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Encyclopedia > 1970 in sports

See also: 1969 in sports, other events of 1970, 1971 in sports and the list of 'years in sports'. 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... This page indexes the individual year in sports pages. ...

Contents


Auto Racing

Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... The Daytona 500 is a 200-lap, 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup Series race held annually at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... NASCAR Nextel Cup logo NASCAR Nextel Cup trophy The NASCAR Championship is the championship held in NASCARs top stock car racing series. ... Bobby Isaac (born August 1, 1932 or 1934, the exact year is disputed) is a former NASCAR Grand National (now Nextel Cup) Series champion. ... Indianapolis 500, 1994 The Indianapolis 500 Mile Race, frequently shortened to Indianapolis 500 or Indy 500, is an American race for open-wheel automobiles held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Note: A cart may also be short for cartridge, particularly in the radio industry, where precursors of 8-track cartridges (and later CDs and zip drives) were used. ... Formula One, abbreviated to F1 and also known as Grand Prix racing, is the highest class of single-seat open-wheel formula auto racing. ... Jochen Rindt Karl Jochen Rindt (April 18, 1942 - September 5, 1970) was a racing driver. ... 1952 Le Mans race, depicted on cover of Auto Sport Review magazine 24 hours of Le Mans (24 heures du Mans) is the most famous sports car endurance race held at Circuit de la Sarthe near Le Mans, France, in the French Sarthe département. ... Hans Herrmann was a Formula One driver from Germany. ... Richard Attwood was a Formula One driver from Britain. ... The Porsche 912, a Porsche of the 1960s Porsche (), is a German manufacturer of sports cars, founded in 1931 by Ferdinand Porsche, the engineer who created the first Volkswagen. ... Rallying (international) or rally racing (US) is a form of automobile racing that takes place on normal roads with modified production or specially built road cars. ... The Monte Carlo Rally (officially Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo) is an automobile racing event organized each year by the Automobile Club de Monaco who also organize the F1 Grand Prix of Monaco and the Monaco Kart Cup. ... The Porsche 912, a Porsche of the 1960s Porsche (), is a German manufacturer of sports cars, founded in 1931 by Ferdinand Porsche, the engineer who created the first Volkswagen. ... Drag racing is a form of auto racing in which cars or motorcycles attempt to complete a fairly short, straight and level course in the shortest amount of time. ... The National Hot Rod Association, known as the NHRA, was founded by Wally Parks in 1951 in the State of California to provide a governing body to organize and promote the sport of drag racing. ... Clocked Speed = 506kph, Kwinana Race Track, W.A., 2005 Top-Fuel Racing refers to a class of drag racing in which the cars are run on 85% nitromethane and about 15% methanol also known as racing alcohol, instead of gasoline. ...

Baseball

Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a defensive player called a pitcher and hit by an offensive player called a batter with a round, smooth stick called a bat. ... January 16 is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... In American baseball, the Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to simply as the Gold Glove, is the award annually given to the Major League player judged to be the most superior individual fielding performance at each position (in each league), as voted by the managers and coaches in each... An outfielder moves in to catch a fly ball Outfielder is a collective term including left fielder, center fielder, and right fielder, the three positions in baseball farthest from the batter. ... Curt Flood (January 18, 1938–January 20, 1997) was an American baseball player. ... The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The St. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper, currently affiliated with the Fox network. ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Louis Boudreau (July 17, 1917 - August 10, 2001) was a Major League Baseball player and the American League MVP Award winner in 1948. ... Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a defensive player called a pitcher and hit by an offensive player called a batter with a round, smooth stick called a bat. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... Dock Ellis (born March 11, 1945) was a former professional baseball player who pitched for the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... The Pittsburgh Pirates are a Major League Baseball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... In baseball and softball, a no-hit game (more commonly known as a no-hitter) refers to a contest in which one of the teams has prevented the other from getting an official hit during the entire length of the game, which must be at least 9 innings by the... The San Diego Padres are a Major League Baseball team based in San Diego, California. ... Robert W. Peterson (born October 19, 1938) is a Canadian senator from Saskatchewan. ... MLB logo Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans, Black Americans, or simply blacks, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to West and sub-Saharan Africa. ... Part of the History of baseball series. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... In baseball, the World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in North America, played in October after the end of the regular season between the pennant winner of the American League and the pennant winner of the National League. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The Baltimore Orioles are a Major League Baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland. ... This article refers to the American baseball league. ... Cincinnati Reds National League AAA Louisville Bats AA Chattanooga Lookouts A Sarasota Reds Dayton Dragons R Billings Mustangs GCL Reds The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...

Basketball

Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... NBA logo, depicting former star Jerry West The National Basketball Association, more popularly known as simply the NBA, is the worlds premier mens professional basketball league. ... The New York Knicks (or New York Knickerbockers) are a National Basketball Association team based in New York, New York. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ... The Basketball World Championship (official name: FIBA World Championship) is a world basketball tournament held quadrenially. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ...

Boxing

2004 Armed Forces Amateur Boxing Championships, held in 2003. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Carlos Cruz (November 4, 1937_February 15, 1970) was a boxer from the Dominican Republic. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Joseph William Frazier (born in Beaufort, South Carolina on January 12, 1944), better known as Joe Frazier, is a world famous former boxer and world Heavyweight champion. ... Heavyweight is a division, or weight class, in boxing. ... 2004 Armed Forces Amateur Boxing Championships, held in 2003. ... James Albert Jimmy Ellis (1940-present) was an American prizefighter who held the World Boxing Association Heavyweight title from 1968 to 1970. ...

Cricket

For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ... ICC logo The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the governing body for international Test match and One-day International cricket. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ...

Cycling

Cycling is a recreation, a sport, and a means of transport across land. ... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle race for professionals held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... Baron Eddy Merckx /merks/ (born Edouard Louis Joseph Merckx on June 17, 1945 in Meensel-Kiezegem, Belgium) is considered by many to be the greatest cyclist of the 20th Century. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as Le Tour or The Tour, is an epic long distance road bicycle racing competition for professionals held over three weeks in July in and around France. ... Baron Eddy Merckx /merks/ (born Edouard Louis Joseph Merckx on June 17, 1945 in Meensel-Kiezegem, Belgium) is considered by many to be the greatest cyclist of the 20th Century. ... The professional World Cycling Championship is organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), and is a single massed start road race, the winner being the first across the line at the completion of the full race distance. ... Jean-Pierre Monséré (1948-1971) was a Belgian cyclist. ...

Figure Skating

Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... World Figure Skating Championships: Mens singles winners: 1896 - Gilbert Fuchs, (Germany) 1897 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1898 - Henning Grenander, (Sweden) 1899 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1900 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1901 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1902 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1903 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1904 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1905 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1906 - Gilbert... Irina Konstantinovna Rodnina (born September 12, 1949, Moscow, Russia) was a Soviet figure skater. ...

Football (American)

An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Date January 11, 1970 Stadium Tulane Stadium City New Orleans, Louisiana Attendance 80,562 MVP Len Dawson, Quarterback National Anthem Al Hirt Coin Toss Game referee Halftime Show Mardi Gras with Carol Channing U.S. TV Network CBS Announcers Jack Buck, Frank Gifford and Pat Summerall Nielsen Ratings 39. ... Conference AFC Division West Founded 1960 Home Field Arrowhead Stadium City Kansas City, Missouri Colors Red, white and gold Head Coach Dick Vermeil All-Time Record (W-L-T) (At Start of 2005 Season) 364-320-12 The Kansas City Chiefs are a National Football League team based in Kansas... Conference NFC Division North Founded 1961 Home Field Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome City Minneapolis, Minnesota Colors Purple, gold, and white Head Coach Mike Tice All-Time Record (W-L-T) (At Start of 2005 Season) 380-315-9 The Minnesota Vikings are a National Football League team based in Minneapolis...

Football (Australian Rules)

An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Australian rules football at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. ... See also Australian Football League. ... Carlton Football Club logo The Carlton Football Club, nicknamed The Blues for their dark blue playing colours, is one of the oldest, richest, and most successful Australian rules football clubs. ... Collingwood Football Club logo The Collingwood Football Club, nicknamed The Magpies after the black and white striped jerseys worn by the players, is an Australian rules football club, playing in the elite Australian Football League. ... The Charles Brownlow Medal is an annual medal awarded by the Australian Football League to the best and fairest player of the year. ... Sydney Swans logo The Sydney Swans are an Australian Football League (AFL) club based in Sydney. ...

Football (Canadian)

An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... The Montreal Alouettes (French, Alouettes de Montréal) refers to a team in the Canadian Football League based in Montreal, Quebec. ... This article is for the CFL football team. ... The Vanier Cup (French: Coupe Vanier) is the championship trophy of Canadian Interuniversity Sport mens football. ... The Manitoba Bisons are the athletic teams that represent the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...

Football (Soccer)

An Australian rules football match at the Richmond Paddock, Melbourne, in 1866. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... The Football World Cup (official name: FIFA World Cup) is the most important competition in international football (soccer). ... The FA Cups trophy is also known as the FA Cup. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as the Blues, previously known as the Pensioners), founded in 1905, is a Premier League football team that plays at Stamford Bridge football ground in South west London. ... Leeds United F.C. is the only professional association football club in Leeds. ...

Golf

Men's Golf Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor sport where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ...

  • PGA tour's leading money winner for the year: Lee Trevino - $157,037

Women's Golf The Grand Slam of golf consists of four major golfing events held each year; the events are often referred to as the major tournaments and are all recognized as a part of the worlds two most prestigious tours, the PGA TOUR in the United States and the PGA European... This article is about the month of May. ... The Masters is one of four Grand Slam golf tournaments. ... Billy Casper (b. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... Tony Jacklin (born July 7, 1944) is an English golfer, who was arguably the most successful UK player of his generation. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... The Champions Belt & The Claret Jug. ... // Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940 in Columbus, Ohio), also known as The Golden Bear, was a major force in professional golf from the 1960s to the mid 1990s, and is regarded by many as the greatest golfer of all time. ... Note: as an adjective (stressed on the second syllable instead of the first), august means honorable. ... The PGA Championship is an annual golf tournament, conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA TOUR. The PGA Championship is one of the four Major Championships in mens golf, and it is the golf seasons final major, being played in August. ... Dave Stockton (Born November 2, 1941 San Bernardino, California) is an American golfer who was prominent on the PGA Tour from the middle of the 1960s to the late 1970s. ... Founded in 1916, the Professional Golfers Association of America is headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, United States and claims to be the largest working sports organization in the world with more than 27,000 members. ... Lee Trevino (born December 1, 1939) is a professional American golfer. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ...

The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... Donna Caponi (b January 19 1945 Detroit, Michigan) is an American professional golfer. ... The LPGA Championship is the second-longest running tournament in the history of the Ladies Professional Golf Association, surpassed only by the U.S. Womens Open. ... Shirley Englehorn (b December 12, 1940) is a professional golfer. ... Kathy Whitworth (born September 27, 1939 in Monahans, Texas) was an American professional golfer. ... The LPGA is the Ladies Professional Golf Association. ...

Thoroughbred Horse Racing

Thoroughbred horse racing is the main form of horse-racing throughout the world. ... The Melbourne Cup is Australias major annual thoroughbred horse race. ... The Queens Plate is North Americas oldest thoroughbred horse race, run at a distance of 1 1/4 miles for 3-year-old thoroughbed horses, foaled in Canada, run annually in July at Woodbine Racetrack, Etobicoke (Toronto), Ontario. ... Almoner (from Latin Almosunartius) is a chaplain or church officer who was in charge of distributing charity. ... Races at Lonchamp - Édouard Manet, 1867 The Prix de LArc de Triomphe is a flat thoroughbred horse race of a 2400 metres (about 1 mile 4 furlongs) raced on turf for 3 year olds and up, Colts, horses, Fillies and mares (exclude geldings). ... The Irish Derby Stakes have been held annually at The Curragh in County Kildare, Ireland since 1866. ... The racehorse Nijinsky II (named after the dancer Vaslav Nijinsky) was a son of Northern Dancer and Flaming Page and a grandson of Nearco. ... The racehorse Nijinsky II (named after the dancer Vaslav Nijinsky) was a son of Northern Dancer and Flaming Page and a grandson of Nearco. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... The Two Thousand Guineas Stakes is a Group 1 1 mile (1600 meters) thoroughbred flat racing horse race for 3-year-olds colts and fillies run in May of each year over the Rowley Mile at Newmarket, Suffolk, England. ... The racehorse Nijinsky II (named after the dancer Vaslav Nijinsky) was a son of Northern Dancer and Flaming Page and a grandson of Nearco. ... Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ... The racehorse Nijinsky II (named after the dancer Vaslav Nijinsky) was a son of Northern Dancer and Flaming Page and a grandson of Nearco. ... The St. ... The racehorse Nijinsky II (named after the dancer Vaslav Nijinsky) was a son of Northern Dancer and Flaming Page and a grandson of Nearco. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged yearly in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... The Preakness Stakes is a classic 1 3/16 mile (1. ... The Belmont Stakes is a prestigious horse race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. ...

Harness Racing

  • Fresh Yankee was named "Horse of the Year" by the U.S. Trotting Association and the U.S. Harness Writers Association.

A trotter training at Vincennes hippodrome Harness racing is a form of horse-racing in which the horses race in a specified gait. ... The Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Pacers consists of the following horse races: Cane Pace Messenger Stakes Little Brown Jug The traditional order of the races was Cane Pace, Little Brown Jug, and Messenger. ... The Cane Pace is a harness horse race run annually since 1955. ... The Little Brown Jug is a harness race for three-year-old pacing standardbreds hosted by the Delaware County Agricultural Society since 1946 at the County Fairgrounds in Delaware, Ohio. ... The Messenger Stakes is an American harness racing event for 3-year-old pacing horses. ... The Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Trotters consists of the following horse races: Hambletonian Yonkers Trot Kentucky Futurity Since its inauguration in 1955, only seven horses have ever won the Trotting Triple Crown. ... The Hambletonian is a United States harness racing event held annually for three-year-old trotting standardbreds. ... The Yonkers Trot is a harness race for three-year old trotting standardbreds held at Yonkers Raceway in New York. ... The Kentucky Futurity is a stakes race for three-year-old trotters, held annually at The Red Mile in Lexington, Kentucky since 1893. ... The Interdominions is a harness racing competition held between horses from Australia and New Zealand. ...

Ice Hockey

Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Art Ross Memorial Trophy is given to the National Hockey League player with the highest combined total of goals and assists during the regular season. ... Robert Gordon Orr, O.C. (born March 20, 1948 in Parry Sound, Ontario) is a retired Canadian ice hockey player. ... The National Hockey League (NHL) is a professional sports organization composed of hockey teams in the United States and Canada, where it is also known by its French name, Ligue Nationale de Hockey (LNH). ... The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the most valuable ice hockey player in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ... The National Hockey League (NHL) is a professional sports organization composed of hockey teams in the United States and Canada, where it is also known by its French name, Ligue Nationale de Hockey (LNH). ... Robert Gordon Orr, O.C. (born March 20, 1948 in Parry Sound, Ontario) is a retired Canadian ice hockey player. ... The Boston Bruins are a National Hockey League team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ... The Boston Bruins are a National Hockey League team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The St. ... Robert Gordon Orr, O.C. (born March 20, 1948 in Parry Sound, Ontario) is a retired Canadian ice hockey player. ... The Conn Smythe Trophy is awarded annually to the most valuable player during the National Hockey Leagues Stanley Cup playoffs. ... The Ice Hockey World Championships are an annual event put together by the IIHF, the International Ice Hockey Federation, since 1930. ...

Skiing

  • Alpine Skiing
    • The men's overall season champion: Karl Schranz, Austria
    • The women's overall season champion: Michele Jacot, France

Skiing is the activity of gliding over snow using skis (originally wooden planks, now usually made from fiberglass or related composites) strapped to the feet with ski bindings. ... Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ...

Snooker

Snooker table Snooker is a variation of the game of billiards played on a baize-covered table that has pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long cushions. ... The World Championship is the climax of snookers annual calendar and the most important snooker event of the year in terms of prestige, prize money and world ranking points. ... Ray Reardon is a retired Welsh snooker player. ... John Pulman (1926 - December 25, 1998) was an English professional snooker player who dominated the game throughout the 1960s. ...

Speed skating

  • First ISU Sprint Speed Skating Championships for Men and Ladies held in West Allis, U.S.A.

Gaetan Boucher training for the 1976 Olympics Speed skating or speedskating is a form of ice skating in which the competitors attempt to travel a certain distance over the ice as quickly as possible. ... The International Skating Union (ISU) is the international governing body for competitive ice skating disciplines, including figure skating, synchronized skating, speed skating, and short track speed skating. ... West Allis is a city located in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. ...

Tennis

It has been suggested that Game point be merged into this article or section. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... This article is about the Australian Open tennis tournament. ... Country: United States Height: 61 (185 cm) Weight: 160 lbs. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ... Jan Kodeš (born March 1, 1946) was a right-handed Czech tennis player who won three Grand Slam events in the early 1970s. ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... John David Newcombe, born May 23, 1944 in Sydney, Australia, was a tennis champion. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Ken Robert Rosewall, born November 2, 1934 in Sydney, Australia, was a champion tennis player. ... Margaret Smith Court (pre-marital name: Margaret Jean Smith) (born July 16, 1942) is a retired Australian professional tennis player. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... This article is about the Australian Open tennis tournament. ... Margaret Smith Court (pre-marital name: Margaret Jean Smith) (born July 16, 1942) is a retired Australian professional tennis player. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ... Margaret Smith Court (pre-marital name: Margaret Jean Smith) (born July 16, 1942) is a retired Australian professional tennis player. ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Margaret Smith Court (pre-marital name: Margaret Jean Smith) (born July 16, 1942) is a retired Australian professional tennis player. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Margaret Smith Court (pre-marital name: Margaret Jean Smith) (born July 16, 1942) is a retired Australian professional tennis player. ... Davis Cup logo The Davis Cup is the international team event in mens tennis. ... While the German language and the feeling of Germanhood go back more than a thousand years, the state now known as Germany was unified as a modern nation-state only in 1871, when the German Empire, dominated by the Kingdom of Prussia, was forged. ...

General sporting events

Multi-Sport Events Arctic Winter Games Asian Games Canada Games Commonwealth Games Francophone Games Gaelic Games Gay Games Goodwill Games Nordic Games Pan American Games Paralympic Games Special Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Winter Olympic Games World Games World Wheelchair Games X Games American football Alamo Bowl Aztec Bowl Capital... Commonwealth Games is a multi-sport event held every four years involving the elite athletes of The Commonwealth. ... Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ...

Births

February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has a related story: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... Secretariat (March 30, 1970 - October 4, 1989) was an American thoroughbred race horse (Sire: Bold Ruler; Dam: Somethingroyal), born at Meadow Farms Stables in Caroline County, Virginia. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Dame Kelly Holmes Dame Kelly Holmes (born: April 19, 1970) is a British middle distance athlete. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... Country: United States Residence: Las Vegas, Nevada, USA Height: 5 ft 11 in (180 cm) Weight: 177 lbs. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... Michael Richard Weir O.Ont. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... Gabriela Sabatini in action Gabriela Sabatini (b. ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... A journeyman defensive tackle who is currently (January 2005) playing for the Miami Dolphins. ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... Maia Ann Mereana Lewis (born 20 June 1970 in Christchurch, New Zealand) is a cricketer and current captain of the New Zealand womens cricket team. ... August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ... Alan Shearer Alan Shearer, OBE (born August 13, 1970) is a successful English footballer. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... Belinda Clarke (born September 10, Australian cricketer. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years). ... Isabelle Brasseur and Lloyd Eisler book cover Isabelle Brasseur (born July 28, 1970) is a Canadian figure skater. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in Leap years). ... October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... Anil Radhakrishna Kumble (pronounced COOM-bley) (born October 17, 1970 in Bangalore, Karnataka) is an Indian cricketer and has been a member of the Indian cricket team since 1990. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... Tonya Maxine Harding (born November 12, 1970) is a former figure skater from Portland, Oregon. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

Deaths


  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: 1970 in sports (246 words)
See also: 1969 in sports, other events of 1970, 1971 in sports and the list of 'years in sports'.
Rollins was a prime mover in bringing world-class motor sports to Delaware.
Rollins also served as chairman of Dover Downs, which in recent years has grown to become the seventh-leading motor sports venue in the world and among the leading harness tracks in the U.S.
Overview - 1970's Sports (177 words)
Television had reshaped the sports industry in the decade before, and now the businessmen went to work to exploit their market.
Football, baseball, basketball, boxing, auto racing, golf, and tennis were where the sports entertainment money was, and by the end of the 1970s top athletes demanded as much as a million dollars a year to perform.
Traditionally in team sports athletes had been considered property whose value lay with a team owner or manager who could market their skills.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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