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Encyclopedia > 1975 in literature
            List of years in literature       (Table)
… 1965 .  1966 .  1967 .  1968  . 1969  . 1970  . 1971 …
1972 1973 1974 -1975- 1976 1977 1978
… 1979 .  1980 .  1981 .  1982  . 1983  . 1984  . 1985 …
     In poetry: 1972 1973 1974 -1975- 1976 1977 1978     
Related time period  or  subjects
 1972 . 1973 . 1974 - 1975 - 1976 . 1977 . 1978 
 1940s . 1950s . 1960s -1970s- 1980s . 1990s . 2000s 
 19th century . 20th century . 21st century 
Art . Archaeology . Architecture . Literature . Music . Science +...

The year 1975 in literature involved some significant events and new books. This page indexes the individual year in literature pages. ... The table of years in literature is a tabular display of all years in literature, for overview and quick navigation to any year. ... See also: 1964 in literature, other events of 1965, 1966 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1965 in literature, other events of 1966, 1967 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1966 in literature, other events of 1967, 1968 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1967 in literature, other events of 1968, 1969 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The year 1969 in literature involved some significant events and new books. ... See also: 1969 in literature, other events of 1970, 1971 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1970 in literature, other events of 1971, 1972 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1971 in literature, other events of 1972, 1973 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1972 in literature, other events of 1973, 1974 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1973 in literature, other events of 1974, 1975 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1975 in literature, other events of 1976, 1977 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1976 in literature, other events of 1977, 1978 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1977 in literature, other events of 1978, 1979 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1978 in literature, other events of 1979, 1980 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1979 in literature, other events of 1980, 1981 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1980 in literature, other events of 1981, 1982 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1981 in literature, other events of 1982, 1983 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1982 in literature, other events of 1983, 1984 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1983 in literature, other events of 1984, 1985 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1984 in literature, other events of 1985, 1986 in literature, list of years in literature. ... // John Betjeman becomes Poet Laureate A.R. Ammons: Briefings: Poems Small and Easy Collected Poems: 1951-1971, winner of the National Book Award in 1973 John Ashbery, Three Poems Ted Berrigan, Ron Padgett, and Tom Clark, Back In Boston Again John Berryman, (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux) Elizabeth Bishop and... // Adrienne Rich, Rape Derek Walcott, Another Life See 1973 Governor Generals Awards for a complete list of winners and finalists for those awards. ... // The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics is founded by Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman. ... // With the 1974, fall of the dictatorship in Greece, poets, authors and intellectuals who had fled after the coup of 1967 returned, and this year many began publishing in that country. ... // Two poems written in 1965 by Mao Zedong just before the Cultural Revolution, including Two Birds: A Dialogue, are published on January 1[1] Elizabeth Bishop, One Act Marya Fiamengo, In Praise of Older Women Thom Gunn, Jack Straws Castle Derek Walcott, Sea Grapes James Merrill: Divine Comedies, including... // British publication Gay News successfully prosecuted in the United Kingdom for blasphemy and libel for publishing James Kirkups The Love that Dares to Speak its Name Samuel Beckett, Collected Poems in English and French Elizabeth Bishop, Geography III, which includes In the Waiting Room, The Moose, and the villanelle... // L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Magazine, edited by Bruce Andrews and Charles Bernstein, first published Stevie, a film based on a play about the poet Stevie Smith is released Maya Angelou, And Still I Rise Paul Blackburn, translator (posthumous), Proensa: An Anthology of Troubadour Poetry Odysseus Elytis... This page indexes the individual years pages. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This page indexes the individual years pages. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... This article is about the decade of 2000-2009. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 20XX redirects here. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... See also: 1974 in art, other events of 1975, 1976 in art, List of years in art // Events Exhibitions Works Births date unknown - Banksy, graffiti artist Deaths January 19 - Thomas Hart Benton, mural painter May 20 - Barbara Hepworth, sculptor December 20 - Heinz Henghes, sculptor Awards Categories: 1975 | Years in art... 1975 in archaeology // Explorations Excavations Five year project at Quiriguá begins, sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania, the National Geographic Society, and the government of Guatemala. ... See also: 1974 in architecture, other events of 1975, 1976 in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... // January 2 - New York City U.S. District Court Judge Richard Owen rules that former Beatle John Lennon and his lawyers can have access to Department of Immigration files pertaining to his deportation case. ... See also: Other events of 1975 List of years in science . ...

Contents

Events

is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ... General view showing Grossmünster church. ... Romain Gary (May 8, 1914 – December 2, 1980) was a novelist, film director, World War II pilot, and diplomat. ... Romain Gary (May 8, 1914 – December 2, 1980) was a French novelist, film director, World War II pilot, and diplomat. ... The Prix Goncourt is the most prestigious prize in French literature, given to the author of the best and most imaginative prose work of the year. Edmond de Goncourt, a successful author, critic, and publisher, bequeathed his entire estate for the foundation and maintenance of the Académie Goncourt. ... Hearing Secret Harmonies is the final novel in Anthony Powells twelve-volume masterpiece, A Dance to the Music of Time. ... A Dance to the Music of Time is a twelve volume roman à clef by Anthony Powell, published between 1951 and 1975. ... Anthony Dymoke Powell, CH (December 21, 1905 - March 28, 2000) was a British novelist best known for his A Dance to the Music of Time duodecalogy published between 1951 and 1975. ... Milan Kundera (IPA: ) (born April 1, 1929 in Brno, Czechoslovakia) is a Czech-born writer who writes in both Czech and French. ...

New books

Edward Paul Abbey (January 29, 1927 - March 14, 1989) was an American author and essayist noted for his advocacy of environmental issues and criticism of public land policies. ... The Monkey Wrench Gang is a novel written by American author Edward Abbey (1927-1989), published in 1975. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ... Saul Bellow, born Solomon Bellows, (Lachine, Quebec, Canada, June 10, 1915 – April 5, 2005 in Brookline, Massachusetts) was an acclaimed Canadian-born American writer. ... Humboldts Gift is a 1975 novel by Saul Bellow, which won him the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1976. ... Thomas Louis Berger (born July 20, 1924) is a U.S. novelist. ... Sir Malcolm Stanley Bradbury (September 7, 1932 – November 27, 2000) was a British author and academic. ... The History Man (1975) is a campus novel by British author Malcolm Bradbury set in 1972 in the fictional seaside town of Watermouth in the South of England. ... Edward Morley Callaghan, CC, LL.B., LL.D., FRSC (September 22, 1903 – August 25, 1990) was a Canadian novelist, short story writer, playwright, TV and radio personality. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), commonly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ... Curtain: Poirots Last Case is a work of detective fiction by Agatha Christie and first published in the UK by the Collins Crime Club in September 1975 and in the US by Dodd, Mead and Company later in the same year. ... James Clavell, born Charles Edmund Dumaresq Clavell (10 October 1924 – 7 September 1994) was a British novelist, screenwriter, director and World War II hero and POW. Clavell is best known for his epic Asian Saga series of novels and their televised adaptations, along with such films as The Great Escape... This page is about the James Clavell novel. ... Susan Mary Cooper (born May 23, 1935) in Burnham, Buckinghamshire, England is a British author. ... The Grey King is a book by Susan Cooper in The Dark Is Rising Sequence. ... Michael Crichton, pronounced [1], (born October 23, 1942) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... The Great Train Robbery is a bestselling 1975 historical fiction novel written by Michael Crichton. ... Archibald Joseph Cronin (July 19, 1896–January 6, 1981) was a Scottish novelist, dramatist, and nonfiction writer who was one of the most renowned storytellers of the twentieth century. ... The Minstrel Boy is an Irish patriotic song written by Thomas Moore (1779-1852) who set it to the melody of The Moreen, an old Irish air. ... William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ... World of Wonders is the third novel in Robertson Davies Deptford Trilogy. ... Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907 – November 6, 2000) was an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Murray Fletcher Pratt (1897–1956) was a science fiction and fantasy writer; he was also well-known as a writer on naval history and on the American Civil War. ... The Compleat Enchanter by L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, Nelson Doubleday, 1975 The Compleat Enchanter: The Magical Misadventures of Harold Shea is an omnibus collection of three classic fantasy stories by science fiction and fantasy authors L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, gathering material previously published in... Samuel Ray Delany, Jr. ... Dhalgren is a science fiction novel by Samuel R. Delany. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... E.L. Doctorow, photograph by Jill Krementz, from back cover of Doctorows 1975 novel Ragtime Edgar Lawrence Doctorow (born January 6, 1931, New York, New York) is the author of several critically acclaimed novels that blend history and social criticism. ... This article is about the 1975 novel. ... William Gaddis (December 29, 1922 - December 16, 1998) was an American novelist. ... JR may stand for: Japan Railways Aero California, International Air Transport Association code The novel J R, written by William Gaddis John Ross J.R. Ewing, Jr. ... Romain Gary (May 8, 1914 – December 2, 1980) was a French novelist, film director, World War II pilot, and diplomat. ... Madame Rosa (La Vie devant soi) (1977) is a French film directed by Moshé Mizrahi. ... Arthur Hailey (April 5, 1920 – November 24, 2004) was a British/Canadian novelist. ... The Moneychangers is a 1975 novel written by Arthur Hailey. ... This article is about the author Thomas Harris. ... This article is about the novel. ... Georgette Heyer (pronounced hair) (16 August 1902 – 4 July 1974) was an English Historical romance and detective fiction novelist. ... My Lord John is a novel by Georgette Heyer. ... Jack Higgins is the principal pseudonym of UK novelist Harry Patterson (b. ... The Eagle Has Landed is a book by Jack Higgins first published in 1975. ... Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, CBE (born May 7, 1927) is a Booker prize-winning novelist, short story writer, and two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Heat and Dust (1975) is a novel by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala which won the Booker Prize in 1975. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Salems Lot is a horror novel by Stephen King, written in 1975, and was Kings second published novel. ... Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (August 28, 1814 - February 7, 1873) was an Irish writer of short stories and novels concerning the strange and supernatural. ... The Purcell Papers (1880) are a collection of thirteen Gothic, supernatural, historical and humorous short stories by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-73) originally written for the Dublin University Magazine. ... David Lodge (born January 28, 1935 at London, England) is a British author. ... This article is about the thought experiment called changing places. To read about the novel by David Lodge, see Changing Places The changing places thought experiment was created by Max Velmans, Reader of Psychology at Goldsmiths College, University of London, and was discussed in his 2000 work, Understanding Consciousness. ... Robert Ludlum Robert Ludlum (May 25, 1927 New York City â€“ March 12, 2001 Naples, Florida) was an American author of 21 thriller novels. ... The Road to Gandolfo is a story by Robert Ludlum about General MacKenzie Hawkins, a living military legend and a veteran. ... Gabriel José de la Concordia García Márquez, also known as Gabo (born March 6, 1927[1] in Aracataca, Colombia) is a Colombian novelist, journalist, editor, publisher, political activist, and recipient of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. ... The Autumn of the Patriarch cover The Autumn of the Patriarch (original Spanish title: El Otoño del Patriarca) is a novel, written by Gabriel García Márquez in 1975. ... Bharati Mukherjee (born July 27, 1940) is an award-winning Indian born American writer. ... Wife (1975) is a novel by noted author, Bharati Mukherjee. ... Gary Arthur Myers (Born August 16, 1937) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... Tim OBrien Tim OBrien (born October 1, 1946) is an American novelist who mainly writes about his experiences in the Vietnam War and the impact the war had on the American soldiers who fought there. ... Robert B. Parkers novel Cold Service Robert B. Parker (born September 17, 1932) is an acclaimed American writer of detective fiction. ... Elizabeth Peters (a pen-name of Barbara Mertz) has written many books in the mystery genre, featuring strong female protagonists and many archaeological connections. ... Crocodile on the Sandbank is a novel by Elizabeth Peters, first published in 1975. ... The Amelia Peabody series of mystery novels are written by Elizabeth Peters. ... Anthony Dymoke Powell, CH (December 21, 1905 - March 28, 2000) was a British novelist best known for his A Dance to the Music of Time duodecalogy published between 1951 and 1975. ... Hearing Secret Harmonies is the final novel in Anthony Powells twelve-volume masterpiece, A Dance to the Music of Time. ... James Otis Purdy photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1957. ... Judith Rossner (March 31, 1935 - August 9, 2005) was an American novelist, best known for her 1975 novel Looking for Mr. ... Looking for Mr Goodbar was a 1975 novel by Judith Rossner, and a 1977 movie starring Diane Keaton and Tuesday Weld that was based on the novel. ... Nawal El Saadawi (Arabic: نوال السعداوى) (born October 27, 1931) is an Egyptian feminist writer, activist and physician. ... Woman at Point Zero was a book written in 1975 by Nawal el-Saadawi. ... Paul Mark Scott (25 March 1920 – 1 March 1978) was a British novelist, playwright, and poet, best known for his monumental tetralogy the Raj Quartet. ... Anya Seton (January 23, 1904 (although the year is often misstated to be 1906 or 1916) - November 8, 1990) was an American author of historical romances. ... A young girl is troubled by dreams and faantasies which parallel the life of another girl who lived over 200 years before. ... Tom Sharpe (born March 30, 1928) is an English satirical author, born in London and educated at Lancing College and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. ... Blott on the Landscape is a novel written in 1975 by Tom Sharpe. ... Robert Anton Wilson Robert Anton Wilson or RAW (January 18, 1932 – January 11, 2007) was a prolific American novelist, essayist, philosopher, psychologist, futurologist, anarchist, and conspiracy theory researcher. ... “Illuminatus” redirects here. ... Matthew Phipps Shiel (July 21, 1865 – February 17, 1947), was a prolific British writer of fantastic fiction, remembered mostly for supernatural and scientific romances, published as novels, short stories and as serials. ... Rex Stout, full name Rex Todhunter Stout, (December 1, 1886 - October 27, 1975) was an American writer best known as the creator of the larger-than-life fictional detective Nero Wolfe. ... Original cast recording A Family Affair is a musical with a book by James and William Goldman, lyrics by James Goldman, and music by John Kander. ... Glendon Swarthout Glendon Fred Swarthout (1918–1992) was an American author and novelist who wrote a great variety of books. ... The Shootist is a novel written by Glendon Swarthout, published in 1975. ... Joseph Aloysius Wambaugh, Jr. ... The cover of Joseph Wambaughs classic police fiction story, The Choirboys (ISBN 0-440-11188-9), is a controversial 1975 work of fiction written by Los Angeles Police Department officer-turned-novelist Joseph Wambaugh. ... John Holbrook Vance (born August 28, 1916 in San Francisco, California) is generally described as an American fantasy and science fiction author, though Vance himself has reportedly objected to such labels. ... Showboat World (original title: The Magnificent Showboats of the Lower Vissel River, Lune XXIII, Big Planet), written in 1975, is the second, stand-alone novel in a pair of science fiction novels by Jack Vance (the first being Big Planet) that share the same setting, a backward, lawless, metal-poor... Roger Joseph Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. ... Sign of the Unicorn is the third book in the Chronicles of Amber series by Roger Zelazny. ...

Poetry

Linwood Vrooman Carter (June 9, 1930 - February 7, 1988) was an American author of science fiction and fantasy, as well as an editor and critic. ... Dreams from Rlyeh is a collection of poems by Lin Carter. ... George Leslie Norris (May 21, 1921, Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales–April 6, 2006, Provo, Utah) was a prize-winning Welsh poet and short story writer. ...

Non-fiction

Philip Burnett Franklin Agee (born July 19, 1935) is a former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) employee and author who wrote the book, Inside the Company: CIA Diary (1975)[1], detailing his experiences in the CIA. Agee joined the CIA in 1957 and worked as a case officer with postings in... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Jacob Bronowski (January 18, 1908, Łódź, Congress Poland, Russian Empire - August 22, 1974, East Hampton, New York, USA) was an English-Polish mathematician, best known as the presenter of the BBC television documentary series, The Ascent of Man. ... The Ascent of Man (1973) was a groundbreaking BBC documentary series, produced in association with Time-Life Films, written and presented by Jacob Bronowski. ... Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907 – November 6, 2000) was an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Blond Barbarians and Noble Savages by L. Sprague de Camp, T-K Graphics, 1975 Blond Barbarians and Noble Savages is a 1975 collection of essays on the fantasy writers Robert E. Howard and H.P. Lovecraft by science-fiction writer L. Sprague de Camp, first published by T-K Graphics. ... Paul Fussell (born 1924, Pasadena, California) is a cultural historian and a professor emeritus of English literature of the University of Pennsylvania. ... Frank Belknap Long (April 27, 1901 - January 3, 1994) was a prolific American writer of horror fiction, fantasy, science fiction, poetry, gothic romance, comic books, and non-fiction. ...

Births

is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kehlmanns novel Measuring the World in 8 different languages Daniel Kehlmann (born January 13, 1975 in Munich) is a German language author. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Zadie Smith (born October 27, 1975) is an English novelist. ...

Deaths

is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sydney Goodsir Smith (26 October 1915 - 15 January 1975) was a New Zealand-Scottish poet, artist, dramatist and novelist. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, KBE (15 October 1881 – 14 February 1975) (IPA: ) was a comic writer who has enjoyed enormous popular success for more than seventy years. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... See comedian Stand up comedian List of Comedians List of British comedians comics comic book comic strip underground comics alternative comics web comic sprite comics manga graphic novel List of comic characters This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Jeeves, here portrayed by Stephen Fry in ITVs Jeeves and Wooster series, is P.G. Wodehouses most famous character. ... Bertie Wooster portrayed by Hugh Laurie in ITVs Jeeves and Wooster series Bertram Wilberforce Bertie Wooster is the wealthy, good-natured co-protagonist and narrator of P. G. Wodehouses Jeeves stories. ... Sir Julian Sorell Huxley, FRS (June 22, 1887 – February 14, 1975) was a English biologist, author, Humanist and internationalist, known for his popularisations of science in books and lectures. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ivo Andrić. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Murray Leinster (June 16, 1896 in Norfolk, Virginia- June 8, 1975) was a nom de plume of William Fitzgerald Jenkins, an award-winning American writer of science fiction and alternate history. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint-John Perse (pseudonym of Alexis Leger) (May 31, 1887 – September 20, 1975) was a French poet and diplomat who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1960 for the soaring flight and evocative imagery of his poetry. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Constance Malleson (October 24, 1895 - October 5, 1975) was a British actress (under the name Colette ONeil) and writer, the wife of actor Miles Malleson and lover of Bertrand Russell. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Arnold Joseph Toynbee (April 14, 1889 - October 22, 1975) was a British historian whose twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, A Study of History, 1934-1961, was a synthesis of world history, a metahistory based on universal rhythms of rise, flowering and decline. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Cedric Sherriff (6 June 1896 – 13 November 1975) was an English writer. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth Taylor (née Coles; July 3, 1912 – November 19, 1975) was a popular English novelist and short story writer. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Francis Charles Webb-Wagg who published under the name Francis Webb (8 February 1925 — 23 November 1975) was an Australian poet. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alan Ross McWhirter (12 August 1925 - 27 November 1975), known as Ross McWhirter, was, with his twin brother, Norris McWhirter, co-founder of the Guinness Book of Records. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:Thorntonwilderteeth. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Awards

Two American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medals are awarded each year by the academy for distinguished achievement. ... Kenneth Burke (May 5, 1897–November 19, 1993) was a major American literary theorist and philosopher. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in... Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, CBE (born May 7, 1927) is a Booker prize-winning novelist, short story writer, and two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Heat and Dust (1975) is a novel by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala which won the Booker Prize in 1975. ... Each winner of the 1975 Governor Generals Awards for Literary Merit was selected by a panel of judges administered by the Canada Council for the Arts. ... The Cholmondeley Award is given by the Society of Authors for poetry. ... Jenny Joseph (born 7 May 1932) is an English poet. ... John Ormond (1923 - 1990), was a Welsh poet and filmaker. ... The Eric Gregory Award is given by the Society of Authors to British poets under 30 on submisson. ... Charles N. Mellowes Professor of Engineering and Professor of Mathematics. ... Peter Cash is a Canadian singer-songwriter. ... Founded in 1919, the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes are among the oldest and most prestigious book prizes awarded for literature written in the English Language. ... Brian Moore (August 25, 1921 - January 11, 1999) was a novelist. ... Founded in 1919, the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes are among the oldest and most prestigious book prizes awarded for literature written in the English Language. ... Karl Miller (born 1931) is a British literary editor, critic and writer. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Joseph William Haldeman is an American science fiction author. ... For the related comic series of the same name, see The Forever War (comics). ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... Childrens books redirects here. ... Virginia Hamilton (March 12, 1936 – February 19, 2002) was a prolific childrens author. ... M. C. Higgins, the Great is a book by Virginia Hamilton that won the Newbery Medal for excellence in American childrens literature in 1975. ... Sir Roger Newdigates Prize is awarded to students of the University of Oxford for Best Composition in English verse by an undergraduate who has not yet been in attendance at Oxford for four years since his or her date of admittance. ... Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... Eugenio Montale Eugenio Montale (October 12, 1896, Genoa – September 12, 1981, Milan) was an Italian poet, prose writer, editor and traslator, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1975. ... Spanish literary prize awarded 6 January of every year since 1944 by the editorial house Ediciones Destino. ... Francisco Umbral Francisco Umbral, also Paco Umbral, (May 11, 1935 - August 28, 2007) was a Spanish journalist, novelist, biographer and essayist. ... The Prix Goncourt is the most prestigious prize in French literature, given to the author of the best and most imaginative prose work of the year. Edmond de Goncourt, a successful author, critic, and publisher, bequeathed his entire estate for the foundation and maintenance of the Académie Goncourt. ... Romain Gary (May 8, 1914 – December 2, 1980) was a French novelist, film director, World War II pilot, and diplomat. ... Madame Rosa (La Vie devant soi) (1977) is a French film directed by Moshé Mizrahi. ... The Prix Médicis is a French literary award given each year in November. ... The Prix Médicis is a French literary award given each year in November. ... Steven Millhauser (born 3 August 1943 in New York City) is perhaps one of modern American fictions most elusive characters. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, The Sandbox and The American Dream. ... Seascape is a play by the US playwright Edward Albee. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... Michael Shaara Michael Shaara (June 23, 1928 - May 5, 1988) was a writer of science fiction, sports fiction, and historical fiction. ... The Killer Angels front cover The Killer Angels (1974) is a historical novel by Michael Shaara that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1975. ... The Pulitzer Prize in Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. ... Young Gary Snyder, on one of his early book covers Gary Snyder (born May 8, 1930) is an American poet (originally, often associated with the Beat Generation), essayist, lecturer, and environmental activist. ... The Viareggio Literary Prize is a prestigious Italian literary award, started in 1930, and is named after the Tuscan city of Viareggio. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Films for the Humanities and Sciences - Educational Media - The Literature of Spain: 1975 to the Present-in Spanish (356 words)
The Literature of Spain: 1975 to the Present—in Spanish
In this program, respected authorities look at the past 25 years of literature in post-Franco Spain and the literary inclinations of the next up-and-coming generation of poets, authors, and playwrights.
A passionate dissatisfaction with Spain's immediate past and a keen awareness of the need for a rebirth of spirit and letters was a mindset held in common by a disparate group of writers later renowned as the Generation of '98.
1975 in literature - Definition, explanation (514 words)
Founded in 1975, CCL is a bilingual journal of criticism and...
An interview owith James Jones in 1975 by Don Swaim of CBS Radio.
Account of the 1975 staging of some York Cycle plays in the streets of York.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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