FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
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Encyclopedia > 1980's
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1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (1st millennium BC – 1st millennium – 2nd millennium – other millennia) Events Beginning of Christianity and Islam London founded by Romans as Londinium Diaspora of the Jews The Olympic Games observed until 393 The Library of Alexandria, largest library in the world, burned Rise and fall of the Roman Empire Germanic kingdoms... (1st millennium – 2nd millennium – 3rd millennium – other millennia) Events The Black Death Mongol Empires in Asia The Renaissance in Europe The Protestant Reformation The agricultural and industrial revolutions The rise of nationalism and the nation state European discovery of the Americas and Australia and their colonization European colonization and decolonization... (2nd millennium – 3rd millennium – 4th millennium – other millennia) The third millennium is the third period of one thousand years in the Common Era. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2000-2099. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of transition between the turbulent 1960s and the more conservative 1980s and 1990s, many of the trends that are associated widely with the Sixties, from the Sexual Revolution... Events and trends Technology Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft Windows operating system becomes virtually ubiquitous on IBM... This article is about the decade starting at the beginning of 2000 and ending at the end of 2009. ... Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s - 2010s - 2020s 2030s 2040s 2050s 2060s Years: 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 The Decade as a Whole This decade is expected to be called the... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1982 is a number and represents a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar Events January-February January 6 - William Bonin is convicted of being the freeway killer. January 8 - AT&T agrees to divest itself of twenty-two subdivisions January 11 - Mark Thatcher, son of the British... 1983 is an integer and composite number that represents a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Contents

Events and trends

The 1980's marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960's and 1970's and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. This decade has been somewhat derided since its closing for its perceived "Greed" among Yuppies, certain clothes/music/hairstyles which seem outlandish by modern standards, overall high crime rates in many countries, and of course the onset of the AIDS virus in the early part of the decade. While true to some extent, events and trends of the 1980's contributed greatly towards toppling the Soviet Union and European Communism in the last months of the decade, and the 1980's saw very rapid developments in numerous sectors of technology which have defined the 20th century as a whole.


Technology

A bulletin board system or BBS is a computer system running software that allows users to dial into the system over a phone line and, using a terminal program, perform functions such as downloading software and data, uploading data, reading news, and exchanging messages with other users. ... The tower of a personal computer. ... SONY Recorder Walkman (TCM-S68V) MD Walkman The Sony Walkman personal stereo was a transistorized miniature portable cassette tape player invented by Akio Morita, Masaru Ibuka and Kozo Ohsone, and manufactured by Sony Corporation. ... Top view VHS cassette with US Quarter for scale Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed The Video Home System, better known by its acronym VHS, is a recording and playing standard for video cassette recorders (VCRs), developed by JVC (ironically, with some of its critical technology under... Image of a recordable compact disc (pencil included for scale) A compact disc (or CD) is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... Computer and video games A screenshot of Tetris for the Nintendo Game Boy A console game (better known as a video game) is a form of interactive multimedia used for entertainment, which consists of a moveable image displayed on a screen that is usually controlled and manipulated using a handheld... Atari 2600 (four-switch version). ... Screenshot E.T. (Atari 2600 version) The video game crash of 1983 refers to the sudden bankruptcy of a number of companies producing home computers and video game consoles in North America in late 1983. ... The Nintendo Entertainment System (North America, Europe, and Australia) NES redirects here. ... Shuttle Orbiter Challenger (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-99) was a Space Shuttle orbiter. ... Macintosh, also known as Mac, is a family of personal computers manufactured by Apple Computer, Inc. ... Gui is a French form of the male name Guy. ... Chernobyl area. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Framework, launched in the 1980s, was probably the first office suite - an integrated word processor, outliner, mini-database and spreadsheet program developed by Ashton-Tate for personal computers running DOS. In 1983 Robert Carr and Marty Mazner founded Forefront Corporation to develop Framework. ...

Science

In physics, the W and Z bosons are the elementary particles that mediate the weak nuclear force. ... CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research, the worlds largest particle physics laboratory, situated on the border between France and Switzerland, just west of Geneva. ... Image of substitutional Cr impurities (small bumps) in the Fe(001) surface. ... Gerd Binnig (born 1947) is a German-born physicist who shared with Heinrich Rohrer half of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Physics for their invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). ... Heinrich Rohrer (born 1933) is a Swiss physicist who, with Gerd Binnig, received half of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Physics for their joint invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). ...

War, peace and politics

The Cold War ( 1947- 1991) was the open yet restricted rivalry that developed after World War II between groups of nations practicing different ideologies and political systems. ... In the summer of 1989, the foreign ministers of Austria and Hungary, Alois Mock and Gyula Horn, ceremoniously cut through the border defences separating their countries. ... Order: 39th President Vice President: Walter Mondale Term of office: January 20, 1977 – January 20, 1981 Preceded by: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Ronald Reagan Date of birth: October 1, 1924 Place of birth: Plains, Georgia First Lady: Rosalynn Carter Political party: Democratic James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... The Games of the XXII Olympiad were held in 1980 in Moscow, Soviet Union. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow  listen? ( Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, pronunciation: Moskva), capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 1097. ... During the Cold War, the Eastern Bloc (or Soviet Bloc) comprised the following Central and Eastern European countries: Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, East Germany, Poland, Albania (until the early 1960s, see below), the Soviet Union, and Czechoslovakia. ... The Games of the XXIII Olympiad were held in 1984 in Los Angeles, sports Opening ceremonies July 28, 1984 Closing ceremonies August 12, 1984 Officially opened by Ronald Reagan Athletes Oath Edwin Moses Judges Oath Sharon Weber Olympic Torch Rafer Johnson Highlights After the American-led boycott of... This article is about the largest city in California. ... Solidarity (Polish Solidarność) is a Polish trade union federation founded in September 1980, originally led by Lech Wałęsa. ... The Republic of Poland, a democratic country with a population of 38,626,349 and area of 312,685 km², is located in Central Europe, between Germany to the west, the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south, Ukraine and Belarus to the east, and the Baltic Sea, Lithuania and... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Communism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles... The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) is a system proposed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan on March 23, 1983 to use space-based systems to protect the United States from attack by strategic nuclear missiles. ... The Pershing II Missile during a test flight The MGM-31 Pershing was a solid-fueled two-stage inertially guided medium range ballistic missile used by the U.S. Armys Missile Command. ... The RT-21M Pioneer was a medium-range ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead deployed by the Soviet Union from 1976 to 1988. ... Korean Air Flight 7 (KAL007, KE007) was the flight number of a civilian airliner shot down by Soviet fighters on September 1, 1983, over Soviet territorial waters just west of Sakhalin island, killing all 269 passengers and crew. ... 1983 is an integer and composite number that represents a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Soviet redirects here. ... Leonid Brezhnev Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev (Russian: Леонид Ильич Брежнев) (December 19, 1906 - November 10, 1982) was effective ruler of the Soviet Union from 1964 to 1982, though at first in partnership with others. ... Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov (Ю́рий Влади́мирович Андро́пов), (June 2 (O.S.) = June 15 (N.S.), 1914 - February 9, 1984) was a Soviet politician and General Secretary of the CPSU from November 12, 1982 until his death just sixteen months later. ... Chernenko Konstantin Ustinovich Chernenko (Константи́н Усти́нович Черне́нко) (September 24, 1911 - March 10, 1985) was a Soviet politician and General Secretary of the CPSU who led the Soviet Union from February 13, 1984 until his death just eleven months later. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: ; Pronunciation: mih-kha-ILL ser-GHE-ye-vich gor-bah-CHOFF) (born March 2, 1931), was leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991. ... Glasnost (Russian: гла́сность,  listen?) was one of Mikhail Gorbachevs policies introduced to the Soviet Union in 1985. ... Perestroika  listen? (Перестро́йка) is the Russian word (which passed into English) for the economic reforms introduced in June 1987 by the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. ... Soviet Union - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Berlin Wall on November 16, 1989 The Berlin Wall ( German: Berliner Mauer) was a long barrier separating West Berlin from East Berlin and the surrounding territory of East Germany. ... For the historical eastern German provinces, see Historical Eastern Germany East Germany, officially the German Democratic Republic (GDR), German Deutsche Demokratische Republik (DDR), was a Communist Party-led state that existed from 1949 to 1990 in the former Soviet occupation zone of Germany. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... German reunification (Deutsche Wiedervereinigung) refers to the reunification of Germany from its constituent parts of East Germany and West Germany under a single government on October 3, 1990. ... The Velvet Revolution (Czech: sametová revoluce, Slovak: nežná revolúcia) (November 16 - December 29 1989) refers to a bloodless revolution in Czechoslovakia that saw the overthrow of the communist government there. ... Czechoslovakia (Czech: Československo, Slovak: Česko-Slovensko/before 1990 Československo) was a country in Central Europe that existed from 1918 until 1992 (except for the World War II period). ... People on the streets of Bucharest The Romanian Revolution of 1989 was a week-long series of riots and protests in late December of 1989 that overthrew the Communist regime of Nicolae Ceauşescu. ... Romania (formerly spelled Rumania or Roumania; Romanian: România) is a country in southeastern Europe. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... The Right Honourable Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) is a British politician and the first woman Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, a position she held from 1979 to 1990. ... Thatcherism is the system of political thought attributed to the governments of Margaret Thatcher, British Prime Minister during the 1980s. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... François Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterand ( October 26, 1916 - January 8, 1996;  pronunciation?) was a French politician and President of France from May 1981, re-elected in 1988, until 1995. ... The emblem of the French Socialist Party The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste or PS), founded in 1969, is the main opposition party in France. ... Dr. Helmut Kohl (full name Helmut Josef Michael Kohl) was Chancellor of Germany from 1982 to 1998. ... West Germany was the informal but almost universally used name for the Federal Republic of Germany from 1949 until 1990, during which years the Federal Republic did not yet include East Germany. ... Chancellor ( Latin: cancellarius), an official title used by most of the peoples whose civilization has arisen directly or indirectly out of the Roman empire. ... The Falklands War or the Malvinas War (Spanish: Guerra de las Malvinas), was an armed conflict between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the Falkland Islands, also known in Spanish as the Islas Malvinas, between March and June of 1982. ... Argentina is a country in southern South America, situated between the Andes in the west and the southern Atlantic Ocean in the east. ... The Falkland Islands are an archipelago in the South Atlantic consisting of two main islands, East Falkland and West Falkland, and a number of smaller islands. ... 1982 is a number and represents a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar Events January-February January 6 - William Bonin is convicted of being the freeway killer. January 8 - AT&T agrees to divest itself of twenty-two subdivisions January 11 - Mark Thatcher, son of the British... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... The State of Israel (Hebrew: מְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל, transliteration: ; Arabic: دَوْلَةْ اِسْرَائِيل, transliteration: ) is a country in the Middle East on the eastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Lebanese Republic or Lebanon is a country in the Middle East, along the Mediterranean Sea, bordered by Syria and Israel. ... 1982 is a number and represents a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar Events January-February January 6 - William Bonin is convicted of being the freeway killer. January 8 - AT&T agrees to divest itself of twenty-two subdivisions January 11 - Mark Thatcher, son of the British... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Iranian troops in the northern front. ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republic of Cuba is an archipelago in the northern Caribbean that lies at the confluence of the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Mariel is a town and bay on the north coast of Cuba approximately 40 kilometres west of the city of Havana. ... Cuban President Fidel Castro Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born August 13, 1926) has ruled Cuba since 1959, when, leading the 26th of July Movement, he helped overthrow the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista and turn Cuba into the first socialist state in the Western Hemisphere. ... P.W. Botha Pieter Willem Botha, (born January 12, 1916) commonly known as P.W. and as die groot krokodil (the great crocodile) was Prime Minister of South Africa from 1978 to 1984 and State President of South Africa from 1984 to 1989. ... Apartheid ( International Phonetic Alphabet in English and in Afrikaans) is the policy and the system of laws implemented and enforced by White minority governments in South Africa from 1948 till 1990; and by extension any legally sanctioned system of racial segregation. ... The Republic of South Africa is a large republic located at the southern tip of the continent. ... King Juan Carlos I His Majesty King Juan Carlos I (Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón), styled HM The King (born January 5, 1938), is the reigning King of Spain. ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... The Kingdom of Spain or Spain (Spanish and Galician: Reino de España or España; Catalan: Regne dEspanya; Basque: Espainiako Erresuma) is a country located in the southwest of Europe. ... For the National Association of Theatre Owners, please see National Association of Theatre Owners. ... 1982 is a number and represents a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar Events January-February January 6 - William Bonin is convicted of being the freeway killer. January 8 - AT&T agrees to divest itself of twenty-two subdivisions January 11 - Mark Thatcher, son of the British... The European Union or EU is an intergovernmental organisation of European countries, which currently has 25 member states. ... The Republic of Portugal (Portuguese: República Portuguesa) is a democratic republic located on the west and southwest parts of the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe, the westernmost country in continental Europe. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tiananmen Square (天安门广场; Traditional: 天安門廣場; Pinyin: Tiānānmén Guǎngchǎng) is a large paved public plaza near the middle of Beijing, China in front of the Forbidden City, facing south. ... Beijing  listen? ( Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; ; Postal System Pinyin: Peking), is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Great Wall of China, stretching over 6,700 km, was erected beginning in the 3rd century BC to guard the north from raids by men on horses. ... The Republic of the Philippines is a country of South East Asia, located in the western Pacific Ocean some 1,210 km (750 mi) from mainland Asia. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Ferdinand Marcos Ferdinand Edralin Marcos (September 11, 1917 – September 28, 1989) was the tenth President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Argentina is a country in southern South America, situated between the Andes in the west and the southern Atlantic Ocean in the east. ... South Korea, officially the Republic of Korea (ROK; Korean: Daehan Minguk (Hangul: 대한 민국; Hanja: 大韓民國)), is a country in East Asia, covering the southern half of the Korean Peninsula. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte1 (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... Soviet Union - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Afghanistan (Pashtu/Dari-Persian: Afğānistān افغانستان) is a country in Central Asia. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Order: 4th Secretary-General Term of Office: January 1, 1972–December 31, 1981 Predecessor: U Thant Successor: Javier Pérez de Cuéllar Born: December 21, 1918 Place of birth: St. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... The Socialist Republic of Vietnam is a country in Southeast Asia. ... National motto: Nation, Religion, King National anthem: Nokoreach Capital Phnom Penh Largest city Phnom Penh Official languages Khmer Government King Prime Minister Democratic const. ... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ... Le Pen Jean-Marie Le Pen (born June 20, 1928) is a controversial French politician. ... The French Republic or France (French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. ... Jörg Haider in Carinthia (promotional photo) Jörg Haider (born January 26, 1950) is an Austrian politician. ... This article is about the green parties around the world. ... Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles... Grenada is an island nation in the southeastern Caribbean Sea including the southern Grenadines. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Communism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Famous Reagans include: Ronald Reagan, the 40th President of the United States Nancy Reagan, the wife of Ronald Reagan and influential First Lady Ron Reagan, President Reagans son and journalist Michael Reagan, President Reagans son and conservative talk show host This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid... The Great Socialist Peoples Libyan Arab Jamahiriya or Libya (Arabic: ليبيا) is a country in North Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, located between Egypt on the east, Sudan on the southeast, Chad and Niger on the south and Algeria and Tunisia to the west. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... George Bush can refer to several people, two of whom have been Presidents of the United States: George W. Bush - George Walker Bush, the 43rd and current President of the United States (2001–present). ... Panama (Spanish: Panamá) is the southernmost country of Central America. ... Manuel Noriega Date of birth February 11, 1938 Place of birth Panama City, Panama Occupation Career soldier Education Military School de Chorrilos Lima, Peru School of the Americas Panama Remarks Allegedly a participant in the military coup détat to overthrow Arnulfo Arias. ... The Reagan Doctrine was, in a sense, an important response to the Brezhnev Doctrine of the Soviet Union. ... Anti-communism is opposition to communist ideology, organization, or government, on either a theoretical or practical level. ... Soviet redirects here. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Nicaragua is a republic in Central America. ... Angola is a country in southwestern Africa bordering Namibia, Congo-Kinshasa, and Zambia, and with a west coast along the Atlantic Ocean. ... National motto: Nation, Religion, King National anthem: Nokoreach Capital Phnom Penh Largest city Phnom Penh Official languages Khmer Government King Prime Minister Democratic const. ... Afghanistan (Pashtu/Dari-Persian: Afğānistān افغانستان) is a country in Central Asia. ... In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Sandinista! is also the name of a popular music album by The Clash. ... Nicaragua is a republic in Central America. ... The World Court refers collectively to the Permanent Court of International Justice (PCIJ) and its successor the International Court of Justice (ICJ). ... Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... Iran (Persian: ایران) is a Middle Eastern country located in southwestern Asia. ... Iran (Persian: ایران) is a Middle Eastern country located in southwestern Asia. ... Ayatollah Khomeini founded the first modern Islamic republic Ayatollah Seyyed Ruhollah Khomeini (آیت‌الله روح‌الله خمینی in Persian) (May 17, 1900 – June 3, 1989) was an Iranian Shia cleric and the political and spiritual leader of the 1979 revolution that overthrew Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the then Shah of Iran. ... A fatwa (Arabic: فتوى) plural fataawa, is a legal pronouncement in Islam, issued by a religious law specialist on a specific issue. ... Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947, in Bombay, India) is an essayist and author of fiction, most of which is set on the Indian subcontinent. ... The cockpit landed in a farmers field near a tiny church in Tundergarth, Scotland Pan Am Flight 103 was Pan Ams daily Frankfurt-London-New York-Detroit evening flight. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, with an intent to destroy Israel. ... The Palestine Liberation Front (PLF) was founded to create a Palestinian state; it was headquartered first in Lebanon, and later in Tunisia. ... The Achille Lauro was a passenger liner, most remembered for its 1985 hijacking. ... Leon Klinghoffer (September 24, 1916 - October 8, 1985) was killed aboard the Achille Lauro. ... Abu Nidal (May, 1937 - August 16, 2002), born Sabri al-Banna in Jaffa, was a Palestinian political leader and prominent terrorist. ... Hezbollah militant Guerrilla carrying Hezbollah Flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God) is a political and military organization in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ...

Economics

The term Reaganomics, a portmanteau of Reagan and economics, was used to describe, and decry, the economic policies of U.S. President Ronald Reagan during the 1980s. ... Thatcherism is the system of political thought attributed to the governments of Margaret Thatcher, British Prime Minister during the 1980s. ... The term Rogernomics, a portmanteau of Roger and economics, was created by analogy with Reaganomics to describe the economic policies followed by New Zealand finance minister Roger Douglas from his appointment in 1984. ... A bull market is a financial market where prices of instruments (e. ... 1983 is an integer and composite number that represents a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) is one of several stock market indices created by Wall Street Journal editor and Dow Jones & Company founder Charles Dow. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is made up of Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela; since 1965, its international headquarters have been in Vienna, Austria. ... Nodding donkey pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 Petroleum (from Latin petrus – rock and oleum – oil), mineral oil, or crude oil, sometimes colloquially called black gold, is a thick, dark brown or greenish flammable liquid, which exists in the upper strata of some areas of the Earths... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Mexican States or Mexico (Spanish: Estados Unidos Mexicanos or México; regarding the use of the variant spelling Méjico, see section The name below) is a country located in North America, bordered to the north by the United States of America, to the southeast by Guatemala and Belize, to... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The East Asian Tigers, sometimes also referred to as Asias Four Little Dragons, referred to the economies of Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Singapore; these territories and nations were noted for maintaining high growth rates and rapid industrialization between the early 1960s and 1990s. ... Balance of trade figures are the sum of the money gained by a given economy by selling exports, minus the cost of buying imports. ... Populism is a political ideology or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, which exists only to serve its own interests, and therefore, the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and instead used for the... Official language Japanese Capital Tokyo Largest City Tokyo Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 60th 377,835 km² 0. ... October 19 is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The recession of the late nineteen-eighties was a economic recession that hit much of the world beginning in 1987. ...

Culture

A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... Cable television or Community Antenna Television (CATV) (and often shortened to cable) is a system of providing television, FM radio programming and other services to consumers via radio waves transmitted directly to people’s televisions through fixed coaxial cables as opposed to the over-the-air method used in traditional... Cheers is the name of a long-running sitcom made by Charles-Burrows-Charles Productions in association with Paramount Television for NBC. The show premiered on September 30, 1982 and had its widely-watched series finale on May 20, 1993, followed by a long and ongoing run in syndication. ... Photo of the entire cast of The Cosby Show. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1][2](although he currently is not recognized in CNNs official history). ... The Nintendo GameCube is an example of a popular video game console. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born on December 18, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a Jewish American film director whose films range from science fiction to historical drama to horror. ... Film poster for E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (20th anniversary) E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is a 1982 science fiction film that tells the story of the young boy Elliott who befriends an alien being trapped on Earth and trying to find his way home. ... 1982 is a number and represents a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar Events January-February January 6 - William Bonin is convicted of being the freeway killer. January 8 - AT&T agrees to divest itself of twenty-two subdivisions January 11 - Mark Thatcher, son of the British... A music video (also video clip, promo) is a short film meant to present a visual representation of a popular music song. ... The MTV logotype, often used in different, less stylized, forms. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Michael Jackson Michael Joseph Jackson (born August 29, 1958 in Gary, Indiana), is an American singer, songwriter, and record producer. ... Madonna Madonna Ciccone Ritchie (born Madonna Louise Ciccone in Bay City, Michigan, August 16, 1958), simply known by the stage name Madonna, is an American singer frequently referred to as the Queen of Pop music. ... At the height of its fame, Duran Duran (The Fab Five) was featured on the cover of the February 1984 issue of Rolling Stone magazine. ... The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (Ityopiya, Amharic ኢትዮጵያ) is a country situated in the Horn of Africa. ... Origins Charity work to aid the starving has developed from religious alms in previous centuries to organised charities in the modern day. ... Cover art for the original Do They Know Its Christmas? release – artist Peter Blake Band Aid is a British and Irish charity supergroup founded in 1984 by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure in order to raise money for famine relief in Ethiopia by releasing a record Do They Know... Cover art for the original Do They Know Its Christmas? release – artist Peter Blake This article is about the song. ... USA for Africa (United Support of Artists for Africa), was the name under which forty-five US artists, led by Harry Belafonte, Kenny Rogers, Michael Jackson, and Lionel Richie, recorded the hit single We Are the World in 1985. ... We Are the World is a 1985 song written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie, produced by Quincy Jones and recorded by a supergroup of popular musicians billed as USA for Africa. ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... This article refers to the largest city of Pennsylvania. ... Nuclear Disarmament is the proposed recall and dismantling of nuclear weapons, particularly those the US and USSR targeted on each other. ... Hair metal is a type of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s, in the United States, and was a strong force in popular music throughout the 1980s and early-1990s. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born March 22, 1948) is a highly successful British composer of musical theatre. ... Claude-Michel Schönberg is a French record producer, actor, singer, popular songwriter, and musical theatre composer, best known for his collaborations with the librettist Alain Boublil. ... Alain Boublil is a librettist, best known for his collaborations with the composer Claude-Michel Schönberg. ... Les Misérables programme from Palace Theatre purchased for £3 in July 2003. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... The tone of this article is inappropriate for an encyclopedia article. ... This article is about things that people play with. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... A watchdog originally referred to a dogs job, but now has been used in additional contexts with the same implication of watching or safeguarding: For the dogs job, see guard dog. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Kurtis Blow, (born Curtis Walker on August 9, 1959), is one of the most influential early rappers and hip hops first mainstream star. ... This page is about the rap group; NWA can also mean Northwest Airlines or National Wrestling Alliance. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Griffith Observatory and the Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachyov (Gorbachev)  listen? ( Russian: ; pronunciation: mih-kha-ILL ser-GHE-ye-vich gor-bah-CHYOHV) (born March 2, 1931), was leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991. ... Rubiks Cube on a diagonal tilt Rubiks Cube is a mechanical puzzle invented by the Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik in 1974. ... USPS stamp depicting the Cabbage Patch Kids craze of the 1980s. ... Trivial Pursuit is a popular party game. ... Fad - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of Our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of Our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A supercouple, in soap opera terms, is a couple on a program that becomes... Categories: Supercouples ... For the ITV soap opera which ran from 1972 to 1979, see General Hospital (British television). ...

Others

AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, sometimes written Aids) is a human disease characterized by progressive destruction of the bodys immune system. ... Jack Ruby murdered the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... John Lennon John Winston Lennon, later John Ono Lennon, (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), is best known as a singer, songwriter, and guitarist for The Beatles. ... Sven Olof Joachim Palme (January 30, 1927 - February 28, 1986) was a Swedish politician. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles... Pope John Paul II has reigned since 22 Oct 1978. ... His Holiness Pope John Paul II, officially in Latin , born Karol Józef Wojtyla [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death. ... A violent crime or crime of violence is a crime in which the offender uses or threatens violent force upon the victim. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events...

People

World Leaders

Bruno Kreisky Bruno Kreisky (January 22, 1911—July 29, 1990) was an Austrian politician. ... The Republic of Austria (German: Republik Österreich) is a landlocked country in Central Europe. ... Fred Sinowatz (born February 5, 1929 in Neufeld an der Leitha, Burgenland) is a former Austrian politician of the SPÖ. He was Chancellor of Austria from 1983 untill 1986. ... Franz Vranitzky (born October 4, 1937) is an Austrian politician of the SPÖ party (social democrates). ... Hon Bob Hawke Robert James Lee Hawke (born December 9, Australian trade union leader and politician, was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia. ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... Canada is a sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. ... The Right Honourable Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte1 (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... The Republic of Chile is a country in South America occupying a long coastal strip between the Andes mountains and the Pacific Ocean. ... Deng Xiaoping Deng Xiaoping  listen? ( Simplified Chinese: 邓小平; Traditional Chinese: 鄧小平; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Teng Hsiao-ping; pronounced Dung Shyao-ping; August 22, 1904— February 19, 1997) was a revolutionary elder in the Communist Party of China (CPC) who served as the de facto ruler of the Peoples... The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) comprises most of the cultural, historic, and geographic area known as China. ... Chiang Ching-kuo (蔣經國 in pinyin: Jiǎng Jīngguó) (April 271, 1910 - January 13, 1988), Kuomintang politician and leader, was the son of Chiang Kai-shek and held numerous posts in the government of the Republic of China (from 1949 on Taiwan). ... The Republic of China ( Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a multiparty democratic state that is composed of the island groups of Taiwan, the Pescadores, Quemoy, and the Matsu. ... Erich Honecker – official GDR portrait Erich Honecker (25 August 1912–29 May 1994) was a German Communist politician who led East Germany from 1971 until 1989. ... For the historical eastern German provinces, see Historical Eastern Germany East Germany, officially the German Democratic Republic (GDR), German Deutsche Demokratische Republik (DDR), was a Communist Party-led state that existed from 1949 to 1990 in the former Soviet occupation zone of Germany. ... Anwar Sadat Mohamed Anwar el-Sadat – محمد أنورالسادات Arabic - ( December 25, 1918 – October 6, 1981) was an Egyptian politician and President from 1970 to 1981. ... The Arab Republic of Egypt, commonly known as Egypt, (in Arabic: مصر, romanized Miṣr or Maṣr, in Egyptian dialect) is a republic mostly located in north-eastern Africa. ... Hosni Mubarak, President of Egypt Muhammad Hosni Said Mubarak ( Arabic : محمد حسنى سيد مبارك ) (born May 4, 1928), usually known as Hosni Mubarak (Mubarak also spelled Moubarak), has been the President of the Arab Republic of Egypt since October 14, 1981. ... Ortega addresses the UN General Assembly Daniel Ortega Saavedra (born 11 November 1945) was President of Nicaragua from 1985 to 1990, during the Sandinista government, and is currently the leader of the Sandinista party. ... El Salvador (Spanish for The Savior) is a republic in Central America with a population of approximately 6. ... Mengistu Haile Mariam (born 1937) was the head of state of Ethiopia from 1977 to 1991. ... The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (Ityopiya, Amharic ኢትዮጵያ) is a country situated in the Horn of Africa. ... Urho Kekkonen Urho Kaleva Kekkonen (September 3, 1900 - August 31, 1986) was a Finnish politician who served as Prime Minister of Finland from 1950 to 1956, and as the most long-standing president of Finland from 1956 to 1981. ... The Republic of Finland (Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland) is a Nordic country in northeastern Europe, bordered by the Baltic Sea to the southwest, the Gulf of Finland to the southeast and the Gulf of Bothnia to the west. ... Mauno Henrik Koivisto (born November 25, 1923) was the president of Finland from 1982 to 1994. ... François Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterand ( October 26, 1916 - January 8, 1996;  pronunciation?) was a French politician and President of France from May 1981, re-elected in 1988, until 1995. ... The French Republic or France (French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. ... Andreas Papandreou Andreas Georgios Papandreou, Ανδρέας Γ. Παπανδρέου (5 February 1919 - 23 June Greek economist and politician. ... Greece, officaly called the Hellenic Republic (Greek: Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), is a country in the southeast of Europe on the southern tip of the Balkan peninsula. ... Indira Priyadarshini Gandhi (इन्दिरा प्रियदर्शिनी गान्धी) (November 19, 1917 – October 31, 1984) was Prime Minister of India from January 19, 1966 to March 24, 1977, and from January 14, 1980 until her assassination in 1984. ... The Republic of India is the second most populous country in the world, with a population of more than one billion, and is the seventh largest country by geographical area. ... Rajiv Gandhi (राजीव गान्धी) (August 20, 1944 - May 21, 1991), first son of Indira and Feroze Gandhi, attended The Doon School and Cambridge University, and was Prime Minister of India from his mothers death on October 31, 1984 until his resignation on December 2, 1989 following general election defeat. ... Ayatollah Khomeini founded the first modern Islamic republic Ayatollah Seyyed Ruhollah Khomeini (آیت‌الله روح‌الله خمینی in Persian) (May 17, 1900 – June 3, 1989) was an Iranian Shia cleric and the political and spiritual leader of the 1979 revolution that overthrew Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the then Shah of Iran. ... Iran (Persian: ایران) is a Middle Eastern country located in southwestern Asia. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majid al-Tikrītī (Often spelt Husayn or Hussain; Arabic صدام حسين عبدالمجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 1) was President of Iraq from 1979 to 2003. ... The Republic of Iraq is a Middle Eastern country in southwestern Asia encompassing the ancient region of Mesopotamia at the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. ... Patrick John Hillery (born May 2, 1923) was the sixth President of Ireland (1976-1990). ... The Republic of Ireland (Irish: Poblacht na hÉireann) is the official description of an independent state which covers approximately five-sixths of the island of Ireland, off the coast of north-west Europe. ... Charles (Charlie) James Haughey ( Ir. ... Dr. Garret FitzGerald (Irish: Gearóid MacGearailt) (born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland. ... Prime Minister Menachem Begin Menachem Begin (August 16, 1913 - March 9, 1992) became the 6th Prime Minister of Israel in May 1977. ... The State of Israel (Hebrew: מְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל, transliteration: ; Arabic: دَوْلَةْ اِسْرَائِيل, transliteration: ) is a country in the Middle East on the eastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea. ... Shimon Peres Shimon Peres (born August 21, 1923), an Israeli politician, is the head of the Israeli Labour Party and served as 8th Prime Minister of Israel from 1984-1986 and 1995-1996 and Foreign Affairs Minister of Israel from 2001-2002, and became Vice Premier in a coalition under... Hirohito (裕仁), the Shōwa Emperor (昭和天皇), (April 29, 1901 - January 7, 1989) reigned over Japan from 1926 to 1989. ... Official language Japanese Capital Tokyo Largest City Tokyo Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 60th 377,835 km² 0. ... Yasuhiro Nakasone Yasuhiro Nakasone (中曽根 康弘 Nakasone Yasuhiro, b. ... Jabir al-Ahmad al-Jabir Al Sabah (born June 29, 1926) is the emir of Kuwait, of the Al-Sabah dynasty in power there since the mid-18th century. ... The State of Kuwait is a small oil-rich monarchy on the coast of the Persian Gulf, enclosed by Saudi Arabia in the south and Iraq in the north. ... Colonel Muammar al-Qaddafi Muammar Abu Minyar al-Qaddafi 1 (Arabic: معمر القذافي Mu`ammar al-Qadhdhāfī) (born 1942), leader of Libya since 1970 and a controversial Arab statesman. ... The Great Socialist Peoples Libyan Arab Jamahiriya or Libya (Arabic: ليبيا) is a country in North Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, located between Egypt on the east, Sudan on the southeast, Chad and Niger on the south and Algeria and Tunisia to the west. ... His Holiness Pope John Paul II, officially in Latin , born Karol Józef Wojtyla [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death. ... Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado (born December 12, 1934) was President of Mexico, for the PRI, from December 1, 1982 to December 1, 1988. ... The United Mexican States or Mexico (Spanish: Estados Unidos Mexicanos or México; regarding the use of the variant spelling Méjico, see section The name below) is a country located in North America, bordered to the north by the United States of America, to the southeast by Guatemala and Belize, to... Samora Moisés Machel (September 29, 1933 - October 19, 1986) was a prominent leader of FRELIMO and president of Mozambique. ... Mozambique is also the name given to a style of music from the 1960s, an advanced rumba by Peyo el AfroCán Mozambique is a country in Southern Africa, bordering South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. ... Sir Robert David (Rob) Muldoon KCMG CH (25 September 1921–5 August 1992) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1975 to 1984. ... New Zealand is an independent sovereign state in the south-western Pacific Ocean. ... The Right Honourable David Russell Lange, CH, ONZ, was Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1984 to 1989. ... For the British actor, see Geoffrey Palmer (actor) For the English lawyer, see Geoffrey Palmer (attorney) The Right Honourable Sir Geoffrey Winston Russell Palmer, AC, KCMG (born 21 April 1942), served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from August 1989 until September 1990, leading the Labour Party. ... Queen Juliana Juliana Louise Emma Marie Wilhelmina, Duchess of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, (April 30, 1909 - March 20, 2004) of the House of Orange-Nassau was Queen of the Netherlands from her mothers abdication in 1948 to her own abdication in 1980 and Queen Mother (with the title of Princess) from... The Netherlands (Dutch: Nederland) is the European part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden). ... Gen. ... The Islamic Republic of Pakistan (, or Islami Jamhooriya-e-Pakistan, in Urdu), or Pakistan, is a country located in South Asia and is part of the Greater Middle East. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Ferdinand Marcos Ferdinand Edralin Marcos (September 11, 1917 – September 28, 1989) was the tenth President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... The Republic of the Philippines is a country of South East Asia, located in the western Pacific Ocean some 1,210 km (750 mi) from mainland Asia. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Corazón Aquino Corazón Cojuangco Aquino (born January 25, 1933), widely known as Cory Aquino, was President of the Philippines from 1986 to 1992. ... The Republic of the Philippines is a country of South East Asia, located in the western Pacific Ocean some 1,210 km (750 mi) from mainland Asia. ... Term of Office from July 19, 1989 until December 22, 1990 Profession Officer Political Party PZPR First Lady Barbara Jaruzelska Date of Birth July 6, 1923 Place of Birth Kurów near Puławy, Poland Date of Death Place of Death Wojciech Witold Jaruzelski (VOY-chekh VEE-told ya-ru-ZEL-skee... The Republic of Poland, a democratic country with a population of 38,626,349 and area of 312,685 km², is located in Central Europe, between Germany to the west, the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south, Ukraine and Belarus to the east, and the Baltic Sea, Lithuania and... Lee Kuan Yew (born September 16, 1923) (Chinese: 李光耀, Pinyin: Lǐ Guāng Yào), also known as Lee Kan-You or Harry Lee Con-You, was the first Prime Minister of the Republic of Singapore from 1959 to 1990. ... National motto: Majulah Singapura (English: Onward, Singapore) National anthem: Majulah Singapura Capital Singapore1 Largest city Singapore1 Official languages English, Mandarin Chinese, Malay, Tamil Government President Prime minister Westminster system (de jure) Dominant-party system (de facto) Sellapan Rama Nathan Lee Hsien Loong Independence - From Malaysia August 9, 1965 Area  - Total... P.W. Botha Pieter Willem Botha, (born January 12, 1916) commonly known as P.W. and as die groot krokodil (the great crocodile) was Prime Minister of South Africa from 1978 to 1984 and State President of South Africa from 1984 to 1989. ... The Republic of South Africa is a large republic located at the southern tip of the continent. ... Chun Doo Hwan (born 18 January Korean military officer and the President of South Korea from 1980 to 1988. ... South Korea, officially the Republic of Korea (ROK; Korean: Daehan Minguk (Hangul: 대한 민국; Hanja: 大韓民國)), is a country in East Asia, covering the southern half of the Korean Peninsula. ... Leonid Brezhnev Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev (Russian: Леонид Ильич Брежнев) (December 19, 1906 - November 10, 1982) was effective ruler of the Soviet Union from 1964 to 1982, though at first in partnership with others. ... Soviet Union - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachyov (Gorbachev)  listen? ( Russian: ; pronunciation: mih-kha-ILL ser-GHE-ye-vich gor-bah-CHYOHV) (born March 2, 1931), was leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991. ... Soviet Union - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... King Juan Carlos I His Majesty King Juan Carlos I (Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón), styled HM The King (born January 5, 1938), is the reigning King of Spain. ... The Kingdom of Spain or Spain (Spanish and Galician: Reino de España or España; Catalan: Regne dEspanya; Basque: Espainiako Erresuma) is a country located in the southwest of Europe. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Sven Olof Joachim Palme (January 30, 1927 - February 28, 1986) was a Swedish politician. ... The Kingdom of Sweden (Swedish: Konungariket Sverige  listen) is a Nordic country in Scandinavia, in Northern Europe. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the 16 sovereign states that recognize Queen Elizabeth II as their Queen and head of state. ... The Right Honourable Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) is a British politician and the first woman Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, a position she held from 1979 to 1990. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Order: 39th President Vice President: Walter Mondale Term of office: January 20, 1977 – January 20, 1981 Preceded by: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Ronald Reagan Date of birth: October 1, 1924 Place of birth: Plains, Georgia First Lady: Rosalynn Carter Political party: Democratic James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles... This page is about Helmut Schmidt, the German politician. ... West Germany was the informal but almost universally used name for the Federal Republic of Germany from 1949 until 1990, during which years the Federal Republic did not yet include East Germany. ... Dr. Helmut Kohl (full name Helmut Josef Michael Kohl) was Chancellor of Germany from 1982 to 1998. ... Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... Mobutu Sese Seko Nkuku wa za Banga (or Mobutu Sese Seko Koko Ngbendu Wa Za Banga; October 14, 1930 - September 7, 1997) was the President of Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) from 1965 to 1997. ... Zaire (spelt Zaïre in French) was the name of the Second Republic of Democratic Republic of the Congo between 1971 and 1997. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... The Republic of Zimbabwe is a country located in the southern part of the continent of Africa, between the Zambezi and Limpopo rivers. ...

Entertainers

Matthew Broderick (born March 21, 1962) is an American film and stage actor who is perhaps most widely known for his role as the protagonist in Ferris Buellers Day Off. ... Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick) shakes things up on a parade float Ferris Buellers Day Off is a 1986 film written and directed by John Hughes. ... Glory can refer to: Glory (religion) Glory (optical phenomenon) Glory (film) Glory (Buffy the Vampire Slayer) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Phoebe Belle Katz Cates (born July 16, 1963) is an American film actress who, by her description, has retired from acting to become a full-time mother. ... Fast Times at Ridgemont High is a 1982 American teen film directed by Amy Heckerling and written by Cameron Crowe (who wrote both the screenplay and a book of the same name which inspired the movie). ... This is an article about the movie Gremlins. ... Tom Cruise - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Top Gun is a 1986 American movie starring Tom Cruise as Lt. ... Rain Man is a 1988 film which tells the story of a selfish yuppie who discovers that his father has left all of his estate to the autistic brother he never knew he had. ... Risky Business is a 1983 film written and directed by Paul Brickman. ... The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ... Emilio Estevez (born May 12, 1962) is an American actor. ... The Breakfast Club (1985) is a quintessential 1980s film written and directed by John Hughes in which a group of teenagers representing different cliques in high school spend a Saturday morning in detention together and come to realize that they are all deeper than their respective stereotypes. ... The Outsiders is a novel by S. E. Hinton; see The Outsiders (novel). ... Young Guns is a 1988 film featuring Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland, Lou Diamond Phillips, Charlie Sheen, Dermot Mulroney and Casey Siemaszko. ... Harrison Ford as Han Solo in The Empire Strikes Back Harrison Ford (born July 13, 1942) is an American actor who between 1977 and 1983 appeared in what were then four of the top ten highest-grossing movies ever. ... Indiana Jones wax figure at Madame Tussauds Indiana Jones is a fictional character, a bullwhip-toting archaeologist with an overdeveloped fear of snakes, played by Harrison Ford in a series of films by George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. ... The DVD cover of the Star Wars trilogy. ... Blade Runner is a dark cyberpunk film directed by Ridley Scott and released in 1982. ... This page is about witnesses in law courts. ... Michael J. Fox (born June 9, 1961) is a Canadian-born actor, made famous by his role in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... Back to the Future is a 1985 film by Robert Zemeckis, written by Robert Zemeckis and Robert Gale, and starring Michael J. Fox. ... Teen Wolf is a 1985 movie starring Michael J. Fox as Scott Howard, a high school student who discovers that his family has an unusual heritage when he finds himself transforming into a wolfman. ... Mel Gibson, 1982 Mel Gibson (born January 3, 1956) is an American-born Australian-reared actor, director and producer best known for either acting in Mad Max movie series, the Lethal Weapon series, Braveheart and directing The Passion of the Christ. ... Lethal Weapon is a series of American movies that were released in 1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998, all starring Mel Gibson and Danny Glover as a mismatched pair of Los Angeles police officers. ... Mad Max DVD cover Mad Max is an Australian science fiction film starring Mel Gibson as Max Rockatansky. ... Paul Hogan (born October 8, 1939 in Lightning Ridge, Australia) is an Australian actor and comedian. ... Crocodile Dundee was an Australian film of 1986, starring Paul Hogan, who co-wrote the screenplay. ... Michael Keaton, (born September 9 or September 5, 1951 in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania) is an American actor. ... Batman Real name Bruce Wayne Publisher DC Comics First appearance Detective Comics #27 Created by Bob Kane Bill Finger Batman, more properly known as The Batman and occasionally as The Bat-Man, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in 1939. ... Mr. ... Night shift refers either to a group of workers who work during the night, or the period in which they work. ... George Walton Lucas Jr (born May 14, 1944) is an American film director famous for his epic Star Wars and Indiana Jones trilogies. ... Indiana Jones wax figure at Madame Tussauds Indiana Jones is a fictional character, a bullwhip-toting archaeologist with an overdeveloped fear of snakes, played by Harrison Ford in a series of films by George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. ... The DVD cover of the Star Wars trilogy. ... Captain Eo poster A drawing of the Supreme Leader Captain Eo (alternately, Captain EO) was a 3-D film shown in Disney theme parks. ... Eddie Murphy Edward Regan Eddie Murphy (born April 3, 1961, Brooklyn, New York) is an African-American comedian and actor. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late-night 90-minute comedy-variety show from NBC which has been broadcast virtually every Saturday night since its debut on October 11, 1975. ... Beverly Hills Cop (1984) is an American action comedy film directed by Martin Brest and starring Eddie Murphy. ... Trading Places (1983) is the title of a successful comedy film starring Eddie Murphy, Dan Aykroyd and Jamie Lee Curtis. ... Jack Nicholson (born April 22, 1937) is a highly successful American method actor. ... Terms of Endearment is a 1983 film which tells the story of a mother and daughter whose relationship is tense at best. ... The Shining can refer to: the Stephen King book: see The Shining (book) the Stanley Kubrick film based on the book: see The Shining (film) the ABC mini-series scripted by Stephen King: The Shining (mini-series) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Batman Real name Bruce Wayne Publisher DC Comics First appearance Detective Comics #27 Created by Bob Kane Bill Finger Batman, more properly known as The Batman and occasionally as The Bat-Man, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in 1939. ... Prizzis Honor is a 1985 comedy film which tells the story of a mob hit man and hit woman who fall in love with each other, even though they have been hired to kill each other. ... Ironweed is a 1983 novel by William Kennedy. ... Reds is a 1981 movie starring Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton. ... Photo of Michelle Pfeiffer Michelle Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is an American actress and singer. ... Scarface has several meanings: Scarface is a nickname for Al Capone. ... Dangerous Liaisons is a 1988 film directed by Stephen Frears. ... Arnold Schwarzenegger as governor of California, with the gubernatorial seal in the background. ... The Terminator was a 1984 sci-fi action film which became the break-through role for former body-builder Arnold Schwarzenegger. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Conan the Barbarian is a literary character created by Robert E. Howard in a series of fantasy pulp stories published in Weird Tales in the 1930s. ... Michael Jackson Michael Joseph Jackson (born August 29, 1958 in Gary, Indiana), is an American singer, songwriter, and record producer. ... The thriller is a genre of fiction in which tough, resourceful, but essentially ordinary heroes are pitted against villains determined to destroy them, their country, or the stability of the free world. ... Madonna Madonna Ciccone Ritchie (born Madonna Louise Ciccone in Bay City, Michigan, August 16, 1958), simply known by the stage name Madonna, is an American singer frequently referred to as the Queen of Pop music. ... Madonna is Italian for My lady. Its historical usage refers to the Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... U2 is an Irish rock band featuring Bono (Paul David Hewson) on vocals and guitar, The Edge (David Howell Evans) on guitar and pianos, vocals, and bass, Adam Clayton on bass and guitar, and Larry Mullen, Jr. ... War Cover War is a 1983 (see 1983 in music) album from U2. ... The Joshua Tree is an album by U2, released on March 9, 1987 on Island Records (see 1987 in music). ... U2: Rattle and Hum is a rockumentary of U2s 1987 tour of the United States. ...

Sports figures

Alexis Argüello (born April 19, 1952), is a former world champion Nicaragua. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Wilfred Benitez (born September 12, 1958), also known popularly as Wilfredo Benitez, is a Puerto Rican boxer. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a former NBA basketball player. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... George Howard Brett (born May 15, 1953 in Glen Dale, West Virginia) is a former American baseball player. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. ... Julio César Chávez (born July 12, 1962 in Culiacán, Sinaloa) is a Mexican world champion boxer who won world titles in 3 different divisions, went undefeated for 89 bouts before originally retiring with a record of 104-5-2, with 80 knockouts. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Roberto Duran (b. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... The Nature Boy Ric Flair (born February 25, 1949 in Memphis, Tennessee) has been one of the leading personalities in professional wrestling since the 1970s. ... Professional wrestling is a form of performance entertainment where the participants engage in simulated sporting matches. ... Wilfredo Gómez (born October 29, 1956) is a former boxer and three time world champion. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Wayne Gretzky playing for the New York Rangers in 1997 Wayne Douglas Gretzky (born January 26, 1961) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Delorez Florence Griffith Joyner (December 21, 1959 - September 21, 1998) was an American athlete, still holder of the World Records in the 100 m and 200 m as of 2004. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Marvin Hagler Marvelous Marvin Hagler (born May 23, 1954), a native of Brockton, Massachusetts, was a very tough looking character, and a number one ranked Middleweight boxer for many years before he could fight for the title. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Ellery Hanley, is a Rugby League player and coach. ... Rugby league is a team sport, played by teams of 13 players per side (usually plus 4 substitutes). ... Thomas Hearns (born October 18, 1958), aka the Hit Man and the Motor City Cobra, is a professional boxer. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Terry Hollywood Hogan Bollea Terry Bollea, aka Hulk Hogan and later Hollywood Hogan, (born August 11, 1953) is an American professional wrestler and actor. ... Professional wrestling is a form of performance entertainment where the participants engage in simulated sporting matches. ... Larry Holmes (born November 3, 1949) is a former world heavyweight boxing champion who won his first 48 professional fights as a heavyweight champion, falling just one short of breaking Rocky Marcianos record of 49 for a boxing champion. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Vincent Edward Bo Jackson (born November 30, 1962) is an American former multi-sport athlete who played professional football and Major League Baseball simultaneously, and was the first athlete named an All-Star in both sports. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. ... Jahangir Khan (born December 10, 1963) is seen by some as the greatest squash player in history. ... Squash racquet and ball Squash is an indoor racquet sport which was, until recently, called Squash Racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball used in its parent game Racquets-see below). ... Magic Johnson Earvin Magic Johnson, Jr. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... Michael Jordan Michael Jeffrey Jordan (born February 17, 1963, in Brooklyn, New York) is a former National Basketball Association player, considered by many to be the greatest of all time. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Greg LeMond (born June 26, 1961 in Lakewood, California) became the first non-European cyclist to win the Tour de France in 1986. ... Cycling is a recreation, a sport, and a means of transport across land. ... Sugar Ray Leonard (born May 17, 1956) is an American who is a former boxer. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Frederick Carlton Carl Lewis (born July 1, American athlete. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Wally Lewis, nicknamed The King, is generally considered the greatest Rugby League player of all time. ... Rugby league is a team sport, played by teams of 13 players per side (usually plus 4 substitutes). ... Ronald Mandel Ronnie Lott (born May 8, 1959 in Albuquerque, New Mexico) is a former American football player who starred as a cornerback, free safety and strong safety in college football and the NFL. Lott graduated from the University of Southern California in 1981 with a degree in public administration. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Maradona and the World Cup trophy Diego Armando Maradona (El Diego) (born October 30, 1960) is a former Argentine football player. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... John Patrick McEnroe, Jr. ... Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... Mal Meninga was a legendary Australian Rugby League player. ... Rugby league is a team sport, played by teams of 13 players per side (usually plus 4 substitutes). ... Mark Douglas John Messier (born January 18, 1961, in Edmonton, Alberta) was an Ice Hockey center in the National Hockey League, who spent a quarter of a century in the professional ranks (1979-2004) with the Edmonton Oilers, New York Rangers, and Vancouver Canucks. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team celebrates the goal that led them to victory over the USSR. The Miracle on Ice is the popular nickname for the final round of ice hockey competition in the 1980 Olympic Winter Games, in which a team of amateur and collegiate players from... Joe Montana (born Joseph Clifford Montana on June 11, 1956 in Monongahela, Pennsylvania) is widely considered one of the best quarterbacks in the history of the NFL. He led the San Francisco 49ers to four Super Bowls (1982, 1985, 1989, 1990) and became the only player to win three Super... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Navratilova at the 2000 US Open Martina Navrátilová (born October 18, 1956) is a Czech-born American tennis player. ... Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... The Golden Bear, Jack Nicklaus Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940 in Columbus, Ohio), also known as The Golden Bear, was a major force in professional golf from the 1960s to the late 1990s. ... This article is about the sport of golf. ... Michel Platini (born June 21, 1955) is a former French football player, widely regarded as one of the most elegant midfielders of his generation. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... Alain Marie Pascal Prost, born February 24, 1955 in Saint-Chamond, Loire, France, is one of the most successful Formula One drivers of all time. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. ... Ozzie Smith was well-known for his defensive plays at shortstop. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. ... Michael Spinks (born July 13, 1956), a native of St. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Lawrence Taylor (born February 4, 1959) is a retired Hall of Fame American Football linebacker for the New York Giants NFL franchise. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Isiah Lord Thomas III (born April 30, 1961 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American former professional basketball player and coach, and is currently the president of basketball operations for the NBAs New York Knicks. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... Francis Morgan Daley Thompson, born July 30th, 1958 in London, England, is a former British decathlete. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Michael Gerard Tyson (born June 30, 1966, New York City, USA) is a professional boxer. ... Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). ... Gary Winston Lineker OBE, (born 30 November 1960), was a notable English international footballer. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ...

Film

Ghostbusters logo ©1984 Columbia Studios Ghostbusters (sometimes written Ghost Busters) is a 1984 sci-fi comedy film about three parapsychologists who are fired from a New York City University, and start up their own business investigating and excising ghosts. ... Meg Ryan Meg Ryan (born November 19, 1961) is a blue-eyed, blonde-haired American actress. ... Carlos Irwin Estevez, whose stage name is Charlie Sheen, (born September 3, 1965) is an American actor. ... Bo Derek Bo Derek (born Mary Cathleen Collins on November 20, 1956) is an American film actress and model. ... Matt Dillon (February 14, 1964) is an actor born in New Rochelle, New York, USA His first notable roles were in a series of teen themed movies, but he won critical acclaim for his performance as Bob in Gus Van Sants Drugstore Cowboy. ... Jodie Foster in Panic Room Alicia Christian Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962) is an American actress and director. ... Sixteen Candles is a 1984 Brat Pack film starring Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall, and Michael Schoeffling. ... Batman DVD cover, 1997 release version Batman was released in U.S. theaters on June 23, 1989 by Warner Bros. ... Michael Keaton, (born September 9 or September 5, 1951 in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania) is an American actor. ... Jack Nicholson (born April 22, 1937) is a highly successful American method actor. ... Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick) shakes things up on a parade float Ferris Buellers Day Off is a 1986 film written and directed by John Hughes. ... The Brat Pack was a group of young actors and actresses that became famous in the 1980s and frequently appeared in films together. ... John Hughes (born February 18, 1950 in Lansing, Michigan) is a noted film director, producer and writer, responsible for some of the most successful comedy films of the 1980s and 1990s. ... The Breakfast Club (1985) is a quintessential 1980s film written and directed by John Hughes in which a group of teenagers representing different cliques in high school spend a Saturday morning in detention together and come to realize that they are all deeper than their respective stereotypes. ... Pretty in Pink is a 1986 film about teenage love and the struggle of growing up in poverty. ... This article is about Hairspray, the musical that started performances on Broadway in 2002. ... Top Gun is a 1986 American movie starring Tom Cruise as Lt. ... Sean Penn (born August 17, 1960) is a American film actor noted for his inflammatory and sometimes violent personality. ... Michael Sylvester Enzio Stallone (born July 6, 1946 in New York City), usually known as simply Sylvester Stallone, is an American film actor, director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Rambo is a trilogy of popular action films based on the characters created by David Morrell in his novel First Blood. ... Patrick Wayne Swayze, (born 18 August 1952), is a dancer, actor and singer, memorable for his roles in the films Dirty Dancing (1987), Ghost (1990) and Donnie Darko (2001). ... Dirty Dancing - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Susan Alexandra Sigourney Weaver (born October 8, 1949) is an American actress perhaps best remembered for her portrayal of Ripley in Alien (1979) and its sequels. ... This article is about a novel, there is also an unrelated 1987 movie named The Lost Boys. ...

Television

See Also: 1980s in television This page indexes the individual year in television pages. ...

The A-Team (1983 - 1987) was a television show about a group of fictional ex-US Army commandos on the run from the military. ... Laurence Tureaud (born May 21, 1952), better known as Mr. ... ALF or Alf can have several meanings: ALF is an acronym standing for Animal Liberation Front, an animal rights group ALF is an acronym standing for Alien Life Form ALF was the name of an American television sitcom ALF is also a programming language Alf refers to both a river... Cagney and Lacey was an American television series, which aired on CBS for six seasons from 1982 to 1988. ... Cheers is the name of a long-running sitcom made by Charles-Burrows-Charles Productions in association with Paramount Television for NBC. The show premiered on September 30, 1982 and had its widely-watched series finale on May 20, 1993, followed by a long and ongoing run in syndication. ... Photo of the entire cast of The Cosby Show. ... Diffrent Strokes is the name of an American situation comedy that aired from 1978 to 1985 on NBC and from 1985 to 1986 on ABC. The sitcom was about two African-American children, brothers, from a poor Harlem background in who were adopted by a rich white widower who... The Dukes of Hazzard is a American television series that originally aired on the CBS television network from 1979 to 1985. ... A dynasty is a family or extended family which retains political power across generations, or more generally, any organization which extends dominance in its field even as its particular members change. ... EastEnders is a popular BBC television soap opera, which was first broadcast on February 19, 1985. ... The Facts of Life opening titles. ... Falcon Crest was an American primetime television soap opera created by producer Earl Hamner Jr. ... Family Ties was an American television sitcom which aired on NBC for seven seasons, from 1982 to 1989 (176 episodes). ... The Full House logo. ... Growing pains is a term used to describe certain physiological symptoms common in children. ... For the ITV soap opera which ran from 1972 to 1979, see General Hospital (British television). ... Hill Street Blues was a serial police drama that first aired on NBC in 1981 and ran on primetime into 1987. ... The Jewel in the Crown is a British television drama series produced by Granada Television for ITV and based on the Raj Quartet novels by Paul Scott. ... KITT on display at Universal Studios Knight Rider was a popular US 1980s television show. ... L.A. Law (1986 - 1994) was one of the most popular television shows of the 1980s and 1990s. ... Late Night with David Letterman was the name of NBCs nightly hour long comedy talk show, which premiered in 1982 and went off the air in 1993. ... Miami Vice was a television series (five seasons from 1984-1989) starring Don Johnson and Philip Michael Thomas as two Miami policemen working undercover, James Sonny Crockett (Sonny) and Ricardo Tubbs. ... The term Moonlighting has two possible meanings: Moonlighting (employment) is doing a second job outside of normal working hours. ... The MTV logotype, often used in different, less stylized, forms. ... Neighbours is a long-running Australian television soap opera, running daily episodes of 25 minutes not including comercials. ... The original lineup of Only Fools and Horses, featuring Rodney, Del Boy and Grandad, lasted from 1981 to 1985. ... Punky Brewster was a popular childrens television comedy show in the 1980s. ... Roseanne was an American sitcom which aired on ABC from 1988 to 1997, starring the stand-up comedian Roseanne Barr. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late-night 90-minute comedy-variety show from NBC which has been broadcast virtually every Saturday night since its debut on October 11, 1975. ... This article is about the Cartoon characters. ... St. ... The First Lady of the United States, Laura Bush and current host Jay Leno. ... Johnny Carson John William Johnny Carson (October 23, 1925 – January 23, 2005) was a United States actor, comedian and writer best known for his iconic status as the host of The Tonight Show from 1962 until 1992. ... Yes, (prime) minister: Sir Humphrey Appleby, James Jim Hacker, Bernard Woolley Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister are British sitcoms about the struggle between (Dr) James Jim Hacker (played by Paul Eddington), the government minister of the (fictional) Department of Administrative Affairs (and later as Prime Minister) and...

Music

Musical genres popular during the 1980s include hip hop, old school rap, heavy metal music, twee pop, hair metal, New Wave music, New Romantic, shoegazing, jangle pop, hardcore punk, alternative rock, dream pop, techno, house, acid house, and two-tone. Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... The very first hip hop to come out of the block parties of New York City in the 1970s and early 1980s is called old school hip hop. ... Heavy metal is a form of rock music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... Twee (or Twee pop) is a type of indie rock that is known for simple, sweet melodies and lyrics, often with jangling guitars. ... Hair metal is a type of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s, in the United States, and was a strong force in popular music throughout the 1980s and early-1990s. ... The New Wave is a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centred around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... New Romantic was a New Wave music subgenre and fashion movement that occurred primarily in the United Kingdom during the early 1980s. ... Shoegazing is a style of music that emerged in Britain in the late 1980s. ... Jangle pop was an American musical genre that arose in the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Hardcore punk (or hardcore) is an intensified version of punk rock usually characterized by short, loud, and often angry songs with exceptionally fast tempos and chord changes. ... The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... Dream pop is a type of alternative rock that originated in the early 1980s when bands like the Cocteau Twins began twisting New Wave melodies into sonic, echoing textures and mumbled vocals. ... Techno is a form of electronic music that emerged in the mid-1980s and primarily refers to a particular style developed in and around Detroit and subsequently adopted by European producers. ... House music refers to a collection of styles of electronic dance music, the earliest forms beginning in the early- to mid- 1980s. ... Alternate meaning: The Acid House a 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, later made into a film. ... Two Tone (or 2 Tone) is a style of music created by fusing elements of punk rock and ska. ...


See also: 1980s music groups, List of rock and roll albums in the 1980s Music groups in the 1980s came from many countries and with many different types of rock/pop music. ... This is a list of albums that are particularly notable or influential. ...


External links

  • 80s (http://www.80sxchange.com)
  • 80s memories and memorabilia (http://www.doyouremember.co.uk/)
  • [1] (http://www.inthe80s.com)

  Results from FactBites:
 
American Rhetoric: Ted Kennedy - 1980 Democratic National Convention Address (0 words)
The 1980 Republican convention was awash with crocodile tears for our economic distress, but it is by their long record and not their recent words that you shall know them.
The demand of our people in 1980 is not for smaller government or bigger government but for better government.
The task of leadership in 1980 is not to parade scapegoats or to seek refuge in reaction, but to match our power to the possibilities of progress.
1980's "The Moomins" animation - Bring it out on DVD! Petition (0 words)
This petition is in reference to the English and Polish versions of the stop motion animation series "The Moomins".
The series was produced by Film Polski and Jupiter Films in 1980 and aired in Poland, Austria and elsewhere, with dubbed and heavily edited 5 minute long versions airing in the UK.
The English version of this show most closely evoked the spirit of Tove Jansson's original books due to Rupert Murdoch's spontaneous narration and it is primarily this version that we would like to see released on DVD.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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