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Encyclopedia > 1979 in literature

See also: 1978 in literature, other events of 1979, 1980 in literature, list of years in literature. See also: 1977 in literature, other events of 1978, 1979 in literature, list of years in literature. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... See also: 1979 in literature, other events of 1980, 1981 in literature, list of years in literature. ... This page indexes the individual year in literature pages. ...

Contents


Events

Sophies Choice (1979) is a novel written by William Styron about a young American Southerner who wants to be a writer and befriends Nathan, who is Jewish, and his beautiful lover Sophie, a Polish (but not Jewish) survivor of the Nazi concentration camps. ... William Styron is an American novelist, born in Newport News, Virginia on June 11, 1925. ... A Bend in the River (ISBN 0844666319) is a 1979 novel by Nobel laureate V. S. Naipaul. ... Sir V.S. Naipaul Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, T.C. (born August 17, 1932, in Chaguanas, Trinidad and Tobago), better known as V. S. Naipaul, is a Trinidadian-born British novelist of Hindu heritage and Indo-Trinidadian ethnicity. ...

New books

A Bend in the River (ISBN 0844666319) is a 1979 novel by Nobel laureate V. S. Naipaul. ... Sir V.S. Naipaul Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, T.C. (born August 17, 1932, in Chaguanas, Trinidad and Tobago), better known as V. S. Naipaul, is a Trinidadian-born British novelist of Hindu heritage and Indo-Trinidadian ethnicity. ... Margaret Sinclair Trudeau (born September 10, 1948 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) was the wife of Pierre Trudeau, the 15th Prime Minister of Canada. ... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... The Dead Zone is a novel by Stephen King published in 1979. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author best known for horror novels. ... The Executioners Song book cover The Executioners Song is a 1979 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Norman Mailer that depicts the events surrounding the execution of Gary Gilmore by the state of Utah for murder. ... Norman Mailer, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Norman Kingsley Mailer (born January 31, 1923) is an American writer and innovator of the nonfictional novel. ... Raymond Williams (1921 - 1988) was a highly influential Welsh academic, novelist and critic. ... Peter Francis Straub, born March 2, 1943 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States, is a writer of fiction and poetry, best known as a horror-genre author. ... The Ghost Writer (1979, ISBN 0679748989) is a novel by Philip Roth. ... Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933) is a Jewish-American novelist who is best known for his sexually-explicit comedic novel Portnoys Complaint (1969) and for his late-90s trilogy comprising the Pulitzer Prize-winning American Pastoral (1997), I Married a Communist (1998), and The Human Stain (2000). ... Jailbird is Kurt Vonneguts 1979 fictional novel about a man recently released from a low security prison. ... Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... A 2002 Penguin Books paperback edition Moonraker is the third James Bond novel written by Ian Fleming. ... Christopher Wood (November 5, 1935) is a screenwriter best known for the James Bond films The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979 Woods novelization of The Spy Who Loved Me was the first ever James Bond novelization, authorized by Glidrose Publications. ... Kane and Abel Kane and Abel is a 1979 novel by British author, Jeffrey Archer. ... Jeffrey Howard Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born April 15, 1940) is the successful author of a number of popular novels, raised considerable sums for charities, was a former MP and Deputy Chairman of the Conservative Party, who was later convicted of perjury. ... Disambiguation: You may be looking for the poem Kindred (poem) by Ruth Bidgood A Kindred is the most prevalent form of Ásatrú group in the United States. ... Octavia Butler or Octavia E. Butler (born June 22, 1947) is an American science fiction writer, and one of the handful of African-American women in the field. ... Howard Fast (November 11, 1914 - March 12, 2003) was an American novelist and television writer. ... The Matarese Circle is a novel by Robert Ludlum. ... Robert Ludlum (May 25, 1927 – March 12, 2001) was the author of 29 spy fiction novels. ... Harold Robbins (originally Harold Rubin) (May 21, 1916–October 14, 1997) was an American author. ... (1897), a painting by Camille Pissarro of the boulevard that led to Montmartre as seen from his hotel room. ... Arthur Hailey (April 5, 1920 - November 24, 2004) was a British/Canadian/American/Bahamian novelist. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Right Stuff is both a 1979 book by Tom Wolfe, and a 1983 film adapted from the book, which tell the true story of the first seven astronauts selected for the NASA space program. ... Tom Wolfe (born March 2, 1931) is an American author and journalist. ... Smileys People is a spy novel by John le Carré, published in 1979, by Random House (ISBN 0394508432). ... John le Carré is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931) in Poole, Dorset, England. ... Sophies Choice (1979) is a novel written by William Styron about a young American Southerner who wants to be a writer and befriends Nathan, who is Jewish, and his beautiful lover Sophie, a Polish (but not Jewish) survivor of the Nazi concentration camps. ... William Styron is an American novelist, born in Newport News, Virginia on June 11, 1925. ... Nature plays a large part in many of John Fowles novels. ... John Fowles was born March 31, 1926 in Leigh-on-Sea, a small town in Essex, near London. ... Henry Kissinger Henry Alfred Kissinger (born May 27, 1923 as Heinz Alfred Kissinger) is a German-born American diplomat and statesman. ... Tom Flanagan is a writer and professor of political science at the University of Calgary and part of a group known as the Calgary School. ...

Births

Deaths

March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... Jean Stafford (July 1, 1915-March 26, 1979) was an award-winning American short story writer and novelist, who won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her Collected Short Stories in 1970. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... Jean Rhys (August 24, 1890 - May 14, 1979), originally Ella Gwendolen Rees Williams, was a novelist in the mid 20th century. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Forrest Carter, (September 4, 1925 – June 7, 1979) was the pseudonym of Asa Earl Carter, an American novelist. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... Herbert Marcuse Herbert Marcuse (July 19, 1898 – July 29, 1979) was a prominent German-American philosopher and sociologist of Jewish descent, member of the Frankfurt School. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Donald Grant Creighton, CC , MA , BA (July 15, 1902-December 19, 1979) was a noted Canadian historian. ...

Awards


  Results from FactBites:
 
1979 in literature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (218 words)
See also: 1978 in literature, other events of 1979, 1980 in literature, list of years in literature.
See 1979 Governor General's Awards for a complete list of winners and finalists for those awards.
Odysseus Elytis won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1979.
Princeton University Senior Theses brief display (6390 words)
Arrowsmith, William Ayres (1945): The Literary Soil, An Essay in the Sociology of Literature.
Foulk, Mary Warren (1991): Literature that "Dares and Defies:" Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth and Kate Chopin's The Awakening.
Tompkins, II, Clavin (1947): Myth and Literature: The Recurrence of a Mythical Pattern in The Odyssey, The Aeneid, The Divine Comedy and Goethe's Faust.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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