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Encyclopedia > 1972 Summer Olympics
Games of the XX Olympiad
Games of the XX Olympiad

Host city Munich, Germany
Nations participating 121
Athletes participating 7170 (6075 men, 1095 women)
Events 195 in 23 sports
Opening ceremony August 26
Closing ceremony September 10
Officially opened by President Gustav Heinemann
Athlete's Oath Heidi Schüller
Judge's Oath Heinz Pollay
Olympic Torch Günther Zahn
Stadium Olympic Stadium

The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were celebrated in Munich, in what was then West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. Munich won its Olympic bid in April 1966 over the cities of Detroit, Madrid and Montreal. For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The President of Germany is Germanys head of state. ... Gustav Walter Heinemann (July 23, 1899 - July 7, 1976) was a German politician. ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... Athens Olympic Stadium The Olympic Stadium is the name usually given to the big centrepiece stadium of the Summer Olympic Games. ... At the heart of the Olympiapark München in northern Munich, the Olympiastadion was the main venue for the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Detroit redirects here. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ...

The Olympic Park
The Olympic Park

The 1972 Summer Olympics were the second Summer Olympics held in Germany, after the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin. The Munich Olympics were intended to present a new, democratic and optimistic Germany to the world, as shown by its official motto, "the Happy Games". The emblem of the Games was a blue solar logo (the "Bright Sun"). The Olympic mascot, the dachshund "Waldi", was the first officially named Olympic mascot. The games also saw the introduction of the now universal sports pictograms designed by Otl Aicher. However, this joyful mood was ruined by the killings of 11 Israeli athletes by Palestinian terrorists in an event known as the "Munich massacre". Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x1024, 180 KB) This image was originally posted to Flickr as Olympic park 12. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x1024, 180 KB) This image was originally posted to Flickr as Olympic park 12. ... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... The dachshund is a short-legged, elongated dog breed of the hound family. ... Waldi was the first offical Olympic mascot. ... Pictogram for public toilets A pictogram or pictograph is a symbol which represents an object or a concept by illustration. ... Otl Aicher, also known as Otto Aicher (May 13, 1922 - September 1, 1991) was one of the leading German graphic designers of the 20th century. ... Palestinian terrorism refers to acts of violence committed for political reasons by Palestinians or Palestinian militant groups. ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ...


The Olympic Park (Olympiapark) is based on Frei Otto's plans and after the Games became a Munich landmark. The competition sites, designed by architect Günther Behnisch, included the Olympic swimming hall, the Olympics Hall (Olympiahalle, a multipurpose facility) and the Olympic Stadium (Olympiastadion), and an Olympic village very close to the park. The design of the stadium was considered revolutionary, with sweeping canopies of acrylic glass stabilized by metal ropes, used on such a large scale for the first time. 1972 Munich Olympic Stadium West Germany Pavilion at Expo 67, Montreal Canada Multihalle in Mannheim Frei Otto (31 May 1925) is a German architect and research engineer. ... Günther Behnisch is a German architect (born 1922 in Dresden, Germany); Behnisch is one of the most prominent architects representing deconstructivism. ... The Munich Olympiastadion from bigfotos At the heart of the Olympiapark München in northern Munich, the Olympiastadion was the main venue for the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... Perspex redirects here. ...

Contents

Munich massacre

Main article: Munich massacre

The games were marred by what has come to be known as the Munich massacre. On 5 September a group of eight Palestinian terrorists belonging to the Black September organization broke into the Olympic Village and took eleven Israeli athletes hostage in their apartment, soon killing two of them in the apartment; the subsequent standoff in the Olympic Village lasted for almost 18 hours. The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Black September terrorist on a balcony in the Olympic Village in September 1972, during what became known as the Munich Massacre, in which 11 Israeli athletes were kidnapped and killed. ... An Olympic Park is a venue or group of venues set up when a country hosts the Olympic Games. ...


During a botched German rescue attempt at the military airport of Fürstenfeldbruck, where the captors with their hostages had been transferred by helicopter ostensibly to board a plane bound for an undetermined Arabic country, all the surviving Israeli hostages were killed by the Palestinians. Fürstenfeldbruck is a town in Bavaria, Germany. ...


All but three of the Palestinians were killed as well. Two of those three were supposedly killed later by the Mossad. Jamal Al-Gashey is believed to be the sole survivor, and is still living today in hiding in an unspecified Arab country. The Olympic events were briefly suspended but Avery Brundage, the International Olympic Committee president, decided that "the Games must go on" and the games resumed a day later. For the Haganah branch responsible for coordinating Jewish immigration into the British Mandate of Palestine, see Mossad Lealiyah Bet. ... Jamal Al-Gashey (born 1953?) was a member of the Black September offshoot of the Palestine Liberation Organization and is the last-known surviving hostage-taker from the 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre. ... Avery Brundage (September 28, 1887 – May 8, 1975) was an American athlete, sports official, art collector and philanthropist. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ...


The attack prompted heightened security at future Olympics beginning with the 1976 Winter Olympics. The massacre led the German federal government to realize the inadequacy of its post-World War II pacifist approach to combatting terror, and to the creation of the elite counter-terrorist unit GSG 9. It also led Israel to launch an aggressive counterterrorism campaign known as Operation Wrath of God. The events of the Munich massacre were chronicled in the Oscar-winning documentary, One Day in September. A fictional account of the aftermath was dramatized in Steven Spielberg's 2005 film Munich. The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Grenzschutzgruppe 9 (GSG 9 - Border protection group 9) is a German counter-terrorism unit, and is considered to be among the best of such units in the world. ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ... The operation was ordered in response to the massacre of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. ... One Day in September is a 1999 documentary film directed by Kevin Macdonald examining the September 5, 1972 murder of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... Munich is a 2005 drama film starring Eric Bana. ...


Notable events

  • Mark Spitz, a swimmer from the United States, set a world record when he won seven gold medals (while on the way to setting a new world record for each of his seven gold medals) in a single Olympics, bringing his lifetime total to nine (he had won two golds in Mexico City's Games four years earlier). Being Jewish, Spitz was forced to leave Munich before the closing ceremonies for his own protection, after fears arose that he would be an additional target of those responsible for the Munich massacre.
  • Olga Korbut, a tiny Soviet gymnast, became a media star after winning a gold medal in the team competition event, failing to win in the individual all-around after a fall (she was beaten by Lyudmilla Turischeva), and finally winning two gold medals in the Balance Beam and the floor exercise events.
  • In the controversial gold medal basketball game, the United States' Olympic basketball winning streak, which started in 1936, was ended by the Soviet team's victory in the gold medal game, which USA Basketball calls "the most controversial game in international basketball history".[1] Doug Collins made two free throws with three seconds left to give the USA a 50-49 lead, despite the horn going off in the middle of his second attempt. The Soviets failed to score on the ensuing possession, but the clock was stopped at 0:01 after one official heard the earlier horn and the Soviets were frantically urging time-out. The clock had to be reset to three seconds but it was showing 0:50 when play began again. Again, the Soviets failed to score, time apparently expired, and the United States began celebrating, with ABC displaying the 50-49 margin as "final". However, after the vehement protests of FIBA secretary general R. William Jones of Great Britain, the referees added three seconds back to the clock due to error in re-starting the clock. Jones had no authority to intervene during a game, but his reputation was such that the officials dared not disobey him.[citation needed] The extra three seconds allowed the Soviet Union to have one more chance. The Soviets threw the ball downcourt, and Aleksandr Belov made a lay-up as time expired for the final margin of 51-50. A U.S. protest, filed after the match, was denied by FIBA, which voted 3-2 against the protest along Cold War lines (Italy and Puerto Rico voted in favor; Hungary, Poland, and Cuba voted against) and award the gold medal to the Soviets. The U.S. team voted unanimously to refuse the silver medal, and to this day still have not accepted them. They remain in a vault in Lausanne, Switzerland. USA team captain Kenny Davis even has written in his will that his wife and children can never accept the silver medal.[2] The end of the USA-USSR gold medal game remains one of the most controversial events in Olympic history and has been the subject of numerous film and television specials, including HBO's documentary 0:03 Seconds from Gold.
  • Lasse Virén of Finland won the 5,000 and 10,000 m (the latter after a fall), a feat he would repeat in the 1976 Summer Olympics. The late United States middle-distance legend Steve Prefontaine finished a disappointing fourth in the 5,000 m after swapping the lead multiple times with the victorious Virén
  • Valeri Borzov won both the 100 m and 200 m in track and field. The top two US sprinters and medal favorites in the 100 m, Rey Robinson and Eddie Hart, won their first rounds. But they were given the wrong starting time for the next round by their coach and missed the race, eliminating them.
  • Also in track and field, two black American 400 m runners, Vincent Matthews and Wayne Collett, acted casually on the medal stand, twirling their medals (gold and silver, respectively) and joking with one another as "The Star-Spangled Banner" was being played during the award ceremony. They were banned from the Olympics for life, as Tommie Smith and John Carlos had been in the 1968 Summer Olympics.
  • Dave Wottle won the AAU 800 m title before equalling the world record over 800 m of 1:44.3 at the US Olympic Trials. In the Olympic 800 m final, Wottle immediately dropped to the rear of the field, and stayed there for the first 600 m, at which point he started to pass runner after runner up the final straightaway, finally grabbing the lead in the final metres to win by just 0.03 seconds ahead of the favorite, the Soviet Yevgeny Arzhonov. This gained him the nickname of "The Head Waiter". At the victory ceremony, Wottle unconsciously forgot to remove his golf cap. This was interpreted by some as a form of protest, but Wottle later apologized.
  • Australian swimmer Shane Gould won three gold medals a silver and a bronze medal at the age of 15.
  • Handball (last held in 1936) and Archery (last held in 1920) returned as Olympic sports after a long absence.
  • Slalom canoeing was held for the first time at the Olympics.
  • Dan Gable won the gold medal in wrestling without having a single point scored against him.
  • Wim Ruska became the first judoka to win two gold medals.
  • For the first time, the Olympic Oath was taken by a representative of the referees.
  • American Frank Shorter, who was born in Munich, became the first from his country in 64 years to win the Olympic marathon. As Shorter was nearing the stadium, German student Norbert Sudhaus, wearing a track uniform, joined the race for the last quarter-mile as a gag. He entered the stadium and ran part way around the track. Thinking he was the winner, the crowd began cheering him. Officials then realized the hoax and ushered the jokester off the course. Arriving seconds later, Shorter was understandably perplexed to see someone ahead of him and to hear the boos and catcalls meant for Sudhaus. This was the third time in Olympic history that an American had won the marathon — and in none of those three instances (see Johnny Hayes and Thomas Hicks articles for details) did the winner enter the stadium first.
  • On 11 September a small plane was stolen in Stuttgart and authorities received information that Arab terrorists were planning to drop a bomb on the final ceremonies. IOC officials and Chancellor Willy Brandt, who were attending the ceremonies, were informed. Defense minister Georg Leber had two fighter planes follow the stolen plane, with the intent of shooting it down should it approach Munich. Radar contact to the plane was lost. A short while later, radar contact to an unknown plane was established, but it turned out to be a civilian passenger aircraft. The stolen plane was never found.
  • Badminton and water skiing were the demo sports.
Munich Olympics commemorative 10-mark coin, 1972
Munich Olympics commemorative 10-mark coin, 1972
Munich Olympics mascot, the dachshund Waldi

Mark Andrew Spitz (born February 10, 1950, in Modesto, California) is a former American swimmer. ... A world record is the best performance in a certain discipline, usually a sports event. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... Olga Valentinovna Korbut (Belarusian: Вольга Валянцінаўна Корбут, Volha Valyantsinawna Korbut; Russian: Ольга Валентиновна Корбут) (b. ... Flag of the USSR NOC symbol of the USSR The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (IOC country code:URS) participated in the Summer Olympics nine times (1952-1988 except 1984). ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... Ludmilla Ivanovna Tourischeva (Russian: Людмила Ивановна Турищева alternate spellings: Lyudmilla Turischeva, Ludmilla Turischeva, born July 10, 1952 in Grozny) is a former Russian gymnast and a nine-time Olympic medalist for the Soviet Union. ... The Balance Beam is a artistic gymnastics apparatus. ... A Canadian gymnast trains on a floor. ... Final results for the Basketball competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... This article is about the sport. ... Flag of the USSR NOC symbol of the USSR The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (IOC country code:URS) participated in the Summer Olympics nine times (1952-1988 except 1984). ... USA Basketball is a non-profit organization and the governing body for basketball in the United States. ... For the Canadian journalist and Holocaust denier see Doug Collins (journalist) Paul Douglas Collins (born July 28, 1951 in Christopher, Illinois), better known as Doug Collins, is a former NBA basketball player and announcer who has also been the head coach of a number of NBA teams. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... The International Basketball Federation (French Fédération Internationale de Basketball) is an association of national organizations which governs international competitition in the sport. ... Renato William Jones, commonly R. William, or simply William, Jones, was a popularizer of basketball in Europe and in Asia. ... Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Belov (Russian: ) (November 11, 1951 in Leningrad - October 3, 1978) was a Russian basketball player who won gold with the Soviet basketball team in Basketball at the 1972 Summer Olympics, scoring the winning basket in the gold medal game with no time left. ... The International Basketball Federation (French Fédération Internationale de Basketball) is an association of national organizations which governs international competitition in the sport. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Waterfront view of Ouchy, just south of Lausanne Lausanne is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), across from Évian-les-Bains, France, and about 60 km northeast of Geneva. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Lasse Virén (born July 22, 1949) is a former Finnish athlete, winner of four gold medals at the 1972 Summer Olympics and 1976 Summer Olympics. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Steve Roland Prefontaine (January 25, 1951 – May 30, 1975) (nicknamed Pre) was an American Olympic runner who inspired a running boom in the 1970s along with contemporaries Frank Shorter and Bill Rodgers. ... Lasse Virén (born July 22, 1949) is a former Finnish athlete, winner of four gold medals at the 1972 Summer Olympics and 1976 Summer Olympics. ... Valeri Filippovich Borzov (Валерий Филиппович Борзов) (born October 20, 1949) is a Ukrainian athlete, running for the Soviet Union in the past. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Edward James Eddie Hart (born April 24, 1949) is a former American athlete, winner of gold medal in 4x100 m relay at the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Vincent Edward (Vince) Matthews (born December 16, 1947) is a former American athlete, winner of two gold medals at the 1968 Summer Olympics and 1972 Summer Olympics. ... The Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ... For others with a similar name, see Tommy Smith. ... John Wesley Carlos (born June 5, 1945 in Harlem, New York) is an American former track and field athlete and professional football player. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... David James Dave Wottle (born August 7, 1950) is a former American athlete, winner of 800 m at the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... The Mens 800 metres at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany took place on September 2, 1972. ... Shane Gould (born November 23, 1956) is an Australian former swimmer who won three gold medals, a silver and bronze in 1972 Summer Olympics. ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... Whitewater Slalom is a competitive sport where the aim is to navigate a decked canoe or kayak through a course of gates on river rapids in the fastest time possible. ... Dan Gable Dan Gable (born October 25, 1948 in Waterloo, Iowa), is a well-known American amateur wrestler. ... Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ... Willem Ruska - Born 29th August 1940 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... Judo (Japanese: 柔道 Jūdō) is a martial art, a sport and a philosophy which originated in Japan. ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... Frank Shorter (born October 31, 1947) is an American distance runner and winner of the marathon race at the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... John Joseph Johnny Hayes (April 10, 1886 - August 25, 1965) was an American athlete, winner of the marathon race at the 1908 Summer Olympics. ... Thomas J. Hicks (January 7, 1875 – December 2, 1963) was an American track and field athlete, winner of the Olympic marathon in 1904. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Stuttgart (disambiguation). ... The head of government of Germany is called Chancellor (German: Kanzler). ... For the Oz character, see Willy Brandt (Oz). ... Georg Leber (born October 7, 1920 in Obertiefenbach, near Limburg an der Lahn) is a German politician in the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD). ... This article is about the sport. ... // Water skiing began in 1922 when Ralph Samuelson strapped two boards to his feet and rigged a clothesline up to his boat on Lake Pepin in Lake City, Minnesota. ... copied from http://worldcoingallery. ... copied from http://worldcoingallery. ... ISO 4217 Code DEM User(s) Germany, Montenegro, Kosovo ERM Since 13 March 1979 Fixed rate since 31 December 1998 Replaced by €, non cash 1 January 1999 Replaced by €, cash 1 January 2002 € = 1. ... Image File history File links Waldi_Olympic_01. ... Image File history File links Waldi_Olympic_01. ...

Venues

Olympiasee in Olympiapark, Munich
Olympiasee in Olympiapark, Munich
  • Munich Olympic Park (Olympiapark)
    • Olympic Stadium (Olympiastadion) - opening/closing ceremonies, athletics, football/soccer, modern pentathlon, memorial service for Israeli athletes
    • Boxing Hall (Boxhalle) - boxing, judo
    • Cycling Stadium (Radstadion) - cycling
    • Olympic Sports Hall (Sporthalle) - gymnastics, handball
    • Hockey Facility (Hockeyanlange) - hockey
    • Swimming Hall (Schwimmhalle) - swimming, diving, water polo
    • Volleyball Hall (Volleyballhalle) - volleyball
    • Olympic Village (Olympisches Dorf)
  • Venues in Greater Munich
    • Regatta Course (Regattastrecke), Oberschleißheim - rowing
    • Basketball Hall (Basketballhalle), Siegenburger Straße - basketball, judo
    • Fairgrounds, Fencing Hall 1 (Messegelände, Fechthalle 1) - fencing
    • Fairgrounds, Fencing Hall 2 (Messegelände, Fechthalle 1) - fencing
    • Fairgrounds, Weightlifting Hall (Messegelände, Gewichtheberhalle) - weightlifting
    • Fairgrounds, Judo and Wrestling Hall (Messegelände, Judo- und Ringerhalle) - judo, wrestling
    • Dante Swimming Pool (Dantebad) - water polo
    • Shooting Facility (Schießanglange), Hochbrück - shooting
    • Archery Facility (Bogenschießanlange), Englischer Garten - archery
    • Riding Facility, Riem - equestrian events
    • Dressage Facility Nymphenburg - equestrian events
  • Other venues
    • Olympic Yachting Center, Kiel-Schilksee - water skiing, yachting
    • Nürnberg - football/soccer preliminaries
    • Regensburg - football/soccer preliminaries
    • Passau - football/soccer preliminaries
    • Ingolstadt - football/soccer preliminaries
    • Augsburg - canoeing, football/soccer preliminaries, handball preliminaries
    • Ulm - handball preliminaries
    • Göppingen - handball preliminaries
    • Böblingen - handball preliminaries

Partial view of The Olympiapark (a view down of the Olympiaturm to the Olympic Stadium, on the right: Olympia Halle, left: Schwimmhalle ) The Olympiapark in Munich, Germany, is an Olympic Park which was constructed for the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... At the heart of the Olympiapark München in northern Munich, the Olympiastadion was the main venue for the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... west entrance Olympiahalle is an arena in Munich, Germany, just near Olympic Stadium, at , It is primarily used for ice hockey and basketball, and is the home arena of the Munich Mad Dogs. ... The Olympic Village in Munich as viewed from the Olympic Tower. ... Oberschleißheim is a municipality in the district of Munich, in Bavaria, Germany. ... Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle is an arena in Munich, Germany. ... The Monopteros at dusk The Englischer Garten or English Garden is a large urban public park that stretches from the city center to the northeastern city limits of Munich, Germany. ... View from the Park The Nymphenburg Palace (German: Schloss Nymphenburg) is a Baroque palace in Munich, Bavaria, Germany. ... , For the city in the United States, see Kiel, Wisconsin. ... Nuremberg coat of arms Location of Nuremberg Nuremberg (German: Nürnberg) is a city in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia. ... Regensburg (also Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 151. ... Passau (Latin: Batavis or Batavia, also Passavium; Italian: Passavia; Czech: Pasov) is a town in Niederbayern, Eastern Bavaria, Germany, known also as the Dreiflüssestadt (City of Three Rivers), because the Danube River is joined there by the Inn River from the South, and the Ilz River coming out of... Ingolstadt (Austro-Bavarian: Inglstådt) is a city in the Free State of Bavaria, Germany. ... For other meanings for Augsburg: See Augsburg (disambiguation) , Augsburg is a city in south-central Germany. ... For other uses, see Ulm (disambiguation). ... Göppingen is a town in southern Germany, part of the Stuttgart Region of Baden-Württemberg. ... Böblingen is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, seat of Böblingen District. ...

Medals awarded

See the medal winners, ordered by sport:

Archery at the 1972 Summer Olympics consisted of two medal events, one for men and one for women. ... Athletics Medal Winners at the 1972 Munich Olympics Internal links Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games 1972 Summer Olympics Categories: Athletics at the Olympics | 1972 Summer Olympics ... Final results for the Basketball competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics. ... Final results for the Boxing competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics: It was held August 27 to September 10 // Medals Light-flyweight (-48kg) Flyweight (-51kg) Bantamweight (-54kg) Featherweight (-57kg) Lightweight (-60kg) Light welterweight (-63. ... At the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, seven events in flatwater canoe racing were contested, and for the first time at the Olympic Games, four events in slalom canoeing were also contested. ... The cycling competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich consisted of two road cycling events and five track cycling events, all for men only. ... Final results for the Diving competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics: It was held August 28 to September 4. ... // Medals Medallists Individual Dressage Team Dressage Individual Three-Day Event Team Three-Day Event Individual Jumping Grand Prix Team Jumping Grand Prix Categories: 1972 Summer Olympics ... At the 1972 Summer Olympics, eight fencing events were contested. ... Final results for the Football competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics held in Munich, Augsburg, Ingolstadt, Nürnberg, Passau, and Regensburg. ... Gymnastics at the 1972 Summer Olympics was represented by 14 events: 6 for women and 8 for men. ... Handball at the 1972 Summer Olympics was the second appearance of the sport at the Olympics, returning to the Olympic program after a 36 year absence. ... Final results for the Hockey competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics: Only a men competition occurred that year. ... The Judo competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics was the return of the sport following its absence at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. ... The Modern Pentathlon at the 1972 Summer Olympics was represented by two events (both for men): Individual competition and Team competition. ... Rowing at the 1972 Summer Olympics featured 7 events, all for men. ... At the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, six events in sailing were contested. ... This article is about the shooting events at the Olympic Games. ... The 1972 Olympics were held in Munich, Germany. ... Volleyball at the 1972 Summer Olympics en:Volleyball at the 1972 Summer Olympics Categories: | | ... Final results for the Water Polo competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics held in Munich. ... The weightlifting competition at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich consisted of nine weight classes, all for men only. ... At the 1972 Summer Olympics, 20 wrestling events were contested, for all men. ...

Demonstration sports

Badminton was one of two demonstration sports at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. ... Water skiing was one of two demonstration sports at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. ...

Medal count

These are the top ten nations that won medals at these Games. This is the full table of the medal count of the 1972 Summer Olympics. ...

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Soviet Union 50 27 22 99
2 United States 33 31 30 94
3 East Germany East Germany (GDR) 20 23 23 66
4  West Germany (FRG) (host nation) 13 11 16 40
5 Japan Japan 13 8 8 29
6 Australia Australia 8 7 2 17
7 Poland 7 5 9 21
8 Hungary Hungary 6 13 16 35
9 Bulgaria 6 10 5 21
10 Italy Italy 5 3 10 18

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_East_Germany. ... Flag of East Germany East Germany competed at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan_-_variant. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria_1971-1990. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ...

Participating nations

Participants
Participants

Articles about Munich Summer Olympics by nation: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1357x628, 45 KB) Countries which participated in the 1972 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1357x628, 45 KB) Countries which participated in the 1972 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Albania_1946. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Algeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... Image File history File links Bahamasflag. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Barbados. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bermuda. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bolivia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links British_Honduras_flag. ... British Honduras (now Belize) competed at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria_1971-1990. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Burma_(1948-1974). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Khmer_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cameroon_(1961). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sri_Lanka. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chad. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... The flag of the Republic of China was last used at the 1972 Olympics. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Colombia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Costa_Rica. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cote_d'Ivoire. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Czechoslovakia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Benin. ... Dahomey (now Benin) competed in the Summer Olympic Games for the first time at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Dominican_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_East_Germany. ... Flag of East Germany East Germany competed at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ecuador. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt_1972. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_El_Salvador. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Fiji. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Gabon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ghana. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guatemala. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guyana. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Haiti_(1964-1986). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hong_Kong_1959. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iceland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Indonesia. ... Image File history File links Lionflag. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Jamaica. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan_-_variant. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kenya. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_North_Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kuwait. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lebanon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lesotho_(1966). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Liberia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Liechtenstein. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Luxembourg. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Madagascar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malawi. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malaysia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mali. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malta. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Monaco. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_People's_Republic_of_Mongolia_(1949-1992). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Morocco. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nepal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands_Antilles_(1959-1986). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Niger. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nigeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Panama. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Paraguay. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Peru_(state). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_San_Marino. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Saudi_Arabia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Senegal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Singapore. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Somalia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sudan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Dutch_Guyana. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Swaziland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt_1972. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tanzania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Thailand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Togo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Trinidad_and_Tobago. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tunisia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uganda. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uruguay. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Venezuela_1930-2006. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Vietnam. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States_Virgin_Islands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_SFR_Yugoslavia. ... Flag of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia competed at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zambia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Upper Volta (now Burkina Faso) competed in the Summer Olympic Games for the first time at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany. ...

See also

The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... See also: 1972 Summer Olympics The 1972 Summer Paralympics were the fourth Paralympic Games to be held. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... The International Olympic Committee (IOC) allocates three-letter country codes to all National Olympic Committees and other groups competing in the Olympic Games. ...

Olympics with significant criminal incidents

For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The Centennial Olympic Park bombing was a terrorist bombing on July 27, 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1996 Summer Olympics, the first of four committed by Eric Robert Rudolph. ...

References

  1. ^ USA Basketball]
  2. ^ ESPN Classic - Classic 1972 USA vs. USSR Basketball game

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Olympiapark, München
  • IOC Site on 1972 Summer Olympics

The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ... An all-time medal count for all Olympic Games from 1896 to 2006, including Summer Olympic Games, Winter Olympic Games and a combined total of both, is tabulated below. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... This article includes lists of all Olympic medalists since 1896, organized by each Olympic sport or discipline. ... The Olympic symbols are the icons, flags and symbols used by the International Olympic Committee to promote the Olympic Games. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Olympisch Stadion in 1928 The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were celebrated in 1928 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad originally programmed to celebrated between September 21 to October 6, 1940 were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, but the Games were given back to the IOC, because the Second Sino-Japanese War broke out in... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were celebrated in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... London 2012 redirects here. ... The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, is a major international sports and cultural festival to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2020 Summer Olympics The International Olympic Committee has yet to begin the selection process for the host city; the site of the Games of the XXXII Olympiad—as they will be officially known—is expected to be announced in mid 2013. ... The 2024 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2028 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1924 in Chamonix, France. ... The II Olympic Winter Games were held in 1928 in Sankt-Moritz, Switzerland. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... The 1936 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1936 in the villages of Garmisch and Partenkirchen in Bavaria, Germany. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Sapporo, Japan. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... The V Olympic Winter Games were held in St. ... The 1952 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1952 in Oslo, Norway. ... The VII Olympic Winter Games were held in 1956 in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... Sign outside Olympic Village at Squaw Valley The 1960 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California, United States (located in the Lake Tahoe basin). ... The 1964 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1968 Grenoble, France and opened on February 6. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in February 13 through February 24, 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1984 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia. ... The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and opened by Governor General Jeanne Sauvé. The Olympics were highly successful financially as they brought in million-dollar profits. ... The 1992 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1992 in Albertville, France. ... The 1994 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, is an international winter multiple sports event that will be celebrated from February 7 to February 23, 2014. ... The 2018 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXIII Olympic Winter Games, will be celebrated in 2018, and are an international winter sports athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ... The 2022 Winter Olympics, formally called the XXIV Olympic Winter Games is an event that the International Olympic Committee has yet to organize. ... The Youth Olympic Games (YOG)[1] are planned to be an international multi-sport event held every four years in staggered summer and winter events complementing the current Olympic Games,[2] and will feature athletes between the ages of 14 and 18. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
1972 Olympics — Infoplease.com (537 words)
The United States also lost an Olympic basketball game for the first time ever (they were 62-0) when the Soviets were given three chances to convert a last-second inbound pass and finally won, 51-50.
John Akii-Bua - John Akii-Bua Age: 47 winner of the gold medal in the 400m hurdles at the 1972 Olympics; set a...
Olympic tragedy: 1972 Revisited: the shadow of terrorism still haunts the Olympics almost 30 years after Israeli athletes were massacred......
2004 Summer Olympics (131 words)
Greece was chosen as the host city in 1997, after surprisingly having lost the bid to organise the 1996 Summer Olympics, the celebration of the 100th anniversary of the modern Olympic Games.
In 1997, they had a bid that was not only founded on their tradition, and they defeated Rome in the last round of voting, after Buenos Aires, Stockholm, Cape Town and San Juan had already received too few votes.
Since then, the International Olympic Committee has expressed its concern over the status of the progress of construction work of the new Olympic venues.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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