Vikings NFL franchise. His nickname is the Freak; he is one of the most versatile all-around players ever to play in... Randy Moss (U.S. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. It is one of the more physically demanding sports, with a great deal of physical contact occurring on each play, and requiring rare athletic talent. However, it is also a complex game of... American football player)
  • Muttiah Muralitharan (born April 17, 1972 in Kandy), also simply referred to as Murali, is a Sri Lankan cricketer specializing in off spin bowling. He has been a member of the Sri Lankan cricket team since 1992 since making his Test debut against Australia at Colombo in the Australian cricket... Muttiah Muralitharan (Sri Lankan Cricket (disambiguation). Cricket is a team game played between two teams of eleven players each. It originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the countries of the Commonwealth. In the countries of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far... cricketer)
  • Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (nicknamed Shaq) was born on March 6, 1972 in Newark, New Jersey. He is one of the most dominant basketball players today and currently plays for the Miami Heat of the National Basketball Association. ONeal was named Shaquille Rashaun (Little Warrior in Arabic) by his... Shaquille O'Neal (U.S. Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. Basketball is highly suited to viewing by spectators, as it is primarily an indoor sport, played in a relatively small playing area, or court, with... basketball player)
  • Categories: Basketball stubs | 1982 births | Basketball players at the 2004 Summer Olympics | NBA players | Charlotte Bobcats players | People from Texas ... Emeka Okafor (U.S. Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. Basketball is highly suited to viewing by spectators, as it is primarily an indoor sport, played in a relatively small playing area, or court, with... basketball player)
  • David Américo Ortiz Arias (born November 18, 1975 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic), better known as David Ortiz, is a Major League Baseball first baseman/designated hitter who plays for the Boston Red Sox (2003-04). Previously, Ortiz played for the Minnesota Twins (1997-2002). He bats and throws... David Ortiz (U.S. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • Michael Phelps (born June 30, 1985 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American swimmer and world-record holder (as of 2004). Michael Phelps appeared at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney as the youngest American male swimmer at an Olympic Games in 68 years at the age of 15. While he... Michael Phelps (U.S. Swimming is the method by which humans (or other animals) move themselves through water. Swimming is a popular recreational activity, particularly in hot countries and in areas with natural watercourses. Swimming is also a competitive sport. There are many health benefits of swimming, yet basic swimming skills and safety precautions... swimmer)
  • Paula Radcliffe Paula Jane Radcliffe (December 17, 1973) is an English long-distance runner and is currently the World Record holder for the womens marathon, which she set during the 2003 London Marathon, with a time of 2:15.25. Background Info Paula Radcliffe was born in Northwich, Cheshire... Paula Radcliffe (English An athlete is a person possessing above average physical skills (strength, agility, and endurance) and thus seen suitable for physical activities, in particular, contests. An ancient Greek word for contest was athlos, and those competing in the games were called athletes. In more specific settings, an athlete is one who... athlete)
  • Roddick at the 2000 US Open Andrew Andy Stephen Roddick, nicknamed A-Rod (born August 30, 1982), is an American tennis player who currently is the best tennis player representing his country (#1 USA) and is also one of the top players in the world (#3 World). Roddick is known... Andy Roddick (U.S. Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... tennis player)
  • Alex Rodriguez taking his position at 3rd base at the beginning of a new inning Alexander Emanuel Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975 in New York City), nicknamed A-Rod, is widely regarded as one of the best players in Major League Baseball today and at a young age is already... Alex Rodriguez (U.S. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • For other footballers named Ronaldo, see Ronaldo (disambiguation). Ronaldo Luiz Nazário de Lima (b.September 22, 1976), simply known as Ronaldo, is a Brazilian footballer who is widely considered to be one of the best strikers of all time. Ronaldo celebrating Ronaldos talent was first spotted as a... Ronaldo (Brazilian The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)
  • Wayne Rooney (born 24 October 1985) is a footballer who currently plays for Manchester United and the England national football team. He wears the number 8 shirt for his club, and is generally given the number 9 for his country. Rooney was brought up in a suburb of eastern Liverpool... Wayne Rooney (English The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)
  • Curtis Montague Schilling (born November 14, 1966 in Anchorage, Alaska) is a right-handed starting pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, acquired in a trade with the Arizona Diamondbacks following the 2003 season. One of the most dominant pitchers in the game today, Schilling won a World Series title in... Curt Schilling (U.S. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • Michael Schumacher (born January 3, 1969) is a German Formula One (F1) driver. He is statistically the most successful F1 driver ever, with the most career victories, and a record seven world driver championships. His nicknames are the red baron and Schumi. As of 2004, he earns an estimated US... Michael Schumacher (German Formula One, abbreviated to F1 and also known as Grand Prix racing, is the highest class of single-seat open-wheel auto racing. It is a worldwide sport, involving an annual World Drivers Championship and World Constructors Championship, and is the most expensive sport in the world, as annual team... Formula One driver)
  • Sammy Sosa at bat in September 2000 at Busch Stadium. Samuel Peralta Sosa, better known as Sammy Sosa (born November 12, 1968 in San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic), is a professional Major League baseball player for the Baltimore Orioles. He formerly has played for the Texas Rangers, Chicago... Sammy Sosa (Dominican A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • Martin St. Louis (born June 18, 1975, in Laval, Quebec) is a professional Ice Hockey Right Wing in the NHL, playing for the Tampa Bay Lightning. Currently he plays for HC Lausanne in Switzerland. A diminutive player by NHL standards at 5 foot 9, the tiny Martin St. Louis has... Martin St. Louis (Canadian Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. It is known as the fastest team sport in the world, with players on skates capable of going high speeds along with shots of the puck sometimes... ice hockey player)
  • Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar (born April 24, 1973) is a living cricket legend and member of the Indian cricket team since 1989. He made his international debut against Pakistan in 1989 at the age of 16. He is widely regarded as one of the best batsmen of all time and possibly... Sachin Tendulkar (Indian Cricket (disambiguation). Cricket is a team game played between two teams of eleven players each. It originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the countries of the Commonwealth. In the countries of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far... cricket player)
  • Ian Thorpe Ian James Thorpe (born October 13, 1982), Australian swimmer, is regarded as one of the greatest middle-distance swimmers of all time after winning the 200 and 400 metre freestyle races at the 2004 Olympics in Athens. He has won five Olympic gold medals, more than any other... Ian Thorpe (Australian Swimming is the method by which humans (or other animals) move themselves through water. Swimming is a popular recreational activity, particularly in hot countries and in areas with natural watercourses. Swimming is also a competitive sport. There are many health benefits of swimming, yet basic swimming skills and safety precautions... swimmer)
  • Venus Willimas. Venus Ebone Starr Williams (born June 17, 1980) is an American tennis champion who was born in Lansing, Michigan. She is the daughter of Richard and Oracene Williams and the sister of another tennis champion, Serena Williams. When the Williams sisters (who are five in total) were young... Venus and Serena Williams in the Round of 16 of the 2005 Australian Open. Serena Jamica Williams (born September 26, 1981) is a professional womens tennis player, who has been ranked number 1 by the Womens Tennis Association (WTA) on many occasions. She is the younger sister of another female... Serena Williams (U.S. Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... tennis players)
  • Jonny Wilkinson (born 25 May 1979 at Frimley in Surrey) is an English rugby union player and current Captain of the England Rugby Union team. He plays his club rugby for the Zurich Premiership side Newcastle Falcons. He plays at fly half, and is particularly known for the accuracy of... Jonny Wilkinson (English A Rugby match in the Stade de France Rugby union is a team sport that was (according to legend) developed from the rules used to play football at Rugby School in England. Two teams, each of 15 players have the task of outscoring the opposing team. Players clutch an ovoid... rugby union player)
  • Tiger Woods giving a driving demonstration aboard the USS George Washington Eldrick (Tiger) Woods (born December 30, 1975, Cypress, California), son of Earl and Kultida Woods, is considered one of the greatest golfers of all time. Woods, who has African-American, Asian, Native American, and Caucasian ancestors, is credited with... Tiger Woods (U.S. This article is about the sport of golf. For other meanings, see Golf (disambiguation). Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. It is defined in the Rules of... golfer)
  • Zinédine Zidane (زين الدين يزيد زيدان), nicknamed Zizou, is a football player for Real Madrid and formerly France. A Muslim of Algerian kabyle Berber ethnic origin, he was born June 23, 1972, in Marseille, France. He... Zinedine Zidane (French The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)

See also

  • Electronic dance music (house, techno, drumnbass) is ubiquitous. The charts are full of manufactured corporate Boy Bands and Girl Groups, notably those produced from reality TV shows. There was a notable return to raw garage rocknroll with groups such as The Strokes, The White Stripes and... 2000s music groups
  • This is a list of albums that are particularly notable or influential. It has been derived by compiling lists published by professional sources. Each album has at least one number following it. See references for the key, which assigns each source a number. All the lists are self-described as... List of rock and roll albums in the 2000s
  • Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s in the world - 2010s 2020s 2030s 2040s 2050s Years: 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 The decade as a whole In the context of Wikipedia, the standard name for the decade 2000... 2000s in India

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