FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > 1966 in sports

See also: 1965 in sports, other events of 1966, 1967 in sports and the list of 'years in sports'. 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... This page indexes the individual year in sports pages. ...

Contents


Auto Racing

Auto racing (also known as automobile racing, autosport or motorsport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... Richard Petty (second from left) pictured with his father Lee (to his right), son Kyle (to his left), and grandson Adam (to his far left), in 2000 before the deaths of Lee and Adam. ... The Daytona 500 is a 200-lap, 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup Series race held annually at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... NASCAR Nextel Cup logo NEXTEL Cup trophy, adopted in 2004 4-time champion Jeff Gordon poses with the Winston Cup trophy (used prior to 2004) The NASCAR Championship is the championship held in NASCARs top stock car racing series. ... David Pearson David Pearson (born December 22, 1934 in Whitney, South Carolina) is a former American racecar driver. ... Indianapolis 500, 1994 The Indianapolis 500-Mile Race, frequently shortened to Indianapolis 500 or Indy 500, is an American race for open-wheel automobiles held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Norman Graham Hill (February 17, 1929 - November 29, 1975) was a British motor racing champion. ... A simple wooden cart in Australia A cart transporting watermelons in Harbin, China. ... Mario Andretti portrayed on the cover of Esquire Mario Gabriele Andretti (born February 28, 1940) is an American racing driver, arguably the most successful US citizen in auto racing. ... Formula One - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Jack Brabhams 1961 Cooper-Climax, the car that began the rear-engine revolution at the Indianapolis 500 Sir John Arthur Jack Brabham, OBE (born April 2, 1926) is an Australian racing driver who was Formula One champion in 1959, 1960 and 1966. ... 1952 Le Mans race, depicted on cover of Auto Sport Review magazine The 24 Hours of Le Mans (24 heures du Mans) is the worlds most famous sports car endurance race, held annually at Circuit de la Sarthe near Le Mans, France, in the French Sarthe département. ... Bruce Leslie McLaren (30 August 1937–2 June 1970), born in Auckland, New Zealand, was a race-car designer, driver, engineer and inventor. ... Chris Amon (born 20 July 1943) was a New Zealand Grand Prix driver of the 1960s and 1970s, widely accepted to be one of the best drivers never to win a F1 Grand Prix. ... The Ford Motor Company (often referred to simply as Ford; sometimes nicknamed FoMoCo), NYSE: F is an automobile maker founded by Henry Ford in Dearborn, Michigan, United States (where the company is currently headquartered), and incorporated on June 16, 1903. ... Rallying (international) or rally racing (US) is a form of automobile racing that takes place on normal roads with modified production or specially built road cars. ... The Monte Carlo Rally (officially Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo) is an automobile racing event organized each year by the Automobile Club de Monaco who also organize the F1 Grand Prix of Monaco and the Monaco Kart Cup. ... A Top Fuel dragster, the ultimate in drag racing. ... The National Hot Rod Association, known as the NHRA, was founded by Wally Parks in 1951 in the State of California to provide a governing body to organize and promote the sport of drag racing. ... Clocked Speed = 506 km/h, Kwinana Race Track, W.A., 2005 Top-Fuel Racing refers to a class of drag racing in which the cars are run on 85% nitromethane and about 15% methanol also known as racing alcohol, instead of gasoline. ...

Baseball

Baseball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), nicknamed The Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame, The Thumper and The Kid, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who played 19 seasons, twice interrupted by military service as a Marine Corps pilot, with the Boston Red Sox. ... Baseball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... 2 times Led NL in triples once Hit . ... This article refers to the American baseball league. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Frank Robinson (born August 31, 1935 in Beaumont, Texas), 1935) was a Major League Baseball player and is currently the manager of the Washington Nationals. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), nicknamed The Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame, The Thumper and The Kid, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who played 19 seasons, twice interrupted by military service as a Marine Corps pilot, with the Boston Red Sox. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... The World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada, the culmination of the sports postseason each October. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) East Division (1969-present) Major league titles World Series titles (3) 1983 â€¢ 1970 â€¢ 1966 AL Pennants (7) 1983 â€¢ 1979 â€¢ 1971 â€¢ 1970 1969 â€¢ 1966 â€¢ 1944 East Division titles (8) 1997 â€¢ 1983 â€¢ 1979 â€¢ 1974 1973 â€¢ 1971 â€¢ 1970 â€¢ 1969 Wild card berths (1) 1996 Major league... Major league affiliations National League (1890-present) West Division (1969-present) American Association (1884-1889) Major league titles World Series titles (6) 1988 â€¢ 1981 â€¢ 1965 â€¢ 1963 1959 â€¢ 1955 NL Pennants (21) 1988 â€¢ 1981 â€¢ 1978 â€¢ 1977 1974 â€¢ 1966 â€¢ 1965 â€¢ 1963 1959 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1955 â€¢ 1953 1952 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 â€¢ 1941 1920 â€¢ 1916 â€¢ 1900... Frank Robinson (born August 31, 1935 in Beaumont, Texas), 1935) was a Major League Baseball player and is currently the manager of the Washington Nationals. ...

Basketball

Basketball is very popular in U.S. colleges. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Boston Celtics are a National Basketball Association team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ...

Boxing

2004 Armed Forces Amateur Boxing Championships, held in 2003. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... New York City, officially named the City of New York, is the most populous city in the United States, and the most densely populated major city in North America. ... Emile Griffith (born February 3, 1938) is a former boxer from the US Virgin Islands who won world championships in both the Welterweight and Junior Middleweight divisions. ... Richard Dick Tiger Ihetu (August 14, 1929 - December 14, 1971) was a boxer from Amaigbo, Orlu, Nigeria, was a migrant fighter to Liverpool (and later to America). ...

Cycling

Cycling is a recreation, a sport, and a means of transport across land. ... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle race for professional cyclists held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... Gianni Motta is a former Italian bicycle racer who, like many before him, turned to manufacture and sales of bicycles after his racing career. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is an epic long distance road bicycle racing competition for professionals held over three weeks in July in and around France. ... Lucien Aimar (born April 28, 1941 at Hyeres, France) was a notable road racing cyclist of the 1960s and 1970s, and winner of the Tour de France in 1966. ... The Vuelta a España bicycle race is one of the three Grand Tours of Europe and, after the Tour de France and the Giro dItalia, the third most important road cycling stage race in the world. ... The professional World Cycling Championship is organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), and is a single massed start road race, the winner being the first across the line at the completion of the full race distance. ... Rudi Altig 2005 Rudi Altig (born 18 March 1937) was a leading professional track and road racing cyclist during the 1960s. ...

Figure Skating

Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... World Figure Skating Championships: Mens singles winners: 1896 - Gilbert Fuchs, (Germany) 1897 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1898 - Henning Grenander, (Sweden) 1899 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1900 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1901 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1902 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1903 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1904 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1905 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1906 - Gilbert... Peggy Fleming (born July 27, 1948 in San Jose, California) is an American figure skater who won an Olympic gold medal in 1968. ... Ludmila Yevgeniyevna Belousova ( b. ... Oleg Alekseyevich Protopopov (b. ...

Football (American)

Football is the name given to a number of different team sports. ... AFL logo The American Football League (AFL) was a professional league of American football that operated from 1960 to 1969. ... Conference AFC Division West Year Founded 1960 Home Field Arrowhead Stadium City Kansas City, Missouri Team Colors Red, Gold, and White Head Coach Dick Vermeil League Championships (3) AFL Champions: 1962, 1966 AFL Champions & Super Bowl: 1969 (IV) Conference Championships (0) Division Championships (8) AFL West: 1962, 1965, 1966 AFC... Conference AFC Division East Year Founded 1960 Home Field Ralph Wilson Stadium City Buffalo, New York Team Colors Dark Navy, Red, Royal, Nickel, and White Head Coach Mike Mularkey League Championships (2) AFL Champions: 1964, 1965 Conference Championships (4) AFC: 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993 Division Championships (10) AFL East: 1964... The National Football League has used several different formats to determine their league champions since its founding in 1920. ... Note: Basketball teams from Chicago and Anderson once used the name Packers as well. ... Conference NFC Division East Year Founded 1960 Home Field Texas Stadium City Irving, Texas Team Colors Royal Blue, Metallic Silver, Blue, and White Head Coach Bill Parcells League Championships (5) Super Bowl: 1971 (VI), 1977 (XII), 1992 (XXVII), 1993 (XXVIII), 1995 (XXX) Conference Championships (10) NFL Eastern: 1966, 1967 NFC... Date January 15, 1967 Stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum City Los Angeles MVP Bart Starr, Quarterback Favorite Packers by 14 National Anthem University of Arizona and University of Michigan Bands Coin toss Game referee Halftime show University of Arizona and University of Michigan Bands Attendance 61,946 TV in the... Note: Basketball teams from Chicago and Anderson once used the name Packers as well. ... Conference AFC Division West Year Founded 1960 Home Field Arrowhead Stadium City Kansas City, Missouri Team Colors Red, Gold, and White Head Coach Dick Vermeil League Championships (3) AFL Champions: 1962, 1966 AFL Champions & Super Bowl: 1969 (IV) Conference Championships (0) Division Championships (8) AFL West: 1962, 1965, 1966 AFC...

Football (Australian Rules)

Football is the name given to a number of different team sports. ... Australian football, which is also known as Australian rules football, or less formally as Aussie rules or footy is a code of football which originated in Melbourne, Australia. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The St Kilda Football Club, nicknamed The Saints, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League. ... The Collingwood Football Club, nicknamed The Magpies after the black and white striped jerseys worn by the players, is an Australian rules football club, playing in the elite Australian Football League. ... The Chas Brownlow Trophy, better known as the Brownlow Medal, is an annual medal regarded as the most prestigious award for individual players. ...

Football (Canadian)

Football is the name given to a number of different team sports. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... The Saskatchewan Roughriders are a Canadian Football League team based in Regina, Saskatchewan. ... The Ottawa Rough Riders were a Canadian Football League team based in Ottawa, Ontario. ... The Vanier Cup (French: Coupe Vanier) is the championship trophy of Canadian Interuniversity Sport mens football. ... The St. ...

Football (Soccer)

Football is the name given to a number of different team sports. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... Bobby Moore with Jules Rimet trophy GB World Cup Commemorative overprinted stamp The 1966 Football World Cup Final was the final match in the Football World Cup 1966, contested by England and West Germany. ... The FA Cups trophy is also known as the FA Cup. ... Everton Football Club are an English football club from the city of Liverpool, founded in 1878. ... Sheffield Wednesday Football Club are a football club in the English Football League, based in Sheffield, UK. Sheffield Wednesday won the play-offs of Football League One on 29 May 2005 to win promotion to the Football League Championship. ...

Golf

Men's Golf Golf is a game where individual players or teams hit a ball into a hole using various clubs. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ...


Women's Golf The Grand Slam of golf consists of four major golfing events held each year; the events are often referred to as the major tournaments and are all recognized as a part of the worlds two most prestigious tours, the PGA TOUR in the United States and the PGA European... This article is about the month of May. ... The Masters is one of four Grand Slam golf tournaments. ... // Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940 in Columbus, Ohio), also known as The Golden Bear, was a major force in professional golf from the 1960s to the late 1990s, and is regarded as the greatest golfer of all time. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with a length of 30 days The month is named after the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and equivalent to the Greek goddess Hera. ... The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... Billy Casper (b. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... The Champions Belt & The Claret Jug. ... // Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940 in Columbus, Ohio), also known as The Golden Bear, was a major force in professional golf from the 1960s to the late 1990s, and is regarded as the greatest golfer of all time. ... Note: as an adjective (stressed on the second syllable instead of the first), august means honorable. ... // The PGA Championship is an annual golf tournament, conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA TOUR. The PGA Championship is one of the four Major Championships in mens golf, and it is the golf seasons final major, being played in August. ... Founded in 1916, the Professional Golfers Association of America is headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, United States and claims to be the largest working sports organization in the world with more than 27,000 members. ... Billy Casper (b. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ...

The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... The LPGA Championship, currently known for sponsorship reasons as the McDonalds LPGA Championship, is the second-longest running tournament in the history of the Ladies Professional Golf Association surpassed only by the U.S. Womens Open. ... Kathy Whitworth (born September 27, 1939 in Monahans, Texas) was an American professional golfer. ... LPGA stands for Ladies Professional Golf Association. ...

Thoroughbred Horse Racing

Thoroughbred horse racing is the main form of horse-racing throughout the world. ... The Melbourne Cup is Australias major annual thoroughbred horse race. ... Galilee, was one of the most successful racehorses in Australia. ... The Queens Plate is North Americas oldest thoroughbred horse race, run at a distance of 1 1/4 miles for 3-year-old thoroughbed horses, foaled in Canada, run annually in July at Woodbine Racetrack, Etobicoke (Toronto), Ontario. ... Races at Lonchamp - Édouard Manet, 1867 The Prix de LArc de Triomphe is a flat thoroughbred horse race of a 2400 metres (about 1 mile 4 furlongs) raced on turf for 3 year olds and up, Colts, horses, Fillies and mares (exclude geldings). ... The Irish Derby Stakes have been held annually at The Curragh in County Kildare, Ireland since 1866. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... The Two Thousand Guineas Stakes is a Group 1 1 mile (1600 meters) thoroughbred flat racing horse race for 3-year-olds colts and fillies run in May of each year over the Rowley Mile at Newmarket, Suffolk, England. ... Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ... The St. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... Churchill Downs ractrack, 2004 The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged yearly in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... The Preakness Stakes is a classic 1 3/16 mile (1. ... The Belmont Stakes is a prestigious horse race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. ...

Harness Racing

A trotter training at Vincennes hippodrome Harness racing is a form of horse-racing in which the horses race in a specified gait. ... The Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Pacers consists of the following horse races: Cane Pace Messenger Stakes Little Brown Jug The traditional order of the races was Cane Pace, Little Brown Jug, and Messenger. ... The Cane Pace is a harness horse race run annually since 1955. ... The Little Brown Jug is a harness race for three-year-old pacing standardbreds hosted by the Delaware County Agricultural Society since 1946 at the County Fairgrounds in Delaware, Ohio. ... The Messenger Stakes is an American harness racing event for 3-year-old pacing horses. ... The Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Trotters consists of the following horse races: Hambletonian Yonkers Trot Kentucky Futurity Since its inauguration in 1955, only seven horses have ever won the Trotting Triple Crown. ... The Hambletonian is a United States harness racing event held annually for three-year-old trotting standardbreds. ... The Kerry Way is the longest (215km) signposted walking trail in the Republic of Ireland, and is situated in County Kerry. ... The Yonkers Trot is a harness race for three-year old trotting standardbreds held at Yonkers Raceway in New York. ... The Kentucky Futurity is a stakes race for three-year-old trotters, held annually at The Red Mile in Lexington, Kentucky since 1893. ... The Interdominions is a harness racing competition held between horses from Australia and New Zealand. ... Yamamoto (山本 meaning base of the mountain) is one of the most popular Japanese surnames. ...

Ice Hockey

Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Art Ross Memorial Trophy is given to the National Hockey League player with the most points scored at the end of the regular season. ... The modernized NHL shield logo, debuting in 2005. ... Bobby Hull on the Chicago Blackhawks Robert Marvin Hull, born January 3, 1939 in Pointe Anne (near Belleville), Ontario, Canada, is regarded as one of the greatest ice hockey players and perhaps the greatest left winger to ever play the game. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a National Hockey League team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the most valuable ice hockey player in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ... The modernized NHL shield logo, debuting in 2005. ... Bobby Hull on the Chicago Blackhawks Robert Marvin Hull, born January 3, 1939 in Pointe Anne (near Belleville), Ontario, Canada, is regarded as one of the greatest ice hockey players and perhaps the greatest left winger to ever play the game. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a National Hockey League team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ... The Montréal Canadiens are the oldest established National Hockey League franchise. ... The Detroit Red Wings are a National Hockey League (NHL) team based in Detroit, Michigan, USA. Founded: 1926 Formerly known as: Cougars 1926-1930, Falcons 1930-1932 Home arena: Joe Louis Arena Former Home Arenas: Windsor Arena (1926-27); Detroit Olympia (1927-1979) Uniform colors: Red and white. ... The Ice Hockey World Championships are an annual event put together by the IIHF, the International Ice Hockey Federation, since 1930. ...

Orienteering

The international orienteering symbol. ... The international orienteering symbol. ...

Skiing

Skiing is the activity of gliding over snow using skis (originally wooden planks, now usually made from fiberglass or related composites) strapped to the feet with ski bindings. ... The alpine skiing World Cup is a circuit of alpine skiing competitions regulated by the FIS. Held at ski resorts across Europe, the continental US, and Canada, competitors compete to achieve the best time in four disciplines: Slalom, Giant Slalom, Super-G, and Downhill. ... Jean-Claude Killy (born August 30, 1943) is a French alpine skier and a triple Olympic champion. ...

Snooker

Snooker table Snooker is a billiards sport that is played on a large (12 X 6) baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long cushions. ... The World Snooker Championship is the climax of snookers annual calendar and the most important snooker event of the year in terms of prestige, prize money and world ranking points. ... John Pulman (1926 - December 25, 1998) was an English professional snooker player who dominated the game throughout the 1960s. ... Fred Davis (August 13, 1913 - April 16, 1998) was an English professional snooker and billiards player, and was one of the most loved personalities in the game. ...

Tennis

Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... This article is about the Australian Open tennis tournament. ... Roy Stanley Emerson (born November 3, 1936, in Blackbutt, Queensland, Australia) is a former champion tennis player. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ... Tony Roche was an Australian tennis player, born 17 May 1945 in Wagga Wagga. ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Manuel Martinez Santana (born May 10, 1938) was a Spanish male tennis player. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Frederick Fred Sydney Stolle (October 8, 1938) was an Australian male tennis player. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... This article is about the Australian Open tennis tournament. ... Margaret Smith Court (nee Margaret Jean Smith) (born July 16, 1942) is a retired Australian professional tennis player, who was one of the most successful players in the history of the sport. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ... Ann Haydon-Jones, born Adrianne Shirley Haydon on October 7, 1938 in Birmingham, England, is a former table tennis and lawn tennis champion. ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Billie Jean King (born November 22, 1943, in Long Beach, California) is a retired tennis player from the United States. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Maria Bueno Maria Ester Audion Bueno, born October 11, 1939 in São Paulo, Brazil, is a former tennis champion. ... Davis Cup logo The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ...

General sporting events

Multi-Sport Events Arctic Winter Games Asian Games Canada Games Commonwealth Games Francophone Games Gaelic Games Gay Games Goodwill Games Nordic Games Pan American Games Paralympic Games Special Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Winter Olympic Games World Games World Wheelchair Games X Games American football Alamo Bowl Aztec Bowl Capital... July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... Jim R. Ryun (born April 29, 1947), American athlete and politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1997, representing the 2nd District of Kansas. ... Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation The Commonwealth Games is a multi-sport event held every four years involving the elite athletes of the British Commonwealth. ... Location of Kingston Kingston (population 600,000) is the capital of Jamaica. ...

Births

January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Andrea Jaeger (born 4 June 1965) in Chicago, Illinois, is a former professional tennis player. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Michelle Akers (born February 1, 1966 in Santa Clara, California) was a leading American womens soccer player and played on the historic 1999 Womens World Cup victory by the U.S. Akers attended the University of Central Florida where she was a four-time All-American, was Central... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Armando Barcellos is an athlete from Brazil. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Ellen Gezina Maria van Langen (born February 9, 1966) is a former Dutch middle distance runner Born in Oldenzaal, Van Langen has a degree in economics at the University of Amsterdam. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Anthony Michael Parker (born June 19, 1975 in Naperville, Illinois) is a pro basketball player. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... Chris Gifford (born on March 20, 1966 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a former field hockey striker from Canada, who currently is working as a landscape gardener (Gifford Gardening). ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... Trine Hattestad is a Norwegian javelin thrower, born on 18 April, 1966 in Lørenskog, Norway, as Elsa Katrine Solberg. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... For other persons named Jonathan Edwards, see Jonathan Edwards Jonathan David Edwards (born May 10, 1966 in London, England) is a former British triple jumper. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Xavier Escudé Torrente (born May 17, 1966) is a former field hockey player from Spain, who won the silver medal with his national team at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining, as the last day of May. ... Roshan Siriwardene Mahanama (born 31 May 1966) was a Sri Lankan cricket player. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... Ignacio Cobos (born June 12, 1966) is a former field hockey player from Spain, who won the silver medal with his national team at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... Jan Železný   listen? (born June 16, 1966 in Mladá Boleslav) is a Czech athlete, former world and Olympic champion and world record holder in javelin throw. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining, and the last day of June. ... Michael Gerard Tyson, (born June 30, 1966, Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former American professional boxer and World Heavyweight Champion, and is considered by many to be one of the greatest heavyweight boxers of all time. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... Rik Smits (born August 23, 1966 in Eindhoven, Netherlands) is a former professional basketball player who spent his entire career with the Indiana Pacers. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... Jacques Brinkman (born on August 26, 1966 in Utrecht) is a former Dutch field hockey player, who twice won the golden medal with the national squad: at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta and four years later, at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in Leap years). ... George Weah George Manneh Oppong Ousman Weah (born October 1, 1966 in Monrovia) is a Liberian politician and former football player. ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... Oscar Barrena (born October 22, 1966) is a former field hockey player from Spain, who won the silver medal with his national team at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Milkovich (born October 17, 1966 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a former field hockey midfielder from Canada, who came into the sport at age eight after his father started the West Vancouver Field Hockey Club. ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Larry Kenneth Robert Walker (born December 1, 1966 in Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada) is a right fielder in Major League Baseball. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Pablo Usoz Ciriza (born December 31, 1966) is a former field hockey player from Spain, who won the silver medal with his national team at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ...

Deaths


  Results from FactBites:
 
ALL SPORTS BANQUET (1107 words)
In 1966, the maximum number of stripes for a Garfield sweater was three since a letter could not be earned in ninth grade.
In addition, a metal pin was authorized to designate the sport and was worn pinned to the bottom leg of the "G".
Two members of the Class of 1966 were honored as such during their junior year and seven in their senior year.
Guide to GW: Athletics (286 words)
While the football program ended in 1966, other sports took off, and today GW hosts a strong intercollegiate varsity athletic program with 20 teams, and is a member of the NCAA Atlantic 10 Conference.
GW student-athletes compete in 14 different sports, most of which are in the Atlantic 10 Conference.
Sports at GW have brought attention to the University and have served to rally students around their teams.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m