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Encyclopedia > 1992 Los Angeles Riots

The 1992 Los Angeles riots, also known as the Rodney King uprising or the Rodney King riots, were sparked on April 29, 1992 when a predominately white jury acquitted four police officers accused in the videotaped beating of black motorist Rodney King when he resisted arrest following a high-speed car chase. Thousands of blacks in the Los Angeles area joined in what is known as a race riot involving acts of law-breaking including looting, assault, arson and murder. In all, 53 people died during the riots.[1] In the Korean American community, the riots are known as Sa-I-Gu (사이구), Korean for "4/29," or April 29.[2] Los Angeles riot may refer to 1992 Los Angeles riots Watts Riots of 1965 Zoot Suit Riots during World War II Category: ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ... Resisting arrest is a term used in the United States (and possibly elsewhere) to describe a criminal charge against an individual who has committed at least any one of the following acts: Eluding a police officer who is attempting to arrest the individual Using or threatening to use force against... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... A race riot or racial riot is an outbreak of violent civil unrest in which race is a key factor. ... Looting (which derives via the Hindi lut from Sanskrit lung, to rob), sacking, plundering, or pillaging is the indiscriminate taking of goods by force as part of a military or political victory, or during a catastrophe or riot, such as during war,[1] natural disaster,[2] or rioting. ... The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ... A Korean American is a person of Korean ancestry who was either born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ...

Contents

Underlying causes

In addition to the immediate trigger of the Rodney King verdict, many other factors were cited as reasons for the unrest, including the extremely high unemployment among residents of South Central Los Angeles, which had been hit very hard by the nation-wide recession; a long-standing perception that the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) engaged in racial profiling and used excessive force, supported by the Christopher Commission, an investigation led by Warren Christopher (who two years later would become Secretary of State under then president Bill Clinton); and specific anger over the sentence given to a Korean American shop-owner for the killing of Latasha Harlins, an African American girl. Additionally, in the time between the public revelation of King's beating and the trial verdict, the two largest L.A. street gangs, the Bloods and the Crips, agreed to a truce with each other, and began working together to make political demands of the police and the L.A. political establishment. Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ... South Los Angeles is the official name for a large geographic and cultural area lying to the south and southeast of downtown Los Angeles, California. ... The recession of the late nineteen-eighties was an economic recession that hit much of the world beginning in 1987. ... “LAPD” redirects here. ... Racial profiling, also known as ethnic profiling, is the inclusion of racial or ethnic characteristics in determining whether a person is considered likely to commit a particular type of crime (see Offender Profiling). ... The Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police Department, informally known as the Christopher Commission, was formed in July 1991, in the wake of the Rodney King beating, by then-mayor of Los Angeles Tom Bradley. ... Warren Minor Christopher (born October 27, 1925) is an American diplomat and lawyer. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... A Korean American is a person of Korean ancestry who was either born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Latasha Harlins (1976-1991) was an African-American teenager shot and killed by Soon Ja Du, a Korean-American liquor store worker. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For other uses, see Gang (disambiguation). ... The Bloods are one of the Los Angeles, California street gangs. ... The blue bandanas worn by most Crip gangs. ...


Rodney King arrest and LAPD Officers' trial

On March 3, 1991, Rodney King, on parole from prison on a robbery conviction, led police on a high-speed pursuit, refusing to pull over in response to the red lights and sirens behind him. Finally, after driving through several red lights and boulevard stops, he pulled over in the Lake View Terrace district. The Los Angeles police were assisted by other law enforcement. King, who had a record of drunk driving and was believed to be under the influence of PCP by the officers on scene, resisted arrest and was tasered, tackled, and struck with batons by three LAPD officers. In a later interview, King said that, being on parole, he feared apprehension and being returned to prison for parole violations. is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ... Lake View Terrace is a suburb district in the north east quadrant of the San Fernando Valley region of the City of Los Angeles, California. ... “LAPD” redirects here. ... “Angel Dust” redirects here. ... An electroshock gun, also referred to as a stun gun, is a weapon used for subduing a person by firing something which administers electric shock, disrupting superficial muscle functions. ...


The incident, minus the first few minutes, was captured on video by a private citizen, George Holliday, from his apartment that was in the vicinity, and it became an international media sensation and a touch point for activists in Los Angeles and around the United States.


Eventually the Los Angeles district attorney charged the four with the use of excessive force in the beating. Due to the media coverage of the beating, the trial received a change of venue to a newly constructed courthouse in predominantly white Simi Valley, in neighboring Ventura County. No Simi Valley residents served on the jury, which had been empanelled in Los Angeles County; the jury was, however, drawn from the nearby San Fernando Valley, a predominantly white and Hispanic area. The prosecutor who failed to obtain convictions for three of the officers in this case, Terry White, was black.[3] [4] On April 29, 1992, three of the officers were acquitted by a jury of ten whites, one Latino, and an Asian. The jury could not agree on a verdict for one of the counts on one of the officers. The acquittal was based in part on a 13-second segment of the video tape that was edited out by television news stations in their broadcast. It was not previously seen by the public. Those first 13 seconds of videotape are very blurry. It shows Rodney King getting up off the ground and charging in the general direction of one of the police officers, Ofc. Laurence Powell. Prior to that, the testimony of the officers indicated that they tried to physically restrain King but, according to the officers, King was able to physically throw them off himself. That alleged incident was not caught on tape.[5] Based on this testimony and the previously unseen segment of the videotape, the officers were acquitted on almost all charges. The general public was largely unaware of the testimony and the unedited videotape footage. A change of venue is the legal term for moving a trial to a new location. ... Simi Valley is an incorporated city located in the extreme southeast corner of Ventura County, California, bordering the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles in the Greater Los Angeles Area. ... Ventura County . ... San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... // The term Latino is a linguistic identity that refers to an individual that has significant ancestry from a nation-state where a Latin derived language is spoken or is the offical language of the government. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In criminal law, an acquittal is the legal result of a verdict of not guilty, or some similar end of the proceeding that terminates it with prejudice without a verdict of guilty being entered against the accused. ...


The Riot

The riots, beginning in the evening after the verdict, peaked in intensity over the next two days, but would ultimately continue for several days. Continuous television coverage, especially by helicopter news crews, riveted the country and shocked viewers around the world. People watched as parts of the city went up in flames, stores were openly looted, innocent bystanders were beaten, and rioters shot at police. A curfew and deployment of California National Guard troops began to control the situation; eventually federal troops from the 7th Infantry Division in Fort Ord and United States Marines from the 1st Marine Division in Camp Pendleton would be sent to the city to quell disorder. The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... This article describes the government of the United States. ... The 7th Infantry Division (Light), nicknamed Lightfighters and sometimes referred to as the The Bayonet Division is a reserve combat division of the United States Army currently made up of National Guard units. ... Fort Ord Fort Ord Fort Ord was a U.S. Army post on Monterey Bay in California. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... The 1st Marine Division is the oldest, largest (active duty), and most decorated division-sized unit in the United States Marine Corps representing a combat-ready force of more than 19,000 men and women. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton is near Oceanside, California. ...


Estimates of the number of lives lost during the unrest vary between 50 and 60, with as many as 2,000 people injured. Estimates of the material damage done vary between about $800 million and $1 billion. Approximately 3,600 fires were set, destroying 1,100 buildings, with fire calls coming once every minute at some points. About 10,000 people were arrested. Stores owned by Korean and other Asian immigrants were widely targeted, although stores owned by whites and blacks were also targeted. Despite the race riot image the event retains, much of the looting and violence was done by young men, both black and Hispanic, and much of the looting was opportunistic theft of luxury goods. Criminals used the chaos to their own benefit, and street gangs settled scores with each other and fought the police. An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... A race riot or racial riot is an outbreak of violent civil unrest in which race is a key factor. ... Look up Luxury in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


First day (Wednesday, April 29)

The acquittals of the LAPD officers came at 3:15 p.m. local time. By 3:45, a generally peaceful crowd of more than 300 persons had appeared at the Los Angeles County Courthouse, most protesting the verdict passed down a few minutes before. Between 5 and 6 p.m., a group of two dozen officers, commanded by LAPD Lt. Micheal Moulin, confronted a growing crowd at the intersection of Florence and Normandie. Outnumbered, these officers retreated instead of taking control of the situation. [6] A new group of protesters appeared at Parker Center, the LAPD's headquarters, by about 6:30 p.m., and 15 minutes later, one of the most infamous images of the riots appeared at the intersection of Florence and Normandie, the intersection earlier abandoned by police. Parker Center Parker Center is the headquarters for the Los Angeles Police Department, and is located in Downtown LA. It is named for former LAPD chief William H. Parker. ...


Reginald Denny beating

At approximately 6:45 p.m., Reginald Denny, a white truck driver stopped at a traffic light at the intersection of Florence and South Normandie Avenues, was dragged from his vehicle and severely beaten by a mob of black local residents as news helicopters hovered above, recording every blow, including a concrete fragment connecting with Denny's temple and a cinder block thrown at his head as he lay unconscious in the street. The police never appeared, having been ordered to withdraw for their own safety, although several assailants were later arrested and one sent to prison. Instead, Denny was rescued, not by police officers, but by unarmed civilian black neighbors who, seeing the assault live on television, rushed to the scene. Denny would recover after brain surgery. Although several Asian and Latino motorists were brutally beaten by the same mob, due to the live coverage he remains the best-known victim of the riots. Damian Williams dances over Denny Reginald Oliver Denny (born April 21, 1953 in San Pedro, California) is a white construction truck driver who was dragged from his truck and nearly beaten to death by black rioters during the 1992 Los Angeles riots. ...


Fidel Lopez beating

At the same intersection, just minutes after Denny was rescued, another beating was captured on video tape. Fidel Lopez, a self-employed construction worker and Guatemalan immigrant, was ripped from his truck and robbed of nearly $2,000. A rioter smashed his forehead open with a car stereo as another rioter attempted to slice his ear off. After Lopez blacked out, the crowd spray painted his chest, torso and genitals black. Lopez survived the attack, after extensive surgery to reattach his partially severed ear and months of recovery.


The riots continue

Arsonists struck in that neighborhood and others, taking out their anger on several unguarded businesses. LAFD's first fire call relating to the riots came at about 7:45 p.m. Looters threw bricks to smash windows and Molotov cocktails to start fires. Cars were torched to block intersections; others were carjacked and their drivers beaten. Rescue personnel were shot at. By dark, stores were being openly looted and fires burned unabated as fire officials refused to send firemen into personal danger. The LAPD ordered all officers to report for duty, and many deployed in riot gear, but they were unseen in broad sections of the city. Between 6:00 and 8:00 p.m., rioting focused in South Central Los Angeles began, and between 7:00 and 9:00 p.m., rioting began in Inglewood. Molotov cocktail is the generic name for a variety of crude incendiary weapons. ... A Canadian firefighter A firefighter or fireman is trained and equipped to extinguish fires. ... Nickname: Location of Inglewood in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Established 1888 Incorporated February 14, 1908 Government  - Mayor Roosevelt F. Dorn Area  - City  9. ...


By 9:00 p.m., the protest at Parker Center had turned violent as rioters threw rocks and damaged some downtown buildings and windows. Also by this time, the situation in affected areas had deteriorated enough that bus service was suspended on some lines, and the flight paths of incoming jets to Los Angeles International Airport were modified because of shots fired at a police helicopter. Parker Center Parker Center is the headquarters for the Los Angeles Police Department, and is located in Downtown LA. It is named for former LAPD chief William H. Parker. ... Runway layout at LAX “LAX” redirects here. ...


Police chief Daryl Gates, long criticized for the perceived racism and corruption in the department, later drew sharp rebuke for attending a political fundraiser that evening. Long-established LAPD tactics and procedures held that the opening hours of a riot were critical, and that a full-force response was required. The LAPD did not respond quickly and decisively in the opening hours, however, and suffered persistent criticism as a result during and following the riots. Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley called for a state of emergency at 8:45 p.m., prompting Governor Pete Wilson to activate 2,000 members of the National Guard. Daryl F. Gates was the Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) from 1978 until 1992. ... Racism is the prejudice that members of one race are intrinsically superior or inferior to members of other races. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Fundraising. ... ... Thomas J. Tom Bradley (December 29, 1917 – September 29, 1998) was the mayor of Los Angeles, California from 1973 to 1993 (five terms) and only the second African American mayor of a major U.S. city. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... For others named Pete Wilson, see Peter Wilson. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ...


Second day (Thursday, April 30)

By the second day the violence appeared widespread and unchecked. The Korean American community, which perceived the first day's events as an abandonment of Koreatown, swiftly organized a self-defense squad composed of veteran Marines and workers, who entered the fray. Open gun battles were televised as Korean shopkeepers and the self-defense group took to using firearms to protect their businesses from crowds of looters. (One of the volunteers, 18-year-old Edward Lee, would die in crossfire that evening.)[7] Organized law-enforcement response began to come together by mid-day. Fire crews began to respond backed by police escort; California Highway Patrol reinforcements were airlifted to the city; and Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley declared a state of emergency and announced a dusk-to-dawn curfew. President Bush spoke out against the rioting, stating that "anarchy" would not be tolerated. The California National Guard, which had been advised not to expect civil disturbance, responded quickly by calling up some 2,000 soldiers, but could not get them to the city until nearly 24 hours had passed due to a lack of proper equipment. Initially, they would only secure areas previously cleared of rioters by police. Later, they would actively provide firepower for law enforcement. The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The California Highway Patrol (CHP) is a state agency that acts as the state police force of California. ... A food-drop, in logistics, is the act of transporting people or cargo from point to point using aircraft. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ...


The Los Angeles Times reported that several of the King jurors had fled their homes and that Rodney King had been placed under psychiatric care. This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ...


Third day (Friday, May 1)

The third day was punctuated by live footage of a shaken Rodney King asking, "Can we all get along?"[8][9] That morning, at 1:00 a.m., California Governor Pete Wilson had requested federal assistance, but it would not be ready until Saturday. State guard units (doubled to 4,000 troops), continued to move into the city in Humvees. Additionally, a varied contingent of 1,700 federal law-enforcement officers from different agencies began to arrive, to protect federal facilities and assist local police. As darkness fell, the main riot area was further hit by a power cut. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (left) and Governor Gray Davis (right) with President George W. Bush in 2003 The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, and ensuring that... For others named Pete Wilson, see Peter Wilson. ... The word federal in a general sense refers to the nature of an agreement between or among two or more states, nations, or other groups to merge into a union in which control of common affairs is held by a central authority created by and with the consent of the... This article refers to the Military HMMWV, not the civilian Hummer sold by General Motors The M998 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV or Humvee) is a military 4WD motor vehicle created by AM General. ... A power outage is the loss of the electricity supply to an area. ...


Friday evening, President Bush spoke to the nation, denouncing "random terror and lawlessness", summarizing his discussions with Mayor Bradley and Governor Wilson, and outlining the federal assistance he was making available to local authorities. Citing the "urgent need to restore order", he warned that the "brutality of a mob" would not be tolerated, and he would "use whatever force is necessary". He then turned to the Rodney King case and a more moderate tone, describing talking to his own grandchildren and pointing to the reaction of "good and decent policemen" as well as civil rights leaders. He said he had already directed the Justice Department to begin its own investigation, saying that "grand jury action is underway today" and that justice would prevail.[10]


By this point, many entertainment and sports events were postponed or canceled. The Los Angeles Lakers hosted the Portland Trail Blazers in a basketball playoff game on the night the rioting started, but the following game was postponed until Sunday and moved to Las Vegas. The Los Angeles Clippers moved a playoff game against the Utah Jazz to nearby Anaheim. In baseball, the Los Angeles Dodgers postponed games for four straight days from Thursday to Sunday; all were made up as part of doubleheaders in July. The Hollywood Park Racetrack and Los Alamitos horse racing tracks were also shut down. L.A. Fiesta Broadway, a major event in the Latino community, was not held in the first weekend in May as scheduled. Residents of the neighborhood had to leave their homes after soaking their roofs with water to prevent ashes from settling and igniting a fire. The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... The Portland Trail Blazers are a professional basketball team based in Portland, Oregon. ... Vegas redirects here. ... “Clippers” redirects here. ... The Utah Jazz is a professional basketball team based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Location of Anaheim within Orange County, California Coordinates: , Country United States State California County Orange Government  - Mayor Curt Pringle Area  - City  50. ... This article is about the sport. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... Hollywood Park is a thoroughbred racecourse located in Inglewood, California, about 3 miles (5 km) from Los Angeles International Airport and next door to the Great Western Forum. ... Location of Los Alamitos within Orange County, California. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ...


Fourth day (Saturday, May 2)

On the fourth day, 4,000 Soldiers and Marines arrived from Fort Ord and Camp Pendleton to suppress the crowds and restore order. Calm began to appear as the Army and Marines arrived with Abrams tanks and Armored Personnel Carriers. With most of the violence under control, 30,000 people attended a peace rally. By the end of the day a sense of normalcy began to return. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Fort Ord Fort Ord Fort Ord was a U.S. Army post on Monterey Bay in California. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton is near Oceanside, California. ... The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army and the United States Marine Corps, with three main versions being deployed starting in 1980: the M1, M1A1, and M1A2. ... Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are armoured fighting vehicles developed to transport infantry on the battlefield. ...


Whether in response to the riots, or simply to the verdict, on May 2 the Justice Department announced it would begin a federal investigation of the Rodney King beating. The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ...


Fifth day (Sunday, May 3)

Overall quiet set in and Mayor Bradley assured the public that the crisis was pretty much under control.[11] However, in an isolated incident, a motorist was shot in an evening encounter with National Guardsmen.


Sixth day (Monday, May 4)

Although Mayor Bradley lifted the curfew, signaling the official end of the riots, sporadic violence and crime continued for a few days afterward. Schools, banks, and businesses reopened. Federal troops would not stand down until May 9; the state guard remained until May 14; and some soldiers remained as late as May 27.


The best documented count of the dead may be the April 24, 2002 LA Weekly article, "The L.A. 53", by Jim Crogan. Using coroner's reports, police records and interviews, he documented 53 people and how they died. L.A. Weekly is a free weekly tabloid-sized newspaper (a so-called alternative weekly) in Los Angeles, California. ...

Gunfire killed 35, including eight people shot by law enforcement and two by National Guardsmen. Six died in arson fires. Attackers used sticks or boards to kill two others. Stabbings killed two. Six died in car accidents; two in hit-and-runs. One was strangled.


The violence crossed racial and ethnic lines. The dead included 25 African-Americans, 16 Latinos, eight Caucasians, two Asians, one Algerian, and one Indian or Middle Easterner. Men outnumbered women, 48 to 5. [1]

Aftermath

After the riots, pressure mounted for a retrial of the officers, and federal charges of civil rights violations were brought against the officers. Near the first anniversary of the acquittal, the city tensely awaited the decision of the federal jury; seven days of deliberations raised speculative fear of an incendiary outcome in the event of a not guilty verdict. Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ...


Precautionary measures were taken by the government and media. The decision was read in an atypical 7:00 a.m. Saturday court session on April 17, 1993. Two officers--Officer Laurence Powell and Sergeant Stacey Koon were found guilty and the other two were acquitted. Mindful of accusations of sensationalist reporting following the first jury decision, media outlets opted for more sober coverage which included calmer on-the-street interviews.[12] Police were fully mobilized with officers on 12-hour shifts, convoy patrols, scout helicopters, street barricades, tactical command centers, and support from the National Guard and Marines.[13][14] No violence broke out. is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Laurence Michael Powell (b. ... Stacey C. Koon was a Sergeant with the Los Angeles Police Department. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ...


The four officers have since quit or have been fired from the LAPD. Officer Theodore Briseno left the LAPD after being acquitted on federal charges. Officer Timothy Wind, who was also tried twice and acquitted twice, was fired after Willie L. Williams became Chief of Police. Chief Williams himself did not have his contract renewed by the Los Angeles Police Commission, who said Williams had failed his primary task of remaking the city's police force in the aftermath of the Rodney King beating.[15] Willie L. Williams served as LAPD police chief 1992-1997. ...


Officer Laurence Powell has been attending school since his release from prison. Sergeant Koon has been getting on with his life.


Rodney King, meanwhile, has been arrested at least eleven times on a variety of charges.[9]


The riots in popular culture

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

Music

  • Body Count released, a month before the riots, the notorious song Cop Killer, which was thought of as a precursor to the rioting.
  • Ice Cube's song "We Had To Tear This Motherfucka Up" was written as a statement on the verdict and expressed sentiments similar to those of the rioters. Most of his 1992 release, The Predator, was in some way evocative of the riots and King. Ice Cube's song "Black Korea" on his 1991 album Death Certificate characterizes South Korean store owners as racist through the eyes of a young black man. The song reflected the tensions between Korean Americans and African Americans following the Latasha Harlins shooting. A year later, during the riots, Koreans and Korean-owned stores were a major target of rioters. In 1994, Ice Cube reunited with Dr. Dre to record the single Natural Born Killaz, in which Ice Cube makes reference to the Reginald Denny beating.
  • Sublime's song entitled "April 29, 1992 (Miami)" is based on accounts of the riots.
  • Tupac Shakur's song 'Souljas Story' mentions Rodney King: "They finally pull me over and I laugh. 'Remember Rodney King?' and I blast on his punk ass"
  • Dr. Dre's song The Day Tha Niggaz Took Over references the riots. Snoop Dogg and RBX also feature on the song, portraying their emotions as the riots started.
  • Ministry's (in their industrial metal phase) music video for the song N.W.O. features a scene in which a woman representing the Statue of Liberty is beat down in a similar fashion to the Rodney King beating. Also featured in the video are snippets from various riots including the L.A. Riots.
  • The title song on Porno for Pyros' self-titled debut album was inspired by the riots.
  • Downset song "Anger" from their self-titled debut album was inspired by the riots. The cover of the album also featured an image of South Central Los Angeles burning.
  • Ben Harper's song "Like a King" plays on the fact that Rodney King shares the last name of civil rights leader Martin Luther King.
  • On his 1995 release, Rapture, Peter Mulvey's song "Smell the Future" repeatedly refers to the 1992 riots.
  • In the song California Love, Tupac Shakur rapped the lyrics "only in Cali where we riot not rally to live and die", referencing both the 1965 and 1992 riots in Los Angeles.
  • Rage Against the Machine's second studio album, Evil Empire, features Down Rodeo, a song about the LA Riots. Additionally, their third studio album was entitled The Battle of Los Angeles.
  • Billy Idol's song, "Shock to the System" contains many references to the riots.
  • Bad Religion's songs "Recipe For Hate" and "Don't Pray on Me" (both off the album Recipe For Hate) were influenced by the riots
  • Tori Amos's clip for the song "1000 Oceans" recreated scenes from the L.A. riots. The film-clip was shot in L.A. and featured local actors who had lived through the riots.
  • Rancid's song "I Wanna Riot" is based on the events.
  • The Californian African American all-female group En Vogue released their anti-prejudice song "Free Your Mind" the same year after the riots. It was a Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 hit for them.
  • The Machine Head album Burn My Eyes (1994) contains the song "Real Eyes, Realize, Real Lies", which features sampled commentary from news reports and interviews surrounding the riots
  • The Offspring's song "L.A.P.D." off the album "Ignition" is all about the Rodney King incident.
  • Slayer and Ice-T collaborated on the song "Disorder", which appeared on the "Judgment Night" movie soundtrack. The song was a medley of 3 songs by the UK punk rock band The Exploited. The song "UK '82" (which dealt with police brutality) was renamed "LA '92".
  • Aerosmith's song "Livin' on the Edge" from their 1993 album Get a Grip was inspired by the riots.
  • Black Label Society's music video for the song "Fire it Up" off of their 2005 release Mafia used extensive riot footage, much of which was from the '92 L.A. incidents.
  • The Boo Radleys' 1993 album "Giant Steps" contains a song entitled "Rodney King (Song for Lenny Bruce)"
  • Lamb of God's song, "Forgotten (Lost Angels)", from the Sacrement Album, has the following lyrics pertaining to the riots "'92 should have burnt this fucker down"
  • The D12 song Fight Music say's "If any nigga looking too hard, we Rodney King'n 'em"

This article is about the musical group. ... Cop Killer is a controversial song by a North American Rapmetal and Hardcore punk band Body Count. ... OShea Jackson (born June 15, 1969) better known by his stage name, Ice Cube, is an American rapper, actor and film director. ... The Predator is a 1992 and third solo album by Ice Cube. ... OShea Jackson (born June 15, 1969) better known by his stage name, Ice Cube, is an American rapper, actor and film director. ... Death Certificate is the critically acclaimed second solo album from rapper Ice Cube, released on October 29, 1991. ... Death Certificate is the second solo album from rapper Ice Cube, released by Priority Records on October 29, 1991. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Natural Born Killaz is a single from the reunited duo of Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. ... Sublime was an American band that originated in Long Beach, California. ... April 26, 1992 (Miami) is a song from the eponymous third album of Sublime. ... Tupac Amaru Shakur (June 16, 1971 – September 13, 1996), also known by his stage names 2Pac, Makaveli, or simply as Pac, was an American artist renowned for his rap music, movie roles, poetry, and his social activism. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. ... RBX (Reality Born Unknown), born Eric Collins, is the son of Bootsy Collins, a cousin of Snoop Dogg, Daz Dillinger and is a rapper from Long Beach, California. ... Ministry is an American industrial metal band founded by front-man by Al Jourgensen in 1981. ... N.W.O. (New World Order) is a song by the industrial band Ministry, released as the second single off the album Psalm 69. ... For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... Porno for Pyros was a US musical group and was Perry Farrells and Stephen Perkins next project after their former band Janes Addiction. ... Porno for Pyros is the first album by the band of the same title, which is a side project of Perry Farrell and Stephen Perkins from Janes Addiction. ... downset. ... Ben Harper (born Benjamin Chase Harper on October 28, 1969 in Claremont, California, USA) is an American musician. ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Peter Mulvey is a acoustic musician based out of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... California Love is a rap song by Tupac Shakur featuring Dr. Dre and Roger Troutman. ... Tupac Amaru Shakur (June 16, 1971 – September 13, 1996), also known by his stage names 2Pac, Makaveli, or simply as Pac, was an American artist renowned for his rap music, movie roles, poetry, and his social activism. ... Rage Against the Machine (also Rage and RATM) is a Grammy Award-winning American rock band, noted for their blend of hip hop, heavy metal, punk and funk as well as their revolutionary politics and lyrics. ... Evil Empire is the second album by Rage Against the Machine. ... Down Rodeo was a promotional single by Rage Against the Machine sent out to various American radio stations. ... Alternate cover The Battle of Los Angeles is the third studio album by Rage Against the Machine. ... Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad, 30 November 1955 in Middlesex) is an English rock musician. ... Bad Religion is a seminal American punk rock band, formed in Southern California in 1980 by Jay Bentley (bass), Greg Graffin (vocals), Brett Gurewitz (guitars) and Jay Ziskrout (drums). ... Recipe for Hate is Bad Religions eighth full-length album, released on September 21, 1993 on Epitaph Records, and re-released in 1994 on Atlantic Records following the bands departure from Epitaph. ... Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Rancid is a punk band, formed in 1991 in Albany, California, by Matt Freeman and Tim Armstrong. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... En Vogue is a Grammy nominated American female R&B vocal quartet assembled by music producers Denzil Foster and Thomas McElroy. ... Free Your Mind is the name of a Grammy Award-nominated hit single released by the all-female R&B group En Vogue in September 24, 1992 from their critically-acclaimed album Funky Divas. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Burn My Eyes is the debut album by Oakland groove metal band Machine Head. ... For other uses, see Offspring (disambiguation). ... Ignition is the second album released by The Offspring on October 16, 1992. ... For other uses, see Slayer (disambiguation). ... Tracy Marrow (born February 16, 1958)[1], better known by stage name Ice-T, is an American rapper, rock musician, author, former United States Army soldier, and actor. ... “Judgment Night” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The Exploited ( ) are a punk rock band from the second wave of UK punk, formed in late 1979 or early 1980. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... Livin on the Edge is a song by American hard rock band Aerosmith. ... Get a Grip is the eleventh studio album by American hard rock band Aerosmith, released in 1993 (see 1993 in music). ... Black Label Society is a heavy metal band formed by Zakk Wylde, with 9 albums released to date. ... The Boo Radleys were a British guitar band of the 1990s who made experimental indie music, and were briefly associated with the Britpop movement. ... Giant Steps is a 1960 album by jazz musician John Coltrane. ... Lamb of God is a Grammy-nominated five-piece metal band from Richmond, Virginia, formerly known as Burn the Priest. ... D12 (also known as D-12, The Dirty Dozen, D-Twizzy and Detroit-Twelve) is an American hip-hop group from Detroit, Michigan, which has had albums reach the top of the American, British, and Australian album charts: Devils Night in 2001 and D12 World in 2004. ... Fight Music is a 2001 rap single by the rap group D12. ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ... Christopher Charles Lloyd (born April 30, 1982 in Baltimore, Maryland), better known as Lloyd Banks, is an American rapper and is a member of G-Unit. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ... LaRon Louis James (born on February 18, 1983) is an American rapper, small time actor and producer. ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ...

Film

  • The 1991 film Grand Canyon, which reflected on the divide between people of different race and class in L.A., was widely seen as a prefiguration of the riots, particularly in a scene with a white driver who was nearly carjacked by young black thugs, then rescued by a black tow-truck driver.
  • Spike Lee's 1992 film Malcolm X opens with a scene of the Rodney King beating, juxtaposed with a burning American flag that burns down and forming the letter X.
  • The 1992 documentary film Post No Bills follows a political poster that was made of LAPD Chief Daryl Gates on an NRA shooting target and glued up on the streets of Los Angeles after the Rodney King beating. This poster was also featured in the film Menace II Society as well as Robert Altman's The Player. Post No Bills also includes an interview with Chief Gates about the poster and documents some of the events surrounding the resignation of Chief Gates from his position as Chief of Police.
  • The 1992 Walter Hill film Trespass, starring Ice T, Ice Cube and Bill Paxton, was a siege drama and unconnected to the LA riots, nevertheless had to have its original title of Looters changed, to avoid sensitivity and controversy - especially since Ice T and Ice Cube were residents of the area affected by the riots and based much of their raps on their locality.
  • The 1994 film Floundering explores the alienation and disaffection the main character sees in his neighborhood of post-riot Venice Beach.
  • The 1994 film Reality Bites depicts a television show under the name of Wedgie, The World of Hip Couture in which hostess Cheryl Goode talks about the "phattest gangsta trend." She stands at the intersection of Florence and Normandie, which was ground zero for the riots.
  • Sa-I-Gu is a short 1993 documentary about Korean women affected by the rioting in Los Angeles in 1992.
  • In the 1998 film BASEketball, the Los Angeles team is named after the riots.
  • The 1998 film American History X has characters argue over the circumstances of Rodney King's arrest.
  • The 2002 film Dark Blue is set during the riots, and reenacts several portions of it, as well as showing the two famous videos.
  • The 2005 film Rize was a documentary of life in Watts LA. It featured footage of the Watts Riot in it and also talked about much of the rioting. It also discussed the deaths of many gang members and African American citizens.
  • The 2006 film Bastards of the Party briefly touched on the Los Angeles Riots.
  • The 2006 film The L.A. Riot Spectacular narrated by Snoop Dogg and also starring Emilio Estevez, Charles Dutton and George Hamilton. This movie takes a satirical look at the riots.
  • Writer/Producer John Ridley and director Spike Lee are attached to a proposed Imagine Entertainment film based on the L.A. Riots. [2]
  • In the 1993 movie production, Falling Down, Michael Douglas's character is shown to enter a Korean convenience store in a predominantly African American neighborhood in Los Angeles. An altercation occurs between Michael Douglas's character and the Korean store clerk played by Michael Paul Chan, wherein the stereotypes of over-charge and lack of cultural assimilation by the Korean store owners is implied.
  • The 2007 film, Freedom Writers, starred Hilary Swank as a school teacher in a Long Beach highschool two years after the riots. The movie opens with scenes of the riots, and is set two years after, in 1994.

Grand Canyon is an ensemble drama directed and co-written by Lawrence Kasdan, advertised as The Big Chill for the 90s, in reference to one of Kasdans earlier successes. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Post No Bills is a documentary film on satirical political poster artist Robbie Conal directed by Clay Walker. ... Daryl F. Gates was the Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) from 1978 until 1992. ... Menace II Society is the directorial debut of twin brothers Allen and Albert Hughes. ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ... Walter Hill (born January 10, 1942 in California) is a prominent American film director, who is known in particular for his revival of the Western. ... Trespass was a 1992 movie directed by Walter Hill. ... Tracy Marrow (born February 16, 1958), better known as Ice T or Ice-T, is an American rapper, singer and actor. ... OShea Jackson (born June 15, 1969) better known by his stage name, Ice Cube, is an American rapper, actor and film director. ... William Paxton (born May 17, 1955) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... Reality Bites is a 1994 film written by Helen Childress and featuring the directorial debut of Ben Stiller. ... BASEketball is a 1998 David Zucker comedy feature film starring South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, along with Dian Bachar, Robert Vaughn, Yasmine Bleeth, and Jenny McCarthy. ... American History X is a 1998 film directed by Tony Kaye. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Dark Blue is a 2002 film directed by Ron Shelton. ... Rize is the capital of Rize Province, in north-east Turkey, on the Black Sea coast. ... The Watts Riots was a large-scale civil disorder lasting six days in Los Angeles, California in 1965. ... Bastards of the Party is a 2006 documentary film produced by Antoine Fuqua and directed by former Bloods gang-member Cle Sloan. ... The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a 2005 comedy film starring Snoop Dogg and Emilio Estevez. ... Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. ... Emilio Estévez (born May 12, 1962) is an American actor, director and writer. ... Charles Dutton is an actor/director who gained acclaim for his show Roc shown on FOX television during 1991. ... George Hamilton may refer to: George Hamilton (actor) (born 1939) His father, a bandleader George Hamilton, IV (born 1937), country music performer George Hamilton, 1st Earl of Orkney (1666-1737) George Hamilton (commentator), gaffe-prone football (soccer) commentator. ... John Ridley John Ridley is an American film director, actor, inventor and writer. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ... Imagine Entertainment is a film and television production company founded in 1986 by director Ron Howard and producer Brian Grazer. ... For other uses of Freedom Writers, see Freedom Writers (disambiguation). ... Hilary Ann Swank (born July 30, 1974) is an American actress. ...

Television

  • The Family Guy episode "Brian Does Hollywood" contains a scene where Peter Griffin goes to Los Angeles and is beaten by the police in a similar fashion to that of Rodney King.
  • The NBC drama L.A. Law seventh-season opener was set on the day of the riots.
  • In the 1992-1993 season premiere of the NBC sitcom A Different World, Dwayne and Whitley's Los Angeles honeymoon coincides with the riots. Rapper/activist Sister Souljah is among the guest stars.
  • The fourth-season opener of the ABC sitcom Doogie Howser, MD was fully devoted to the 1992 riots in Los Angeles.
  • The third-season opener of the Fox comedy series In Living Color focused on the L.A. riots, and subsequent third-season episodes featured skits focusing on the L.A. riots (example: "The L.A. Riots Anniversary Special" promo).
  • An episode of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air saw Will Smith and the Banks family contributing to the post-riot clear-up, and pondering its implications.
  • Peter Kay in an episode of Phoenix Nights argues with a police officer, stating "You'll have another Rodney King on your hands".
  • The third season episode of The Closer, starring Kyra Sedgwick, dealt with the discovery of a man who was killed during the riots.

Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... “Brian Does Hollywood” is an episode of Family Guy. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... A Different World is an American television sitcom which aired for six seasons on NBC (from September 24, 1987 until July 9, 1993). ... Sister Souljah (born as Lisa Williamson in 1964, Bronx, New York) is a controversial American hip hop-generation author, activist, recording artist, and film producer. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... The television show Doogie Howser, M.D. (1989–1993) starred Neil Patrick Harris as a brilliant teenaged doctor who was also faced with the problems of being a normal teenager. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... In Living Color is a sketch comedy television series which ran on the FOX Network from April 15, 1990 to May 19, 1994. ... The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air is an Emmy, BAFTA, and RTS-award winning popular American television sitcom that aired on NBC from September 10, 1990, to May 20, 1996. ... “W. S.” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Peter Kays Phoenix Nights is a British sitcom about The Phoenix Club, a working mens club in the northern English town of Bolton. ... The Closer is an American television police drama series. ... Kyra Sedgwick (born August 19, 1965)[1] is an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress. ...

Other

  • Stage actress Anna Deavere Smith created a play, Twilight: Los Angeles 1992, based on interviews with people about the riots.
  • Video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas contained a section in which the player had to wade through a strikingly similar riot to complete the final missions of the game. The riots were in Los Santos, the game's version of Los Angeles, and followed the acquittal of corrupt police officer Frank Tenpenny (voiced by Samuel L. Jackson), the game's primary antagonist. The game is also set in 1992. However, Tenpenny is black, so at least one major difference between fact and fiction is immediately recognizable. During the riots, buildings and cars smoke, cars speed and are chased more often, people attack others, and some can be seen running with stolen televisions.
  • Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas also contains a random quote said by a police officer who is in pursuit of the African-American protagonist Carl Johnson. The police officer exclaims "There ain't no video cameras around to catch this beating" - a clear reference to Rodney King and the LA riots.
  • The spoken-word album Everything by Henry Rollins is a chapter out of his book Eye Scream, which contains accounts of Rollins's life in LA during the riots as well as his opinions of the cops and the reaction of the residents.
  • In the fourth Police Quest game it is, at one point, commented that Los Angeles has not yet recovered from the riots.
  • The posthumous Bill Hicks album Arizona Bay is a collection of stand-up routines about the L.A. Riots, Reginald Denny and the Rodney King trial. This routine is also featured on his UK albums: Salvation and Live at The Oxford Playhouse.
  • The Len Deighton novel "Violent Ward" (1993) is a detective mystery in the Raymond Chandler vein set against the background of the 1992 riots.
  • "Can't we all just get along?" has been a popular, almost cliched catchphrase, ever since Rodney King's public statement of "People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along?" It is used in various contexts of conflict, most often as a sarcastic response to immature bickering.

For other persons of the same name, see Anna Smith. ... Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas is the fifth video game in the Grand Theft Auto series. ... Western Los Santos is predominantly affluent, compared to the less well-to-do east side. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... Everything is an audio book done on CD but it is also a chapter out of a book entitled Eye Scream. Which was written by Henry Rollins whom tells tales of prose and short stories, some including The infamous LA Riots and his assertive opinions of the situation that happenned... Henry Rollins (born February 13, 1961 as Henry Lawrence Garfield) is an American singer and songwriter, spoken word artist and author. ... Police Quest is a series of computer games produced and published by Sierra On-Line between 1987 and 1993. ... This Section does not cite any references or sources. ... Arizona Bay is an album by comedian Bill Hicks, posthumously released in 1997 through Rykodisc. ... Damian Williams dances over Denny Reginald Oliver Denny (born April 21, 1953 in San Pedro, California) is a white construction truck driver who was dragged from his truck and nearly beaten to death by black rioters during the 1992 Los Angeles riots. ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ... For other uses, see Salvation (disambiguation). ... Len Deighton (left) teaches Michael Caine how to break an egg on the set of The IPCRESS File. ... A famous misquotation is a well-known phrase attributed to someone who, in fact, did not say it. ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ...

See also

The L.A. Four was a nickname given to the first four African American men charged with the racially-motivated attack on Caucasian truck driver Reginald Oliver Denny during the 1992 Los Angeles riots: Damian Williams, Henry Watson, Antoine Miller and Gary Williams. ... The term Watts Riots refers to a large-scale riot which lasted six days in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, in August 1965. ... This is a timeline of the American Civil Rights Movement. ... Zoot Suit riots, June 1943 For the swing album by Cherry Poppin Daddies, see Zoot Suit Riot (album) The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of riots that erupted in Los Angeles, California during World War II, between sailors and soldiers stationed in the city and Mexican American youths, who... In United States politics, a Sister Souljah moment is a politicians public repudiation of an allegedly extremist person, statement, or position perceived to have some association with the politician. ... Maxine Waters (born Maxine Moore Carr on August 15, 1938) has served as a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1991, representing the 35th District of California (map). ... Police observing crowds prior to confrontations The 2005 Cronulla riots were a series of ethnically motivated mob confrontations which originated in and around Cronulla, a beachfront suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... “LAPD” redirects here. ... David Kirkwood on the ground after being struck by police batons Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, verbal attacks, and threats by police officers and other law enforcement officers. ... A torched car in Strasbourg, 5 November. ... For other uses of Freedom Writers, see Freedom Writers (disambiguation). ... 3rd Battalion 1st Marines (3/1) is an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps based out of Camp Horno, at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California. ... Rodney King Rodney Glen King (born April 2, 1965 in Sacramento, California) is an African-American taxi driver who was violently arrested by officers of the LAPD (Ofc. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b "The L.A. 53", LA Weekly, April 24, 2002. Retrieved on [[2007-02-07 '=]]. 
  2. ^ Jennifer Lee, Civility in the City: Blacks, Jews and Koreans in Urban America (Harvard University Press 2002), at 192; see also Sa-I-Gu: From Korean Women's Perspectives, Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, dir., 1993; The Impact of the Los Angeles Riots on the Korean-American Community, AsiaSource: AsiaTODAY (Asia Society), May 3, 2002
  3. ^ http://jurist.law.pitt.edu/trials24.htm
  4. ^ http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/lapd/white.jpg
  5. ^ The National Geographic Channel (US version) program "The Final Report: The L.A. Riots" aired originally on October 4, 2006 10pm EDT, approximately 27 minutes into the hour (including commercial breaks).
  6. ^ The National Geographic Channel (US version) program "The Final Report: The L.A. Riots" aired originally on October 4, 2006 10pm EDT, approximately 38 minutes into the hour (including commercial breaks).
  7. ^ (2000) in Peter Kivisto, Georganne Rundblad: Multiculturalism in the United States: Current Issues, Contemporary Voices. Pine Forge Press. 
  8. ^ Ralph Keyes. The Quote Verifier: Who Said What, Where, and When. ISBN 0-312-34004-4 [1]
  9. ^ a b LeDuff, Charlie. "12 Years After the Riots, Rodney King Gets Along", The New York Times, 2004-09-19. Retrieved on 2007-07-31. 
  10. ^ Bush, George H.W. (1992-05-01). Address to the Nation on the Civil Disturbances in Los Angeles, California. George Bush Presidential Library. Retrieved on 2006-05-12.
  11. ^ Del Vecchio, Rick, Suzanne Espinosa, & Carle Nolte. "Bradley Ready to Lift Curfew He Says L.A. is 'under control'", San Francisco Chronicle, 1992-05-04, p. A1. 
  12. ^ "Los Angeles TV Shows Restraint", Chicago Sun-Times, 1993-04-19, p. 22. 
  13. ^ Mydans, Seth. "Verdict in Los Angeles; Fear Subsides With Verdict, But Residents Remain Wary", The New York Times, 1993-04-19, p. 11. 
  14. ^ Tisdall, Simon, & Christopher Reed. "All Quiet on the Western Front After King Verdicts", The Guardian, 1993-04-19, p. 20. 
  15. ^ Ayres Jr., B. Drummond. "Los Angeles Police Chief Will Be Let Go", The New York Times, 1997-03-11. Retrieved on 2007-07-31. 

L.A. Weekly is a free weekly tabloid-sized newspaper (a so-called alternative weekly) in Los Angeles, California. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... We dont have an article called Asia Society Start this article Search for Asia Society in. ... The National Geographic Channel is a subscription television network that features documentaries produced by the National Geographic Society. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... The National Geographic Channel is a subscription television network that features documentaries produced by the National Geographic Society. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The United States Army War College is a U. S. Army school located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, specifically in the historic Carlisle Barracks. ...

Photography

Video


  Results from FactBites:
 
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