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Encyclopedia > 1980s
Millennia: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s
Years: 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984
1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
Categories: Births - Deaths - Architecture
Establishments - Disestablishments

The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called "The Eighties". The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. The American led global war on drugs began, and US automakers continued market losses to Japan and other countries. Chasing cheap labor, a lot of global manufacturing relocated into Mexico, Korea, Taiwan, China and Eastern Europe, away from traditional manufacturing strongholds. New middle class economies were beginning to emerge in the old Soviet bloc countries and other parts of the world, and Islamic fundamentalism began to assert itself in the Middle East. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... On the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd millennium commenced on 1 January 1001, and ended at the end of 31 December 2000. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 20XX redirects here. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... This article is about the decade of 2000-2009. ... The 2010s decade is a period of 10 pooping years that begins on January 1, 2010 and later ends on December 31, 2019 inclusive. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...



In the United States, the early 1980s were characterized by a disco backlash connected with a religious revival (see Moral Majority) and conservative revival (known as the "Reagan revolution") that led to the end of the liberalism of the 1970s. The New Right succeeded in building a policy approach and electoral apparatus that propelled Ronald Reagan into the White House in the 1980 presidential election. New Right activists generally denounced abortion, pornography, same-sex marriage, feminism, drug legalization, and affirmative action. This article is about the music genre. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... New Right is used in several countries as a descriptive term for various forms of conservatism that emerged in the mid- to late twentieth century. ... Reagan redirects here. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Porn redirects here. ... Recognized in some regions United States (MA, CA eff. ... Feminists redirects here. ... The prohibition of drugs through legislation or religious law is a common means of controlling the perceived negative consequences of recreational drug use at a society- or world-wide level. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota...


The era was characterized by the blend of conservative family values alongside a period of increased telecommunications, a shift towards liberal market economies and the new openness of perestroika and glasnost in the USSR. This transitional period also saw massive democratic revolutions such as the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989 in China, the Czechoslovak velvet revolution, and the overthrow of the dictatorial regime in Romania and other communist Warsaw Pact states in Central and Eastern Europe. It came to be called as the late 1980s purple passage of the autumn of nations. These changes continued to be felt in the 1990s and into the 21st century. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... //   (Russian: IPA: ) is politics of maximal openness, transparency of activity of all official (governmental) institutes, and freedom of information. ... alternative Chinese name Traditional Chinese: Simplified Chinese: Literal meaning: Tiananmen Incident The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, widely known as the Tiananmen Square Massacre, in China referred to as the June Fourth Incident to avoid confusion with the two other Tiananmen Square protests and as an act of official censorship... Non-violent protesters face armed policemen The Velvet Revolution (Czech: , Slovak: ) (November 16 – December 29, 1989) refers to a non-violent revolution in Czechoslovakia that saw the overthrow of the Communist government there;[1] it is seen as one of the most important of the Revolutions of 1989. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A dictatorship is an autocratic form of government in which the government is ruled by a dictator. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article is about a form of government in which the state operates under the control of a Communist Party. ... Not to be confused with the Warsaw Convention, which is an agreement about airlines financial liability and the Treaty of Warsaw (1970) between West Germany and the Peoples Republic of Poland. ... Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Eastern Europe is a concept that lacks one precise definition. ... The Autumn of Nations is the series of events in Central and Eastern Europe in the autumn of 1989, when various communist satellite states of the Soviet Union were overthrown in the space of a few months[1]. The name of this event refers to the Revolutions of 1848, known... 20XX redirects here. ...


The 1980s are also well known for the popular U.S. culture of the time such as the over-the-top fashion, the commercialization of music and film, and wacky hair styles.


The 1980s was also an era of tremendous population growth around the world, surpassing even the 1970s and 1990s for arguably being the largest in human history. This growth occurred not only in developing regions but also developed western nations, where many newborns were the offspring of Baby Boomers. Population growth was particularly astounding and indeed alarming in a number of African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian countries during this decade, with rates of natural increase close to or exceeding 4% annually. A baby boom is defined as a period of increased birth rates relative to surrounding generations. ...

Contents

Social trends

  • Gay people face renewed discrimination which starts with a backlash against disco music which was derided as "fag" music. In 1980, a homophobic documentary was televised by ABC across the nation and fuels this hatred. The rise of AIDS leads to increased homophobia. The Supreme Court upholds laws which criminalize gay sex between consenting adults in the Bowers v. Hardwick decision. Outed gay pop stars such as Boy George face discrimination. MTV bans Dead or Alive music videos because of their gay content.
  • Minorities also face renewed discrimination in the early 1980s. Radio stations and MTV refuse to play black artists even though some of them (e.g. Donna Summer in 1980, Denise Williams in 1984 and Michael and Janet Jackson during larger parts thereof) have big popular hits. Television stations quietly drop all of the black television shows of the 1970s, e.g. Good Times and What's Happening!! and television becomes predominantly white once again.
  • Bands with large hairstyles, e.g. glam or hair metal become popular.
  • Political correctness became a concern in mainstream politics.
  • Social attitudes of the White American majority toward African Americans eased, as well as toward other ethnic, racial and national minorities. Baby boomers, who first began to enter positions of power during the 1980s, likely did much to effect this change. During the late 1980s, public bigotry became largely a thing of the past and racial prejudice lost moral acceptance; thus the popularized concept of multi-culturalism, particularly in advertising, first appeared.
  • Radio stations drop disco music in 1980 and many stations refuse to play music by minorities during the early 1980s. Conservative talk radio starts in the 1980s and by 1984 Rush Limbaugh begins broadcasting from KFBK AM 1530 in Sacramento, California. In 1989 he moved to his flagship station, WABC in New York City. Limbaugh became nationally syndicated by 1989.
  • The War on Drugs is instituted by Reagan and the conservatives because of the excesses of drug use in the 1970s. In spite of draconian sentences which are now being imposed by the Reagan administration, drug use continues unabated. People were using Ecstacy, marijuana, "pot" rock cocaine, "crack", and prescription drugs. The crack epidemic is one thing that is certainly remembered about the United States during the eighties. The crack epidemic inspired new music; "White Lines" by Grand Master Flash was a hit and yet it still a very meaningful message. It spoke of the effects of drugs and their uselessness and telling kids and adults as well to stay clean and be a good example. Coincidentally, Grandmaster Flash was using when he wrote the song, which brought the American people to think it was extremely hypocritical to be singing about staying clean.
  • The role of women in the workplace increased greatly. Continuing the 1970s' trend, more and more women in the English-speaking world took to calling themselves "Ms.", rather than "Mrs." or "Miss." A similar change occurred in Germany, with women choosing "Frau" instead of "Fräulein" in an effort to disassociate marital status from title. In most western countries, women began to exercise the option of keeping their maiden names after marriage; in Canada, legislation was enacted to end the practice of automatically changing a woman's last name upon marriage.
  • Child abuse gained public attention as alleged incidents of child molestation were reported, particularly at day care facilities in various parts of the United States. Several court cases were followed by the media, including California (the McMartin Preschool case), South Carolina (the Little Rascals Day Care case) and New Jersey (the Wee Care Nursery School case), spreading hysteria among parents and teachers. Similar large-scale cases were also reported in Europe, New Zealand and Australia.
  • Social welfare for handicapped children improved, and these children were no longer ignored or forced into state mental institutions.
  • National safety campaigns raised awareness of seat belt usage to save lives in automobile accidents, helping to make the measure mandatory in most countries and U.S. states by 1990. Similar efforts arose to push child safety seats and bike helmet use, already mandatory in a number of U.S. states and some countries.
  • Alcohol education and drug education expanded, bringing about movements such as M.A.D.D., Nancy Reagan's Just Say No campaign, and D.A.R.E.. By 1990, every state in the U.S. mandated the drinking age to be 21, the only country to ever do so.
  • Rejection of smoking, perceived as more unhealthy and deadly than in previous decades, increased among Americans following a 1984 reconfirmation of earlier studies into the risks of smoking by the U.S. Surgeon General. "Smoking" and "non-smoking" sections in American restaurants became common, state efforts to combat underage smoking (such as banning cigarette sales to minors) intensified, and acknowledgment of smoking-related birth defects became more common.
  • Opposition to nuclear power plants grew, especially after the catastrophic 1986 Chernobyl accident.
  • Environmental concerns intensified. In the United Kingdom, environmentally friendly domestic products surged in popularity. Western European countries adopted "greener" policies to cut back on oil use, recycle most of their nations' waste, and increase focus on water and energy conservation efforts. Similar "Eco-activist" trends appeared in the U.S. in the late 1980s.
  • The U.S. support and pressure group Remove Intoxicated Drivers experienced rapid growth.
  • Research on alcohol and weight expanded.

This article is about the music genre. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Holding A Georgia law prohibiting sodomy was valid because there was no constitutionally protected right to engage in homosexual sodomy. ... George Alan ODowd, better known as Boy George (born June 14, 1961 in Eltham, London) is a rock singer-songwriter and club DJ. He grew up in a large, working-class Irish family in Thurles, County Tipperary, Ireland. ... Dead or Alive is a British New Wave band from Liverpool that rose to popularity during the 1980s. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Whats Happening!! is an American sitcom that ran on ABC from August 5, 1976 to April 28, 1979. ... The acronym LAMP (or L.A.M.P.) refers to a set of free software programs commonly used together to run dynamic Web sites or servers: Linux, the operating system; Apache, the Web server; MySQL, the database management system (or database server); Perl, PHP, Python, and/or Primate (mod mono... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Classic Metal. ... Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... A baby boom is any period of greatly increased birth rate during a certain period, and usually within certain geographical bounds. ... Multiculturalism or cultural pluralism is a policy, ideal, or reality that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures in the world, especially as they relate to one another in immigrant receiving nations. ... This article is about the music genre. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Limbaugh. ... Sacramento redirects here. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... WABC (770 kHz), known as NewsTalkRadio 77, is a radio station in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Ms or Ms. ... Occident redirects here. ... Child abuse is the physical, psychological or sexual abuse or neglect of children. ... Sexual abuse is physical or psychological abuse that involves crimes in most countries. ... Day care is the care of a child during the day by a person other than the childs parents or legal guardians, often someone outside the childs immediate family. ... The McMartin preschool case was based on allegations of sexual abuse of the schools children by the schools owners, the McMartin family. ... The Wee Care Nursery School was in Maplewood, New Jersey and was one of many day care child abuse cases that went to trial in the 1980s. ... ... Handicapped may refer to: Disability, a human condition. ... A psychiatric hospital (also called a mental hospital or asylum) is a hospital specializing in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... This article is about the safety device. ... This article is about the year. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bicycle helmet A Bicycle helmet is specifically designed to provide head protection for cyclists. ... Alcohol education in the United States traces its roots to the Scientific Temperance Instruction movement promoted by Mary Hunt of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) . That movement began in the 1880s and by 1900, alcohol temperance or abstinence teaching was required in every state plus all possessions of... Mothers Against Drunk Driving, or MADD, is a single-issue non-profit anti-alcohol organization in the United States and Canada. ... Mrs. ... Drug Abuse Resistance Education, better known as DARE or D.A.R.E., is an educational program aimed primarily at fifth-grade students which seeks to discourage the use of illegal drugs. ... Many nations have a legal drinking age, or the minimum age one must be to drink alcohol. ... The cigarette is the most common method of smoking tobacco. ... This article is about the year. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... The term minor (from Latin smaller, lesser) has several meanings: Minor is a legal term for a young person, see Minor (law). ... A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... This article is about applications of nuclear fission reactors as power sources. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Chernobyl reactor number four after the disaster, showing the extensive damage to the main reactor hall (image center) and turbine building (image lower left) The Chernobyl disaster, reactor accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, or simply Chernobyl, was the worst nuclear power plant accident in history and the only... Synthetic motor oil being poured. ... The international recycling symbol. ... Water conservation refers to reducing use of fresh water, through technological or social methods. ... For the physical concepts, see conservation of energy and energy efficiency. ... Remove Intoxicated Drivers (RID) is the oldest national organization in the United States fighting alcohol impaired and drunk driving (DUI and DWI). ... Alcohol and weight is a subject relevant to millions of people who like to drink alcoholic beverages and who also either want to maintain or to lose body weight. ...

Culture

Space Invaders ) is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado in 1978. ... Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ... Donkey Kong ) is an arcade game released by Nintendo in 1981. ... This article is about the video game. ... Game console redirects here. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... “NES” redirects here. ... “NES” redirects here. ... ET for the Atari 2600 is considered by many to be emblematic of the crash along with the Atari 2600 version of Pac-Man. ... Tron is a 1982 science fiction film starring Jeff Bridges as Kevin Flynn (and his counterpart inside the electronic world, Clu), Bruce Boxleitner as Alan Bradley (and Tron), Cindy Morgan as Lora Baines (and Yori) and Dan Shor as Ram. ... This article is about the 1983 US movie. ... Variations of Rubiks Cubes (from left to right: Rubiks Revenge, the original design of Rubiks Cube, Professors Cube, & Pocket Cube, also known as Mini-Cube). Rubiks Cube is a mechanical puzzle invented in 1974[1] by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture ErnÅ‘ Rubik. ... Two Cabbage Patch Kids dolls Cabbage Patch Kids are a brand of doll created by Xavier Roberts in 1978. ... The Baby On Board window sign Baby On Board refers to a five-inch sign intended to be placed in the back window of an automobile to deter tailgating. ... The Backpack Toys version of Teddy Ruxpin Teddy Ruxpin is an animatronic teddy bear invented by Ken Forsse, Larry Larsen and John Davies. ... Trivial Pursuit is a board game where progress is determined by a players ability to answer general knowledge, popular culture questions. ... For other uses, see FAD (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is my Rubiks Cube in scrambled state. ... Image File history File links This is my Rubiks Cube in scrambled state. ... Variations of Rubiks Cubes (from left to right: Rubiks Revenge, the original design of Rubiks Cube, Professors Cube, & Pocket Cube, also known as Mini-Cube). Rubiks Cube is a mechanical puzzle invented in 1974[1] by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture ErnÅ‘ Rubik. ... The Smurfs (Les Schtroumpfs in French) are a fictional race of small blue creatures who live in a forest somewhere in Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the American Greetings character and franchise. ... The ten original Care Bears in the logo for the 1980s franchise, with Tenderheart Bear at top. ... Fizzy and Galaxy, the unicorns from the My Little Pony animated series My Little Pony is a line of colorful toy ponies marketed primarily to young girls and produced by the toy manufacturer Hasbro. ... G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero is a military-themed action figure (3 3/4 inches tall) that was supported by a Marvel Comic and a popular cartoon television show that ran in the 1980s. ... This article is about the comic strip. ... He-Man and the Masters of the Universe is an American animated television series produced by Filmation based on Mattels successful toy line Masters of the Universe. ... ThunderCats is an American animated television series that was developed and produced by Rankin/Bass Productions, debuting in 1985, based on the characters created by Tobin Ted Wolf. ... Original run 10 September 1984 – 18 November 1985 Episodes 123, plus a one-hour Fleet of Doom special Voltron is a giant mecha robot first featured in the 1980s animated television series Voltron: Defender of the Universe. ... Transformers are fictional alien robots and the titular characters of a popular[1] Hasbro toy line and its spin-offs. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ... The Karate Kid is a 1984 John G. Avildsen film starring Pat Morita, Ralph Macchio and Elisabeth Shue. ... For other uses, see Karate (disambiguation). ... McDojo is a pejorative term used by some Western martial artists to describe a martial arts school where image or profit is of a higher importance than technical standards. ... Bullshido is a derogatory term used by some English speaking martial arts aficionados to describe fraudulent, deceptive, or inept martial arts teaching. ... TMNT redirects here. ... Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... Ray-Ban Wayfarer sunglasses (RB2132 901L) Sunglasses or sun glasses are a visual aid, variously termed spectacles or glasses, which feature lenses that are coloured or darkened to prevent strong light from reaching the eyes. ... Nike, Inc. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Shorts (disambiguation). ... Sportswear is clothing, including footwear, worn for sport or exercise. ... An aerobics class. ... Olivia Newton-John AO OBE (born 26 September 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated English-born Australian pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... Physical is an Olivia Newton-John song that was a #1 hit. ... Flashdance is a musical and romance film released in April 1983, and was one of the most successful films of the early 1980s. ... Jane Fonda (born December 21, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, writer, political activist, former fashion model, and fitness guru. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Food faddism and fad diet refer to idiosyncratic diets and eating patterns. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Olivia Newton-John AO OBE (born 26 September 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated English-born Australian pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... Mark Jacko Jackson (left) and Chopper Read (right) with ABC presenter, Rod Henshaw. ... For other uses, see Yahoo. ... INXS (pronounced In Excess) are an Australian rock group. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article has been selected as the current Australian Collaboration of the Fortnight! Please help improve it to featured article standard. ... Crocodile Dundee is a 1986 Australian comedy film set in the Australian Outback in the area around Walkabout Creek and in New York City. ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... Olivia Newton-John, 1988 Olivia Newton-John (born September 26, 1948, Cambridge) is a British-born Australian singer and actress. ... Fosters Lager is an internationally distributed Australian brand of beer. ... A breakdancer performing a one-handed freeze (also known as a pike) in the streets of Paris. ... Beat Street is a 1984 mainstream hip hop dramatic feature film, and the second following Breakin. It is set in New York City during the popularity rise of hip hop culture in the early 1980s. ... This article is about the 1984 movie; for other breakin or breaking references see breaking. ... A boombox or boom box is a portable stereo system capable of playing radio stations or recorded music at relatively high volume. ... Español redirects here. ... Univision is a Spanish-language television network in the United States and Puerto Rico. ... Telemundo is an American television network based in Hialeah, Florida. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... The De Lorean DMC-12 is a sports car that was manufactured by the De Lorean Motor Company for the American market in 1981 and 1982 in Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ...

Sports

  • The 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow were disrupted by a boycott led by the United States and 64 other countries in protest of the 1979 Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.
  • The US Olympic hockey team beat the USSR, 4-3, in the quarterfinal game that would become known as the Miracle on Ice.
  • the Soviet Union responded to the actions taken by the United States and other nations in 1980 by leading Eastern Bloc countries and allies in a boycott of the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.
  • Mike Tyson dominated Professional Boxing and Larry Bird and Magic Johnson brought the National Basketball Association to new heights just as Michael Jordan was emerging as the league's marquee player.
  • In Major League Baseball, nine different teams won the World Series - a display of league parity that had not occurred in any previous decade.

Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... U.S. captain Mike Eruzione(left) celebrates with Bill Baker (center) moments after scoring the decisive goal against the Soviet Union. ... Learie Constantine, was one of the first great West Indian players. ... The Cricket World Cup in 1983 (aka Prudential Cup, 1983) was the third edition of the tournament. ...

Fashion

Like the fashion of all modern decades (the 1960s dipped into the 1920s and hosted a folk music revival, the 1970s dipped into the 1930s, 1950s and 1960s) 1980s fashion in popular culture incorporated distinct trends from different eras. This helped form a cultivating movement of style. The Punk look of the late 1970s was influential, rather as the late 1960s "hippies are cool" look had been in the 1970s. The most conservative, more masculine fashion look that was most indicative of the 1980s was the wide use of shoulder pads. While in the 1970s the silhouette of fashion tended to be characterized by close fitting clothes on top with wider, looser clothes on the bottom, this trend completely reversed itself in the early 1980s as both men and women began to wear looser shirts and tight, close-fitting pants. Men wore power suits as a result of the greater tendency for people to display their wealth. Brand names became increasingly important in this decade, making Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein household names. In the United States, Madonna was titled the "Material Girl" and many teenage girls looked to her for fashion statements. The popular movie Flashdance (1983) made ripped sweatshirts well-known in the general public. The television shows Dallas and Dynasty also had a similar impact. Other fashion trends of the 80's consisted of door knocker earing, bamboo earings, flashy gold chains, bright adidas suits for girls and kangol hats for guys. These were also great years for tennis shoes in the rual communities. Shoulder pads, popularized perhaps by Linda Evans from the soap opera Dynasty, remained popular throughout the 1980s and even the first three years of the 1990s. The reason behind the sudden popularity of shoulderpads for women in the 1980s may be that women in the workplace were no longer unusual, and wanted to "power dress" to show that they were the equals of men at the office. Many women's outfits had velcro on the inside of the shoulder where various sized shoulderpads could be attached.


The Dynasty television show, watched by over 250 million viewers around the world in the 1980s, influenced the fashion styles in mainstream America. The show, targeted towards females, influenced women to wear jewelry often to show one's economic status. Synthetic fabrics went out of style in the 1980s. Wool, cotton, and silk returned to popularity for their perceived quality.


Men's business attire saw a return of pinstripes for the first time since the 1970s. The new pinstripes were narrower and subtler than 1930s and 1940s suits but similar to the 1970s styles. Three piece suits gradually went out of fashion in the early 'eighties and lapels on suits became very narrow (similar to 1950s styles). While vests in the 1970s had commonly been worn high with six or five buttons, those made in the early 1980s often had only four buttons and were made to be worn low. Neckties also became narrower in the 1980s and skinny versions appeared in leather. Button down collars made a return, both for business and casual wear.


Meanwhile women's fashion and business shoes returned to styles that had been popular in the 1950s and early 1960s with pointed toes and spiked heels. Some stores stocked canvas or satin covered fashion shoes in white and dyed them to the customer's preferred color. While the most popular shoes amongst young women were bright colored high heels, a trend started to emerge which saw 'Jellies' - colorful, transparent plastic flats - become popular


New Romanticism was a manufactured scene within London nightclubs in the early 1980s. The posers within the group, often the more creative people who had always been more interested in the sartorial aspects of dressing up than the anarchic statement of punk anti fashion, looked for new ideas to draw attention to themselves.


Adapted factual or fictional themes and Hollywood glamour were chosen by the New Romantics to make a personal look. The flamboyant, colourful dramatic look used frills and luscious fabrics associated with historical periods. In contrast to punks the wearers made an effort to look flamboyant in an attractive, luxuriant, beautiful, narcissistic way. Right - Adam Ant a new romantic pop star who epitomised the more beautiful aspects of New Romantiscm.


Clubs London night clubs started to change their format from Friday and Saturday nights as being the only important music nights. The club 'Gossips' in Soho began to do Bowie nights on Tuesdays and then more one night specials for niche tastes. That set the scene for special one night club evenings throughout London. Narrow tastes could be catered for.


The former punk posers had taken to glamour and romance in clothing and the club venues offered them a chance to show off that glamour at dedicated evenings. Theatrical ensembles were worn to selected clubs in London such as Blitz and St. Moritz. These were the recognised venues where the romantic movement started.


Designers of New Romantic Clothing The early designers of the romantic look were Vivienne Westwood, Colin Swift, Stevie Stewart and David Holah. Westwood began her romantic ideas with adaptations of dandified Regency designs which later she developed into a Pirate look. She designed especially for Adam and The Ants.


Occasion wear included a return of cocktail dresses and evening suits with flared basque jackets, or Chanel line brocade jackets and just above knee short straight skirts.


Dresses in slinky satins and foulard silks or polyesters were often batwing or with set in sleeves. Both styles had shoulder pads and frequently swathes of fabric were gathered and ruched onto hip bands, with falling silk, crepe de chine or chiffon asymmetric draped swirling skirts.


Lace was popular for evening, especially cream lace bound with cream satin collars. Lace collars made an appearance after being worn by the Princess of Wales. Mohair sweaters were oversized, but covered with lavish beading and satin appliqué they could be worn for evening too. Highly styled intarsia knit jumpers became fashionable.


Glamorous occasion wear was a reaction and an alternative to the dressing down that was emerging from the wearing of sport and fitness wear as casual wear. The 1980s in particular produced one of the most naff garments of the century.


The garment that still creates hoots of laughter and is often used by television producers to typify elements of the era, was the sports inspired Shell Suit, the least likely outfit you would ever find in the wardrobe of a New Romantic. However fashion oft repeats itself, bloomers and all. Skip a generation or two and a frilly new romantic inspired shell suit, jump or flying suit might appeal to someone. Already there are collectors of 1980's shell suits.


Music

This article is about the music genre. ... Disco orchestration is the arranging, orchestration, and musical production and recording techniques that went into the production of mid- to late-1970s disco music. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... Video Killed the Radio Star is a New Wave song released in 1979 by the British group Buggles that celebrates the golden days of radio. ... Buggles (the official version of the band name, used on their albums, singles, and publicity material, omits the prefix The) were a New Wave band formed in 1977 consisting of Trevor Horn, born 1949 in Durham (bass guitar, guitar, percussion, and vocals), Geoff Downes, born 1952 in Stockport, Cheshire (percussion... Duran Duran are an English rock band notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... Devo (pronounced DEE-vo or dee-VO, often spelled DEVO or DEV-O) is an American New Wave group formed in Akron, Ohio in 1972. ... Haircut One Hundred (also known as Haircut 100) was a pop-New Wave band formed in 1980. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... For other persons named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... The Cars were an American rock band, fronted by Ric Ocasek, that emerged from the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... Duran Duran are an English rock band notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... For the bands self-titled debut album, see A Flock of Seagulls (album). ... For the video game programmer Garry Newman, see Garrys Mod. ... Depeche Mode (pronounced ) are an electronic music band formed in 1980, in Basildon, Essex, England. ... Soft Cell is a Synth-Pop duo formed during the early 1980s. ... Bananarama are a British girl group who have had success on the pop and dance charts since 1982. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... Tears for Fears (sometimes abbreviated to TFF or T4F) are a popular English pop band formed in the early 1980s by Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith, which emerged after the dissolution of their first band, the mod-influenced Graduate. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... This date-March 2007 does not cite any references or sources. ... Glam metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s - early 1980s in the United States. ... Poison is an American glam metal band which originally achieved popular success in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... Ratt is an American sleaze metal and semi glam metal band that formed in San Diego and enjoyed significant commercial success during the 1980s. ... Hanoi Rocks is a Finnish rock band formed in 1979, whose most successful period came in the early 1980s. ... Mötley Crüe (IPA pronunciation: ) is an American Hard Rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1981. ... Def Leppard are an English hard rock band from Sheffield who formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bass guitarist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Whitesnake is an English hard rock band, founded in 1977 by David Coverdale (formerly of Deep Purple). ... Quiet Riot is an American heavy metal band, whose 1983 & 1984 success contributed to launching the 1980s glam metal scene. ... Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by high speed riffing and aggression. ... Bay Area is a common term to refer to a metropolitan area situated around a bay. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Megadeth is an American thrash metal band led by founder, frontman, guitarist, and songwriter Dave Mustaine. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Slayer (disambiguation). ... Huntington Beach is the name of a costal city in the state of California. ... Glam metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s - early 1980s in the United States. ... Extreme metal is an umbrella term, somewhat loosely defined, for a number of related heavy metal subgenres that have developed since the 1980s. ... Venom are an English heavy metal band, formed in late 1979 in Newcastle upon Tyne. ... Bathory was a highly influential Swedish thrash metal/black metal/viking metal band, and were regarded as one of the forefathers of black metal and founder of viking metal. ... Hellhammer was an early-1980s extreme metal band, hailing from Switzerland and popular briefly in Europe in the mid-1980s. ... Celtic Frost are a black metalthrash metal band from Zürich, Switzerland, known for their influence on the extreme metal and gothic metal genres. ... Death was an influential American death metal band founded in 1983 by guitarist and vocalist Chuck Schuldiner, and dissolved in 2001. ... Possessed is a death metal band that formed in 1983 in El Sobrante, California. ... Morbid Angel is a Florida-based death metal band assembled in 1983. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... This article is about the music genre. ... For the 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, see The Acid House. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Rap redirects here. ... Urban culture is the culture of cities. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Sugarhill Gang is an American hip hop group, known mostly for one hit, Rappers Delight, the first hip hop single to become a Top 40 hit. ... Rappers Delight is a 1979 single by American hip hop trio The Sugarhill Gang; it was one of the first hip hop hit singles. ... Yo! MTV Raps is a two-hour American television music video program, which ran from August 1988 to August 1995. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Joseph Biggie Grand Saddler (born January 1, 1958 in Bridgetown, Barbados), better known as Grandmaster Flash, is a American hip hop musician and DJ; one of the pioneers of hip-hop DJing, cutting, and mixing. ... Kurtis Blow (born Curtis Walker, 9 August 1959, Harlem, New York) is one of the first commercially successful rappers and the first to sign with a major label. ... This article is about the hip-hop group. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... John Henry Bonzo Bonham (May 31, 1948 – September 25, 1980) was an English drummer and member of the band Led Zeppelin. ... Pat Benatar (born Patricia Mae Andrzejewski on 10 January 1953) is an influential, four-time Grammy Award-winning US rock singer who has recorded several million- and multimillion-selling albums and singles. ... Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad) is a British hard rock singer-songwriter and musician. ... Guns N Roses is an American hard rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... For other persons of the same name, see Robert Palmer. ... This article is about the group. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Lionel Brockman Richie, Jr. ... Bananarama are a British girl group who have had success on the pop and dance charts since 1982. ... For the 1960s band, see The Go-Gos (1960s). ... This article is about the band. ... Duran Duran are an English rock band notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ... Foreigner is a hard rock band formed in New York City in 1976 by veteran musicians Mick Jones and ex-King Crimson member Ian McDonald, along with then-unknown vocalist Lou Gramm (Louis Grammatico). ... John Peter Farnham (born July 1, 1949) is an English-born Australian pop singer. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... ... Wang Chung is a British New Wave music group. ... Tears for Fears (sometimes abbreviated to TFF or T4F) are a popular English pop band formed in the early 1980s by Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith, which emerged after the dissolution of their first band, the mod-influenced Graduate. ... Poison is an American glam metal band which originally achieved popular success in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... RATT redirects here, it can also be used as an acronym for radio teletype. ... Kiss is an American rock band formed in New York City in January 1973. ... Tigertailz are a glam metal band hailing from Cardiff, Wales. ... Dokken is an American heavy metal and hard rock band which was formed in 1976. ... Twisted Sister is an American heavy metal band from New York City. ... Pretty Boy Floyd is a hard rock band from Hollywood, California formed in 1987. ... Mötley Crüe (IPA pronunciation: ) is an American Hard Rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1981. ... Cinderella is an American blues based hard rock and glam metal band most known during the 1980s and early 1990s. ... Europe is a Swedish hard rock band originally assembled as a progressive rock group; they later added keyboards to their sound in order to soften it. ... For other bands named The Scorpions or other meanings of scorpion, see scorpion. ... Lisa Lisa redirects here. ... For other uses, see Heart (disambiguation). ... Juice Newton (born Judy Kay Cohen 18 February 1952 in Lakehurst, New Jersey) is a Grammy Award-winning American pop music and country singer. ... Culture Club is a popular English new romantic rock group, that achieved considerable global success in the 1980s. ... Eurythmics (often incorrectly referred to as The Eurythmics) are a seminal British synth pop duo consisting of Annie Lennox and David A. Stewart. ... Def Leppard are an English hard rock band from Sheffield who formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. ... Deacon Blue are a Scottish pop band. ... For other persons of the same name, see Brian Adams. ... Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band from Leyton in the East End of London. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bass guitarist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Depeche Mode (pronounced ) are an electronic music band formed in 1980, in Basildon, Essex, England. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Simple Minds is a rock band from Scotland, which had its greatest worldwide popularity from the mid-1980s to the early-1990s. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... Cynthia Ann Stephanie Cyndi Lauper (born June 22, 1953) is an American Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter, and MTV VMA-winning video and Emmy Award-winning film, television and Theater actress. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Rick Springfield (born Richard Lewis Springthorpe on August 23, 1949 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is a songwriter, musician and actor. ... Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock) November 26, 1939) is an 11 time Grammy Award-winning (sharing three), American Singer, Dancer, Record Producer, Executive Producer, Film Producer, Actress, Writer, Performer, Songwriter, Author and occasional Painter whose career has spanned from 1956 to present. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... John Mellencamp, also known as John Cougar and John Cougar Mellencamp, (born October 7, 1951) is a Grammy-winning American rock singer-songwriter and occasional actor. ... For other uses, see Rick Astley (disambiguation). ... Olivia Newton-John AO OBE (born 26 September 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated English-born Australian pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... For other uses, see Prince (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the singer. ... Whitney Elizabeth Houston (born August 9, 1963) is a six-time Grammy award winning, American R&B singer, soprano, pianist, actress, film producer, and former model. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... The Beastie Boys are a hip hop musical group from New York City consisting of Michael Mike D Diamond, Adam MCA Yauch, Adam Ad-Rock Horovitz. ... Kim Wilde (born Kim Smith, November 18, 1960 in Chiswick, West London) is an English pop singer, professional gardener and pop cultural figure. ... Laura Branigan (July 3, 1957 – August 26, 2004) was a popular American singer/actress from Brewster, New York, best known in the U.S. for the song Gloria (1982). ... The Cars were an American rock band, fronted by Ric Ocasek, that emerged from the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ... For other persons named George Michael, see George Michael (disambiguation). ... Wham! (often written WHAM!) was a pop band formed in 1981 by George Michael, Andrew Ridgeley, and briefly, Stephen Gaffney. ... A famine is a phenomenon in which a large percentage of the population of a region or country are so undernourished that death by starvation becomes increasingly common. ... Band Aid was a British and Irish charity supergroup, founded in 1984 by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure in order to raise money for famine relief in Ethiopia by releasing the record Do They Know Its Christmas? for the Christmas market. ... Do They Know Its Christmas? is a song written by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure in 1984 specifically to raise money for Ethiopian famine relief. ... USA for Africa (United Support of Artists for Africa), was the name under which forty-five U.S. artists, led by Harry Belafonte, Kenny Rogers, Michael Jackson, and Lionel Richie, recorded the hit single We Are the World in 1985. ... Not to be confused with We Are Here To Change The World, a song that was featured in Captain EO. For the album with the same title, see We Are the World (album). ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... U.S. and USSR/Russian nuclear weapons stockpiles, 1945-2006 Nuclear disarmament is the proposed dismantling of nuclear weapons, particularly those of the United States and the Soviet Union (later Russia) targeted on each other. ... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Stevland Hardaway Morris)[1] is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer, and animal-rights activist. ... This article is about a musical recording. ... Princes look, circa 1983 Prince (born Prince Rogers Nelson on June 7, 1958), known as from 1993 to 2000, is a popular and influential singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist. ... Indochine is a French rock band, formed in 1981. ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... Norman Iceberg (born Norman Joseph Bédard on July 30, 1962) is a Canadian singer and songwriter. ... For the toy construction material, see Meccano. ... Contemporary Christian Music (or CCM; also by its religious neutral term inspirational music) is a genre of popular music which is lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Amy Lee Grant (born November 25, 1960 in Augusta, Georgia) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for her Contemporary Christian Music and pop music, and a New York Times Bestselling author, TV personality, and occasional actress. ... Kathleen Colleen Troccoli (born June 28, 1958) is a contemporary Christian singer, author, and speaker. ... BeBe Winans (born Benjamin Winans, 17 September 1962, in Detroit, Michigan) is a Grammy Award winning gospel and R&B singer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... // Michael Whitaker Smith (born October 7, 1957, to Paul and Barbara Smith in Kenova, West Virginia), often nicknamed Smitty, is a Christian singer, songwriter, guitarist, and keyboardist. ... Stryper is a Christian metal band from Orange County, California, USA. Formed in 1983, they are pioneers in the mainstream popularization of Christian rock music. ... Petra, which means rock, massive in Greek, is a Christian Rock band formed in the 1970s. ... Hardcore Punk is a subgenre of Punk Rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... The Dead Kennedys are a hardcore punk band from San Francisco, California. ... Minor Threat was an American hardcore punk band that formed in Washington DC in 1980 and disbanded in 1983. ... Black Flag was a hardcore punk band formed in 1976 in southern California, largely as the brainchild of Greg Ginn: the guitarist, primary songwriter and sole continuous member through multiple personnel changes. ... Reagan Youth (a play on Hitler Youth) was a band started by singer Dave Rubinstein (Dave Insurgent) and his friend and guitarist Paul Bakija in Queens in the early 1980s. ... El General, (born Edgardo A. Franco) is a Panamanian musical artist best known as the father of reggaeton. ... Reggaeton (also spelled Reggaetón, and known as Reguetón and Reggaetón in Spanish) is a form of urban music which became popular with Latin American youth during the early 1990s and spread over the course of 10 years to North American, European, Asian, and Australian audiences. ... Princes look, circa 1983 Prince (born Prince Rogers Nelson on June 7, 1958), known as from 1993 to 2000, is a popular and influential singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist. ... The Minneapolis sound is a hybrid mixture of funk, rock, pop, R&B & new wave that was masterminded by Prince in the late 1970s. ... To emphasize the emotional aspect of a power ballad, crowds customarily hold up lit lighters. ... For other uses, see Heart (disambiguation). ... The original line-up of Guns N Roses. ... Hardcore Punk is a subgenre of Punk Rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... Minor Threat was an American hardcore punk band that formed in Washington DC in 1980 and disbanded in 1983. ... The Dead Kennedys are a hardcore punk band from San Francisco, California. ... Husker Du can refer to: Hüsker Dü, a rock music group from Minneapolis-St. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... This article is about the musician. ... Dare to Be Stupid track listing Like a Surgeon Dare to Be Stupid I Want a New Duck One More Minute Yoda George of the Jungle Slime Creatures From Outer Space Girls Just Want To Have Lunch This is the Life Cable TV Hooked on Polkas Dare to Be Stupid... Weird Al Yankovic in 3-D track listing Eat It Midnight Star The Brady Bunch Buy Me A Condo I Lost on Jeopardy Polkas On 45 Mr. ...

Television

See also: 1980s in television This page indexes the individual year in television pages. ...

  • In 1980, black television shows disappeared and would only finally reappear in 1984 with theThe Cosby Show. It is rated number 1 in the Nielsen Ratings in the United States for five consecutive TV seasons. Unlike the black shows from the 1970s, The Cosby Show avoided discussing the problems faced by black people in real life such as racism, discrimination and poverty.
  • On July 29, 1981, American television networks invaded England to provide TV coverage of another highly anticipated royal ceremony for the marriage of Diana, Princess of Wales and Charles, Prince of Wales. The marriage ceremony took place at St Paul’s Cathedral before 3500 guests, and an estimated television audience of 750 million people.
  • The decade began poorly for minorities and gays. Music videos featuring minorities were not played by MTV (e.g. they refused to play Donna Summer's video for the 1980 rock hit "The Wanderer", the video of "Let's Get Physical" by Olivia Newton John (1981) was edited to remove all gay references) and gays were portrayed poorly by the media, especially by a widely seen homophobic documentary (which aired in 1980) about gays in San Francisco. With the rise of AIDS, shows which portrayed gays or gay friendly characters were quickly pulled off the air (Three's Company, Bosom Buddies).
  • Now regarded as an icon of the 1980s, Miami Vice (1984) redefined the cop show genre, combining film-like production values with MTV style music videos.
  • The Oprah Winfrey Show hit the U.S. scene, shattering 20th century taboos and creating confession culture. According to a Yale study, the tabloid talk show genre popularized by Oprah Winfrey's success provided much needed high impact media visibility for gays, bisexuals, transsexuals, and transgender people, allowing them greater entry into mainstream culture.[1]
  • Brandon Tartikoff became an executive at NBC and is credited with turning around NBC's low prime time reputation with such hit series as Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, ALF, Family Ties, The Cosby Show, Cheers, Miami Vice, The Golden Girls, Knight Rider, The A-Team, St. Elsewhere, Night Court, Hunter, Highway to Heaven, Matlock, Remington Steele, A Different World, 227 and Empty Nest.
  • The Fox network was launched. CNN became the first 24-hour news channel. The growth of cable television with hundreds of new cable networks of a certain field or interest, such as The Weather Channel which debuted in 1982, offered television viewers a much expanded menu from which to choose.
  • In the UK, two rival satellite television services launch in 1989. British Satellite Broadcasting and Sky Television offered viewers up to five extra channels, but both failed to gain the success enjoyed by cable television in North America. The two companies would later merge.
  • Punky Brewster, reflecting many trends and fads of the 80s, captured the interest of younger viewers.
  • Soap operas gained popularity among high-schoolers and college students in the United States, thanks in part to the supercoupling of Luke Spencer and Laura Webber on the most popular soap of the day, General Hospital. High-budget evening soap operas are also popular with Dynasty, Knot's Landing, and Dallas running for most of the decade in the 10 p.m. time slot.
  • The gay community received an upsurge in popular exposure, with U.S. prime time ratings giants Dynasty and The Golden Girls and UK soap operas Brookside and EastEnders, featuring either regular or recurring gay characters throughout their long runs. These shows were highly influential in increasing the visibility of regular gay characters on television.
  • The music-based cable networks MTV and MuchMusic first appeared on the airwaves, and became major pop cultural influences with music videos and in-depth coverage of musicians and trends among North American youth.
  • He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, the first animated children's television program built exclusively around a toy line, started a new trend of increasing the connection between children's programming and toy advertising, alarming many parents and watchdog organizations; an explosive number of toy tie-in cartoons follow, most notably (for the era) Transformers, G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero and Dino-Riders.
  • Animation in the United States and elsewhere saw a dramatic improvement in production values and saw a resurgence of mainstream appeal, both in feature films and on television. Star Blazers, Battle of the Planets, Voltron, and Robotech helped to develop the first wave of organized anime fandom in North America.
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation, regarded by some as the pinnacle of the Star Trek series, made its syndicated debut in 1987.
  • Murder, She Wrote became a smash hit with audiences.
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000 debuted on the Minneapolis UHF station KTMA in 1988; the following year it was picked up by the fledgling Comedy Channel, which later became Comedy Central.
  • On February 1, 1982, David Letterman became the host of NBC's Late Night with David Letterman, which remained on the air until 1993 when Letterman left for CBS.
  • On December 6, 1989, the once extremely successful and popular British science fiction series Doctor Who came to an end after more than 26 years and 703 episodes.
  • The #1 shows on American network television throughout the decade:

The Cosby Show is an American television sitcom starring Bill Cosby, first broadcast on September 20, 1984 and ran for eight seasons on the NBC television network, until April 30, 1992. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Olivia Newton-John (born September 26, 1948) is a British-born Australian singer and actress. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Threes Company is an American sitcom that ran from 1977 to 1984 on ABC. It is a remake of the British sitcom Man About the House. ... Bosom Buddies is an American sitcom starring Tom Hanks and Peter Scolari created by Robert L. Boyett, Thomas L. Miller and Chris Thompson. ... For the 2006 movie, see Miami Vice (film). ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... The Oprah Winfrey Show (also known as Oprah) is a United States syndicated talk show, hosted and produced by its namesake Oprah Winfrey, and is the highest-rated talk show in American television history. ... Yale redirects here. ... Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ... Brandon Tartikoff (January 13, 1949 — August 27, 1997) was a popular NBC executive who was credited with turning around NBCs low prime time reputation with such hit series as Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, ALF, Family Ties, The Cosby Show, Cheers, Miami Vice, The Golden Girls, Knight Rider... Hill Street Blues was a serial police drama that was first aired on NBC in 1981 and ran for 146 episodes on primetime into 1987. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ALF or Alf can have several meanings: ALF is an acronym standing for Animal Liberation Front, an animal rights group Alf is an acronym for the Africa Leadership Forum. ... For other uses, see Family Ties (disambiguation). ... The Cosby Show is an American television sitcom starring Bill Cosby, first broadcast on September 20, 1984 and ran for eight seasons on the NBC television network, until April 30, 1992. ... This article is about the TV series. ... For the 2006 movie, see Miami Vice (film). ... For the Hong Kong film, see The Golden Girls (1995 film). ... For the American media company, see Knight Ridder. ... For the United States Army military unit, see The A-Team (military). ... St. ... Night Court was an American television situation comedy that aired on NBC from January 1984 until May 1992. ... Hunting is, in its most general sense, the pursuit of a target. ... Highway to Heaven is a television drama which ran on NBC from 1984 to 1989. ... Matlock is the county town of Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. ... Remington Steele was an American television series first broadcast on the NBC network from 1982 to 1987. ... A Different World was an American television sitcom. ... 227 is an African American sitcom that was broadcast on the NBC network from September 14, 1985 to July 28, 1990, for five seasons, and ranked onto the Nielsen Ratings for three seasons (1985 - 1986, 1986 - 1987, 1987 - 1988). ... Empty Nest was a television sitcom that ran on NBC from 1988 to 1995. ... FOX redirects here. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Cable TV redirects here. ... The Weather Channel (TWC) is a cable and satellite television network that broadcasts weather and weather-related news 24 hours a day. ... Satellite television is television delivered by way of communications satellites, as compared to conventional terrestrial television and cable television. ... BSB logo British Satellite Broadcasting (BSB) was a company set up in 1986 to provide direct broadcast satellite television services to the United Kingdom. ... link titlelink titleThe name Sky Television may refer to: British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB) in the United Kingdom SKY Network Television in New Zealand This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions or M&A refers to the aspect of corporate finance strategy and management dealing with the merging and acquiring of different companies as well as assets. ... Punky Brewster was a popular sitcom in the 1980s. ... The first TIME magazine cover devoted to soap operas, dated January 12, 1976. ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of Our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A supercouple, in soap opera terms, is a couple on a program that becomes... Luke and Laura Spencer, 2006 Luke Spencer and Laura Webber Spencer are fictional characters and the signature supercouple on the American soap opera General Hospital. ... For other uses, see General Hospital (disambiguation). ... Dynasty was an American primetime television soap opera that aired on ABC from January 12, 1981 to May 10, 1989. ... Knots Landing was a primetime television soap opera that aired from December 27th, 1979 to May 13th, 1993 on CBS, just one week before replacing the long-running crime drama, Barnaby Jones in its timeslot, and was at that time the second longest-running primetime drama on U.S. TV... The Southfork Ranch, home of the Ewing family The original cast of Dallas. ... Dynasty was an American primetime television soap opera that aired on ABC from January 12, 1981 to May 10, 1989. ... For the Hong Kong film, see The Golden Girls (1995 film). ... For other uses, see Brookside (disambiguation). ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... MuchMusic (often referred to only as Much) is a Canadian English language cable television specialty channel owned by CTV Limited; a division of CTVglobemedia dedicated to music, music-related programs and youth culture. ... A music video (also video clip, promo) is a short film or video meant to present a visual representation of a popular music song. ... He-Man and the Masters of the Universe is an American animated television series produced by Filmation based on Mattels successful toy line Masters of the Universe. ... A teddy bear A toy is an object used in play. ... // Advert redirects here. ... A watchdog originally referred to a dogs job, but now has been used in additional contexts with the same implication of watching or safeguarding: For the dogs job, see guard dog. ... An animated cartoon is a short, hand-drawn (or made with computers to look similar to something hand-drawn) film for the cinema, television or computer screen, featuring some kind of story or plot (even if it is a very short one). ... This page is about the original Transformers animated series. ... Dino-Riders was a cartoon television series that aired in the late 1980s, primarily as a promotion to launch a new Tyco toy line. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... Space Battleship Yamato (or, alternately, Space Cruiser Yamato) is the English title for the Japanese science fiction anime series 宇宙戦艦ヤマト, created by Leiji Matsumoto. ... Battle of the Planets (1978) is the first Westernized adaptation of the 1972 Japanese animated television series known as Kagaku ninja tai Gatchaman. ... Original run 10 September 1984 – 18 November 1985 Episodes 123, plus a one-hour Fleet of Doom special Voltron is a giant mecha robot first featured in the 1980s animated television series Voltron: Defender of the Universe. ... Robotech science fiction and anime universe. ... Animé redirects here. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... Angela Lansbury as Jessica Fletcher Murder, She Wrote was a popular, long-running television mystery series starring Angela Lansbury as mystery writer and amateur detective Jessica Fletcher. ... Mystery Science Theater 3000 (often abbreviated MST3K, sometimes MST 3000 or MST 3K or just MST) is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... David Michael Letterman (born April 12, 1947, in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.) is an Emmy Award-winning American television host and comedian. ... Late Night with David Letterman was a nightly hour-long comedy talk show on NBC hosted by David Letterman. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the television series. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... The Southfork Ranch, home of the Ewing family The original cast of Dallas. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... The Southfork Ranch, home of the Ewing family The original cast of Dallas. ... Dynasty was an American primetime television soap opera that aired on ABC from January 12, 1981 to May 10, 1989. ... The Cosby Show is an American television sitcom starring Bill Cosby, first broadcast on September 20, 1984 and ran for eight seasons on the NBC television network, until April 30, 1992. ... The Cosby Show is an American television sitcom starring Bill Cosby, first broadcast on September 20, 1984 and ran for eight seasons on the NBC television network, until April 30, 1992. ... The Cosby Show is an American television sitcom starring Bill Cosby, first broadcast on September 20, 1984 and ran for eight seasons on the NBC television network, until April 30, 1992. ... The Cosby Show is an American television sitcom starring Bill Cosby, first broadcast on September 20, 1984 and ran for eight seasons on the NBC television network, until April 30, 1992. ... The Cosby Show is an American television sitcom starring Bill Cosby, first broadcast on September 20, 1984 and ran for eight seasons on the NBC television network, until April 30, 1992. ... Roseanne Cherrie Barr (born November 3, 1952) is an American actress, writer, talk-show host, and comedian. ... The Simpsons made their TV debut on The Tracey Ullman Show in 1987 The Simpsons shorts are a series of 48 one-minute shorts that ran on the variety show The Tracey Ullman Show for three seasons, before the characters spun off into their own half-hour prime time show... The Tracey Ullman Show was a weekly American television variety show, hosted by British comedian and onetime pop singer Tracey Ullman. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...

Film

Horror movies of the 1980s (which probably begin in 1979 with Alien) exist at the glorious watershed when special visual effects finally caught up with the gory imaginings of horror fans and movie makers. Technical advances in the field of animatronics, and liquid and foam latex meant that the human frame could be distorted to an entirely new dimension, onscreen, in realistic close up. This coincided with the materialistic ethos of the 1980s, when having it all was important, but to be seen to be having it all was paramount. People demanded tangible tokens of material success - they wanted bigger, shinier, faster, with more knobs on - as verification of their own value in society. In the same way, horror films during this decade delivered the full colour close-up, look-no-strings-attached, special effect in a way that previous practitioners of the art could only dream about. Everything that had lurked in the shadows of horror films in the 1950s could now be brought into the light of day. The monsters were finally out of the closet. Once they were exposed to the light, however, these monsters proved to be the same as ever: ghosts (of supernatural origin), werebeings (of human origin), and slimy things (origin unknown). The latter maintained a strong presence; the cuddly aliens represented in Star Wars and ET were counterbalanced by the grotesque extraterrestrials of the Alien Trilogy and The Thing. Werewolves made a strong showing in the early 1980s with the Howling series and An American Werewolf in London - and perhaps, as in the 1940s, reflected a fear of the 'wolves' stalking each other under the aegis of the Cold War. Ghosts were not so numerous but still provided cause for terror, whether they were traditional ones, such as those haunting The Overlook Hotel in The Shining (1980), or of more ambiguous status: Freddy Krueger is technically a ghost.


After establishing a successful track record with Dark Star, Halloween and Big Trouble in Little China, Carpenter decided he wanted to remake a movie that had entranced him as a child, The Thing From Another World. This black-and-white RKO picture revolves around the (largely) unseen threat to an isolated group of scientists working on an ice station. When we finally get to see what has been menacing the men, it looks unfortunately like an overgrown carrot, and the sinister effect is somewhat undermined. Carpenter wanted no such disappointment with his version, and engaged Rob Bottin as special effects designer. Apart from working with Carpenter on The Fog, Bottin had previously created the state-of-the-art special effects in The Howling, producing frightening and convincing man-to-wolf transformation scenes. From the very beginning (ie before Carpenter hired him), he had a very clear concept of how the Thing should look and behave, and the result is some of the most grotesque images ever brought to the cinema screen.


SFX aside, The Thing also contains some fine, understated performances from an interesting selection of character actors. Kurt Russell has worked with Carpenter many times, but for the rest of the cast, Carpenter decided he wanted an 'uncomfortable' feel, and chose an array of unfamiliar faces. The Thing's storyline is conventional enough - monster threatens isolated community and picks off the inhabitants one-by-one - but never predictable, in that it is impossible to judge who will be next. There is deliberate ambiguity about who is taken over by the Thing when, and even repeat viewers of the film share the cast's edgy mistrust of each other.


The ending, as Mac (Kurt Russell) and Childs (Keith David) settle down to a slow suicide by hypothermia has provoked much discussion. One, both or neither of the men being a Thing are all valid possibilities, and the mysterious absence of frozen breath coming from Child's mouth simply fuels the debate. There is no triumphant resolution here, no final destruction of the Thing to prove that humans are the superior race. We are left with a real sense of unease, and cannot acquiesce to MacReady's suggestion that we "just wait here for a little while...see what happens." The credits roll and we never know what happens. Despite having 'what happens' thrust in our faces in full, grotesque detail earlier on in the movie, we are never allowed to see what happens at the end. Thus The Thing is that genuine scary movie, a parade of visual nightmares which keeps you jittery long after the last remnant of gore has faded from your retina.


Video games

Although popularity of video games and arcades began in the mid to late 1970s, it continued throughout the 1980s with rapid growth in video game technology throughout the decade. Space Invaders, developed in Japan in 1978, was first previewed at a UK trade show in 1979, making a huge impact on the early 80s gaming scene. Many other games followed including Pac-Man, creating a Pac Man fever craze early in the decade, especially in 1982 and 1983; Super Mario Bros. games became a highly successful franchise starting in 1985 and its popularity continues today. Computer and video games redirects here. ... Space Invaders ) is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado in 1978. ... Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ... This article is about the Super Mario Brothers video game for the NES. For other uses, see Super Mario Bros. ...


In the 1980s, Atari failed to apply proper quality control to the software development process for its popular Video Computer System game console. The amount of low-quality software caused a massive collapse of the home console industry. The release of Nintendo's Famicom/NES console rectified the problem and revived home gaming by only being able to play games approved by the company. PC Engine and Sega Mega Drive were next generation game consoles that were released during the last years of the decade. This article is about the corporate brand. ... The Atari 2600, released in October 1977, is the video game console credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. ... The Nintendo GameCube is an example of a popular video game console. ... ET for the Atari 2600 is considered by many to be emblematic of the crash along with the Atari 2600 version of Pac-Man. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The PC Engine was a video game console released by NEC, a Japanese company, in 1987. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ...


Home computers become popular in the 1980s and during that decade they were used heavily for gaming, especially the ZX Spectrum. The prevailing IBM PC standard was born in 1981 but had a status of a non-entertainment computer throughout the decade. Along with the IBM PC, the Commodore 64 (1982) was the most popular 8-bit home computer and its successor, the Amiga (1985), was the most popular 16-bit home computer. This article is primarily about a certain class of Personal computers from the late 1970s to mid 1980s, see Domotics or Home servers for home computers used in home automation. ... The ZX Spectrum is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... C-64 redirects here. ... This article is about the family of home computers. ...


International issues

In the United States

Reagan redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For the English tennis player, see Samantha Smith (tennis). ... Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov (Russian: , Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov) (June 15 [O.S. June 2] 1914 – February 9, 1984) was a Soviet politician and General Secretary of the CPSU from November 12, 1982 until his death fifteen months later. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... The major events of the assassination attempt The Reagan assassination attempt occurred on March 30, 1981, just 69 days into the presidency of Ronald Reagan. ... Reagan redirects here. ... A pile of crack cocaine ‘rocks’. Crack cocaine is a solid, smokeable form of cocaine and is a highly addictive drug popular for its intense psychoactive high. ... Categories: Stub | Riots ... Miami redirects here. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...

In Canada

  • The 1986 World's Fair, Expo '86, opened on May 2, 1986 and lasted until mid-October. It brought huge international attention to Vancouver, British Columbia and Canada. The fair had an attendance of over 22 million and was considered a great success. The fair attracted many celebrities, including the Prince and Princess of Wales, Margaret Thatcher, Vincent Price, and George Bush Sr. The fair was also credited as showing that World Expositions were still a viable venture during its times.
  • Political unrest in the province of Quebec, which rooted from the many differences between the dominant francophone population versus the anglophone minority and the francophones rights in the dominantly English-speaking Canada, came to a head in 1980 when the provincial government called a public referendum on partial separation from the rest of Canada. The referendum ended with the "no" side winning majority (59.56% no, 40.44% yes).
  • During The Right Honourable Pierre Elliot Trudeau's term as Prime Minister of Canada (and under his oversight), Queen Elizabeth II signed the New Constitution of Canada on 17 April 1982. This Act severed all Political Dependences of the United Kingdom in Canada.
  • In 1984, Progressive Conservative Party of Canada leader Brian Mulroney became Prime Minister of Canada; he remained Prime Minister until 1993, ending almost 67 years of rule by the Liberal Party of Canada.
  • The Meech Lake Accord, a package of changes and amendments to the constitution of Canada, was created in conference and pushed ahead by Brian Mulroney for ratification from the provinces. The accord gave each province more immigration powers and gave Quebec the status of a "distinct society" and a constitutional veto. It was voted down and followed by another set of amendments, which was also voted down in the 1990s. The creation of and eventual failure of the Meech Lake accords eventually, and the following Charlottetown Accords set the stage for another referendum in Quebec, in 1995.

Expo 86 logo The 1986 World Exposition on Transportation and Communication, or simply Expo 86, was a Worlds Fair held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada during the summer of 1986. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... Order: 41st President Term of Office: January 20, 1989–January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican Vice President: Dan Quayle George... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Canadian English (CanE) is the variety of North American English used in Canada. ... The 1980 Quebec referendum was the first referendum in Quebec on the place of Quebec within Canada and whether Quebec should pursue a path toward sovereignty. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated as or ) is an honorific prefix that is traditionally applied to certain people in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Anglophone Caribbean and in other Commonwealth Realms, and elsewhere. ... Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Martin Brian Mulroney PC CC GOQ (predominantly known as Brian Mulroney) (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Meech Lake Accord was a set of failed amendments to the Constitution of Canada negotiated in 1987 by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the provincial premiers, including Robert Bourassa, premier of Quebec. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Headline on October 27, 1992 Globe and Mail. ...

In Europe

In 1981 there was a assassination attempt on Pope John Paul II in Saint Peter's Square. In 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme was assassinated. An attempted assassination of Pope John Paul II occurred on May 13, 1981. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: , Polish: ) born   IPA: ; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City from 16 October 1978, until his death, almost 27 years later, making his the second-longest... Saint Peters Square, or Saint Peters Piazza (Piazza San Pietro, in Italian), is located directly in front of St. ... Sven Olof Joachim Palme ( ) (30 January 1927 – 28 February 1986) was a Swedish politician. ... Memorial plaque at the place of the assassination. ...


In the European Community, after the first direct elections for the European Parliament in 1979, its enlargement continued with the accession of Greece in 1981 and Spain and Portugal in 1986. At the end of the decade, the Fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 would be followed in 1990 by the German reunification. The European Community (EC) was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... Member-states in 1979. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The European Union (EU) was created by six founding states in 1957 (following the earlier establishment by the same six states of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1952) and has grown to 27 member states. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... View in 1986 from the west side of graffiti art on the walls infamous death strip Walls poster in memory of the fall. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the 1990 German reunification. ...


In the United Kingdom

Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... This article is about the year. ... Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...

In Australia

Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... VIC redirects here. ... For the song, see South Australia (song). ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Expo 88 - as seen from the Brisbane River (photo taken from Victoria Bridge) Expo 88 - showing a globe of the world (photo taken from Victoria Bridge) Expo 88 at night (photo taken from Victoria Bridge) Expo 88 was a Worlds Fair held in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia between April 30... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ...

Natural disasters

For the mountain in California, see Mount Saint Helena. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Location of Yakima in Washington Coordinates: , Country State County Yakima Incorporated December 1, 1883 Government  - Mayor Dave Edler Area  - City 20. ... Nickname: Location of Spokane in Spokane County and Washington Coordinates: , Country United States State Washington County Spokane Government  - Mayor Dennis P. Hession Area  - City  58. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake was a major earthquake that struck the San Francisco Bay Area of California on October 17, 1989 at 5:04 p. ... Dates: October 14, 1989–October 28, 1989 MVP: Dave Stewart (Oakland) Television: ABC CBS Radio Network (Jack Buck, Johnny Bench and John Rooney Announcers: Al Michaels, Tim McCarver and Jim Palmer Umpires: Rich Garcia (AL), Paul Runge (NL), Al Clark (AL), Dutch Rennert (NL), Vic Voltaggio (AL), Eric Gregg (NL... San Francisco redirects here. ... Chart of ocean surface temperature anomaly [°C] during the last strong El Niño in December 1997 El Niño and La Niña are major temperature fluctuations in the tropical Pacific Ocean. ... The Richter magnitude scale, or more correctly local magnitude ML scale, assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Space radar image of Nevado del Ruiz Nevado del Ruiz 2006 Nevado del Ruiz is an Andean stratovolcano in Caldas Department, Colombia. ... Lake Nyos is a crater lake in the Northwest Province of Cameroon, located at . ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ...

People

Many people were influential in shaping the 1980s, including entertainers, sports figures and politicians.


Entertainers

Notable individuals and groups who provided entertainment in the 1980s are divided as follows.


Musicians and Bands

This article is about the band. ... This article is about the album. ... This article is about the album by AC/DC. For the title track, see For Those About to Rock (We Salute You). ... Who Made Who is a hard rock album by Australian band AC/DC, released in 1986 as the soundtrack to the Stephen King movie Maximum Overdrive. ... Blow Up your Video is an album by the Australian hard rock band AC/DC, first released on January 18, 1988. ... Adam & the Ants were a rock and roll group during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... For similar terms like Adam Adamant, Atom Ant, adamant, adamantium, etc, see Adamant (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Stand and Deliver (disambiguation). ... #REDIRECT Goody Two Shoes is a popular song by Adam Ant. ... a-ha is a Grammy Award-nominated band from Norway. ... Take on Me is a song by the Norwegian band a-ha. ... The Sun Always Shines on T.V. is a song by Norwegian band a-ha, from their first album Hunting High and Low, released in 1985. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... Done with Mirrors (1985) is the eighth studio album by American hard rock band Aerosmith and marked the return of Joe Perry and Brad Whitford to the fold. ... Permanent Vacation is the ninth studio album by American hard rock band Aerosmith, released in 1987 (see 1987 in music). ... Pump is the tenth studio album by American hard rock band Aerosmith, released in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... Amy Lee Grant (born November 25, 1960 in Augusta, Georgia) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for her Contemporary Christian Music and pop music, and a New York Times Bestselling author, TV personality, and occasional actress. ... Annie Lennox (born 25 December 1954) is a Scottish musician, vocalist, and Academy Award-winning songwriter. ... For the approach to music education, see Eurhythmics. ... Asia is an arena rock/progressive rock group. ... Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ... Singles from Bon Jovi Released: 1983 Released: 1984 Bon Jovis self-titled debut album Bon Jovi was released in January of 1984. ... Bon Jovis second album, 7800° Fahrenheit was released in April of 1985. ... Alternate cover Original banned wet T-shirt cover Singles from Slippery When Wet Released: 1986 Released: 1986 Released: 1987 Released: 1987 Slippery When Wet is the third studio album by Bon Jovi released on August 18, 1986 (see 1986 in music). ... Singles from New Jersey Released: 1988 Released: 1988 Released: 1989 Released: 1989 Released: 1989 Bon Jovis fourth album, New Jersey was released on September 13, 1988. ... The Cars were an American rock band, fronted by Ric Ocasek, that emerged from the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... Shake It Up is a song by American New Wave band The Cars off of their 1981 album of the same name. ... You Might Think is a single by The Cars from their fifth studio album, Heartbeat City. ... Drive is a 1984 song by The Cars. ... Chaka Khan (born March 23, 1953) is a multiple Grammy Award-winning American singer known for hit songs such as Im Every Woman, I Feel For You and Through the Fire. Khan was first featured as a member of the funk band Rufus before beginning her solo career. ... Chrissie Hynde (born Christine Ellen Hynde, 7 September 1951, Akron, Ohio) is an American rock musician, best known as the leader of the band The Pretenders. ... The Pretenders are a New Wave and rock band, known best for innovative songwriting and charismatic performances by bandleader, guitarist, and vocalist Chrissie Hynde. ... Sir Cliff Richard OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb on 14 October 1940) is an English singer, actor and businessman. ... For other persons named Corey Hart, see Corey Hart (disambiguation). ... Sunglasses At Night is a song recorded by Corey Hart. ... Corrosion of Conformity is an American heavy metal band. ... Eye for an Eye is the first album by the band Corrosion of Conformity released in 1983 Tell Me Minds Are Controlled Indifferent Broken Will Rabid Dogs L.S. Listen Rednekkk Coexist Excluded Dark Thoughts Poison Planet What? Negative Outlook Positive Outlook No Drunk College Town Not Safe Eye For... This article is about the English rock band. ... Culture Club is a popular English new romantic rock group, that achieved considerable global success in the 1980s. ... Cynthia Ann Stephanie Cyndi Lauper (born June 22, 1953) is an American Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter, and MTV VMA-winning video and Emmy Award-winning film, television and Theater actress. ... Shes So Unusual was the debut album by American 1980s icon Cyndi Lauper. ... True Colours, the fifth album released by New Zealand band Split Enz, was their first major commercial success. ... A Night to Remember is the name of popular 1980s icon and singer Cyndi Laupers third album (as well as a song on the album). ... David Brooks, conservative commentator for the New York Times and other publications. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... Let’s Dance is the title album track on David Bowies album Lets Dance. ... It has been suggested that Olympia 74 be merged into this article or section. ... DeBarge was an American soul music, and funk group. ... Deborah Ann Harry (born July 1, 1945, in Miami, Florida) is a singer-songwriter and actress most famous for being the lead singer for the punk rock/new wave band Blondie. ... Blondie is the name of an American rock band that first gained fame in the late 1970s, and which has sold over 140 million records. ... Def Leppard are an English hard rock band from Sheffield who formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement. ... Singles from Pyromania Released: February 1983 Released: May 1983 Released: August 1983 (US) Released: October 1983 (UK) Pyromania is the third studio album by British hard rock band Def Leppard, released in 1983. ... Singles from Hysteria Released: July, 1987 (UK) September, 1987 (US) Released: August, 1987 (US only) Released: September, 1987 (UK) April, 1988 (US) Released: November, 1987 (UK) January, 1988 (US) Released: April, 1988 (UK) November, 1988 (US) Released: July, 1988 (UK) August, 1988 (US) Released: February, 1989 (UK, US) Hysteria is... Depeche Mode (pronounced ) are an electronic music band formed in 1980, in Basildon, Essex, England. ... For other uses, see Dio (disambiguation). ... Duran Duran are an English rock band notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... Duran Duran is an album by Duran Duran, originally released worldwide in 1981, and reissued to greater success in 1983. ... Rio is a hit single from the album Rio by Duran Duran, and one of their most recognizable songs and music videos. ... Seven and the Ragged Tiger is Duran Durans third studio album, released globally in November, 1983. ... Notorious is the fourth album by Duran Duran. ... Big Thing is an album by Duran Duran, released worldwide in 1988, (see 1988 in music). ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Europe is a Swedish hard rock band originally assembled as a progressive rock group; they later added keyboards to their sound in order to soften it. ... For the approach to music education, see Eurhythmics. ... The Exploited is a punk rock band from the second wave of UK punk, formed in late 1979 or early 1980. ... Troyal Garth Brooks (born February 7, 1962) is an American country music singer-songwriter. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... For other persons named George Michael, see George Michael (disambiguation). ... Wham! was a pop duo which was formed by George Michael and his best friend Andrew Ridgeley in the early 1980s. ... Joseph Biggie Grand Saddler (born January 1, 1958 in Bridgetown, Barbados), better known as Grandmaster Flash, is a American hip hop musician and DJ; one of the pioneers of hip-hop DJing, cutting, and mixing. ... Guns N Roses is an American hard rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... For other uses, see Appetite for Destruction (disambiguation). ... G N R Lies is the second studio album released by the hard rock band Guns N Roses in 1988 (see 1988 in music). ... Hall & Oates is a popular music duo made up of Daryl Hall & John Oates. ... For other uses, see Heart (disambiguation). ... Alone is a song recorded by American rock band Heart. ... These Dreams is the name of a song recorded by rock band by Heart. ... What About Love is a song recorded by rock band Heart. ... Howard Jones (born John Howard Jones, 23 February 1955) is an English singer and songwriter who gained acclaim in the 1980s. ... New Song may refer to: A New Song, a pamphlet of poems, chants, ballads and songs published by the International Workers Order in 1938 The New Song, a 2003 studio album by Townhall New Song Church, a church in Fair Lawn, New Jersey, United States New Song, a song by... What Is Love was the title of a single by musician Howard Jones. ... INXS (pronounced In Excess) are an Australian rock group. ... The Swing is Australian rock band INXSs fourth studio album. ... Kick is an album by the Australian rock band INXS, released in 1987. ... Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band from Leyton in the East End of London. ... The Number of the Beast is a heavy metal album released in 1982 (see 1982 in music) by Iron Maiden on EMI in the UK and originally Harvest Records/Capitol Records in the U.S. (now on Sanctuary Records/Columbia Records). ... This article is about the singer. ... Janet Jackson released her third album Control on March 2, 1986. ... Janet Jacksons Rhythm Nation 1814 (commonly titled simply Rhythm Nation or Rhythm Nation 1814) is the fourth studio album by American R&B/pop singer Janet Jackson. ... John Peter Farnham (born July 1, 1949) is an English-born Australian pop singer. ... Youre The Voice is a song by Christian pop and rock artist Rebecca St. ... The Age of Reason is either Thomas Paines book The Age of Reason. ... Journey is an American rock band formed in 1973 in San Francisco, California. ... Journeys seventh album, Escape, was released in August of 1981. ... Frontiers, Journeys eighth album, was released in February of 1983 on the Columbia Records label. ... Journeys ninth album, Raised on Radio, was released in May of 1986 on the Columbia Records label. ... For other uses, see Judas priest (curse). ... British Steel is a heavy metal album by Judas Priest, released on April 14 1980 (see 1980 in music). ... Kate Bush (born 30 July 1958) is an English singer, songwriter, musician and record producer. ... Never for Ever (1980) is Kate Bushs third album. ... The Dreaming is the fourth album by Kate Bush. ... Hounds of Love is a 1985 album by Kate Bush. ... The Whole Story is Kate Bushs 6th released album, and her first compilation. ... The Sensual World is the sixth all-new studio album by Kate Bush, and the singers seventh album release in total. ... Kenneth Ray[2] Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... Kim Wilde (born Kim Smith, November 18, 1960 in Chiswick, West London) is an English pop singer, professional gardener and pop cultural figure. ... For the band, see King Diamond (band). ... Them is the English language third person plural pronoun used after a preposition or as the object of a verb. ... Laura Branigan (July 3, 1957 – August 26, 2004) was a popular American singer/actress from Brewster, New York, best known in the U.S. for the song Gloria (1982). ... Loose Ends was a successful English R&B band that had several urban contemporary hits. ... For the single by Mike Oldfield, see Magic Touch (song). ... Luther Ronzoni Vandross, Jr. ... Madness are a British pop/ska band from Camden Town, London, that formed in 1976. ... Audio sample Our House is a single by English ska/pop band Madness, from their UK album The Rise & Fall and their US compilation Madness. ... This article is about the 1979 Madness song. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... Audio sample Material Girl is a song written by Peter Brown and Robert Rans for American singer Madonnas second album, Like a Virgin. ... Madonna is the self-titled debut album by pop singer Madonna, released on July 27, 1983 by Sire Records. ... Like a Virgin is the second studio album by singer Madonna. ... True Blue is the third studio album by pop singer Madonna, released on June 30, 1986 by Sire Records. ... Whos That Girl is the soundtrack album of the movie Whos That Girl, starred by Madonna. ... You Can Dance is the first compilation album by pop singer Madonna, released on November 17, 1987 by Sire Records. ... This article is about the album. ... This article is about the band. ... Kings of Metal is the sixth album by Heavy Metal band Manowar. ... MC Hammer (born Stanley Kirk Burrell on March 30, 1962) is an American MC who was popular during the late 1980s and early 1990s, known for his dramatic rise to and fall from fame and fortune, his trademark Hammer pants, and for leaving a lasting influence on hip hop culture... Megadeth is an American thrash metal band led by founder, frontman, guitarist, and songwriter Dave Mustaine. ... Killing Is My Business. ... This article concerns the boy band Menudo. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Kill Em All is American thrash metal band Metallicas debut album, released on July 25, 1983 on Megaforce Records. ... For the album by Marshmallow Coast, see Ride the Lightning (Marshmallow Coast album). ... For the title track of the album, see Master of Puppets (song). ... ...And Justice for All is American heavy metal band Metallicas fourth studio album released August 25, 1988, by Elektra Records. ... For other persons named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the album. ... Bad is an album by pop singer Michael Jackson, released on August 25, 1987 by Epic/CBS Records. ... Mötley Crüe (IPA pronunciation: ) is an American Hard Rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1981. ... Shout at the Devil is the second album by heavy metal band Mötley Crüe, released on September 26, 1983. ... Theatre of Pain is the third album by rock band Mötley Crüe, released on June 21, 1985. ... For similarly-titled works, see Girls Girls Girls. ... Dr. Feelgood is the fifth album by heavy metal band Mötley Crüe, released on September 1, 1989. ... Nena (born March 24, 1960 in Hagen, North Rhine-Westphalia) is a German singer who became famous with the New German Wave song 99 Luftballons (99 Red Balloons in the English version). ... 99 Luftballons is a Cold War-era protest song by the German singer Nena. ... New Edition is an American R&B/Pop group formed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1980, that was most popular during the 1980s. ... This article is about the group. ... Please Dont Go Girl is a 1988 hit single from New Kids on the Block which reached #10 in the Billboard Hot 100 that brought the band widespread public attention & teenage girls, written and produced by Maurice Starr the song was originally recorded by an earlier Starr group Irving... Hangin Tough is New Kids on the Blocks second album, which was released in 1988. ... This article is about the alternative rock/electronic band New Order. ... NIN redirects here. ... Nik Kershaw Nik Kershaw (born Nicholas David Kershaw on March 1, 1958) is an English singer-songwriter, popular during the 1980s. ... Wouldnt It Be Good is a song by Nik Kershaw (Human Racing, 1983) that was among his more popular singles reaching no. ... The Riddle is a song written by Nik Kershaw which was a Number 3 hit in the UK singles chart in 1984, and the title track to his second album, The Riddle. ... Radio Musicola track listing When A Heart Beats was the eighth Top 40 hit for 1980s teen idol Nik Kershaw. ... I Wont Let the Sun Go Down on Me is a song by singer Nik Kershaw, first released on his hit debut album Human Racing. ... This article is about the hip-hop group. ... This article is about the album. ... This article is about the N.W.A. song. ... Olivia Newton-John AO OBE (born 26 September 1948) is a Grammy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated English-born Australian pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... Ozzy redirects here. ... Blizzard of Ozz is a heavy metal album by Ozzy Osbourne, recorded in Surrey, U.K. and released on September 20, 1980 (see 1980 in music) in the UK and on January 15, 1981 (see 1981 in music) in the US. This is Osbournes first solo album and one... Diary of a Madman is an album by Ozzy Osbourne. ... Bark at the Moon is a heavy metal album by Ozzy Osbourne, released on December 10, 1983. ... The Ultimate Sin is an album by Ozzy Osbourne. ... For other uses, see No rest for the wicked. ... Paula Julie Abdul is an American, multi-platinum selling, Grammy Award-winning singer, dancer, television personality, jewelry designer, actress, and Emmy Award-winning choreographer. ... Forever Your Girl is the debut album from singer Paula Abdul. ... Petra, which means rock, massive in Greek, is a Christian Rock band formed in the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... In the Air Tonight is a song by Phil Collins which first appeared on his 1981 album, Face Value. ... Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now) is a song originally written and recorded by British singer Phil Collins. ... Sussudio is a pop song by Phil Collins, released as a single in January 1985. ... Take Me Home is the 10th track on Collins third solo album, No Jacket Required. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... The Final Cut may mean: The Final Cut, an album by Pink Floyd The Final Cut, an industrial music group The Final Cut, the third part of the House of Cards trilogy about the rise and fall of a Machiavellian prime minister The Final Cut, a 2004 movie See also... Alternate cover US remaster cover A Momentary Lapse of Reason is Pink Floyds 1987 album, the bands first release after the official departure of Roger Waters from the band in 1985. ... Poison is an American glam metal band which originally achieved popular success in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... Look What the Cat Dragged In was the debut album of American glam metal band Poison. ... Open Up and Say… Ahh!, was the second and most successful album by American hair metal band Poison. ... For other uses, see Prince (disambiguation). ... Purple Rain is a 1984 feature film directed by Albert Magnoli and written by Magnoli and William Blinn. ... Sign O the Times was Princes 1986 follow-up to Parade his first solo album since splitting with The Revolution. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bass guitarist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Quiet Riot is an American heavy metal band, whose 1983 & 1984 success contributed to launching the 1980s glam metal scene. ... Metal Health was the breakthrough album for the American heavy metal band Quiet Riot. ... This article is about the band. ... For other persons of the same name, see Robert Palmer. ... For other uses, see Riptide. ... Run-DMC is a famous hip hop crew founded by Jason Mizell (Jam Master Jay) and includes Joseph Run Simmons and Darryl DMC McDaniels, all from Hollis, Queens. ... Raising Hell is a 1986 (see 1986 in music) album by old school rappers Run-D.M.C.. Their breakthrough album, Raising Hell trumped standing perceptions of commercial viability for hip hop groups, achieving triple-platinum status and receiving critical attention from quarters that had previously ignored hip hop as... Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Permanent Waves is the seventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released January 1, 1980 (see 1980 in music). ... Moving Pictures is the eighth studio album by Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ... Signals is the ninth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1982 (see 1982 in music). ... Grace Under Pressure is the tenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1984 (see 1984 in music). ... Power Windows is the eleventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1985 (see 1985 in music). ... For the FireHouse album, see Hold Your Fire (FireHouse album). ... Presto is the thirteenth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... Sheena Easton (born Sheena Shirley Orr on April 27, 1959, Bellshill, North Lanarkshire, Scotland) is a Scottish two time Grammy Award-winning pop singer and theatre & television actress. ... Sheila Escovedo (born December 12, 1957), better known as Sheila E., is the daughter of percussionist Pete Escovedo, with whom she frequently performs. ... Simple Minds is a rock band from Scotland, which had its greatest worldwide popularity from the mid-1980s to the early-1990s. ... Look up Once upon a time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... To document their successful worldwide Once Upon a Time tour, Simple Minds released the double-live set Live In The City of Light in 1987, which was recorded primarily over two nights in Paris in 1986. ... Street Fighting Years is an album by the Simple Minds, released in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ... Simply Red are an English pop band. ... For other uses, see Slayer (disambiguation). ... Show No Mercy is the debut album by the thrash metal band Slayer, which was released in December 1983 through Metal Blade Records. ... The SOS Band is an American musical ensemble, founded in Atlanta, Georgia in 1977. ... The Finest is an album by Fine Young Cannibals, released on London Records. ... Stryper is a Christian metal band from Orange County, California, USA. Formed in 1983, they are pioneers in the mainstream popularization of Christian rock music. ... This article is about the band. ... The Logical Song is a hit single on Supertramps 1979 album Breakfast in America and written and sung by band member Roger Hodgson. ... Teena Marie (born Mary Christine Brockert on March 5, 1956 in Santa Monica, California, USA) is an American Grammy Award-nominated singer/songwriter/producer. ... The cover to the Jackson 5s first LP, Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5, released on Motown Records in 1969. ... Music sample White Rabbit vs. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Zenyatta Mondatta is the third album by The Police, released in 1980 (see 1980 in music). ... For other uses, please see Ghost in the Machine (disambiguation) Ghost in the Machine is the fourth album by The Police, released in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ... Synchronicity is the fifth album by The Police, released in 1983. ... Tiffany Renee Darwish (born October 2, 1971), known popularly as Tiffany, is an American singer who had a number of teen pop hits during the late 1980s. ... Tiffany is the self-titled debut album by Tiffany, released in May, 1987 (see 1987 in music). ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Hard Promises is the fourth album by Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers released in May of 1981. ... Long After Dark is the fifth album by Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, released in November of 1982 on MCA Backstreet Records. ... Southern Accents is a 1985 album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. ... It has been suggested that Free Fallin be merged into this article or section. ... Toto (IPA pronunciation: ) is a Grammy Award winning American rock band founded in 1976[1] by some of the most popular and experienced session musicians of the era. ... Still from the promotional video for Africa Africa is a song by 80s rock band Toto. ... Rosanna is a hit song; one of the best known, by 1980s rock band Toto, the opening track from the 1982 album Toto IV. Rosanna won a Record of the Year Grammy Award. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... War is the third studio album by Irish rock band U2, released in 1983. ... For other uses, see Joshua tree (disambiguation). ... Rattle and Hum refers to both a motion picture about the band U2 and its companion album, documenting the bands 1987 Joshua Tree Tour of the United States and its exploration into American music. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ... Women and Children First is the third album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1980. ... Fair Warning is the fourth studio album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1981. ... Diver Down is the fifth album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1982. ... 1984 (rendered MCMLXXXIV on the cover) is the sixth album by American hard rock band Van Halen. ... 5150 is the seventh album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1986. ... OU812 is the eighth album by American hard rock band Van Halen, released in 1988. ... Whitesnake is an English hard rock band, founded in 1977 by David Coverdale (formerly of Deep Purple). ... Slide It In is an album released in 1984 by British band Whitesnake. ... Whitesnake, 1987 album by the British rock band of the same name (Whitesnake) was a major crossover hit and one of the top-selling albums in the hair metal genre, eventually selling over eight million copies (and thus going eight times platinum). ... album of Steve Vai. ... ZZ Top (pronounced ) is an American hard rock band formed in 1969 in Houston, Texas. ... Eliminator is the eighth studio album by American blues-rock band ZZ Top, released in 1983 (see 1983 in music). ... Afterburner is the ninth studio album by American blues-rock band ZZ Top, released in 1985 (see 1985 in music). ...

Actors

This article is about the actor. ... For other uses, see St. ... Pretty in Pink is a popular 1986 film about teenage love and social cliques in 1980s American high schools. ... Michael Anthony Thomas Charles Hall (born April 14, 1968), known professionally as Anthony Michael Hall, is an American actor, producer and director who achieved stardom in several successful teen-oriented films of the 1980s. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... This article is about the 1985 film. ... For other uses, see Weird Science. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... This article is about the first film in the series. ... Predator is a 1987 science fiction, action and horror film directed by John McTiernan and starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Carl Weathers and Jesse Ventura. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Bo Derek (born Mary Cathleen Collins on November 20, 1956, Long Beach, California, USA) is a Golden Globe-nominated American film actress and model. ... Walter Bruce Willis (born March 19, 1955) is a Golden Globe- and double Emmy-winning German-born American actor and singer. ... Moonlighting is a television series that first aired on ABC in the United States from 1985 to 1989 with a total of 66 episodes. ... This article is about the 1988 action film. ... Look Whos Talking is a 1989 comedy film which stars John Travolta (James Ubriacco) and Kirstie Alley (Mollie). ... The Brat Pack was a group of young actors and actresses that became famous in the 1980s and frequently appeared in films together. ... Charles Irwin Sheen (born September 3, 1965) is a Golden Globe Award-winning and Emmy-nominated American actor. ... This article is about the 1987 film. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... This article is about the David Lynch film. ... This page is about the movie Hoosiers. Hoosiers is also the nickname of Indiana University athletic teams; see Indiana Hoosiers. ... For other uses, see Eddie Murphy (disambiguation). ... SNL redirects here. ... Beverly Hills Cop (1984) is an American comedy film directed by Martin Brest and starring Eddie Murphy. ... This article is about the 1983 movie. ... For the reality television series starring Victoria Beckham, see Victoria Beckham: Coming to America. ... Emilio Estévez (born May 12, 1962) is an American actor, director and writer. ... This article is about the 1985 film. ... The Outsiders is a film adaptation of the novel of the same name by S. E. Hinton, and was made in 1983 by Francis Ford Coppola. ... Young Guns is a 1988 action/western film directed by Christopher Cain and written by John Fusco. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... This article is about the fictional character. ... This article is about the series. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Witness is a 1985 movie released by Paramount Pictures, starring Harrison Ford, Kelly McGillis, and Lukas Haas. ... John Joseph Nicholson (born April 22, 1937), known as Jack Nicholson, is a three time Academy Award-winning American actor internationally renowned for his often dark-themed portrayals of neurotic characters. ... For the Drawn Together episode, see Terms of Endearment (Drawn Together episode). ... For other uses of this term, see Shining. ... Batman DVD cover, 1997 release version Batman was released in U.S. theaters on June 23, 1989 by Warner Bros. ... Prizzis Honor is a 1985 comedy film that tells the story of a mob hit man and hit woman who fall in love with each other, even though they have been hired to kill each other. ... Ironweed book cover Ironweed is a 1983 novel by William Kennedy. ... Reds is a 1981 film starring Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Planes, Trains & Automobiles is an American comedy movie produced by Paramount Pictures in 1987. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Matthew Broderick (born March 21, 1962) is a Tony Award-winning American film and stage actor who is best known for his roles as the title character in Ferris Buellers Day Off and the adult Simba in Disneys The Lion King. ... This article is about the 1983 US movie. ... Ferris Bueller redirects here. ... Biloxi Blues, a play by Neil Simon, is the second in what is known as Simons Eugene Trilogy, the first being Brighton Beach Memoirs, and the third being Broadway Bound. ... Glory is a 1989 Academy Award-winning drama based on the history of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment during the American Civil War. ... Meg Ryan (born November 19, 1961) is an American actress who specializes in romantic comedies but has also worked in other film genres. ... Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson, AO (born January 3, 1956) is an American-Australian actor, historian, Academy Award-winning director, producer and screenwriter. ... Lethal Weapon is a 1987 action film, the first in a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all directed by Richard Donner and starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of LAPD detectives. ... For other uses, see Mad Max (disambiguation). ... Mary Louise Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award, Cannes Best Actress, Berlin Best Actress winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Ironweed is a 1987 film based on the novel by William Kennedy and tells the story of an alcoholic, wandering man and woman during the Great Depression. ... A Cry in the Dark (Australia: Evil Angels) is a 1988 film based on the disappearance and assumed death of Azaria Chamberlain, a nine-week-old baby girl who went missing from a campground near Uluru (formerly Ayers Rock) on August 17, 1980. ... She-Devil is a 1989 film starring Meryl Streep and Roseanne Barr. ... Michael John Douglas (born September 5, 1951), better known by the stage name Michael Keaton, is an American actor, perhaps best known for his early comedic roles in films such as Night Shift, Beetlejuice, and his portrayal of Batman in the two Tim Burton directed films of the series. ... Batman DVD cover, 1997 release version Batman was released in U.S. theaters on June 23, 1989 by Warner Bros. ... For the Lonestar song, see Mr. ... A night shift is either a group of workers who work during the night, or the period in which they work. ... For other persons named Michael Fox, see Michael Fox (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Family Ties (disambiguation). ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... This article is about the film. ... Michelle Marie Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning, BAFTA-winning American actress. ... Grease 2 is the 1982 sequel to the 1978 smash hit Grease. ... Scarface is a 1983 film directed by Brian De Palma, written by Oliver Stone and starring Al Pacino as Antonio Tony Montana. ... Dangerous Liaisons is a 1988 film directed by Stephen Frears. ... Molly Kathleen Ringwald (born February 18, 1968) is an American actress, singer, and dancer. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Pretty in Pink is a popular 1986 film about teenage love and social cliques in 1980s American high schools. ... Noriyuki Pat Morita (June 28, 1932 – November 24, 2005) was an American actor who is probably best known for playing the roles of Arnold on the TV show Happy Days and Mr. ... The Karate Kid is a 1984 John G. Avildsen film starring Pat Morita, Ralph Macchio and Elisabeth Shue. ... Patrick Wayne Swayze (born August 18, 1952) is an American dancer, actor, singer and songwriter. ... Dirty Dancing is a 1987 romance film credited as being one of the most watched films of all time, particularly among women. ... Paul Hogan starring as Crocodile Dundee. ... Crocodile Dundee is a 1986 Australian comedy film set in the Australian Outback in the area around Walkabout Creek and in New York City. ... Paul Reubens (born Paul Rubenfeld on August 27, 1952) is an American actor, writer, and comedian, known professionally for his character Pee-wee Herman. ... Pee-wee escapes from Warner Bros. ... Pee-wees Playhouse is a childrens television program starring Pee-Wee Herman. ... Big Top Pee-wee is the 1988 family comedy sequel to the 1985 movie, Pee-wees Big Adventure, and stars Paul Reubens (as Pee-wee Herman), Penelope Ann Miller, Valeria Golino, and Kris Kristofferson. ... Phoebe Cates (born on July 16, 1963) is an American film actress known for her roles in several teen films, most notably Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Gremlins. ... Ridgemont High School redirects here. ... For other uses, see Gremlin (disambiguation). ... Richard Tiffany Gere[1] (born August 31, 1949) is a Golden Globe- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American actor. ... DVD cover American Gigolo is a 1980 film, written and directed by Paul Schrader, who based the film on French director Robert Bressons Pickpocket (1959). ... An Officer and a Gentleman is a 1982 film which tells the story of a United States Navy aviation Officer Candidate who comes into conflict with the Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant who trains him. ... Sigourney Weaver (born Susan Alexandra Weaver on October 8, 1949 in New York City) is an Oscar-nominated American actress. ... Working Girl is an Academy Award nominee for Best Picture and an Academy Award winner for Best Song (Let the River Run by Carly Simon), which tells the story of a Staten Island-raised secretary, Tess McGill, working in the mergers and acquisitions department of a Wall Street investment bank. ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ... Summary Steve Martin plays an attorney dating the boss daughter, who is also an aspiring jazz rhythm guitarist. ... Planes, Trains & Automobiles is an American comedy movie produced by Paramount Pictures in 1987. ... This article is about the film Parenthood. ... Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone[1] (born July 6, 1946) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, director, producer and screenwriter. ... This article is about the Sylvester Stallone character and films. ... Rocky III (1982) is the third installment in the Rocky movie series. ... For the soundtrack to the movie, see Rocky IV (album). ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Top Gun is a 1986 American film directed by Tony Scott and produced by Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer in association with Paramount Pictures. ... Rain Man is a 1988 film which tells the story of a selfish yuppie who discovers that his father has left all of his estate to the autistic brother he never knew he had. ... Risky Business is a 1983 comedy film written by Paul Brickman in his directorial debut. ... The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ... Tracy Chapman (born March 30, 1964) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for her singles, Fast Car, Talkin Bout a Revolution, Baby Can I Hold You and Give Me One Reason. She is a multi-platinum and multi-Grammy Award-winning artist. ... Tracy Chapman is the self-titled debut album by singer/songwriter Tracy Chapman, released in 1988 (see 1988 in music). ... Whoopi Goldberg (born November 13, 1955) is an American actress, comedian, radio presenter, host, and author. ... This article is about about the novel. ... This article is about the movie. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... Labyrinth is a 1986 fantasy film, directed by Jim Henson, produced by George Lucas, and designed through the art of Brian Froud. ... David Paul Cronenberg OC, FRSC (born March 15, 1943[2]) is a Canadian film director and occasional actor. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... Dune is a 1984 science fiction film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name. ... This article is about the David Lynch film. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... This article is about the series. ... Captain EO (alternately, Captain Eo) is a 3-D film which was formerly shown in Disney theme parks. ... For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ... This article is about the entire Terminator franchise. ... For other people with this name, see John Hughes. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Legend is a 1985 fantasy film released by 20th Century Fox (in Europe) and Universal Pictures (in the U.S. and Canada), directed by Ridley Scott and starring Tom Cruise, Mia Sara, Tim Curry, Alice Playten, and Billy Barty. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... For the video games based on the movie, see E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial in video games. ... The Goonies was a hit movie in 1985, directed by Richard Donner. ...

Sports figures

André René Roussimoff (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993), best known as André the Giant, was a French professional wrestler and actor. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Alexis Argüello (born April 19, 1952), is a former world champion boxer, born in Nicaragua. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Marcel Marco van Basten (October 31, 1964 in Oog in Al, Utrecht) is a Dutch football manager, currently in charge of the Dutch national team. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Wilfred Benitez (born September 12, 1958 in New York, New York), is a Puerto Rican boxer. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the best players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... This article is about the sport. ... Serge Blanco (born 31 August 1958 in Caracas, Venezuela) is a former rugby union footballer who played fullback for Biarritz Olympique and France, gaining 93 caps, 81 at fullback. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir Ian Terence Botham, OBE (born 24 November 1955) is a former England Test cricketer and Test team captain, and current cricket commentator. ... John Michael Brearley OBE (born in Harrow, Middlesex, on 28 April 1942) is a former cricketer who captained the England cricket team in 31 of his 39 Test matches, winning 17 and losing only 4. ... For the US Army Air Forces general during World War II, see George Brett (military). ... This article is about the sport. ... For other persons named Peter Brock, see Peter Brock (disambiguation). ... Motor Sport redirects here. ... For the pitcher who currently plays for the Arizona Diamondbacks, see Billy Buckner. ... Warwick Capper (born 12 June 1963) is a former Australian rules football full-forward who played for the Victorian/Australian Football Leagues Sydney Swans with a short stint at the Brisbane Bears. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... David Ian Campese (born October 21, 1962 in Queanbeyan), also known as Campo, is an Australian former Rugby Union player. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... For this mans son, also a boxer, see Julio César Chávez, Jr. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Errol Christie in 2007 Errol Christie is a former professional British boxer and currently a boxing trainer. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962, in Dayton, Ohio), is a starting pitcher for the New York Yankees, and is one of the preeminent pitchers in Major League history. ... This article is about the sport. ... Roberto Duran (b. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... This article is about the elder Dale Earnhardt. ... Paul Roberto Falcão on a 1982 Italian magazine. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Richard Morgan Fliehr[2] (born on February 25, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota[2]) better known by his ring name Ric Flair , is a legendary American professional wrestler of iconic staus signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on its SmackDown! brand. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Marcus Dell Gastineau (born November 20, 1956) is a former American football player who was a leading defensive end for the New York Jets from 1979 to 1988. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Michael William Gatting (born June 6, 1957) was an English cricketer who played first-class cricket for Middlesex County Cricket Club. ... Sunil Manohar Gavaskar   (Marathi:सुनिल मनोहर गावसकर) (born July 10, 1949 at Bombay, Maharashtra), nicknamed Sunny, was a cricket player during the 1970s and 1980s for Bombay and India. ... Dwight Eugene Gooden (born November 16, 1964 in Tampa, Florida), also known as Doc Gooden or Dr. K, is a former major league baseball player. ... Cuthbert Gordon Greenidge was a West Indian cricketer, born May 1, 1951 in Black Bess, St. ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Florence Griffith-Joyner, also known as Flo-Jo (December 21, 1959 – September 21, 1998) was an American athlete, still holder of the World Records in the 100 m and 200 m as of 2006. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red urethane track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Sir Richard John Hadlee MBE (born July 3, 1951) is a former New Zealand cricketer. ... Marvelous Marvin Hagler (born Marvin Nathaniel Hagler in Newark, New Jersey, May 23, 1954), is a former American boxer. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Alan David Hansen (born Alloa, Clackmannanshire, Scotland, June 13, 1955) is a BBC television expert football pundit and a former football player. ... Thomas Hearns (born October 18, 1958, in Memphis, Tennessee), is an American 7-time world champion professional boxer. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Rickey Henley Henderson (born December 25, 1958 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who is baseballs all-time leader in stolen bases[1] and runs scored. ... This article is about the sport. ... Keith Hernandez (born October 20, 1953 in San Francisco, California) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman, who played for the St. ... This article is about the sport. ... Terrence Gene Bollea (born on August 11, 1953) is an American actor and semi-retired professional wrestler better known by his ring name Hulk Hogan. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... For the politician and activist, see Larry Holmes (Marxist). ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Hossein Khosrow Ali Vaziri (حسین خسرو وزیری), (born March 15, 1943 in Tehran, Iran) is a retired Iranian professional wrestler better known by his ring name The Iron Sheik. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Vincent Edward Bo Jackson (born November 30, 1962 in Bessemer, Alabama) is an American athlete and a former multi-sport professional. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the cricketer from the West Indies, see Imran Khan (Trinidad and Tobago cricketer). ... This article is about the sport. ... Jahangir Khan Jahangir Khan (born December 10, 1963, sometimes spelled Jehangir Khan) is a former World No. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... Jarmila Kratochvílová (born 26 January 1951) was a late-developing Czech 400m runner whose career was dogged by injury and illness. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red urethane track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Mario Lemieux (born October 5, 1965) is a retired professional ice hockey centre who played 17 seasons for the Pittsburgh Penguins of the National Hockey League (NHL) between 1984 and 2005. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Gregory James Greg LeMond (born June 26, 1961 in Lakewood, California) is a former professional road bicycle racer from the United States and a three time winner of the Tour de France. ... Cycling is the use of bicycles, or - less commonly - unicycles, tricycles, quadricycles and other similar wheeled human powered vehicles (HPVs) as a means of transport, a form of recreation or a sport. ... Ivan Lendl (IPA: ) (born March 7, 1960, in Ostrava, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic)) is a former World No. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Ray Charles Leonard (born May 17, 1956 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is a retired professional boxer. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Frederick Carlton Carl Lewis (born July 1, 1961) is a retired American track and field athlete who won 10 Olympic medals including 9 golds (He received the gold medal in the 100 meters in 1988 Olympics after Ben Johnson was disqualified for using drugs), and 10 World Championships medals, of... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red urethane track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Captain of the Australia national rugby league football team Wally Lewis (born December 1, 1959 in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia) is a former rugby league footballer who was one of the most pre-eminent players of the 1980s. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Gary Lineker Gary Winston[1] Lineker, OBE (born 30 November 1960 in Leicester) is a former English international football striker who scored ten goals in two World Cups for the England national team and is currently a sports broadcaster for the BBC... Soccer redirects here. ... Saleem Malik (Urdu: سلیم ملک) (born April 16, 1963) is a former Pakistani cricketer [1981/82 - 1999] who once captained the Pakistani cricket team. ... This article is about the sport. ... Maradona and the World Cup trophy Diego Armando Maradona (El Diego) (born October 30, 1960) is a former Argentine football player. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Malcolm Denzil Marshall (April 18, 1958 - November 4, 1999) was a West Indian cricketer, regarded as one of the finest fast bowlers ever to have played Test cricket; some have suggested he was the finest of all. ... Donald Arthur Mattingly (nicknamed Donnie Baseball and The Hit Man) (born April 20, 1961) is a retired first baseman who played for the New York Yankees of the American League from 1982-1995. ... This article is about the sport. ... John Patrick McEnroe Jr. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Australian national rugby league team captain Malcolm Norman Meninga AM (born on the 8th of July, 1960 in Bundaberg, Queensland) is an Australian rugby league identity. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Not to be confused with Marc Messier, an actor from Quebec. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Mohammad Javed Miandad (Urdu: محمد جاوید میانداد ) (born June 12, 1957), known in the Cricketing World as Javed Miandad (Urdu: جاوید میانداد), was born in Karachi, Pakistan. ... This article is about the sport. ... Joseph Clifford Joe Montana, Jr. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Martina Navrátilová (b. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940), also known as The Golden Bear,[1] is widely regarded as the greatest professional golfer of all time, in large part because of his records in major championships. ... This article is about the game. ... Walter Jerry Payton (July 25, 1954 – November 1, 1999) was an American football player, who played for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Nelson Piquet Souto Maior (born August 17, 1952), more commonly known as Nelson Piquet, is a Brazilian racing driver who was Formula One world champion in 1981, 1983, and 1987. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Roderick George Toombs (born April 17, 1954) better known by his ring name Rowdy Roddy Piper, is a Canadian professional wrestler, and film actor. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Michel François Platini (born June 21, 1955) is a French former football manager and midfielder, and current president of the UEFA (Union of European Football Associations). ... Soccer redirects here. ... Kirby Puckett (March 14, 1960 [1] – March 6, 2006) was a center fielder in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Minnesota Twins from 1984 to 1995. ... This article is about the sport. ... Alain Marie Pascal Prost, OBE (born 24 February 1955) is a French racing driver. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Sir Isaac Vivian Alexander Richards (known by his second name, Vivian or, more popularly, Viv Richards), a former West-Indian cricketer, was born in St Johns, Antigua on 7 March 1952. ... Ian James Rush MBE (born 20 October 1961) is a Welsh footballer who played as a striker and is best known for playing with Liverpool. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... This article is about the sport. ... Ayrton Senna da Silva (pronounced / /, March 21, 1960 – May 1, 1994) was a Brazilian three-times Formula One world champion. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Sgt. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Osborne Earl Ozzie Smith (born December 26, 1954, in Mobile, Alabama) is a former Major League Baseball shortstop who was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2002. ... This article is about the sport. ... Neville Southall (born September 16, 1958 in Llandudno, Wales) is a professional footballer, currently playing for Rhyl in the Welsh league. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Michael Spinks, a native of St. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Darryl Eugene Strawberry (born March 12, 1962) is a former baseball player who is well-known both for his play on the baseball field and for his controversial behavior off it. ... Lawrence Julius Taylor (born February 4, 1959, in Williamsburg, Virginia), commonly referred to as LT, is a retired Hall of Fame American football player. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Isiah Lord Thomas III () (born April 30, 1961, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and is currently the head coach of the NBAs New York Knicks. ... This article is about the sport. ... Francis Morgan Thompson, CBE (born July 30, 1958 in Worcester Park), known commonly as Daley Thompson, is a former English decathlete and arguably the greatest the world had ever seen. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red urethane track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Michael Gerard Tyson (born June 30, 1966) is a former two-time American world heavyweight boxing champion and is the youngest man to have won a world heavyweight title. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... David Mark Winfield (born October 3, 1951, in St. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about Dwight Yorke, the football player. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Jon Steven Young (born October 11, 1961 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is a former quarterback for the National Football Leagues San Francisco 49ers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and the Los Angeles Express of the short-lived United States Football League. ... Arthur Antunes Coimbra (born in March 3, 1953), better known as Zico , is a former Brazilian footballer and coach. ... Soccer redirects here. ...

Political figures

For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Reagan redirects here. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of the former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... John Napier Wyndham Turner PC CC QC (born June 7, 1929) was the seventeenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 30, 1984 to September 17, 1984. ... Martin Brian Mulroney PC CC GOQ (predominantly known as Brian Mulroney) (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... Unlike in the United States, the spouse of the Prime Minister of Canada does not have a prominent role. ... Geills McCrae Kilgour Turner (born December 23, 1937) is the wife of John Napier Turner, a former Prime Minister of Canada. ... Mila (left) and Brian (right) Mulroney greet Pierre Trudeau (Foreground). ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... Joseph Stalin, first General Secretary The General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (First Secretary in 1953-1966) was the title synonymous with leader of the Soviet Union after Vladimir Lenins death in 1924. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev[1] (Russian: , IPA: ; born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... Joseph Stalin, first General Secretary The General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (First Secretary in 1953-1966) was the title synonymous with leader of the Soviet Union after Vladimir Lenins death in 1924. ... Brezhnev redirects here. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... Martin Kippenberger (born 25 February 1953 in Dortmund, died 7 March 1997 in Vienna), was an influential German artist whose penchant for mischievousness made him the focus of a generation of German enfants terrible including Albert Oehlen and Markus Oehlen, Georg Herold[1], Dieter Göls, and Günther F... José Daniel Ortega Saavedra (born 11 November 1945) is the current President of Nicaragua. ...

See also

1980s fashion in popular culture incorporated distinct trends from different eras, including ancient Egypt, early 20th century English royalty, Victorian era buccaneers, and punk rockers from the 1970s. ... This page indexes the individual year in television pages. ... This page indexes the individual year in music pages. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC - h2g2 - Growing Up in the 1980s (818 words)
More than just a collection of dates, the 1980s were a time of discovery, innovation, tragedy and creativity.
It saw the end of the Cold War and the start of MTV, a rise in unemployment and the fall of the Berlin Wall; breakdancing and Reaganomics, political correctness, portable cassette-players, the Tiananmen Square massacre and 'Live Aid'.
But with the explosion of 'must-have' brands - most notably in the region of trainers - the 1980s saw children under pressure from their peers to have the 'right' label.
1980s Summary (711 words)
In the 1980s American culture was defined by a triumphant political and social conservatism.
The 1980s was a decade of consolidation in the media, as huge television networks were bought up by even bigger companies, small publishing firms were cobbled together into multimedia behemoths, and small-town newspapers were bought by nationwide chains...
The decade of the 1980s was a great period of restructuring for the majority of religions in the United States.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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