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Encyclopedia > 1st century
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century
Decades: 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s
50s 60s 70s 80s 90s
Categories: Births - Deaths
Establishments - Disestablishments

The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period A millennium (pl. ... In the Gregorian calendar, the 1st millennium is the period of one thousand years that commenced with the year 1 Anno Domini. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... 1 — lions became extinct in Western Europe (see European lion). ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s Years: 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Sometimes the 10s is used as shorthand for the 1910s, the 1810s, or other such... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s Years: 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Sometimes the 20s is used as shorthand for the 1920s, the 1820s, or other such decades... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 Sometimes the 30s is used as shorthand for the 1930s, the 1830s, or other such decades in various... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 10s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 Sometimes the 40s is used as shorthand for the 1940s, the 1840s, or other such decades in various centuries... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 Sometimes the 50s is used as shorthand for the 1950s, the 1850s, or other such decades in various centuries Events... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s - 110s 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 Note: Sometimes the 60s is used as shorthand for the 1960s, the 1860s, or other such decades in various centuries... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s - 110s - 120s 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 Note: Sometimes the 70s is used as shorthand for the 1970s, the 1870s, or other such decades in other centuries... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s - 110s - 120s - 130s 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 Note: Sometimes 80s is used as shorthand for the 1980s, the 1880s, or other such decades in different centuries. ... Note: Sometimes the 90s is used as shorthand for the 1990s, the 1890s, or other such decades in various centuries. ... A century (From the Latin cent, one hundred) is one hundred consecutive years. ... This article is about the year 1. ... Pliny the Younger advances to consulship. ... The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... This article describes the ancient classical period: for the classical period in music (second half of the 18th century): see Classical music era. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


During this period Europe, North Africa and the Near East fell under increasing domination by the Roman Empire, which continued expanding, most notably conquering Britain under the emperor Claudius (43). The reforms introduced by Augustus during his long reign stabilized the empire after the turmoil of the previous century's civil wars. Later in the century the Julio-Claudian Dynasty, which had been foundered by Augustus came to an end with the death of Nero in 68. There followed the famous Year of Four Emperors, a brief period of civil war and instability, which was finally brought to an end by Vespasian, 9th Roman emperor, and founder of the Flavian Dynasty. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Events Aulus Plautius, with 4 legions, landed on Britain. ... For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... Template:Julio-Claudian Dynasty The Julio-Claudian Dynasty refers to the first five Roman Emperors: Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. ... For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nero (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 1st century BCE - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s - 60s - 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Years: 63 64 65 66 67 - 68 - 69 70 71 72 73 Events June 9 - Roman Emperor Nero commits suicide. ... The forced suicide of emperor Nero, in 68 AD, was followed by a brief period of civil war (the first Roman civil war since Antonys death in 31 BC) known as the Year of the four emperors. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... The Flavian dynasty was a series of three Roman Emperors who ruled from 69, the Year of the Four Emperors, to 96, when the last member was assassinated. ...


China was under the Han dynasty (with interruption) during 1st century. It was interrupted by the Xin/Hsin dynasty under Wang Mang for about 15 years before being restored, thereby giving rise to the Western/Former Han and the Eastern/Later Han. The capital was also moved from Changan to Luoyang.

Contents

Christianity

During the reign of Tiberius, Jesus, a religious teacher from Galilee, who Christians believe to be the Son of God, was crucified in Judea. Over the next few decades his followers carried his message far and wide, eventually introducing it to Rome itself. The Roman state began to persecute the new sect almost immediately, and would continue to do so for centuries, sometimes vigorously, and other times passively, until Christianity was eventually taken up by the emperor Constantine, and later established as the official religion of the Roman state. For other persons named Tiberius, see Tiberius (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Galilee (Arabic al-jaleel الجليل, Hebrew hagalil הגליל), meaning circuit, is a large area overlapping with much of the North District of Israel. ... Map of the southern Levant, c. ... A Converted British Family sheltering a Christian Priest from the Persecution of the Druids, an imaginary scene of persecution by druids in ancient Britain painted by William Holman Hunt. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ...


Events

The skeleton called the "Ring Lady" unearthed in Herculaneum. One of the victims of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79
The skeleton called the "Ring Lady" unearthed in Herculaneum. One of the victims of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79

Image File history File links Ring_Lady. ... Image File history File links Ring_Lady. ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ... This article is about the year 79. ... This article is about the year 1. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of species. ... The borders of Western Europe were largely defined by the Cold War. ... The Census of Quirinius refers to the enrollment of the Roman Provinces of Syria and Iudaea for the purpose of taxation taken during the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus when Publius Sulpicius Quirinius was appointed governor of Syria. ... For other uses, see 8 (disambiguation). ... Events Rome Greek geographer Strabo publishes Geography, a work covering the world known to the Romans and Greeks at the time of Emperor Augustus - it is the only such book to survive from the ancient world. ... Wang Mang (王莽, pinyin: Wáng Măng) (45 BC–October 6, 23), courtesy name Jujun (巨君), was a Han Dynasty official who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded Xin (or Hsin) Dynasty (新朝, meaning new dynasty), ruling AD 8–23. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (202 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–190 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication to Cao Wei 220... For other uses, see number 28. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s - 70s - 80s 90s 100s 110s 120s Years: 70 71 72 73 74 - 75 - 76 77 78 79 80 Events Last known cuneiform inscription Accession of Han Zhangdi. ... Emperor Ming of Han, ch. ... A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ... Events The Emperor Tiberius retires to Capri, leaving the praetorian prefect Sejanus in charge of both Rome and the Empire. ... For alternate uses, see Number 36. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the condemned is tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Entombment of Christ by Pieter Lastman The death of Jesus is an event described by the New Testament, as occurring after the Passion of Jesus, as a result of his crucifixion. ... The Masoretes (baalei masorah) were scribes based primarily in at least three places, Tiberias (the best known); Eretz Yisrael, or the land of Israel; and Babylonia. ... Tanakh (‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak) is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Media:Example. ... Pāli is a Middle Indo-Aryan dialect or prakrit. ... For other uses, see Tacitus (disambiguation). ... Sweden in the 12th century before the incorporation of Finland during the 13th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This page deals with the Hindu varnas. ... Map of the Angkor region in Cambodia. ... Tây SÆ¡n Dynasty (1778–1802) Nguyá»…n Dynasty (1802–1945) French Indochina (1887–1954) Empire of Vietnam (1945) North-South Division During The Indochina Wars (1945–1975) Democratic Republic of Vietnam State of Vietnam Republic of Vietnam Republic of South Vietnam Socialist Republic of Vietnam (from 1976) List... Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche, is a highly romanticized portrait of the Goths as cavalrymen. ... Gothiscandza was according to the 6th century Goth scholar Jordanes, the first settlement of the Goths after their migration from Scandinavia (Scandza). ... Areas in the first half of the 3rd century: Wielbark culture (red) , Przeworsk culture (green), a Baltic culture (Aesti?, yellow), DÄ™bczyn culture (pink) and the Roman Empire (purple) Wielbark culture (German: , Polish: , Ukrainian Ukrainian: ) was an archaeological culture identified with the Goths which appeared during the first half of... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Book of Acts, Chapter 15 Council of Jerusalem is a title applied in retrospect to an unnamed meeting described in Acts of the Apostles chapter . ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 18 - Great fire of Rome: A fire began to burn in the merchant area of Rome and soon burned completely out of control while Emperor Nero allegedly played his lyre and sang while watching the blaze from a safe distance, although there is no hard evidence to support this... According to Tacitus, the Great Fire of Rome started on the night of 18 July in the year 64, among the shops clustered around the greenhills shoping centre. ... A Converted British Family sheltering a Christian Priest from the Persecution of the Druids, an imaginary scene of persecution by druids in ancient Britain painted by William Holman Hunt. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... This article is about the year 66. ... This article is about the year 73. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Iudaea Province Commanders Vespasian, Titus Simon Bar-Giora, Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala), Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000? 1,100,000? Casualties Unknown 1,100,000? (majority Jewish civilian casualties) Jewish-Roman wars First War – Kitos War – Bar Kokhba revolt The first... This article is about the year 70. ... Model of Herods Temple - currently in the Israel Museum View from east to west of the model of Herods Temple Herods Temple in Jerusalem was a massive expansion of the Second Temple along with renovations of the entire Temple Mount. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Titus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 79. ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) is an ancient Roman town, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano. ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... After the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, Rabbi Yohanan ben Zakkai relocated to the city of Yavne/Jamnia and founded a school of Jewish law there, becoming a major source for the later Mishna. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Arena is the venetian name for the amphitheatre located in Pula, Croatia. ... ARENA may refer to either: Nationalist Republican Alliance, a political party in El Salvador. ... Boscoreale is a modern comune of Campania in the Parco Nazionale del Vesuvio under the slopes of Mount Vesuvius, known for the fruit and vineyards of Lacryma Christi del Vesuvio. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... “NY” redirects here. ...

Significant persons

Bronze statue of Augustus, Archaeological Museum, Athens.
Bronze statue of Augustus, Archaeological Museum, Athens.
Bust of Caligula.
Bust of Caligula.

Image File history File links Acaugustus. ... Image File history File links Acaugustus. ... Bust of Gaius Caligula in the Louvre, Paris File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Bust of Gaius Caligula in the Louvre, Paris File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Engraved portrait of Apollonius of Tyana. ... Akiba ben Joseph (or Rabbi Akiva, Rebbi Akiva, c. ... The Hermannsdenkmal Arminius (also Armin, 18 BC/17 BC - 21 AD) was a chieftain of the Cherusci who defeated a Roman army in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest. ... Boudica and Her Daughters near Westminster Pier, London, commissioned by Prince Albert and executed by Thomas Thornycroft Boudica (also spelt Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. ... For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (August 31, 12 – January 24, 41), more commonly known by his nickname Caligula, was the third Roman Emperor and a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, ruling from 37 to 41 . ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Pope Clement I, the bishop of Rome from roughly 88-98 AD who is also called Clement of Rome and Clemens Romanus, is considered to be the fourth pope, after Anacletus, according to Catholic tradition. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ... Du Shi (Wade-Giles: Tu Shih, active 1st century AD) was a governmental Prefect of Nanyang in 31 AD and a mechanical engineer of the Eastern Han Dynasty in ancient China. ... Elisha Ben Abuyah (spelled variously, including Elisha ben Avuya) was a Jewish heretic born in Jerusalem sometime before 70. ... Servius Sulpicius Galba (December 24, 3 BC – January 15, 69) was Roman Emperor from June 8, 68 until his death. ... Emperor Guangwu (January 15, 5 BC - March 29, 57), born Liu Xiu, was an emperor of the Chinese Han Dynasty, restorer of the dynasty in AD 25 and thus founder of the Later Han or Eastern Han (the restored Han Dynasty). ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Hillel (הלל) was a famous Jewish religious leader who lived in Jerusalem during the time of King Herod, Augustus, and probably Jesus; he is one of the most important figures in Jewish history, associated with the Mishnah and the Talmud. ... Saint Ignatius of Antioch (also known as Theophorus)(c. ... Saint James the Just (יעקב Holder of the heel; supplanter; Standard Hebrew YaÊ¿aqov, Tiberian Hebrew Yaʿăqōḇ, Greek Iάκωβος), also called James Adelphotheos, James, 1st Bishop of Jerusalem, or James, the Brother of the Lord[1] and sometimes identified with James the Less, (died AD 62) was an important figure... This article is about Jesus the man, using historical methods to reconstruct a biography of his life and times. ... Hebrew נָצְרַת (Natzrat) (Standard) Náẓərat Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Name Meaning Ancient word in Hebrew Government City District North Population 64,800[1] (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ... St. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... Liu Xin (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Wade-Giles: Lin Hsin, d. ... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ... Ma Yuan (Traditional Chinese: 馬援; pinyin: MÇŽ Yuán) was a Chinese chiangchun who served during the Eastern Han Dynasty. ... Emperor Ming of Han, ch. ... For other uses, see Nero (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nerva (disambiguation). ... Emperor Otho. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Philo (20 BC - 50 AD), known also as Philo of Alexandria and as Philo Judaeus And as Yedidia, was a Hellenized Jewish philosopher born in Alexandria, Egypt. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Ecce Homo (Behold the Man!), Antonio Ciseris depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting a scourged Jesus to the people of Jerusalem. ... Bust, traditionally thought to be Seneca, now identified by some as Hesiod. ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius or Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... For other persons named Tiberius, see Tiberius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Titus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... Vitellius, Museo Nazionale della Civiltà Romana, Rome Aulus Vitellius Germanicus (September 24, 15–December 22, 69) was Roman Emperor from April 17 69 to December 22 of the same year, one of the emperors in the Year of the four emperors. He was the son of Lucius Vitellius, who had... Wang Chung (27 – 97 C.E.) (Traditional Chinese: 王充; Simplified Chinese: 王充; pinyin: Wáng Chōng) was a Chinese philosopher during the Han Dynasty who developed a rational, secular, naturalistic, and mechanistic account of the world and of human beings. ... Wang Mang (王莽, pinyin: Wáng Măng) (45 BC–October 6, 23), courtesy name Jujun (巨君), was a Han Dynasty official who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded Xin (or Hsin) Dynasty (新朝, meaning new dynasty), ruling AD 8–23. ...

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

  • Codex, the first form of the modern book, appears in the Roman empire
  • Year 78 — the beginning of the Saka Era used by South Asian calendars.
  • Bookbinding
  • Various inventions by Hero of Alexandria, including the steam turbine (aeolipile), vending machine, water organ, and various other water-powered machines.
  • In 31, the Han Dynasty Chinese engineer and statesman Du Shi (d. 38) from Nanyang invented the first-known hydraulic-powered bellows to heat the blast furnace in smelting cast iron. He used a complex mechanical device that was powered by the rushing current against a waterwheel, a practice that would continue in China.
  • Although Philo of Byzantium described the saqiya chain pump in the early 2nd century BC, the square-pallet chain pump was innovated in China during this century, mentioned first by the philosopher Wang Chong around 80 AD. Wang Chong also accurately described the water cycle in meteorology, and argued against the mainstream 'radiating influence' theory for solar eclipses, the latter of which was accepted by many, including Zhang Heng.
  • The Chinese astronomer Liu Xin (d. 23) documented 1080 different stars, amongst other achievements.

First page of the Codex Argenteus A codex (Latin for block of wood, book; plural codices) is a handwritten book, in general, one produced from Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages. ... For other uses, see number 78. ... Old book binding and cover Bookbinding is the process of physically assembling a book from a number of folded or unfolded sheets of paper or other material. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... A rotor of a modern steam turbine, used in a power plant A steam turbine is a mechanical device that extracts thermal energy from pressurized steam, and converts it into useful mechanical work. ... Cigarette vending machine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events Aelius Sejanus named co-Consul to the Emperor Tiberius Naevius Sutorius Macro becomes the leader of the Praetorian Guard after Sejanus is executed. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (202 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–190 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Taoism, Confucianism Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication to Cao Wei 220... Du Shi (Wade-Giles: Tu Shih, active 1st century AD) was a governmental Prefect of Nanyang in 31 AD and a mechanical engineer of the Eastern Han Dynasty in ancient China. ... For alternate uses, see Number 38. ... Nanyang might be: Nanyang, Henan, (南阳) a city in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Hydraulics is a branch of science and engineering concerned with the use of liquids to perform mechanical tasks. ... A large bellows creates a mushroom cloud at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, California. ... Blast furnace in Sestao, Spain. ... Cast iron usually refers to grey cast iron, but can mean any of a group of iron-based alloys containing more than 2% carbon (alloys with less carbon are carbon steel by definition). ... An overshot water wheel standing 42 feet high powers the Old Mill at Berry College in Rome, Georgia A water wheel (also waterwheel, Norse mill, Persian wheel or noria) is a hydropower system; a system for extracting power from a flow of water. ... Philo of Byzantium, a Greek writer on mechanics, (born about 280 BCE) flourished during the latter half of the 2nd century B.C. (according to some, a century earlier). ... The chain pump is a type of water pump where an endless chain has positioned on it a series of circular discs. ... The chain pump is a type of water pump where an endless chain has positioned on it a series of circular discs. ... Wang Chung (27 – 97 C.E.) (Traditional Chinese: 王充; Simplified Chinese: 王充; pinyin: Wáng Chōng) was a Chinese philosopher during the Han Dynasty who developed a rational, secular, naturalistic, and mechanistic account of the world and of human beings. ... The movement of water around, over, and through the Earth is called the water cycle. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Photo taken during the 1999 eclipse. ... For other uses, see Zhang Heng (disambiguation). ... Liu Xin (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Wade-Giles: Lin Hsin, d. ... Events Rome Greek geographer Strabo publishes Geography, a work covering the world known to the Romans and Greeks at the time of Emperor Augustus - it is the only such book to survive from the ancient world. ...

Decades and Years


 
 

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