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Encyclopedia > 1955 in sports

See also: 1954 in sports, other events of 1955, 1956 in sports and the list of 'years in sports'. 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page indexes the individual year in sports pages. ...

Contents

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Auto Racing

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Auto racing (also known as automobile racing, autosport or motorsport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... NASCAR Nextel Cup logo NEXTEL Cup trophy, adopted in 2004 4-time champion Jeff Gordon poses with the Winston Cup trophy (used prior to 2004) The NASCAR Championship is the championship held in NASCARs top stock car racing series. ... Tim Flock was one of NASCARs early pioneers. ... A simple wooden cart in Australia A cart transporting watermelons in Harbin, China. ... Robert Charles Bob Sweikert (born May 20, 1926, Los Angeles, CA, died June 17 1956) was an American racing driver, best known as the winner of the 1955 Indianapolis 500 and 1955 National Championship. ... Indianapolis 500, 1994 An Indianapolis 500 racecar depicted on the Indiana state quarter The Indianapolis 500-Mile Race, often shortened to Indianapolis 500 or Indy 500, is an American automobile race, held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Robert Charles Bob Sweikert (born May 20, 1926, Los Angeles, CA, died June 17 1956) was an American racing driver, best known as the winner of the 1955 Indianapolis 500 and 1955 National Championship. ... Formula One - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Juan Manuel Fangio (June 24, 1911 - July 17, 1995) was a legendary Argentine race car driver, considered by many to be the greatest racing driver in Formula One history, winning the world championship no less than five times for Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, Mercedes Benz and Maserati. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pierre Levegh (December 22, 1905 - June 11, 1955) was a French sportsman, mainly remembered for a disaster that killed him and around 80 spectators during the 24 hours of Le Mans in 1955. ... John Michael Hawthorn (April 10, 1929 - January 22, 1959) was a race car driver, born in Mexborough, Yorkshire, England. ... Ivor Bueb was a Formula One driver from Britain. ... Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Jaguar D-type The Jaguar D-type, like its predecessor, is a factory-built race-car. ... Rallying (international) or rally racing (US) is a form of automobile racing that takes place on normal roads with modified production or specially built road cars. ... The Monte Carlo Rally (officially Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo) is an automobile racing event organized each year by the Automobile Club de Monaco who also organize the F1 Grand Prix of Monaco and the Monaco Kart Cup. ... Sunbeam was an automobile manufacturer from 1899. ... Drag racing is a form of auto racing in which any two vehicles (most often two cars or motorcycles) attempt to complete a fairly short, straight and level course in the shortest amount of time, starting from a dead stop. ... The National Hot Rod Association, known as the NHRA, was founded by Wally Parks in 1951 in the State of California to provide a governing body to organize and promote the sport of drag racing. ... Great Bend is the largest city and county seat of Barton County, Kansas. ... Clocked Speed = 314 mph (506 km/h), Kwinana Race Track, W.A., 2005 Top-Fuel Racing refers to a class of drag racing in which the cars are run on 85% nitromethane and about 15% methanol (90% nitromethane, 10% methanol under FIA) also known as racing alcohol, instead of gasoline. ...

Baseball

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A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) Central Division (1994-present) Current uniform Ballpark U.S. Cellular Field (1991-present) Major league titles World Series titles (3) 2005 â€¢ 1917 â€¢ 1906 AL Pennants (6) 2005 â€¢ 1959 â€¢ 1919 â€¢ 1917 1906 â€¢ 1901 Central Division titles (2) [1] 2005 â€¢ 2000 West Division titles (2... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9,27,34,43 Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Ballpark McAfee Coliseum (1968–present) a. ... John Sherman Lollar (August 23, 1924 - September 24, 1977) was a catcher in Major League Baseball for the Cleveland Indians (1946), New York Yankees (1947-1948), St. ... Robert Charles Nieman (January 26, 1927 - March 10, 1985) was a Major League Baseball outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the St. ... Walter Dropo (born January 30, 1923 in Moosup, Connecticut), nicknamed Moose, is a former Major League Baseball first baseman and right-handed batter who played with the Boston Red Sox (1949-52), Detroit Tigers (1952-54), Chicago White Sox (1955-58), Cincinnati Redlegs (1958-59), and Baltimore Orioles 1959-61). ... Chico with the White Sox Alfonso Carrasquel Colón (born January 23, 1928 in Caracas, Venezuela), best known as Chico Carrasquel, was a Major League Baseball player. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890-present) West Division (1969-present) Current uniform Ballpark Dodger Stadium (1962-present) Major league titles World Series titles (6) 1988 â€¢ 1981 â€¢ 1965 â€¢ 1963 1959 â€¢ 1955 NL Pennants (21) 1988 â€¢ 1981 â€¢ 1978 â€¢ 1977 1974 â€¢ 1966 â€¢ 1965 â€¢ 1963 1959 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1955 â€¢ 1953 1952 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 â€¢ 1941... Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) East Division (1969-present) Current uniform Ballpark Yankee Stadium (1923-present) Major league titles World Series titles (26) 2000 â€¢ 1999 â€¢ 1998 â€¢ 1996 1978 â€¢ 1977 â€¢ 1962 â€¢ 1961 1958 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1953 â€¢ 1952 1951 â€¢ 1950 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 1943 â€¢ 1941 â€¢ 1939 â€¢ 1938 1937 â€¢ 1936 â€¢ 1932 â€¢ 1928 1927... John Joseph Johnny Podres (born September 30, 1932 in Witherbee, New York) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher who played with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers (1953-55, 1957-67); Detroit Tigers (1966-67), and San Diego Padres (1969). ...

Basketball

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Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Philadelphia 76ers are a National Basketball Association team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association team based in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan. ... The 1955 European Basketball Championship, commonly called Eurobasket 1955, was the ninth regional championship held by FIBA Europe. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... Dr. Forrest C. Phog Allen Fieldhouse is an indoor arena at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or Kansas) is an institution of higher learning located in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Kansas State University (sometimes referred to as K-State) is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ...

Boxing

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Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Domínguez (left) versus Rafael Ortíz Boxing, also called Western Boxing, prizefighting (when referring to professional boxing) or the sweet science (a common nickname among fans), is a sport and martial art in which two participants of similar weight fight each other with their... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Rocco Francis Marchegiano, better known as Rocky Marciano (September 1, 1923 – August 31, 1969), was an Italian-American boxer. ... Archie Moore whose birth name was Archibald Wright (December 13, 1913 or 1916 – December 9, 1998) was a light heavyweight world boxing champion who set many records in boxing. ...

Cycling

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This road bicycle is built using lightweight, shaped aluminium tubing and carbon fiber stays and forks. ... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle race for professional cyclists held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... Fiorenzo Magni is an Italian professional road racing cyclist. ... Le Tour de France (Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is the most famous and prestigious road bicycle race in the world. ... Louison Bobet (March 12, 1925 - March 13, 1983) was a French professional road cyclist. ... The UCI Road World Championships, often referred to as the World Cycling Championships, is the annual world championship for bicycle road racing organized by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). ... Constant Stan Ockers (3 February 1920 - 1 October 1956) was a Belgian professional racing cyclist. ...

Figure skating

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Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... The World Figure Skating Championships is an annual event sanctioned by the International Skating Union in which elite figure skaters compete for the title of World Champion. ... American figure skater Hayes Alan Jenkins was born March 23, 1933. ... Tenley Emma Albright, M.D. (born July 18, 1935 in Newton Center, MA) became the first American female skater to win a figure skating Olympic gold medal, at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... Frances Dafoe was a Canadian figure skater. ... Norris Bowden was a Canadian figure skater. ...

Football (American)

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Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... City Cleveland, Ohio Team colors Seal Brown, Orange, and White Head Coach Romeo Crennel Owner Randy Lerner General manager Phil Savage Mascot CB, Chomps, TD, and Trapper League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division (1946-1948) National Football League (1950-present) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... The St. ... The University of Oklahoma features 16 varsity sports teams. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ...

Football (Australian rules football)

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Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Australian Rules and Aussie Rules redirect here. ... The Victorian Football League (formerly known as the Victorian Football Association or VFA) is widely regarded as Australias 4th most competitive Australian rules football league after the AFL, SANFL and the WAFL. It features 13 teams from throughout Victoria and Tasmania. ... The Melbourne Football Club (MFC), nicknamed The Demons, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League, based in Melbourne, Victoria. ... The Collingwood Football Club, nicknamed The Magpies after the black and white striped guernseys worn by the players, is an Australian rules football club, playing in the elite Australian Football League. ... The Charles Brownlow Trophy, better known as the Brownlow Medal, is an annual medal awarded to the fairest and best player in the Australian Football League during the regular season (ie. ... Fredrick Ernest Goldsmith (b. ... The Sydney Swans is an Australian Football League (AFL) club based in Sydney, New South Wales. ...

Football (Canadian)

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Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... The Edmonton Eskimos are a Canadian Football League team based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Montreal Alouettes (French, Alouettes de Montréal) are a Canadian Football League team based in Montreal, Quebec. ...

Football (soccer)

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Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...

England

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From 1889 until 1992, this was the highest division overall of organized football in England. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously as The Pensioners), founded in 1905, are an English Premier League football team. ... The 1954-1955 season was the 75th season of competitive football in England, from August 1954 to May 1955: // Overview Chelsea win the League Championship for the first time. ... The FA Cup - this is the fourth trophy, in use since 1992, and identical in design to the third trophy introduced in 1911. ... Newcastle United Football Club is an English professional football team based in Newcastle upon Tyne, nicknamed the Magpies, who currently play in the FA Premier League. ... Manchester City Football Club is an English football club based in the city of Manchester. ...

Golf

Men's Golf Golfer after swing. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ...

Women's Golf The Grand Slam of golf consists of four major golfing events held each year; the events are often referred to as the major tournaments and are all recognized as a part of the worlds two most prestigious tours, the PGA TOUR in the United States and the PGA European... The Masters is one of four Grand Slam golf tournaments. ... Dr. Cary Middlecoff was a dentist from Memphis, Tennessee who gave up his practice to join what is now the PGA TOUR in the 1940s, a time when the practice would quite likely have promised to have been more lucrative. ... The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... // Jack Fleck (born November 7, 1921) is an American professional golfer best known for winning the 1955 U.S. Open. ... The Champions Belt & The Claret Jug. ... Peter Thomson (born 1929) is an Australian golfer. ... Logo for the 2006 PGA The PGA Championship is an annual golf tournament, conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA TOUR. The PGA Championship is one of the four Major Championships in mens golf, and it is the golf seasons final major... Doug Ford (born June 8, 1922 in West Haven, Connecticut) was a two-time major golf champion. ... Founded in 1916, the Professional Golfers Association of America is headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, United States and claims to be the largest working sports organization in the world with more than 27,000 members. ... Julius Boros (March 3, 1920 – May 28, 1994) was a professional golfer. ... The Ryder Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in an event officially called the Ryder Cup Matches by teams from Europe and the United States. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ...

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LPGA stands for Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... Fay Crocker, (born in Montevideo, Uruguay in 1914 or 1915) was the first non-American golfer to win one of the LPGA major golf championships. ... The LPGA Championship, currently known for sponsorship reasons as the McDonalds LPGA Championship, is the second-longest running tournament in the history of the Ladies Professional Golf Association surpassed only by the U.S. Womens Open. ... Beverly Hanson is a professional golfer. ... Patty Berg (born February 13, 1918) was a founder member and then leading player on the LPGA Tour during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. ... LPGA stands for Ladies Professional Golf Association. ...

Thoroughbred Horse Racing

  • August 31 - In one of the most famous match races in thoroughbred racing history, Nashua beat Swaps at Washington Park racetrack. It was Swaps only loss in nine starts as a three-year old. Nashua's owner-breeder, William Woodward, Sr., dreamed of owning an Epsom Derby winner, and he planned to send Nashua to England to train toward that goal. However, Woodward was shot to death by his wife before he could proceed.
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Thoroughbred horse racing is the main form of horse-racing throughout the world. ... The 1976 cup won by Van Der Hum. ... The Queens Plate is North Americas oldest thoroughbred horse race, run at a distance of 1 1/4 miles for 3-year-old thoroughbed horses, foaled in Canada, run annually in July at Woodbine Racetrack, Etobicoke (Toronto), Ontario. ... Races at Lonchamp - Édouard Manet, 1867 The Prix de LArc de Triomphe is a flat thoroughbred horse race of a 2400 metres (about 1 mile 4 furlongs) raced on turf for 3 year olds and up, Colts, horses, Fillies and mares (exclude geldings). ... The horse Ribot (1952-1972) was a bay thoroughbred foaled in England by Tenerani out of Romanella by El Greco. ... The Irish Derby is a Group 1 flat horse race in the Republic of Ireland for three-year-old thoroughbred colts and fillies run over a distance of 1 mile 4 furlongs (2,414 metres) at the Curragh, County Kildare in late June / early July. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... The Two Thousand Guineas Stakes is a Group 1 1 mile (1600 meters) thoroughbred flat racing horse race for 3-year-olds colts and fillies run in May of each year over the Rowley Mile at Newmarket, Suffolk, England. ... Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ... The St. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... Churchill Downs racetrack, 2004 The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged annually in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May, capping the three-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... In finance, a swap is a financial instrument--a kind of derivative security. ... The Preakness Stakes is a classic 1 3/16 mile (1. ... Nashua (1952-1982) was an American born thoroughbred racehorse, perhaps best remembered for a 1955 match race against the horse that had defeated him in the Kentucky Derby. ... The Belmont Stakes is a prestigious horse race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. ... Nashua (1952-1982) was an American born thoroughbred racehorse, perhaps best remembered for a 1955 match race against the horse that had defeated him in the Kentucky Derby. ... August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... The Thoroughbred is a horse breed developed in 18th century England when English mares were bred with imported Arabian stallions to create a distance racer. ... Nashua (1952-1982) was an American born thoroughbred racehorse, perhaps best remembered for a 1955 match race against the horse that had defeated him in the Kentucky Derby. ... In finance, a swap is a financial instrument--a kind of derivative security. ... William Woodward, Sr. ... Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq...

Harness Racing

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A trotter training at Vincennes hippodrome Harness racing is a form of horse-racing in which the horses race in a specified gait. ... The Cane Pace is a harness horse race run annually since 1955. ... The Little Brown Jug is a harness race for three-year-old pacing standardbreds hosted by the Delaware County Agricultural Society since 1946 at the County Fairgrounds in Delaware, Ohio. ... The Cane Pace is a harness horse race run annually since 1955. ... The Triple Crown of Harness Racing for Trotters consists of the following horse races: Hambletonian Yonkers Trot Kentucky Futurity Since its inauguration in 1955, only seven horses have ever won the Trotting Triple Crown. ... The Hambletonian is a United States harness racing event held annually for three-year-old trotting standardbreds. ... The Yonkers Trot is a harness race for three-year old trotting standardbreds held at Yonkers Raceway in New York. ... The Kentucky Futurity is a stakes race for three-year-old trotters, held annually at The Red Mile in Lexington, Kentucky since 1893. ... The Interdominions is a harness racing competition held between horses from Australia and New Zealand. ... A battle cry is a yell or chant taken up in battle, usually by members of the same military unit. ...

Ice Hockey

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Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Art Ross Trophy is given to the National Hockey League player with the most points scored at the end of the regular season. ... NHL redirects here. ... Bernard Joseph André Geoffrion (February 14, 1931 – March 11, 2006), nicknamed Boom Boom, was a Canadian professional ice hockey player and coach. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hart Memorial Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the ice hockey player who is most valuable to his team in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Toronto Maple Leafs are a professional ice hockey team based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... This is the current WikiProject: Ice Hockey Article Improvement Drive collaboration! The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... The Detroit Red Wings are a professional ice hockey team based in Detroit, Michigan, USA. They play in the National Hockey League (NHL). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Ice Hockey World Championships are an annual event put together by the IIHF, the International Ice Hockey Federation, since 1930. ... The Penticton Vees are a Tier II Junior A ice hockey team from Penticton, British Columbia, Canada. ... NCAA sponsors a championship tournament in ice hockey. ... UM also has campuses in Dearborn and Flint. ... The Colorado College is a private four-year, co-educational liberal arts college located at the foot of Pikes Peak, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... Colorado Springs is a middle-sized city, located just east of the geographic center of the state of Colorado in the United States. ...

Snooker

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Snooker is a billiards sport that is played on a large (12 feet × 6 feet) baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long side cushions. ... The World Snooker Championship, currently held at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, is the climax of snookers annual calendar and the most important snooker event of the year in terms of prestige, prize money and world ranking points. ... Fred Davis (August 13, 1913 - April 16, 1998) was an English professional snooker and billiards player, and was one of the most loved personalities in the game. ... John Pulman (December 12, 1923 - December 25, 1998) was an English professional snooker player who dominated the game throughout the 1960s. ...

Tennis

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A tennis net Tennis is a game played between either two players (Singles) or two teams of two players (Doubles). Players use a stringed racquet to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponents court. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... The Australian Open is the first of the worlds four Grand Slam tennis tournaments, held each January at Melbourne Park. ... Ken Robert Rosewall, born November 2, 1934 in Sydney, Australia, was a champion tennis player. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held over two weeks between mid May and early June in Paris, France, and is the second of the Grand Slam tournaments on the annual tennis calendar. ... Marion Anthony Trabert (born August 16, 1930 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former star tennis player and longtime tennis author, TV commentator, instructor, and motivation speaker. ... Wimbledon logo The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as simply Wimbledon, is the oldest and arguably most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Marion Anthony Trabert (born August 16, 1930 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former star tennis player and longtime tennis author, TV commentator, instructor, and motivation speaker. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Marion Anthony Trabert (born August 16, 1930 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former star tennis player and longtime tennis author, TV commentator, instructor, and motivation speaker. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... The Australian Open is the first of the worlds four Grand Slam tennis tournaments, held each January at Melbourne Park. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held over two weeks between mid May and early June in Paris, France, and is the second of the Grand Slam tournaments on the annual tennis calendar. ... Florence Angela Margaret Mortimer Barrett (April 21, 1932) was a British female tennis player. ... Wimbledon logo The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as simply Wimbledon, is the oldest and arguably most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Althea Louise Brough Clapp (March 11, 1923) was an American female tennis player who was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Doris Hart (born on June 2, 1925 in St. ... The great Australians Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall with the Cup in 1953 The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ...

General sporting events

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Multi-Sport Events Arctic Winter Games Asian Games Canada Games Commonwealth Games Francophone Games Gaelic Games Gay Games Goodwill Games Nordic Games Pan American Games Paralympic Games Special Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Winter Olympic Games World Games World Wheelchair Games X Games American football Alamo Bowl Aztec Bowl Capital... The 2nd Pan American Games opened on 12 March in the University Stadium (now Olympic Stadium) before a capacity crowd of 100,000 spectators. ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the federal capital of and largest city in Mexico. ... The Mediterranean Games are a multi-sport games held every four years for nations bordering the Mediterranean Sea. ... For other uses, see Barcelona (disambiguation). ...

Births

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January

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January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pedro Gamarro (born January 8, 1955) is a retired boxer from Venezuela, who represented his native country at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Canada. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dominique Rocheteau (born January 14, 1955 in Etaulesis) is a French former footballer. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Uwe Reinders (born 19 January 1955) is a former German football (soccer) player and manager. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about Peter Fleming the tennis player. ... Juan Pellón Fernández-Fontecha (born January 21, 1955) is a former field hockey player from Spain, who won the silver medal with the Mens National Team at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... Nikolina Shtereva (Bulgarian Николина Штерева; born January 21, 1955) is a former middle distance runner from Bulgaria. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jim Montgomery (born January 24, 1955 in Madison, Wisconsin) is an American swimmer. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Tate was an American prizefighter and Olympian boxer who briefly held the World Boxing Association Heavyweight title from 1979 to 1980. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Virginia Ruzici (January 31, 1955) is a Romanian professional female tennis player. ...

February

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February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Aleksandr Gusev (born February 2, 1955) is a former field hockey player from the Soviet Union, who won the bronze medal with his national team at the boycotted 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, behind India and Spain. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Bruno Pezzey (February 3, 1955 – December 31, 1994) was an Austrian footballer. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... February 5 is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Markus Ryffel (born 1955) is a Swiss long-distance runner who won the silver medal at the 1984 Olympic 5000 metres final in Los Angeles. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Miguel Chaves Sánchez (born February 10, 1955) is a former field hockey player from Spain, who won the silver medal with the Mens National Team at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... Jose Maria Flores Burlon (born February 10, 1955 in Montevideo) is a former boxer from Uruguay. ... The cover of Shark (1998), a biography of Greg Norman. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Donna-Marie Gurr (born February 18, 1955 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a former backstroke swimmer from Canada, who competed for her native country at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For other members of the family, see Nicolas Prost, Alains son. ...

March

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March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... David Charles Jackson (born March 4, 1955 in Wellington — died September 29, 2004) was a boxer from New Zealand, who competed at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, where he was eliminated in the second round of the Welterweight (-69kg) division at the hands of Valery Rachkov from the Soviet... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... Wendy Lansbach Boglioli (born March 6, 1955) is a former Olympic swimmer and swimming coach from the United States, who later became an executive and motivational speaker. ... Peter Dignan was born on March 6, 1955 in Gibraltar, to a former Berlin airlift pilot. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... David Bell (born March 11, 1955) is a retired field hockey player from Australia, who won the silver medal at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Canada. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... Daniel Bertoni (born March 14, 1953) is a former Argentine footballer that played in a Right Winger role. ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in Leap years). ... Jiro Watanabe (born March 16, 1955) is a Japanese former boxer who was considered by many, along with Yoko Gushiken, to be one of the two best world champions to come out of Japan. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... Philippe Boisse (born March 18, 1955) is a gold medal winner at the 1984 Summer Olympics in mens épée. ... Elaine Beryl Jensen (born March 18, 1955 in Feilding, New Zealand) is a former field hockey goalkeeper from New Zealand, who finished in eight position with the National Womens Team at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... Ilja Mohandas (Andy) Hoepelman (born March 26, 1955 in Hilversum, Noord-Holland) is a former water polo player from The Netherlands, who won the bronze medal with the Dutch Mens Team at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Canada. ...

April

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April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... Safet Sušić Safet Sušić (born April 13, 1955 in Zavidovići) is a famous football coach and former football player from Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... Américo Rubén El Tolo Gallego (born 25 April 1955) is an Argentinian soccer coach and former player. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... Ulrika Knape (married name Ulrika Lindberg) (born 1955), is a Swedish diver. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... Douglas Dale Northway (born April 28, 1955) is a former freestyle swimmer from the United States, who won the bronze medal in the Mens 1500m Freestyle at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany. ... Djamel Zidane is a former Algerian footballer. ...

May

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May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Maharaj Krishan Kaushik (born May 2, 1955) is a former field hockey player from India, who was a member of the national team that won the gold medal at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... Marianne Vermaat (born May 2, 1955 in Vlaardingen, Zuid-Holland) is a former backstroke swimmer from the Netherlands, who competed for her native country at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... Ann Grant (born May 6, 1955) is a former field hockey player from Zimbabwe, who was a member of the national team that won the golden medal at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... Florenta Craciunescu (born May 7, 1955) is a retired discus thrower from Romania, who won the bronze medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, United States. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... Edmund (Tad) Coffin (born May 9, 1955 in Toledo, Ohio) is a saddlemaker and equestrian. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... Luis Felipe Martínez (born May 26, 1955) is a retired boxer from Cuba, who represented his native country at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Canada. ...

June

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June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... Lorraine Mary Moller (born June 1, 1955 in Putaruru) is a former athlete from New Zealand, who competed mainly in the marathon. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... Ricardo Rojas (born June 15, 1955) is a retired boxer from Cuba, who represented his native country at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, Soviet Union. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... Michel Platini (June 21, 1955, Jœuf, Département Meurthe-et-Moselle) is a former French football player, regarded as one of the most elegant midfielders of his generation and possibly the greatest French footballer of all time. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... Jean Tigana (b. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... Maxime Bossis is a former French football player. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... Heribert Weber (born June 28, 1955 in Pöls) is a retired Austrian football player and later a football manager. ...

July

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July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... Peter McNamara (born July 5, 1955 in Melbourne, Victoria) is a former tennis player from Australia, who won five singles and nineteen doubles titles during his professional career. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... Gillian Cowley (born July 8, 1955) is a former field hockey player from Zimbabwe, who was a member of the national team that won the golden medal at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... Stephen James Coppell (born 9 July 1955 in Norris Green, Liverpool) is the manager of Reading Football Club. ... July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... Gu Yong-Ju (born July 17, 1955) is a retired boxer from North Korea, who won the gold medal in the bantamweight (– 54 kg) division at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Canada. ...

August

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August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... Gail Neall (born August 2, 1955 in Sydney), known as Gail Yeoh after marriage, was an Australian medley swimmer of the 1970s, who won a gold medal in the 400m individual medley at the 1972 Munich in world record time. ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... Gerhardus Christian Coetzee (born August 4, 1955 in Boksburg), better known as Gerrie Coetzee, is a South African former boxer. ... August 5 is the 217th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (218th in leap years), with 148 days remaining. ... John Whitaker MBE (born August 5, 1955) is a British equestrian and former Olympian. ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... Renzo Vecchiato (born August 8, 1955) is a former basketball player from Italy, who won the silver medal with his national team at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... Udo Beyer (August 9, 1955 in Stalinstadt, today Eisenhüttenstadt) was a German track and field athlete representing East Germany in the shot put. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Albert (Bert) Bergsma (born August 12, 1955 in Apeldoorn, Gelderland) is a former freestyle swimmer from the Netherlands, who competed for his native country at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gerard Nijboer (born 18 August 1955 in Hasselt) was a Dutch athlete who competed mainly in the Marathon. ...

September

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September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Maureen George (born September 1, 1955) is a former field hockey player from Zimbabwe, who was a member of the national team that won the gold medal at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (246th in leap years). ... Florenta Mihai (born September 2, 1955) is a tennis player from Romania. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... Linda Watson (born September 15, 1955) is a former field hockey player from Zimbabwe, who was a member of the national team that won the golden medal at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ludo Coeck (born September 25, 1955; died October 9, 1985) was a Belgian footballer who played mostly on the left wing or in the centre of midfield. ... Karl-Heinz Kalle Rummenigge (born September 25, 1955) is a former German football player. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Nowakowski (born September 27, 1955 in Sztum, Poland) is a retired boxer from East Germany, who won the silver medal in the mens featherweight division (– 57 kg) at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Canada. ...

October

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October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jorge Alberto Valdano (born October 4, 1955 in Las Parejas, Santa Fe Province) is a former Argentine football player and, for many, a reference in World Football, sometimes called The Philosopher of Football. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hans-Peter Briegel (born October 11, 1955) is a former German football player and is currently a football coach. ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... Kulbir Bhaura (born on October 15, 1955) is a former field hockey player, who was a member of the golden winning British squad at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... Annemarie Groen (born October 16, 1955 in Naarden, Noord-Holland) is a former backstroke swimmer from the Netherlands, who competed for her native country at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany. ...

November

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November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... Anne Audain (born November 1, 1955 in Auckland) was a New Zealand middle and long distance athlete, competing in three Olympic Games. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... Detlef Ultsch (born November 7, 1955) is a former East German judo athlete. ... November 26 is the 330th day (331st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Barbara Diane Tilden (born November 26, 1955 in Balclutha, New Zealand) is a retired field hockey player from New Zealand, who was a member of the national team that finished sixth at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California. ... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Sarah English (born November 27, 1955) is a former field hockey player from Zimbabwe, who was a member of the national team that won the gold medal at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Alessandro Altobelli (born November 28, 1955 in Sonnino, Italy) is an Italian football player. ...

December

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December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Juha Tiainen (born December 5, 1955 in Uukuniemi – died April 28, 2003 in Lappeenranta) is a former hammer thrower from Finland who won the gold medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthony Stewart Tony Woodcock (born December 6, 1955) is an English former football player, who played as a striker. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... Mikhail Nichepurenko (born December 12, 1955) is a retired field hockey player from Russia, who won the bronze medal with the Mens National Field Hockey Team from the Soviet Union at the boycotted 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marek Dziuba (born 19 December 1955 in Łódź) is a retired Polish football player and later a football manager. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... Jan Jacob Theodoor (Theo) Doyer (born December 29, 1955 in Amsterdam, Noord-Holland) is a former field hockey player from The Netherlands, who was a member of the Dutch National Team that finished sixth in the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, California. ...

Deaths


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