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Encyclopedia > 1961 in sports

See also: 1960 in sports, other events of 1961, 1962 in sports and the list of 'years in sports'. 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... This page indexes the individual year in sports pages. ...

Contents


Auto Racing

Auto racing (also known as automobile racing, autosport or motorsport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... The Daytona 500 is a 200-lap, 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup Series race held annually at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... NASCAR Nextel Cup logo NEXTEL Cup trophy, adopted in 2004 4-time champion Jeff Gordon poses with the Winston Cup trophy (used prior to 2004) The NASCAR Championship is the championship held in NASCARs top stock car racing series. ... Ned Jarrett Ned Jarrett, Known as Gentleman Ned Jarrett, had a pleasant disposition and smooth demeanor. ... Indianapolis 500, 1994 The Indianapolis 500-Mile Race, frequently shortened to Indianapolis 500 or Indy 500, is an American race for open-wheel automobiles held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... A. J. Foyt (born January 16, 1935) is considered by many as the greatest race car driver of all time. ... A simple wooden cart in Australia A cart transporting watermelons in Harbin, China. ... A. J. Foyt (born January 16, 1935) is considered by many as the greatest race car driver of all time. ... The inaugural Formula One World Championship was won by Italian Giuseppe Farina in his Alfa Romeo in 1950, barely defeating his Argentine teammate Juan Manuel Fangio. ... Philip Toll Hill Jr. ... 1952 Le Mans race, depicted on cover of Auto Sport Review magazine The 24 hours of Le Mans (24 heures du Mans) is the most famous sports car endurance race. ... Olivier Gendebien, born January 12, 1924 in Brussels, Belgium and died on October 2, 1998 in Les Baux de Provence, in the Bouches-du-Rhône departement of France, was a war hero and race car driver. ... Philip Toll Hill Jr. ... The Ferrari Gestione Industriale badge on the front of a 330 GTC Ferrari is an Italian manufacturer of racing cars and high-performance sports cars formed by Enzo Ferrari in 1929. ... Rallying (international) or rally racing (US) is a form of automobile racing that takes place on normal roads with modified production or specially built road cars. ... The Monte Carlo Rally (officially Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo) is an automobile racing event organized each year by the Automobile Club de Monaco who also organize the F1 Grand Prix of Monaco and the Monaco Kart Cup. ... A Panhard-Levassor was the first automobile to be introduced in Japan, in 1898 A 1920s Panhard A VBL of the French Army Panhard, originally Panhard et Levassor, is a French automobile manufacturer. ... Drag racing is a form of auto racing in which cars or motorcycles attempt to complete a fairly short, straight and level course in the shortest amount of time, starting from a dead stop. ... The National Hot Rod Association, known as the NHRA, was founded by Wally Parks in 1951 in the State of California to provide a governing body to organize and promote the sport of drag racing. ...

Baseball

Picture of Fenway Park. ... January 16 is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player, regarded as one of the best of all time. ... MLB logo Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876-present) East Division (1994-present) West Division (1969-1993) Major league titles World Series titles (3) 1995 â€¢ 1957 â€¢ 1914 NL Pennants (17) 1999 â€¢ 1996 â€¢ 1995 â€¢ 1992 1991 â€¢ 1958 â€¢ 1957 â€¢ 1948 1914 â€¢ 1898 â€¢ 1897 â€¢ 1893 1892 â€¢ 1891 â€¢ 1883 â€¢ 1878 1877 East Division titles (11) 2005... An outfielder moves in to catch a fly ball Outfielder is a collective term including left fielder, center fielder, and right fielder, the three positions in baseball farthest from the batter. ... Mack Jones (November 6, 1938 - June 8, 2004), nicknamed Mack The Knife, was a MLB left fielder who played for the Milwaukee & Atlanta Braves (1961-67), Cincinnati Reds (1968) and Montreal Expos (1969-71). ... This article refers to the American baseball league. ... In baseball statistics, a hit (denoted by H), sometimes called a base hit, is credited to a batter when he safely reaches first base after batting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... Roger Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985), was a baseball player primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths 34-year-old single-season home run record in 1961. ... George Herman Ruth (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), better known as Babe Ruth, also commonly known by the nicknames The Bambino and The Sultan of Swat, was an American baseball player and United States national icon. ... 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada, the culmination of the sports postseason each October. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) East Division (1969-present) Major league titles World Series titles (26) 2000 â€¢ 1999 â€¢ 1998 â€¢ 1996 1978 â€¢ 1977 â€¢ 1962 â€¢ 1961 1958 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1953 â€¢ 1952 1951 â€¢ 1950 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 1943 â€¢ 1941 â€¢ 1939 â€¢ 1938 1937 â€¢ 1936 â€¢ 1932 â€¢ 1928 1927 â€¢ 1923 AL Pennants (39) 2003 â€¢ 2001 â€¢ 2000... Major league affiliations National League (1890-present) Central Division (1994-present) West Division (1969-1993) American Association (1882-1889) Major league titles World Series titles (5) 1990 â€¢ 1976 â€¢ 1975 â€¢ 1940 1919 NL Pennants (9) 1990 â€¢ 1976 â€¢ 1975 â€¢ 1972 1970 â€¢ 1961 â€¢ 1940 â€¢ 1939 1919 AA Pennants (1) 1882 Central Division titles... Edward Charles Whitey Ford (born October 21, 1928) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. ...

Basketball

Basketball is very popular in U.S. colleges. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Boston Celtics are a National Basketball Association team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Atlanta Hawks are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ...

Boxing

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... The City of Los Angeles (from Spanish; Los Ángeles, ) also known simply as L.A., is the second-largest city in the United States in terms of population, as well as one of the worlds most important economic, cultural, and entertainment centers. ... Emile Griffith (born February 3, 1938) is a former boxer from the US Virgin Islands who won world championships in both the Welterweight and Junior Middleweight divisions. ...

Cycling

Cycling is a recreation, a sport, and a means of transport across land. ... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle race for professional cyclists held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is an epic long distance road bicycle racing competition for professionals held over three weeks in July in and around France. ... Jacques Anquetil (January 8, 1934 - November 18, 1987), was a French cyclist and the first cyclist to win the Tour de France five times, in 1957 and from 1961 to 1964. ... The professional World Cycling Championship is organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), and is a single massed start road race, the winner being the first across the line at the completion of the full race distance. ... Rik (Henrik) Van Looy (born 20 December 1933) was one of the greatest Belgian professional cyclists of the post-war period, when he was nicknamed the King of the Classics or Emperor of Herentals (after the small Belgian town where he lived). ...

Figure Skating

Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... World Figure Skating Championships: Mens singles winners: 1896 - Gilbert Fuchs, (Germany) 1897 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1898 - Henning Grenander, (Sweden) 1899 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1900 - Gustav Hugel, (Austria) 1901 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1902 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1903 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1904 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1905 - Ulrich Salchow, (Sweden) 1906 - Gilbert... Prague (Czech: Praha, see also other names) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

Football (American)

catch it. ... AFL logo The American Football League (AFL) was a professional league of American football that operated from 1960 to 1969. ... The Tennessee Titans are a National Football League team based in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Conference AFC Division West Year Founded 1960 Home Field Qualcomm Stadium City San Diego, California Team Colors Navy Blue, White, and Gold Head Coach Marty Schottenheimer League Championships (1) AFL Champions: 1963 Conference Championships (1) AFC: 1994 Division Championships (10) AFL West: 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964 AFC West: 1979, 1980... The National Football League has used several different formats to determine their league champions since its founding in 1920. ... Note: Basketball teams from Chicago and Anderson once used the name Packers as well. ... Conference NFC Division East Year Founded 1925 Home Field Giants Stadium City East Rutherford, New Jersey Team Colors Royal Blue, Red, Gray, and White Head Coach Tom Coughlin League Championships (6) NFL Champions: 1927, 1934, 1938, 1956 Super Bowl: 1986 (XXI), 1990 (XXV) Conference Championships (9) NFL Eastern: 1956, 1958...

Football (Australian Rules)

 (Hawthorn 13.16 (94) d Footscray 7.9 (51)) 

catch it. ... Australian football at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. ... The Western Bulldogs, formerly known as the Footscray Football Club or The Bulldogs is an Australian Football League (AFL) club based at the Whitten Oval in western suburban Melbourne, Australia, drawing its supporter base from this traditionally poor, industrial, and less leafy part of Melbourne. ...

Football (Canadian)

catch it. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... The Winnipeg Blue Bombers is a Canadian Football League team based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Hamilton Tiger-Cats are a Canadian Football League team based in Hamilton, Ontario. ...

Football (Soccer)

catch it. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... The FA Cups trophy is also known as the FA Cup. ... Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is a North London football club. ... Leicester City Football Club, nicknamed the Foxes, are an English football team, playing in the Football League Championship. ...

Golf

Men's Golf Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is a game where individual players or teams hit a ball into a hole using various clubs. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ...


Women's Golf The Grand Slam of golf consists of four major golfing events held each year; the events are often referred to as the major tournaments and are all recognized as a part of the worlds two most prestigious tours, the PGA TOUR in the United States and the PGA European... This article is about the month of May. ... The Masters is one of four Grand Slam golf tournaments. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with a length of 30 days The month is named after the Roman goddess Juno (mythology), wife of Jupiter and equivalent to the Greek goddess Hera. ... The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... Gene (Alec) Littler (born 21 July 1930 in San Diego, California) is an American golfer. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... The Champions Belt & The Claret Jug. ... Arnold Palmer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Note: as an adjective (stressed on the second syllable instead of the first), august means honorable. ... // The PGA Championship is an annual golf tournament, conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA TOUR. The PGA Championship is one of the four Major Championships in mens golf, and it is the golf seasons final major, being played in August. ... Carl Jerome Jerry Barber, (April 25, 1916 - September 23, 1994) was born in Jacksonville, Illinois. ... Founded in 1916, the Professional Golfers Association of America is headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, United States and claims to be the largest working sports organization in the world with more than 27,000 members. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Ryder Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in an event officially called the Ryder Cup Matches by teams from Europe and the United States. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ...

The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... Mickey Wright (b February 14 1935 San Diego, California, given names Mary Kathryn) is an American professional golfer. ... The LPGA Championship, currently known for sponsorship reasons as the McDonalds LPGA Championship, is the second-longest running tournament in the history of the Ladies Professional Golf Association surpassed only by the U.S. Womens Open. ... Mickey Wright (b February 14 1935 San Diego, California, given names Mary Kathryn) is an American professional golfer. ... Mickey Wright (b February 14 1935 San Diego, California, given names Mary Kathryn) is an American professional golfer. ... LPGA stands for Ladies Professional Golf Association. ...

Thoroughbred Horse Racing

Thoroughbred horse racing is the main form of horse-racing throughout the world. ... The Melbourne Cup is Australias major annual thoroughbred horse race. ... The Queens Plate is North Americas oldest thoroughbred horse race, run at a distance of 1 1/4 miles for 3-year-old thoroughbed horses, foaled in Canada, run annually in July at Woodbine Racetrack, Etobicoke (Toronto), Ontario. ... Races at Lonchamp - Édouard Manet, 1867 The Prix de LArc de Triomphe is a flat thoroughbred horse race of a 2400 metres (about 1 mile 4 furlongs) raced on turf for 3 year olds and up, Colts, horses, Fillies and mares (exclude geldings). ... The Irish Derby Stakes have been held annually at The Curragh in County Kildare, Ireland since 1866. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... The Two Thousand Guineas Stakes is a Group 1 1 mile (1600 meters) thoroughbred flat racing horse race for 3-year-olds colts and fillies run in May of each year over the Rowley Mile at Newmarket, Suffolk, England. ... Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ... Guava (from Spanish; Goiaba in Portuguese) is a tropical round to pear-shaped fruit produced by the guava tree (Psidium guajava), of the family Myrtaceae. ... The St. ... The Aurelii (meaning the golden) were a Roman gens. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... Churchill Downs ractrack, 2004 The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged yearly in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... The Preakness Stakes is a classic 1 3/16 mile (1. ... The Belmont Stakes is a prestigious horse race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. ...

Harness Racing

A trotter training at Vincennes hippodrome Harness racing is a form of horse-racing in which the horses race in a specified gait. ... The Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Pacers consists of the following horse races: Cane Pace Messenger Stakes Little Brown Jug The traditional order of the races was Cane Pace, Little Brown Jug, and Messenger. ... The Cane Pace is a harness horse race run annually since 1955. ... The Little Brown Jug is a harness race for three-year-old pacing standardbreds hosted by the Delaware County Agricultural Society since 1946 at the County Fairgrounds in Delaware, Ohio. ... The Messenger Stakes is an American harness racing event for 3-year-old pacing horses. ... The Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Trotters consists of the following horse races: Hambletonian Yonkers Trot Kentucky Futurity Since its inauguration in 1955, only seven horses have ever won the Trotting Triple Crown. ... The Hambletonian is a United States harness racing event held annually for three-year-old trotting standardbreds. ... The Yonkers Trot is a harness race for three-year old trotting standardbreds held at Yonkers Raceway in New York. ... The Kentucky Futurity is a stakes race for three-year-old trotters, held annually at The Red Mile in Lexington, Kentucky since 1893. ... The Interdominions is a harness racing competition held between horses from Australia and New Zealand. ...

Ice Hockey

Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Art Ross Memorial Trophy is given to the National Hockey League player with the most points scored at the end of the regular season. ... The modernized NHL shield logo, debuting in 2005. ... Bernard Joseph Andre Boom Boom Geoffrion (born February 14, 1931 in Montreal, Quebec) is a former professional ice hockey player and coach. ... The Montréal Canadiens are the oldest established National Hockey League franchise. ... The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the most valuable ice hockey player in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ... The modernized NHL shield logo, debuting in 2005. ... Bernard Joseph Andre Boom Boom Geoffrion (born February 14, 1931 in Montreal, Quebec) is a former professional ice hockey player and coach. ... The Montréal Canadiens are the oldest established National Hockey League franchise. ... The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a National Hockey League team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Detroit Red Wings are a National Hockey League (NHL) team based in Detroit, Michigan, USA. Founded: 1926 Formerly known as: Cougars 1926-1930, Falcons 1930-1932 Home arena: Joe Louis Arena Former Home Arenas: Windsor Arena (1926-27); Detroit Olympia (1927-1979) Uniform colors: Red and white. ... The Ice Hockey World Championships are an annual event put together by the IIHF, the International Ice Hockey Federation, since 1930. ...

Radiosport

The term Radiosport is of modern Eastern European origin and is used to describe one of several competitive amateur radio activities. ... Europe forms the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) is an amateur map and compass sport that combines the skills of orienteering and radio direction finding. ... Stockholm [, ] is the capital and the largest City of Sweden. ...

Tennis

Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... This article is about the Australian Open tennis tournament. ... Roy Stanley Emerson (born November 3, 1936, in Blackbutt, Queensland, Australia) is a former champion tennis player. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ... Manuel Martinez Santana (born May 10, 1938) was a Spanish male tennis player. ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Country: Australia Height: 5 ft 8 in (172 cm) Weight: 150 lb (68 kg) Plays: Left Turned pro: 1962 Retired: 1974 Highest singles ranking: 1 Singles titles: 39 Career prize money: US$1,564,213 Grand Slam Record Titles: 11 Australian Open W (60, 62, 69) French Open W (62... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Roy Stanley Emerson (born November 3, 1936, in Blackbutt, Queensland, Australia) is a former champion tennis player. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... This article is about the Australian Open tennis tournament. ... Margaret Smith Court (nee Margaret Jean Smith) (born July 16, 1942) is a retired Australian professional tennis player, who was one of the most successful players in the history of the sport. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held from the middle of May to the beginning of June in Paris, France, and is the second of the worlds Grand Slam tournaments. ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Florence Angela Margaret Mortimer Barrett (April 21, 1932) was a British female tennis player. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Darlene Hard (born January 6, 1936 in LA,CA) is a tennis player known for her volleying ability and strong serves. ... Davis Cup logo The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ...

General sporting events

  • Maureen Baynton won the Women's World Amateur Billiards Championships

Multi-Sport Events Arctic Winter Games Asian Games Canada Games Commonwealth Games Francophone Games Gaelic Games Gay Games Goodwill Games Nordic Games Pan American Games Paralympic Games Special Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Winter Olympic Games World Games World Wheelchair Games X Games American football Alamo Bowl Aztec Bowl Capital...

Births

January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Wayne Gretzky playing for the Edmonton Oilers in 1984 Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born January 26, 1961) is a former professional ice hockey player and current head coach and part owner of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Miguel de Paz Pla (born January 31, 1961) is a former field hockey player from Spain, who won the silver medal with his national team at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Volker Fried (born on February 1, 1961) is a former field hockey player from (West-)Germany, who competed at three Summer Olympics for his native country. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Mary Angela Docter (born February 11, 1961) is an American speed skater who competed in four Olympic Games (in 1980, 1984, 1988 and 1992). ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Davey Allison (February 25, 1961 - July 13, 1993) was a NASCAR race car driver who drove the #28 Texaco-Havoline Ford. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... Ray Mancini (born March 4, 1961) was an American boxer from Youngstown, Ohio, who was given the nickname Boom Boom because of his whirlwind fighting style. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... Kirby Puckett, after hitting his famous game-winning home run in the 1991 World Series Kirby Puckett (born March 14, 1961) was widely regarded as one of the best, and most popular, Major League Baseball players of the 1980s and early-to-mid 1990s. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... Lothar Matthäus (born March 21, 1961 in Erlangen, Germany) is a former football (soccer) player and now manager. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... Dennis Keith Rodman (born May 13, 1961 in Trenton, New Jersey) was a professional basketball player mostly known for his controversial antics on and off the court and as a top defender and rebounder. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... Greg LeMond (born June 26, 1961 in Lakewood, California) is a former professional road bicycle racer from the United States. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is an epic long distance road bicycle racing competition for professionals held over three weeks in July in and around France. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... Frederick Carlton Carl Lewis (born July 1, 1961) is an American athlete. ... The Olympic Games, or Olympics, is an international multi-sport event taking place every two years and alternating between Summer and Winter Games. ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... Carsten Fischer (born on August 29, 1961 in Duisburg) is a former field hockey player from (West-)Germany, who competed at three Summer Olympics for his native country. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (246th in leap years). ... Carlos El Pibe Valderrama Carlos Alberto Valderrama Palacio (born September 2, 1961 in Santa Marta) is a Colombian soccer player, often considered the best Colombian player of all time. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... Daniel Constantine Marino Jr. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in Leap years). ... Young on a February 1995 SI cover, his third that year Jon Steven Young (born October 11, 1961 in Salt Lake City, Utah) is best known as a quarterback (QB) for the San Francisco 49ers. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... Nadia Elena Comaneci (originally Comăneci) (born November 12, 1961) is a Romanian-born gymnast, winner of five Olympic gold medals, and the first to be awarded a perfect score of 10 in an Olympic gymnastic event. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reggie White Autobiography cover The Reverend Reginald Howard Reggie White (December 19, 1961 – December 26, 2004), nicknamed the Minister of Defense (a dual reference to his football prowess and to his Evangelical Christian ordination) was one of footballs most prolific sackers in college, the USFL and the NFL. // Career... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

Deaths


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