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Encyclopedia > 1997 Canadian election
(Redirected from 1997 Canadian election)


Politics of Canada


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36th Parliament

In the 1997 Canadian election held on June 2, 1997, Jean Chrétien's Liberal Party of Canada won a second majority government. The Reform Party of Canada replaced the Bloc Québécois as the Official Opposition.


The election closely reflected the pattern that had been set out in the 1993 election. The Liberals swept Ontario, the Bloc took much of Quebec, and much of the west was won by Reform, particularly its Alberta base. The major change was that the NDP and the Progressive Conservative Party all but wiped out the Liberals in the Maritimes. Maritime voters, upset over cuts to employment insurance and other programs, defeated two cabinet ministers. David Dingwall, Minister of Public Works from Nova Scotia, and Doug Young, Minister of National Defence from New Brunswick, both lost to NDP candidates in a major blow to the Liberals.


Because of losses in the Maritimes, the Liberal majority shrunk considerably from the 1993 total. Mostly because of these wins in the Maritimes, Jean Charest's Tories and Alexa McDonough's NDP both regained official party status in the House of Commons. Independent member John Nunziata, who had been expelled from the Liberal Party for opposing the GST, was re-elected in his riding in Toronto.

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Popular Vote map with Bar graphs showing the seats won in the provinces and territories.




Contents

National results

Voter turnout was 67.0%, one of the lowest ever federal election turnouts.



Party Party Leader # of cands Seats Popular Vote
Before After % Change # % Change
Liberal Jean Chrétien 301 174 155 -10.9% 4,994,277 38.46% -2.78%
Reform Preston Manning 227 50 60 +20.0% 2,513,080 19.35% +0.66%
Bloc Québécois Gilles Duceppe 75 50 44 -12.0% 1,385,821 10.67% -2.85%
New Democratic Alexa McDonough 301 9 21 +133.3% 1,434,509 11.05% +4.17%
Progressive Conservative Jean Charest 301 2 20 +900% 2,446,705 18.84% +2.80%
Green Joan Russow 79 0 0 55,583 0.43% +0.18%
Natural Law Neil Paterson 136 0 0 37,085 0.29% +0.00%
Christian Heritage Ron Gray 53 0 0 29,085 0.22% +0.00%
Canadian Action Paul T. Hellyer 58 0 0 17,502 0.13% n.a.
Marxist-Leninist Hardial Bains 65 0 0 11,468 0.09% +0.05%
Independent 71 6 1 34,507 0.46%
No Affiliation 5 0 0 26,252 0.01%
Vacant 4 301  
  1,672 295 12,985,974 100.0
Sources: http://www.elections.ca History of Federal Ridings since 1867 (http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/about/process/house/hfer/hfer.asp?Language=E)


Notes:


"Before" refers to standings in the House of Commons at dissolution, and not to standings at the previous election.


n.a. = not applicable - party was not recognized in previous election


Results by province


Party Name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL NT YK Total
Liberal Seats: 6 2 1 6 101 26 3   4 4 2   155
Popular Vote: 28.8 24.0 24.7 34.3 49.5 36.7 32.9 28.4 44.8 37.9 43.1 22.0 38.5
Reform Seats: 25 24 8 3                 60
Vote: 43.1 54.6 36.0 23.7 19.1 0.3 13.1 9.7 1.5 2.5 11.7 25.3 19.4
Bloc Québécois Seats:           44             44
Vote:           37.9             10.7
New Democratic Seats: 3   5 4     2 6       1 21
Vote: 18.2 5.7 30.9 23.2 10.7 2.0 18.4 30.4 15.1 22.0 20.9 28.9 8.5
Progressive Conservative Seats:       1 1 5 5 5   3     20
Vote: 6.2 14.4 7.8 17.8 18.8 22.2 35.0 30.8 38.3 36.8 16.7 13.9 18.8
Other Seats:         1               1
Vote: 0.6 0.2 0.1 0.3 0.6 0.4   0.4   0.5 7.6 8.9 0.5
Total seats: 34 26 14 14 101 75 10 11 4 7 2 1 301
Parties that won no seats:
Green Vote: 2.0 0.4     0.4 0.1       0.2     0.4
Natural Law Vote: 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.6 0.4 0.1 0.2     0.3
Christian Heritage Vote: 0.4 0.1   0.4 0.4       0.2     1.0 0.2
Canadian Action Vote:     0.3   0.2               0.1
Marxist-Leninist Vote: 0.1     0.2 0.1 0.1             0.1


Source: Elections Canada (http://www.elections.ca/content.asp?section=gen&document=res_table09&dir=rep/dec3097&lang=e&textonly=false)


Notes

  • 1997 was one of only two elections in Canadian history (the other was 1993) where the official Opposition did not have the majority of the opposition's seats. 60 seats for the Reform Party, yet 86 seats for the other opposition parties and independents combined.


Preceded by:
1993 federal election

Canadian federal elections

Followed by:
2000 federal election

External links



  Results from FactBites:
 
Canadian Election Law & Policies (2146 words)
Elections Canada also provides a number of plain English overviews of the laws and policies governing the conduct of federal elections.
The specific limits on candidates' election expenses for the 2006 election vary from riding to riding because they are based on the number of electors in a constituency.
This law was challenged during the 2000 election, by Stephen Harper when he headed up the National Citizens Coalition, on the grounds that the law is an unconstitutional limit on the freedom of expression and of the voters' rights to be fully informed of all points of view.
Canadian federal election, 1997 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (615 words)
The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the 36th Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons.
When the election was called, many commentators noted that it ended the second shortest majority mandate in Canadian history; only Wilfrid Laurier's term of office from 1908-1911 was shorter.
1997 was one of only two elections in Canadian history (the other was 1993) where the official Opposition did not have the majority of the opposition's seats.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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