FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > 1st Division (Australia)
11th Battalion posing on the Great Pyramid of Giza, 1915.
11th Battalion posing on the Great Pyramid of Giza, 1915.

The 1st Division is the main deployable formation of the Australian Army and contains the majority of the army's regular forces. Its headquarters is in Brisbane. First Division has a secondary role as Deployable Joint Force Headquarters (DJFHQ) a joint formation, commanding units of the RAN and RAAF as well as the army during operational deployment. Download high resolution version (800x783, 235 KB)Group portrait of the Australian 11th (Western Australia) Battalion, 3rd Infantry Brigade, Australian Imperial Force posing on the Great Pyramid of Giza in early 1915, prior to the landing at Gallipoli. ... Download high resolution version (800x783, 235 KB)Group portrait of the Australian 11th (Western Australia) Battalion, 3rd Infantry Brigade, Australian Imperial Force posing on the Great Pyramid of Giza in early 1915, prior to the landing at Gallipoli. ... The Great Pyramid is the oldest and the largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa ( ). The oldest and only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World, it is believed to have been constructed over a 20 year period... The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... This article is about the Australian city. ...


The division was first formed in 1914 as a part of the First Australian Imperial Force. It was part of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli campaign, and has existed in one form or another since. 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The First Australian Imperial Force (1st AIF) was the main expeditionary force of the Australian Army during World War I. It was formed from August 15, 1914, following Britains declaration of war on Germany. ... An ANZAC soldier gives water to a wounded Turk The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (popularly abbreviated as ANZAC) was originally an army corps of Australian and New Zealand troops who fought in World War I at Gallipoli, in the Middle East and on the Western Front. ... Combatants British Empire Australia India Newfoundland New Zealand United Kingdom France Ottoman Empire Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Otto von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Atatürk Strength 5 divisions (initial) 14 divisions (final)[] 6 divisions[] Casualties 284,000[] 251,000[] The Battle of Gallipoli took place at Gallipoli from April 1915 to...

Contents

Current Composition

The 1st Division currently consists of 4 Brigades.

  • 1st Brigade - Mechanised Brigade
  • 3rd Brigade - rapid deployment Infantry brigade
  • 7th Brigade - Motorised Infantry Brigade (Reserve and Regular forces)
  • 11th Brigade

Separate Units

From left to right, a Chinook, Blackhawk and Tiger helicopter The 16th (Aviation) Brigade currently commands most of the Australian Armys aviation units. ...

History

World War I

The Australian 1st Division was formed in August 1914, at the outbreak of the First World War, as part of the Australian Imperial Force. It made the first landing at Anzac Cove as part of the Battle of Gallipoli. In 1916 the division was sent to France where it served on the Western Front for the remainder of the war. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The First Australian Imperial Force (1st AIF) was the main expeditionary force of the Australian Army during World War I. It was formed from August 15, 1914, following Britains declaration of war on Germany. ... Combatants Australia, New Zealand Ottoman Empire Commanders William Birdwood Mustafa Kemal Strength 2 divisions 1 battalion 1 div. ... Combatants British Empire Australia India Newfoundland New Zealand United Kingdom France Ottoman Empire Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Otto von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Atatürk Strength 5 divisions (initial) 14 divisions (final)[] 6 divisions[] Casualties 284,000[] 251,000[] The Battle of Gallipoli took place at Gallipoli from April 1915 to... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ...


World War I composition

1st Brigade (New South Wales
Australian 2nd Brigade (Victoria
3rd Brigade 

1 Brigade is a formation of the Australian Army intended as its primary mechanised unit. ... Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $305,437 (1st)  - Product per capita  $45,153/person (4th) Population (End of March 2006)  - Population  6,817,100 (1st)  - Density  8. ... The 1st Battalion was raised for the First Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... The 4th Battalion was raised for the First Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... Capital Melbourne Government Const. ... The 6th Battalion was raised for the First Australian Imperial Force during the First World War. ... The Australian 3rd Brigade is an infantry brigade. ... Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Peter Beattie (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd)  - Product per capita  $40,170/person (6th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  4,070,400 (3rd)  - Density  2. ... Capital Adelaide Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Marjorie Jackson-Nelson Premier Mike Rann (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 11  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $59,819 (5th)  - Product per capita  $38,838/person (7th) Population (End of September 2006)  - Population  1,558,200 (5th)  - Density  1. ... Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $100,900 (4th)  - Product per capita  $50,355/person (3rd) Population (December 2006)  - Population  2,050,900 (4th)  - Density  0. ... Capital Hobart Government Const. ...

Gallipoli

The Australian 1st Division was raised during the initial formation of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in 1914, shortly after the outbreak of the First World War. The division comprised the first three infantry brigades to be assembled and was commanded by the senior Australian general and head of the AIF, Major-General W.T. Bridges. The First Australian Imperial Force (1st AIF) was the main expeditionary force of the Australian Army during World War I. It was formed from August 15, 1914, following Britains declaration of war on Germany. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Major General Sir William Throsby Bridges (February 18, 1861-May 18, 1915) served with Australian forces during World War I, and was the first Australian to reach the rank of General. ...


As part of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, the 1st Division made the initial landing at Anzac Cove on April 25, 1915 during the Allied invasion of the Gallipoli peninsula. The 3rd Brigade formed the covering force which landed first, about 4.30 am, from battleship tows and destroyers. The 1st and 2nd Brigades followed, landing from transports, and all were ashore by 9 am. The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that was formed in Egypt in 1915 and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. ... Combatants Australia, New Zealand Ottoman Empire Commanders William Birdwood Mustafa Kemal Strength 2 divisions 1 battalion 1 div. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Gallipoli peninsula (Turkish: , Greek: ) is located in Turkish Thrace, the European part of Turkey, with the Aegean Sea to the west and the Dardanelles straits to the east. ... The firepower of a battleship demonstrated by USS Iowa. ... USS Lassen, an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast and maneuverable yet long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet or battle group and defend them against smaller, short-range attackers (originally torpedo boats, later submarines and aircraft). ...


While the landing was lightly opposed on the beach by elements of a Turkish battalion, the Australians were checked short of their objectives by mounting Turkish resistance. Critical fights developed on the left, over the hill known as Baby 700, and on the right on 400 Plateau. The firing line that was established on the first day would largely define the front line of the Anzac battlefield for the remaining eight months of the campaign.


On 15 May 1915 General Bridges was mortally wounded and English officer, Brigadier-General H.B. Walker was given temporary command while a replacement was dispatched from Australia. This was Colonel J.G. Legge, the Australian Chief of the General Staff, who was not an immediately popular choice with either his corps commander, Lieutenant-General William Birdwood, or his subordinate brigade commanders. Legge replaced Walker on 24 June but when the command of the newly formed Australian 2nd Division became vacant, Birdwood took the opportunity to move Legge sideways and restore Walker, who was well regarded as a fighting commander and experienced with the Anzac conditions, to the command of the 1st Division. May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Brigadier General (sometimes known as a one-star general from the United States insignia) is the lowest rank of general officer in some countries, usually ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Lieutenant-General Sir Harold Bridgwood Walker (KCB, KCMG, DSO) (26 April 1862–5 November 1934) was an English general who led Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. ... Colonel (IPA: or ) is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... Lieutenant General James Gordon Legge CB, CMG (15 August 1863 - 18 September 1947) was an Australian Army Lieutenant General who served in World War I. Unlike other generals, he never accepted any Imperial honours. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... William Riddell Birdwood, 1st Baron Birdwood (13 September 1865 - 17 May 1951) was a World War I general who is best known as the commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Battle of Gallipoli in 1915. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... The Australian 2nd Division was formed from reinforcements training in Egypt on July 10, 1915 as part of the Australian Imperial Force to fight in World War I. It fought at France where it was the last Australian division to see combat. ...


The 1st Division's role in the August Offensive was to hold the front line and conduct a diversion on 400 Plateau at Lone Pine on 6 August. The resulting battle was the only occasion when a significant length of the Turkish trench line was captured. On 7 August, the 2nd Brigade made an unsuccessful attempt to capture German Officers' Trench as a preliminary operation to other assaults at Quinn's Post and the Nek. // Combatants British Empire Australia India New Zealand United Kingdom Ottoman Empire Commanders Ian Hamilton Otto von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Strength 4 divisions (initial) 8 divisions (final) Unknown Casualties Suvla: 8,155 Anzac: 12,000+ Total: 20,155+ 12,000 The Battle of Sari Bair, also known as the August Offensive... Combatants Australia Ottoman Empire Commanders Harold Walker Unknown Strength 1 division Unknown Casualties 2,300 6,000 The Battle of Lone Pine, which took place during the Gallipoli campaign, was the only successful Australian attack against the Turkish trenches within the original perimeter of the ANZAC battlefield, and yet it... August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ...


In October General Walker was severely wounded and replaced by the division's artillery commander, Br.-Gen. Talbot Hobbs who in turn fell ill and was replaced on 6 November by the commander of the Australian 1st Light Horse Brigade, Br.-Gen. H.G. Chauvel. The 1st Division was evacuated from the peninsula in December, returning to Egypt, where it was brought back up to strength. On 14 March, Walker, having recovered from his wounds, resumed command of the division, now part of I Anzac Corps. Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ... Sir Joseph John Talbot Hobbs (born London, August 24, 1864, died at sea en route to France April 21, 1938) was an Australian architect. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... General Sir Henry George Harry Chauvel GCMG KCB (April 16, 1865 - March 4, 1945) was a general officer of the First Australian Imperial Force that fought during World War I. He is less well known than a contemporary, General John Monash, because he served in the Middle East theatre and... For the Lebanese political coalition, see March 14 Alliance. ... The I Anzac Corps was an Australian and New Zealand World War I army corps formed in Egypt in February 1916 as part of the reorganization of the Australian Imperial Force following the evacuation of Gallipoli in November 1915. ...


Somme, 1916

When the 1st Division arrived in France in April 1916, it was initially sent to a quiet sector south of Armentières to acclimatize to the Western Front conditions. In mid-July, with the British offensive on the Somme dragging on, I Anzac was sent to join the British Reserve Army of Lt.-Gen. Hubert Gough who intended to use the Australian divisions to take the village of Pozières. General Walker resisted Gough's efforts to throw the 1st Division into battle unprepared, insisting on careful preparation. When the 1st Division did attack, shortly after midnight on 23 July, it succeeded in capturing half of the village but failed to make progress in the neighbouring German trench system. After enduring a heavy German bombardment, far surpassing anything yet experienced by an Australian unit, the 1st Division was withdrawn, having suffered 5,285 casualties, and was replaced by the Australian 2nd Division. Armentières is a commune and a canton of the département of Nord, in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais région, in France. ... For most of World War I, Allied Forces, predominantly those of France and the United Kingdom, were stalled at trenches on the Western Front. ... Combatants British Empire Australia Canada New Zealand Newfoundland South Africa United Kingdom France German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Joseph Joffre Max von Gallwitz Fritz von Below Strength 13 British & 11 French divisions (initial) 51 British and 48 French divisions (final) 10. ... The British Reserve Army was a field army of the British Expeditionary Force during the First World War. ... Sir Hubert de la Poer Gough (August 12, 1870–1963) was a British World War I general who commanded the British Fifth Army from 1916 to 1918. ... The Battle of Pozières was a two week struggle for the French village of Pozières, and the ridge on which it stands, during the middle stages of the 1916 Battle of the Somme. ... July 23 is the 204th day (205th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 161 days remaining. ... The Australian 2nd Division was formed from reinforcements training in Egypt on July 10, 1915 as part of the Australian Imperial Force to fight in World War I. It fought at France where it was the last Australian division to see combat. ...


The division's respite was brief as in mid-August, with its battalions restored to about two-thirds strength, it returned to the line on Pozières ridge, relieving the Australian 4th Division and continuing the painful progress towards Mouquet Farm. On 22 August, having lost another 2,650 men, the division was one more relieved by the 2nd Division. Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... The Australian 4th Division was formed in the First World War during the expansion of the Australian Imperial Force infantry brigades in February 1916. ... Categories: Stub | Battles of the Somme 1916 ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ...


On 5 September, I Anzac was withdrawn from the Somme and sent to Ypres for rest. The division anticipated spending winter quarters in Flanders but was recalled to the Somme for the final stages of the British offensive. This time they joined the British Fourth Army, holding a sector south of Pozières near the village of Flers. The battlefield had been reduced to a slough of mud but the 1st Division was required to mount a number of attacks during the Battle of Le Transloy; all ended in failure which was inevitable in the conditions. September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... Ypres municipality and district in the province West Flanders Ypres (French, pronounced generally used in English1) or Ieper (official name in Dutch, pronounced ) is a Belgian municipality located in the Flemish province of West Flanders. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... Flanders (Dutch: ) has several main meanings: the social, cultural and linguistical, scientific and educational, economical and political community of the Flemings; generally called the Flemish community (others refer to this as the Flemish nation) which is, with over 6 million inhabitants, the majority of all Belgians; the constituent governing institution... The British Fourth Army was a field army of the British Expeditionary Force during the First World War. ... Flers is a french commune near the northern edge of the département of Somme and the région of Picardie. ... The Battle of Le Transloy was the final offensive mounted by the British Fourth Army during the 1916 Battle of the Somme. ...


Hindenburg Line, 1917

Starting on 24 February 1917, the 1st Division took part in the pursuit of the German forces as they retreated to their prepared fortifications in the Hindenburg Line. The division advanced against the German screen towards Bapaume and, on the night of 26 February, the 3rd Brigade captured the villages of Le Barque and Ligny-Thilloy. On the morning of 2 March, they withstood a German attempt to retake the villages. The 1st Division was then withdrawn to rest, joining the 4th Division. I Anzac's pursuit was carried on by the 2nd and 5th divisions. February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The Hindenburg Line was a vast system of defences in Northern France constructed by the Germans during the winter of 1916– 17 during World War I; the Germans called it the Siegfried Line. ... Bapaume is a chief town of canton of northern France, in the département of Pas-de-Calais, arrondissement of Arras. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... The Australian 5th Division was formed in February 1916, during the First World War as part of the expansion of the Australian Imperial Force infantry brigades. ...


By April, the 1st Division (and I Anzac Corps) was once again part of General Gough's Fifth Army (formerly the Reserve Army). On 9 April — the day the British launched the Battle of Arras — the 1st Division captured the last three villages (Hermies, Boursies and Demicourt) used by the Germans as outposts of the Hindenburg Line, thereby bringing the British line in striking distance of the main Hindenburg defences. This action cost the division 649 casualties. For actions during the fighting at Boursies, Captain J.E. Newland and Sergeant J.W. Whittle, both of the 12th Battalion (3rd Brigade), were awarded the Victoria Cross. The British Fifth Army was a field army of the British Expeditionary Force during the First World War. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... The Battle of Arras is the name of a number of battles near the town of Arras in Artois, France: Battle of Arras (1654) Battle of Arras (1917) - British offensive during the First World War. ... John Ernest Newland (VC, MSM) (22 August 1881- 19 March 1948) was an Australian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... John Woods Whittle (VC, DCM) was an Australian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Victoria Cross medal, ribbon, and bar. ...


The 1st Division was in support during the First Battle of Bullecourt which was the Fifth Army's main contribution to the Arras offensive. Once the first attempt on Bullecourt had failed, British attention concentrated on Arras and the Fifth Army's front was stretched thin with the 1st Division having to cover 13,000 yards. Arras (Dutch: ) is a town and commune in northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pas-de-Calais département. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the yard. ...


The Germans, well aware of the vulnerable state of the British defences, launched a counter-stroke on 15 April. The Germans attacked with 23 battalions against four Australian battalions. The German plan was to drive back the advanced posts, destroy supplies and guns and then retire to the Hindenburg defences. However, despite their numerical superiority, the Germans were unable to penetrate the Australian line. The 1st Division's artillery batteries in front of Lagnicourt were overrun and the village was occupied for two hours but counter-attacks from the Australian 9th and 20th Battalions (the latter from the 2nd Division) drove the Germans out. In this action the Australians suffered 1,010 casualties, mainly in the 1st Division, against 2,313 German casualties. Only five artillery guns were damaged. April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ...


On 3 May the Second Battle of Bullecourt commenced with the 1st Division in reserve but it was drawn into the fighting on the second day. The Australians seized a foothold in the Hindenburg Line which over the following days was slowly expanded. The German attempts to drive the British from their gains finally ceased on 17 May and the 1st Division was withdrawn for an extended rest. May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (138th in leap years). ...


Third Battle of Ypres

The 1st Division's artillery was in action from the start of the Third Battle of Ypres on 31 July 1917 but the infantry were not called upon until the second phase of the battle commenced on 20 September with the Battle of Menin Road. Attacking along with ten other divisions, including the Australian 2nd Division on their left, the 1st Division captured Nonne Boschen and Glencourse Woods and gained a foothold in Polygon Wood. The Australian divisions suffered 5,000 casualties from the battle, mainly due to retaliatory shelling from heavy artillery after the advance had completed. Passchendaele village, before and after the Battle of Passchendaele The Battle of Passchendaele, otherwise known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was one of the major battles of World War I, fought by British, ANZAC, and Canadian soldiers against the German army near Ypres (Ieper in Flemish) in West Flanders... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining. ... Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... Combatants British Empire Australia Canada New Zealand United Kingdom France German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Hubert Gough Herbert Plumer Arthur Currie Max von Gallwitz Erich Ludendorff Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties 448,000 killed and wounded 260,000 killed and wounded The 1917 Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third... The Australian 2nd Division was formed from reinforcements training in Egypt on July 10, 1915 as part of the Australian Imperial Force to fight in World War I. It fought at France where it was the last Australian division to see combat. ...


The 1st Division was relieved by the Australian 5th Division before the next assault, the Battle of Polygon Wood (26 September), but in turn took up the advance for the following Battle of Broodseinde (4 October), the third and final of the successful bite-and-hold attacks conceived by General Herbert Plumer of the British Second Army. This battle marked the peak of British success during 3rd Ypres and was the end of the 1st Division's involvement. The Australian 5th Division was formed in February 1916, during the First World War as part of the expansion of the Australian Imperial Force infantry brigades. ... Combatants British Empire Australia Canada New Zealand United Kingdom France German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Hubert Gough Herbert Plumer Arthur Currie Max von Gallwitz Erich Ludendorff Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties 448,000 killed and wounded 260,000 killed and wounded The 1917 Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United Kingdom France Canada Australia New Zealand German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Hubert Gough Herbert Plumer Arthur Currie Max von Gallwitz Erich Ludendorff Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties 448,000 killed and wounded 260,000 killed and wounded The 1917 Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third Battle of... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Herbert Onslow Plumer (1857-1932) was a British colonial official and soldier. ... The British Second Army was extant in both World Wars. ...


Hazebrouck

The Australians wintered in Flanders, engaging in vigorous patrolling and raiding. The 1st Division was still at Messines when the Germans launched their final offensive starting on the Somme with Operation Michael on 21 March 1918. In the first week of April, the 1st Division, along with the 2nd, began moving to the Somme when, on 9 April, the Germans launched Operation Georgette; an attack north and south of Armentières followed by a swift drive towards the vital rail junction of Hazebrouck. Mesen (French: Messines) is a municipality located in the Belgian province of West Flanders. ... Somme is a French département, named after the Somme River, located in the north of France. ... The Spring Offensive (Operation Michael) was a German offensive along the Western Front during the First World War which marked the deepest advance by any side since 1914. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... The Battle of the Lys was part of the 1918 German Operation Georgette offensive in Flanders during the First World War. ... Armentières is a commune and a canton of the département of Nord, in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais région, in France. ... Hazebrouck en Flandre Hazebrouck is a commune of the Nord département, in northern France. ...


The 1st Division, having reached Amiens and about to join up with the Australian Corps, was ordered to turn around and hurry back north. Hazebrouck was reached on 12 April, just in time to relieve the exhausted British divisions. Holding a line five miles east of the town, the 1st Division helped halt the German advance on 13 April and then repulsed a renewed offensive on 17 April after which the Germans abandoned their push, concentrating instead on the high ground west of Messines. Amiens is a city and commune in the north of France, 120 km north of Paris. ... The Australian Corps was a World War I army corps that contained all five Australian infantry divisions serving on the British army in France. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ...


The division remained active in Flanders from May to July, engaging in a process of informal but carefully planned raiding known as Peaceful Penetration. Their greatest success came on 11 July when they took 1,000 yards of front, 120 prisoners and 11 machine guns from the German 13th Reserve Division. This unrelenting pressure had a severe impact on German morale. July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... Morale is a term for the capacity of people to maintain belief in an institution or a goal. ...


Hundred Days, 1918

The 1st Division returned to the Australian Corps on 8 August 1918, the day on which the final British offensive commenced with the Battle of Amiens. The division was sent into action the following day, relieving the 5th Division, but was understandably late due to its rushed preparation. The 1st Division continued the attack for the next three days but progress was slow as the Australians moved beyond their supporting guns and tanks. The Australian Corps was a World War I army corps that contained all five Australian infantry divisions serving on the British army in France. ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... This article or section should be merged with Hundred Days Battle The Hundred Days offensive, as it was subsequently called, was a World War I offensive by Australian, British and Canadian forces that signalled the end of the war, but resulted in massive casualties for the British Expeditionary Force. ... Combatants United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia Germany Commanders Henry Rawlinson Georg von der Marwitz Strength 4 Aus. ...


On 23 August the 1st Division attacked south of the River Somme towards Chuignes with the British 32nd Division on its southern flank attacking Herleville. The Australians suffered 1,000 casualties but took 2,000 German prisoners out of a total of 8,000 captured by both the British Third and Fourth Armies on that day. The 1st also captured a German 14-in naval gun. On 18 September the 1st Division took part in the assault on the Hindenburg "Outpost" Line. August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... Somme river The Somme River (French Rivière Somme) is a river in Picardy, northern France. ... The British 32nd Division was a New Army division that was originally made up of battalions raised by public subscription or private patronage. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ...


The 1st Division was disbanded in 1919 following the secessions of hostilities. The division name assigned to an Australian Citizens Military Forces (reserve) continuing the divisions traditions. Following the federation of Australia in 1901, the six colonial militias were merged to form a national reserve army. ...


World War II

From 1921, the Australian Army's 1st Division was an Citizens Military Forces/Militia (reserve) formation, comprised primarily of infantry units. Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... Following the federation of Australia in 1901, the six colonial militias were merged to form a national reserve army. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ...


The assignment of battalions to brigades and divisions varied considerably within the army during this period. Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ...


The division was based mostly at Parramatta and — for virtually all of its existence — was tasked with defence of the greater Sydney area. After World War II broke out, the division was partly mobilised, although the Militia was barred from overseas service. As a result, many members joined the Second Australian Imperial Force. After the Pacific War began in December 1941, Militia members were prevented from joining the AIF, and were called up for full-time service, in case there were attacks by Japanese land forces against the Australian mainland. Parramatta is a city, suburb and Local Government Area in Sydney, Australia, 25 kilometres west of the central business district (CBD) in Western Sydney. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of over 4. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Second Australian Imperial Force (2nd AIF) was the name given to the volunteer units of the Australian Army in World War II. The 2nd AIF was formed, from 1939 onwards, to fight overseas: most army units were Militia (reserve) units and under Australian law at the time, Militia troops... Combatants China (from 1937) Việt Minh ((from 1941) United States of America (from 1941) United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (from 1941) British India (1941) Commonwealth of Australia (1941) Free France (1941) Philippines (1941) Netherlands (1941) New Zealand (1941) Canada (1941) Soviet Union (from 1945) Peoples... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ...


Present

Commanding officers

1939: Maj. Gen. Robert Jackson
1940-41: Maj. Gen. Albert Fewtrell
1942: Maj. Gen. Francis Derham
1942: Maj. Gen. Cyril Clowes
1943: Maj. Gen. Herbert Lloyd




Australian Army Divisions in World War II
Militia

1st Division | 2nd Division | 3rd Division | 4th Division | 5th Division | 10th Division (Mk I) | 11th Division
12th Division | 2nd Armoured Division | 3rd Armoured Division
Australian Imperial Force
6th Division | 7th Division | 8th Division | 9th Division | 10th Division (Mk II) | 1st Armoured Division This is a list of Australian Army divisions during World War II. Australian 1st Armoured Division Australian 2nd Armoured Division (a. ... Following the federation of Australia in 1901, the six colonial militias were merged to form a national reserve army. ... This article concerns the Australian 3rd Division which has existed as a reserve unit at various times since 1921; for information regarding the World War I unit by the same name, see Australian 3rd Division (World War I). ... The 5th Division was a Militia unit of the Australian Army. ... The Second Australian Imperial Force (2nd AIF) was the name given to the volunteer units of the Australian Army in World War II. The 2nd AIF was formed, from 1939 onwards, to fight overseas: most army units were Militia (reserve) units and under Australian law at the time, Militia troops... The 6th Division of the Australian Army was a unit in the Second Australian Imperial Force (2nd AIF) during World War II. It served in the North African campaign, the Greek campaign and the New Guinea campaign, including the crucial battles of the Kokoda Track, among others. ... December 27, 1943. ... My God, I wish we had [the] 9th Australian Division with us this morning. ...

1. divisjon (Australia)


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m