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Encyclopedia > 1950's
These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. The individual century pages contain lists of decades and years. See history for different organizations of historical events. See Calendar and List of calendars for other groupings of years. For earlier time periods see cosmological timeline, geologic timescale, evolutionary timeline, pleistocene... Centuries:
Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. In the sense of the Common Era... 19th century - (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 20th century - (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2000-2099. The 21st century is the first century of the 3rd millennium... 21st century
This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. See also centuries and history. Decade is also an album by Neil Young. During the 20th Century and continuing today it became popular to look at that centurys decades as historical entities in themselves. Particular... Decades:

Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s - 1920s - 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s Years: 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Referred to as the Roaring 20s. Events and trends Technology John Logie Baird invents the first working television system... 1920s Events and trends Technology Jet engine invented Science Nuclear fission discovered by Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner and Fritz Strassmann Pluto, the ninth planet from the Sun, is discovered by Clyde Tombaugh British biologist Arthur Tansley coins term ecosystem War, peace and politics Socialists proclaim The death of Capitalism Rise to... 1930s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s - 1940s - 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s Years: 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 Events and trends Technology First nuclear bomb First cruise missile, the V1 flying bomb and the first ballistic missile, the... 1940s - 1950s - Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. Many of the trends of... 1960s 1970s - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ 1970s From Wikipedia Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of... 1970s Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology Bulletin board system popularity Popularization of personal computers, Walkmans, VHS videocassette recorders, and compact disc (CD) players Introduction of the IBM PC Home video games become enormously popular, most notably Atari until the market crashes in 1983; the rise... 1980s

Years:

Events January January 5 - US Senator Estes Kefauver introduces a resolution calling for examination of organized crime in the USA January 6 - The United Kingdom recognizes the Peoples Republic of China. The Republic of China severs diplomatic relations with Britain in response. January 9 - The Israeli government recognizes the... 1950 Global Metrics Human security Major Armed Conflicts: Total Deaths in Battle: 700,000 people Violent Deaths caused by Government (Other than War): Violent Deaths caused by other humans: Juvenile Violent Crime: Political security Nations Holding Multi-party Elections: Percentage Living under a Fully Democratic System of Governance: Free Countries: Percentage... 1951 Summary of notable events in 1952. Events January events January 8 - West Germany has 8 million refugees inside its borders. January 24 - Sudden heavy snowfall in Algeria. January 24 - Vincent Massey sworn in as first Canada-born Governor-General of Canada. February events February 2 - A Cuba moving northeast. The... 1952 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. Events January January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. January 13 - Marshal Josip Broz Tito chosen President of Yugoslavia January 20 - Change of US presidency from Harry S. Truman (1945-1953) to Dwight D... 1953 1954 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). Events January events January 14 - The Hudson Motor Car Company merges with Nash-Kelvinator forming the American Motors Corporation January 14 - Marilyn Monroe weds Joe DiMaggio. January 15 - Mau Mau leader Waruhiu Itote is captured in... 1954 1955 is a common year starting on Saturday. Events January-April January 2 - Panama president Jose Antonio Remon is assassinated. January 19 - The Scrabble board game debuts. February 8 - Nikolai Bulganin ousts Georgi Malenkov February 13 - Israel obtains 4 of the 7 Dead Sea scrolls. February 23 - First meeting of... 1955 1956 is a leap year starting on Sunday. (see link for calendar) Events January January 1 - End of Egyptian Condominium in Sudan. January 16 - President Egypt vows to reconquer Palestine January 26 - Italy January 26 - United Kingdom bans heroin January 26 - The last Soviet troops leave the military base in... 1956 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Events Environmental change The Africanized bee is accidentally released in Brazil The Asian Flu pandemic begins in China March 10 - Floodgates of The Dalles Dam are closed inundating Celilo Falls and ancient indian fisheries along the... 1957 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 1 - Treaty of Rome founding the EU is implemented January 4 - Sputnik 1 falls to Earth from its orbit (launched on October 4, 1957) January 8 - 14 year old Bobby Fischer wins the... 1958 1959 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-February January 1 - Cultivars of plants named after this date must be named in a modern language, not in Latin. January 1 - Cuba: Fulgencio Batista flees Havana when forces of Fidel Castro advance January... 1959


Contents

Events and trends

Technology

  • The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States tests the first The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945 lifted nuclear fallout some 18 km (60,000 feet) above the epicenter. A nuclear weapon is a weapon that derives its energy from nuclear reactions and has enormous destructive power — a single nuclear weapon is capable of... fusion bomb. See The history of nuclear weapons chronicles the development of nuclear weapons—devices of enormous destructive potential which derive their energy from nuclear fission or nuclear fusion reactions—starting with the scientific breakthroughs of the 1930s which made their development possible, continuing through through the nuclear arms race and... History of nuclear weapons
  • Sputnik 1 The Sputnik program was a series of unmanned space missions launched by the Soviet Union in the late 1950s to demonstrate the viability of artificial satellites. The name Sputnik (Спутник) comes from Russian where it means satellite or fellow traveller. Sputnik 1... Sputnik, the first man-made satellite, and thus the The Sputnik crisis was a turning point of the Cold War that began on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet Union launched the Sputnik 1 satellite. The USA had believed itself to be the leader of space technology and thus a leader of missile development. The surprise Sputnik launch and... Sputnik crisis
  • The This article deals with the de Havilland Comet jet airliner. For the 1930s racing aircraft see de Havilland DH.88 The de Havilland Comet of Britain was the worlds first commercial jet airliner. Design work began in 1946 under Ronald Bishop and the intention was to have a commercial... De Havilland Comet enters service as the world's first See also: Jet (disambiguation) A jet is a stream of fluid produced by discharge through an orifice into free space. Since gases are compressible fluids, the velocity attained by a jet of gas cannot be determined by Bernoullis principle. Instead, if one uses adiabatic expansion from P1 to P2... jet An airliner of Air Jamaica, the Airbus A340 An airliner is a type of aircraft initially designed for the transport of paying passengers. There are many variants developed for air freight, military or luxury corporate use. Occasionally the military version precedes the civilian sector. Examples are the Boeing KC-135... airliner
  • Charles Townes builds a The acronym maser stands for Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. A maser resembles a laser, but operates in the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum. History Charles H. Townes, J. P. Gordon, and H. J. Zeiger built the first maser at Columbia University in 1953. The device used... maser in 1953 at Columbia University.

Science

  • The Miller-Urey experiment attempts to recreate the chemical conditions of the primitive Earth in the laboratory, and synthesized some of the building blocks of life. The Miller-Urey experiment (or Urey-Miller experiment) was an experiment that simulated hypothetical conditions present on the early Earth and tested for the... Urey-Miller experiment shows that under simulated conditions resembling those thought to have existed shortly after Earth first accreted, many of the basic organic molecules that form the building blocks of modern life are able to spontaneously form
  • Francis Harry Compton Crick, OM (June 8, 1916 – July 28, 2004) was one of the discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule. Born in Northampton, England, he studied physics at University College London, and became a B.Sc. in 1937. During World War II, he worked on magnetic... Francis Crick and James Watson James Dewey Watson (born April 6, 1928) is one of the discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule. Born in Chicago, Illinois, he enrolled at the age of 15, earned a B.Sc. in Zoology at the University of Chicago in 1947 and a Ph.D. in... James D. Watson discover the helical structure of DNA replication Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid which is capable of carrying genetic instructions for the biological development of all cellular forms of life and many viruses. DNA is sometimes referred to as the molecule of heredity as it is inherited and used to propagate traits. During reproduction... DNA at the The Cavendish Laboratory is in the Department of Physics of the University of Cambridge. The Department is itself part of the School of Physical Sciences. It was built in 1873 as a teaching laboratory. It was initially on the New Museums site off Free School Lane, in the centre of... Cavendish Laboratory at the The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after Oxford). It is situated in the town of Cambridge, England. According to legend, the university was founded in 1209 by scholars escaping from Oxford after a fight with locals there. Cambridge has produced more Nobel... University of Cambridge
  • Bruce C. Heezen (1924 - June 21, 1977) was a geologist. He his most famous as being the leader of a team from Columbia University which discovered the Mid-Atlantic Ridge during the 1950s. He was bron in Vinton, Iowa, and in 1947 received his B.A. from the Iowa State... Bruce Heezen discovers the Courtesy USGS The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is an underwater mountain range of the Atlantic Ocean that runs from Iceland to Antarctica, and is the longest mountain range on Earth. The ridge was discovered by Bruce Heezen in the 1950s. The discovery of this ridge led to the theory of seafloor... Mid-Atlantic Ridge
  • Two polio vaccines are used throughout the world to combat polio. The first was invented by Jonas Salk and first tested in 1952 and announced to the world by Salk on March 26, 1953. It consists of an injected dose of killed polio virus. Albert Sabin produced an oral polio... Polio Vaccine
  • Project management is the ensemble of activities (such as tasks) concerned with successfully achieving a set of goals. This includes planning, scheduling and maintaining progress of the activities that comprise the project. Reduced to its simplest project management is the discipline of maintaining the risk of failure at as low... Project management

War, peace, and politics

  • The Korean War (Korean: 한국전쟁), from June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953, was a conflict between North Korea and South Korea. It was also a Cold War proxy war between the United States and its United Nations allies and the communist powers of the Peoples... Korean War
  • Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. If you can do so, please leave a note on the talk page or adjust the article text as necessary, and then remove this notice. The term Red Scare has been applied to two distinct periods of intense anti-Communism... Red Scare, Joseph McCarthy This article is about the American politician. For other people with the same name, see Joseph McCarthy (disambiguation). Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 15, 1908 - May 2, 1957) was an American politician of the Republican Party. McCarthy served as a U.S. Senator from the U.S. state of... McCarthy Hearings
  • The Suez Crisis, also known as the Suez War, Suez Campaign or Kadesh Operation was a war fought on Egyptian territory in 1956. The conflict pitted Egypt against an alliance between France, the United Kingdom and Israel. The alliance between the two European nations and Israel was largely one of... Suez Crisis
  • This article is about the continent. For alternative meanings, see: Europe (disambiguation) A comprehensive collection of continental features is found in Europe, albeit on a smaller scale than elsewhere. Mountain ranges, peninsulas, islands and more arid or cold regions can be seen in this satellite composite image of Europe Europe... European The European Union or EU is an intergovernmental organisation of European countries, which currently has 25 member states. The Union was established under that name by the Treaty on European Union (commonly known as the Maastricht Treaty) in 1992. However, many aspects of the EU existed before that date through... Common Market founded.
  • Map of Warsaw Pact member countries. The Warsaw Pact or Warsaw Treaty, officially named the Treaty of friendship, co-operation and mutual assistance was a military alliance of the Eastern European Soviet Bloc countries, who intended to organize against the perceived threat from the NATO alliance (which had been established... Warsaw pact founded.
  • Most aboveground A nuclear test explosion is an experiment involving the detonation of a nuclear weapon. Motivations for testing generally are broken into the categories: weapons related (verifying that a weapon works, or examining exactly how it works) weapons effects (how weapons behave under various conditions, and how structures behave when subjected... nuclear test explosions happened during this decade.
  • The The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States This article is about the foreign intelligence service of the United States of America. For other uses of the term CIA, see CIA (disambiguation). The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is one of the three American foreign intelligence agencies, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals... CIA Operation PBSUCCESS (1954) was the CIA-organized covert operation that overthrew the democratically-elected President of Guatemala, Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán. The CIA armed and trained an ad-hoc Liberation Army of about 400 fighters in Nicaragua. Under the command of Colonel Carlos Castillo Armas, the Liberation Army invaded Guatemala... orchestrated the overthrow of the For the city, see Guatemala City. The Republic of Guatemala is a country in Central America, in the south of the continent of North America, bordering both the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. It is bordered by Mexico to the north, Belize to the northeast, and Honduras and El... Guatemalan government.
  • The Republic of Hungary (Magyar Köztársaság) or Hungary (Magyarország) is a landlocked country in Central Europe, bordered by Austria, Slovakia, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia. It is known locally as the Country of the Magyars. National motto: (none current) historical: Regnum... Hungarian Hungarians investigate a disabled Soviet tank in Budapest The 1956 Hungarian Revolution, also known as the Hungarian Uprising, was a popular revolt against Soviet influence and control in Hungary. The revolt was brutally suppressed by Soviet troops. About 25-50,000 Hungarian insurgents and 7,000 Soviet troops were killed... revolution of 1956 brutally suppressed by The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) .( Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик... Soviet Union's troops.
  • Cuban President Fidel Castro Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born August 13, 1926) has ruled Cuba since 1959, when, leading the 26th of July Movement, he helped overthrow the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista and turn Cuba into the first socialist state in the Western Hemisphere. He held the title of premier... Fidel Castro gains power in The Republic of Cuba is an archipelago in the northern Caribbean that lies at the confluence of the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. To the north are found the United States and the Bahamas, to the west Mexico, to the south the Cayman Islands and... Cuba.
  • Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005... Mahmoud Abbas becomes involved in Palestinian politics in The State of Qatar (قطر) is an emirate in the Middle East. Situated on a small peninsula off the larger Arabian Peninsula, it borders Saudi Arabia to the south and is otherwise surrounded by the Persian Gulf. The pronunciation of Qatar in English varies; see List of words... Qatar.
  • Decolonization generally refers to a movement following the Second World War in which the various European colonies of the world were granted independence. It began with liberation of Pakistan in 1947. In other words, it is the process of emancipation of colonies. One could say that the process has still... Decolonization: The Algerian War of Independence (1954–62) was a period of guerrilla strikes, maquis fighting, terrorism against civilians on both sides, and riots between the French army and colonists in Algeria and the FLN (Front de Lib ration Nationale) and other pro-independence Algerians. Although the French government of... Algeria, The First Indochina War (also called the French Indochina War) was fought in French Indochina from 1946 through 1954 between the nation of France and the resistance movement led by Ho Chi Minh, called the Viet Minh. The Viet Minh, seasoned by combat against occupying Japanese soldiers during the Second... Vietnam, and elsewhere.
  • Early history of the The Peoples Republic of China was proclaimed in the aftermath of the Communist Partys triumph in the Chinese Civil War by Mao Zedong on October 1, 1949. The Mao era The new government assumed control of a people exhausted by two generations of war and social conflict and... People's Republic of China, of the state of Main article: State of Israel. This article discusses the history of the State of Israel, from 1948 A.D. to the present. See also History of Palestine for history of the region from approximately 600 B.C. to 1948 A.D., and History of ancient Israel and Judah for history... Israel, and of the Prehistory Geologically the area of modern Indonesia appeared sometime around the Pleistocene period when it was still linked with the Asian mainland. The areas first known humanlike inhabitant was Java man some 500,000 years ago. The current Indonesian archipelago was formed during the thaw after the latest ice... Indonesian state.

Economics

  • "Economic miracle" in West Germany was the informal but almost universally used name for the Federal Republic of Germany from 1949 until 1990, during which years the Federal Republic did not yet include East Germany. Since the German reunification of 1990, the Federal Republic of Germany is informally called simply Germany. The Federal... West Germany.

Culture, religion

  • Brylcreem (pronounced brill-cream) is a brand name pomade, the precursor to todays hair gel. Created in 1929, Brylcreem was invented at the Chemico Works in Bradford Street, Birmingham, England. Brylcreem was the first mass-marketed mens hair care product. Its purpose is to keep combed hair in... Brylcreem and other hair tonics have a period of popularity
  • See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band Family watching television in the 1950s. Television is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound over a distance. The term has come to refer to all the aspects of television programming and transmission... Television replaces Radio transmission diagram and electromagnetic waves Radio is a technology that allows the transmission of signals by modulation of electromagnetic waves with frequencies below those of light. Radio waves Radio waves are a form of electromagnetic radiation, and are created whenever a charged object accelerates with a frequency that lies... radio as the dominant mass medium in industrialized countries.
  • In the West, the generation traumatized by the The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. However, most of the remainder of the 1930s was spent recovering from the contraction, and it would be well after World War II when such indicators as industrial production, share prices and global GDP... Great Depression and Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (60,000 ft) into the air. August 9, 1945 World War II was a global conflict that started in 7 July 1937 in Asia and 1 September 1939 in Europe and lasted until 1945, involving the majority of the... World War II creates a culture with emphasis on normality and calm conformity.
  • Juvenile delinquency refers to antisocial or criminal acts performed by juveniles. It is an important social issue because juveniles are capable of committing serious crimes, but society must also recognize that responsibility for juvenile behavior goes beyond the juveniles themselves. See also Crime Hooliganism Parenting Separatism Revolution Rebellion Teen angst... Juvenile delinquency said to be at unprecedented epidemic proportions in The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... USA
  • (There is no universally agreed-upon term for this genre of music, but at least one reference calls it by this name. It is also referred to as mainstream pop music.) Traditional pop music is a genre of music which encompasses music that succeeded big band music and preceded rock... Traditional pop music reaches its climax; early Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. As a cultural... rock and roll music embraced by teenagers/ Young people often find ways to express themselves which are different to the generally accepted culture of their community. The various methods by which they express themselves and associate are known as youth culture. Young people having a subculture unique to themselves is a recent phenomena. It is thought that... youth culture while generally dismissed or condemned by older generation.
  • Beatnik can refer to two different things: A member of the Beat Generation An esoteric programming language This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred you here, you might want to go back... Beatnik culture/ The The term beat generation was introduced by Jack Kerouac in approximately 1948 to describe his social circle to the novelist John Clellon Holmes (who published an early novel about the beat generation, titled Go, in 1952, along with a manifesto of sorts in the New York Times Magazine: This is... Beat Generation
  • Optimistic visions of semi-Utopian technological future including such devices as the Norman Bel Geddes flying car design (concept model), 1945 In the 1950s, the western world was recovering from World War II and everything seemed possible. The flying car was a vision of transportation in the 21st century, and a common feature of science fiction futures. Several designs exist (such as... flying car.
  • Film poster for The Day the Earth Stood Still The Day the Earth Stood Still is a 1951 science fiction film which tells the story of a humanoid spaceman who comes to Earth to convince its leaders to learn how to live in peace. It stars Michael Rennie, Patricia Neal... The Day the Earth Stood Still hits movie theaters.
  • Along with the appearance of the sentence typical KILROY WAS HERE graffiti Kilroy was here is an American popular culture expression, often seen in graffiti. Its origins are indistinct, but recognition of it and the distinct doodle of Kilroy peeking over a wall is almost ubiquitous in the US. The same doodle also appears in other cultures... Kilroy was here across the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States, For the handwriting system, see Graffiti (Palm OS). Graffiti is a type of deliberate human markings on property. Graffiti can take the form of art, drawings, or words, and is illegal vandalism when done without the property owners consent. Its origin can be traced back to ancient civilizations such... graffiti as an The Mona Lisa Although today the word art usually refers to the visual arts, the concept of what art is has continuously changed over centuries. Perhaps the most concise definition is its broadest—art refers to all creative human endeavors, excluding actions directly related to survival and reproduction. From... art form develops, especially among urban African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. The majority of African Americans are of African, European and Native American ancestry. Terms for African... African Americans; graffiti eventually becomes one of the four elements of Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. The four main elements of hip-hop are MCing, DJing, graffiti, and breakdancing. Some consider beatboxing the fifth element of hip hop; others might add political activism... hip hop
  • The Catcher in the Rye is a famous novel by J. D. Salinger. Published in 1951, the novel remains controversial today, particularly in the U.S.A., where it was the 13th most frequently challenged book of the 1990s, according to the American Library Association [1]. Its protagonist, Holden Caulfield... The Catcher in the Rye

Others

  • Wartime Rationing is the controlled distribution of resources and scarce goods or services: it restricts how much people are allowed to buy or consume. Rationing, for whatever reason, controls the size of the ration, ones allotted portion of the resources being distributed on a particular day or at a particular... rationing ends in the The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom

People

World leaders

  • Prime Minister Louis Stephen St. Laurent (Saint-Laurent or St-Laurent in French) (February 1, 1882 - July 25, 1973) was the twelfth Prime Minister of Canada from November 15, 1948 to June 21, 1957. He was born in Compton in Quebecs Eastern Townships to a French-Canadian father and Irish mother... Louis St. Laurent ( Canada is an independent sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. Bordering the United States, its territorial claims extend north into the Arctic Ocean as far as the North Pole. Canada is a federation of ten provinces... Canada)
  • Prime Minister John George Diefenbaker (September 18, 1895 - August 16, 1979) was the thirteenth Prime Minister of Canada. Born in Neustadt, Ontario, Canada, he received a B.A. in 1915, an M.A. in Political Science and Economics in 1916, and an LL.B. in 1919 from the University of Saskatchewan. Diefenbaker... John Diefenbaker ( Canada is an independent sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. Bordering the United States, its territorial claims extend north into the Arctic Ocean as far as the North Pole. Canada is a federation of ten provinces... Canada)
  • Chairman Mao Zedong (December 26, 1893—September 9, 1976) was the chairman of the Communist Party of China from 1935 until his death. Under his leadership, it became the ruling party of mainland China as the result of its victory in the Chinese Civil War and the founding of the... Mao Zedong ( The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) comprises most of the cultural, historic, and geographic area known as China. Since its founding in 1949, it has been led by the Communist Party of China (CPC). It is the worlds most populous country, with a population of over 1.3... People's Republic of China)
  • President Chiang Kai-shek ( October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was a Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. He commanded the Northern Expedition to unify China against the warlords and emerged victorious in 1928... Chiang Kai-shek ( The Republic of China ( Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a multiparty democratic state that is composed of the... Republic of China on Taiwan)
  • President Gamal Abdel Nasser (Arabic: جمال عبد الناصر) Gamal Abdel Nasser (January 15, 1918 - September 28, 1970) was the second President of Egypt after Muhammad Naguib and is considered one of the most important Arab leaders in history. He was the... Gamal Abdel Nasser ( The Arab Republic of Egypt, commonly known as Egypt, (in Arabic: مصر, romanized Mişr or Maşr, in Egyptian dialect) is a republic mostly located in northeastern Africa. Covering an area of about 1,020,000 km², it includes the Sinai Peninsula (considered part of... Egypt)
  • Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru (जवाहरलाल नेहरू) (November 14, 1889 - May 27, 1964), also called Pandit (Teacher) Nehru, was the leader of the (moderately) socialist wing of the Indian National Congress during and after Indias struggle for independence from the British... Jawaharlal Nehru ( The Republic of India is the second most populous country in the world, with a population of more than one billion, and is the seventh largest country by geographical area. India has grown significantly, both in population and in strategic importance in the last two decades. The Indian economy is... India)
  • Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion David Ben-Gurion (October 16, 1886—December 1, 1973; Hebrew: דוד בן גוריון) was the first Prime Minister of Israel. Early life Paula Munweis and David (Green) Ben-Gurion, 1915 He was born as David Gruen in P... David Ben-Gurion ( The State of Israel (Hebrew: מדינת ישראל, translit.: Medinat Yisrael; Arabic: دولة اسرائيل, translit.: Daulat Israil) is a country in the Middle East on the eastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea... Israel)
  • Emperor Hirohito (裕仁), the Shōwa Emperor (昭和天皇), (April 29, 1901 - January 7, 1989) reigned over Japan from 1926 to 1989. He was known in the West by his given name Hirohito (he had no surname). He was the 124th Emperor of Japan. Emperor Hirohito His... Hirohito ( Official language Japanese Capital Tokyo Largest City Tokyo Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 60th 377,835 km² 0.8% Population  - Total ( 2004)  - Density Ranked 10th 127,333,002 337/km² GDP  - Total (PPP, 2005)  - Total (nominal)  ... Japan)
  • The Venerable Pius XII, born Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Eugenio Pacelli (Rome, March 2, 1876 - October 9, 1958) served as the Pope from March 2, 1939 to 1958. He was the only pope to exercise his Extraordinary (Solemn) Magisterium (that is, to claim Papal Infallibility) in the 20th century when he... Pope Pius XII
  • The Blessed John XXIII wearing a Papal Tiara Angelo Roncalli was born in Sotto il Monte (province of Bergamo), Italy on November 25, 1881. The fourth in a family of fourteen, his family worked as sharecroppers, a striking contrast to the royally born Eugenio Pacelli, Johns predecessor as pope... Pope John XXIII
  • Taoiseach John Aloysius Costello (20 June 1891 - 5 January 1976), a successful barrister, was one of the main legal advisors to the government of the Irish Free State after independence, Attorney-General of Ireland from 1926-1932 and Taoiseach from 1948-1951 and 1954-1957. Early Life Costello was born on... John A. Costello ( The Republic of Ireland ( Irish: Poblacht na hÉireann) is the official description of an independent state which covers approximately five-sixths of the island of Ireland, off the coast of north-west Europe. It is the westernmost state of the European Union, and has a developed economy and... Ireland)
  • Taoiseach Eamon de Valera1 (born Edward George de Valera, Irish name Éamonn de Bhailéara) (October 14, 1882 - August 29, 1975), was a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from Britain in the early 20th Century, and of the Republican opposition in the ensuing Irish Civil War, and was subsequently... Eamon de Valera ( The Republic of Ireland ( Irish: Poblacht na hÉireann) is the official description of an independent state which covers approximately five-sixths of the island of Ireland, off the coast of north-west Europe. It is the westernmost state of the European Union, and has a developed economy and... Ireland)
  • Taoiseach ... Sean Lemass ( The Republic of Ireland ( Irish: Poblacht na hÉireann) is the official description of an independent state which covers approximately five-sixths of the island of Ireland, off the coast of north-west Europe. It is the westernmost state of the European Union, and has a developed economy and... Ireland)
  • Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin ( Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili ( Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვილ... Joseph Stalin ( The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) .( Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик... Soviet Union)
  • Nikita Khrushchev in 1962 Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (Russian: Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв) (nih-KEE-tah khroo-SHCHYOFF) (April 17, 1894 – September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union... Nikita Khrushchev ( The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) .( Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик... Soviet Union)
  • King George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952. As well as being the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the British... George VI ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Queen Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... Elizabeth II ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Prime Minister Sir The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, FRS ( November 30, 1874 – January 24, 1965) was a British statesman, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II. At various times an author, soldier, journalist, and politician, Churchill is generally regarded as... Winston Churchill ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Prime Minister Sir Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG ( June 12, 1897 - January 14, 1977), British politician, was Foreign Secretary during World War II and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the 1950s. He is remembered mainly for his role in the disastrous Suez Crisis of 1956. In a 2004... Anthony Eden ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Prime Minister Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM (10 February 1894 - 29 December 1986), nicknamed Supermac and Mac the Knife, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. Early life Macmillan was born in Brixton. He was educated at Eton and at... Harold Macmillan ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Prime Minister Rt Hon Robert Menzies Sir Robert Gordon Menzies (20 December 1894 – 14 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia. He had a rapid rise to power, but his first term as Prime Minister was a failure. He spent eight years in the... Robert Menzies ( Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only one to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/ Oceania. It also includes a number of secondary islands, the largest of which is Tasmania, an Australian State. Australia is... Australia)
  • President Harry S. Truman - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ Harry S. Truman From Wikipedia For the victim of Mt. St. Helens, see Harry Truman (volcano victim). Harry S. Truman ( May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-fourth... Harry S. Truman ( The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States)
  • Prime Minister George Borg Olivier (5 July 1911 - 29 October 1980) was three times the Prime Minister of Malta (1950 to 1955 and 1962 to 1971). During his rule Malta became an independent nation. Borg belonged to the conservative Nationalist Party. Categories: People stubs | 1911 births | 1980 deaths | Prime Ministers of Malta... George Borg Olivier ( This article is about the European nation. For other meanings, see this page. Official languages Maltese and English Capital Valletta Largest City Birkirkara President Edward (Eddie) Fenech Adami Prime Minister Lawrence Gonzi Religion Catholicism Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 184th 316 km² Negligible Population  - Total ( 2003)  ... Malta)
  • President Order: 34th President Vice President: Richard Nixon Term of office: January 20, 1953 – January 20, 1961 Preceded by: Harry S. Truman Succeeded by: John F. Kennedy Date of birth: October 14, 1890 Place of birth: Denison, Texas Date of... Dwight D. Eisenhower ( The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States)
  • Chancellor Konrad Adenauer (January 5, 1876–April 19, 1967) was a German statesman. Adenauer, a Centre Party politician, was Mayor of Cologne from 1917 to 1933, and as such, flirted with Rhenish separatism in the early 1920s. From 1922 to 1933 he was chancellor of the Prussian State Council (Preussischer... Konrad Adenauer ( West Germany was the informal but almost universally used name for the Federal Republic of Germany from 1949 until 1990, during which years the Federal Republic did not yet include East Germany. Since the German reunification of 1990, the Federal Republic of Germany is informally called simply Germany. The Federal... West Germany)
  • President Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. Early years Tito was born Josip Broz in Kumrovec, northwestern Croatia, in an area called Zagorje, which was then part of Austria-Hungary. He... Josip Broz Tito ( The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. It was formed in 1945 from remains of the pre-war Kingdom of Yugoslavia under the name Democratic Federal Yugoslavia, in 1946 it changed its name to Federal Peoples Republic of Yugoslavia and... Yugoslavia)

Entertainers

  • Abbott and Costello is the name of a legendary comedy team made up of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. Abbott met Costello in 1931 while Abbott was working as a cashier at the Brooklyn theater. Costello asked Abbott to fill in for his straight man, who was ill. Throughout the... Abbott and Costello
  • Jack Benny (born Benjamin Kubelsky, February 14, 1894 – December 26, 1974) was a comedian, vaudeville performer, film actor, and one of the most prominent early stars of American radio and television. Often cited for his impeccable comic timing, Benny was an influential comedy innovator, a major architect of the... Jack Benny
  • Chuck Berry Charles Edward Berry (born October 18, American guitarist, singer and composer. Berry was born in St. Louis, Missouri and was one of the first members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1986). He received Kennedy Center Honors in 2000. While there is debate about who recorded... Chuck Berry
  • Humphrey Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957) was an iconic American actor who retains legendary status decades after his death. In 1999, the American Film Institute named Bogart the Greatest Male Star of All Time. Bogart typically played smart, playful, courageous, tough, occasionally reckless characters, living in a... Humphrey Bogart
  • Marlon Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Marlon Brando, Jr. (April 3, 1924 - July 1, 2004) was an American actor who brought the techniques of method acting to prominence in the films A Streetcar Named Desire and On the Waterfront, both directed by Elia... Marlon Brando
  • This article is about the actor James Dean. You might also be looking for Jimmy Dean. James Dean James Byron Dean (February 8, 1931 - September 30, 1955) was an American film actor. Epitomizing youthful angst and charisma, Deans screen persona is probably best embodied in the title of his... James Dean
  • Ava Gardner Ava Gardner (December 24, 1922 – January 25, 1990) was an American actress. Ava Lavinia Gardner was born in the small farming community of Grabtown, Johnston County, North Carolina, the last of 7 children of poor tobacco farmers. She was married to Mickey Rooney from 1941 to 1943... Ava Gardner
  • The Goon Show was a hugely popular and extremely influential British radio comedy programme, which was originally produced and broadcast by the BBC from 1951 to 1960 on the BBC Home Service. Background The show was enormously popular in Britain in its heyday; tickets for the recording sessions at the... The Goons
  • Cary Grant (January 18, 1904 – November 29, 1986) was an English-born American film actor. He was perhaps the foremost exemplar of the debonair leading man, not only handsome, but witty and charming. Cary Grant Born Archibald Alexander Leach in Bristol, he had a confused and unhappy childhood. His... Cary Grant
  • Audrey Hepburn Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929 - January 20, 1993) was a Belgian-born actress. Born Audrey Kathleen Ruston in Brussels she was the daughter of Joseph Anthony Ruston, a British banker, and Baroness Ella van Heemstra, a Dutch aristocrat descended from French and English kings. Her father appended the... Audrey Hepburn
  • Alfred Hitchcock Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, KBE (13 August 1899 – 29 April 1980) was a British film director closely associated with the suspense genre. Influenced by expressionism in Germany, he began directing in England, and worked in the United States from 1939. With more than fifty feature films to... Alfred Hitchcock
  • Anthony John Hancock, best known as Tony Hancock (May 12, 1924 - June 26, 1968) was a major figure in British television and radio comedy in the 1950s and 1960s. Early Life and Career He was born in Birmingham, England, but raised in Bournemouth where his mother and step-father ran... Tony Hancock
  • Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936–February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of Rock and Roll. Biography Holly was born in Lubbock, Texas. The Holleys were a musical family and as a young boy Holly learned to play the... Buddy Holly
  • This article is about the comedian and telethon host; Jerry Lewis is also the name of a U.S. politician. There is also a musician named Jerry Lee Lewis. Joseph Levitch (born March 16, 1926), better known as Jerry Lewis, is an American comedian, actor , producer, and director known for... Jerry Lewis
  • Dean Martin (June 7, 1917 - December 25, 1995) was an American film actor and singer, crooner. Biography Born Dino Paul Crocetti into an Italian-American family in Steubenville, Ohio, he left school at age sixteen and had a variety of jobs including that of prizefighter before changing his name and... Dean Martin
  • Groucho Marx poses for an NBC promotional photograph Julius Henry Marx, known as Groucho Marx (October 2, 1890 - August 19, 1977), was an American comedian, working both with his siblings, the Marx Brothers, and on his own. The Marx family grew up on the Upper East Side of New York... Groucho Marx
  • Marilyn Monroe Marilyn Monroe (June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962) was an American actress of the 20th century. Her sizzling screen presence and premature death would make her a perennial sex symbol and later a pop icon. Early life A Los Angeles native, she was born Norma Jeane Mortensen... Marilyn Monroe
  • Paul Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an American actor and film director. He was born in Shaker Heights, Ohio to a Catholic mother and a Jewish father who owned a successful sporting goods store. He served in the Navy in World War II, in the Pacific theater. When he... Paul Newman
  • Laurence Olivier, as photographed in 1939 by Carl Van Vechten Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (May 22, 1907 – July 11, 1989) was an English actor and director, esteemed by many as the greatest actor of the 20th century. Life Laurence Olivier was born in Dorking, Surrey. He attended... Laurence Olivier
  • Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock and Roll, or as just simply The King, was an American singer who had an immeasurable effect on world culture. He started his career under the name the Hillbilly Cat and was soon... Elvis Presley
  • Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932 in Macon, Georgia) is a pioneer of rock and roll though he says (quoted in Hamm 1979, p.391) he came from a family where my people didnt like rhythm and blues. Bing Crosby - Pennies from Heaven - Ella Fitzgerald, was... Little Richard
  • There are several individuals by the name of James Stewart. The best-known James Stewart of modern times is the Hollywood movie star of the name, widely known as Jimmy Stewart. An English actor whose real name was James Stewart was told by the Screen Actors Guild to change it... James Stewart
  • Josephine Owaissa Cottle (born April 5, 1922), better known as Gale Storm, is an American actress/singer. Born in Bloomington, Texas, her father passed away before she was a year old and her mother struggled to raise five children alone. In Junior High and High School she performed in the... Gale Storm
  • Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935) is an American rock and roll pioneer piano player and singer. Jerry Lee Lewis Born in Ferriday, Louisiana, he early showed a natural talent at the piano. His parents, though poor, took out a loan to buy him a piano, and within a... Jerry Lee Lewis
  • Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908 - November 5, 1982) was a French film-maker. He was born Jacques Tatischeff in Le Pecq, Yvelines, France, and died in Paris, France. Originally a mime, in the late 1930s Tati recorded some of his early sporting cameos on film with some success and thus... Jacques Tati
  • This article is about the actress. There are also articles about the painter and the novelist of the same name. Elizabeth Taylor Elizabeth Taylor (born February 27, 1932) is an English-born Academy Award winning actress. She was born Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor in Hampstead, London, England, the second child of... Elizabeth Taylor
  • John Wayne (May 26, 1907 - June 11, 1979), nicknamed Duke, was an American film actor whose career spanned the evolutionary phase of American cinema, appearing in silent movies and talkies alike. He remains, by many accounts, the most popular star in the history of American film. He was born Marion... John Wayne
  • John Randolph Jack Webb (April 2, 1920 - December 23, 1982) was an American actor, television producer, and writer who is most famous for his role as a detective in the television series Dragnet. Webb grew up poor in the Bunker Hill section of Los Angeles. He was a sickly child... Jack Webb

Sports figures

  • Alberto Ascari (July 13, 1918 – May 26, 1955) was one of Formula Ones first stars and the first great Ferrari driver. Born in Milan, Italy, Ascari had racing in his blood, as his father Antonio Ascari was a talented Grand Prix motor racing star in the 1920s, racing... Alberto Ascari (Italian Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. Motor racing or motorsport may also mean motorcycle racing. It is one of the worlds most popular spectator sports and perhaps the most thoroughly commercialized. History The Start Auto racing began almost immediately after... racing driver)
  • Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister KBE (born March 23, 1929) is a former British athlete best known as the first man to run the mile in less than four minutes. Bannister is now a distinguished neurologist. He was born in Harrow, Middlesex, England. History Bannister was educated at the City of... Roger Bannister (English This article refers to the British English definition of Athletics that is limited in scope to sporting events that in American English are known as Track and Field. Thus, Track and Field redirects here. If you are looking for the American English definition of the word athletics, which is used... track and field athlete)
  • Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925) is a former catcher and manager in Major League Baseball who played almost his entire career for the New York Yankees. He is one of only four players to be named the Most Valuable Player of the American League three times, and... Yogi Berra (U.S. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • Maureen Catherine Connolly (Little Mo) was a professional tennis player born on September 17, 1934, in San Diego, California, United States. As a child, an athletic Maureen Connolly loved horseback riding but her mother was unable to pay the cost for riding lessons and as such she took up the... Maureen Connolly (U.S. Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... tennis player)
  • Juan Manuel Fangio (June 24, 1911 - July 17, 1995) was a noted Argentinian racing car driver and winner of the Formula One championship five times, including four in a row from 1954-57. He was born in Balcarce, Argentina. He began his racing career in South America in 1934, mostly... Juan Manuel Fangio (Argentinian Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. Motor racing or motorsport may also mean motorcycle racing. It is one of the worlds most popular spectator sports and perhaps the most thoroughly commercialized. History The Start Auto racing began almost immediately after... racing driver)
  • Gordon Howe (born March 31, 1928 in Floral, Saskatchewan) is a Canadian hockey player who is often referred to as Mr. Hockey. Playing Career Gordie Howe made his NHL debut in 1946 at the age of 18, playing right wing for the Detroit Red Wings. He quickly established himself as... Gordie Howe (Canadian Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. It is known as the fastest team sport in the world, with players on skates capable of going high speeds along with shots of the puck sometimes... ice hockey player)
  • Rocco Francis Marchegiano (September 1, 1923 - August 31, 1969), better known as Rocky Marciano, was a boxer who holds the distinction of being the only Heavyweight Champion of the World to retire undefeated. Marciano had to fight practically since the start of his life in Brockton, Massachusetts. He contracted pneumonia... Rocky Marciano (U.S. Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). In computer science, boxing is a way to wrap primitive types over object types. See object type. Boxer engines for automotive applications redirect to either Flat-4 or Flat-6. 2004 Armed Forces Amateur Boxing Championships, held in 2003... boxer)
  • Sir Stanley Matthews (February 1, 1915 - February 23, 2000) was a football player of genius and one of the greats of the English game. His nickname in England was The Wizard of the Dribble and on the continent he gained the name of The Magician. Matthews was born in Seymour... Stanley Matthews (English The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)
  • Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931) is a former star of Major League Baseball. Mays, nicknamed The Say Hey Kid, played center field throughout nearly all his career and is regarded as one of the finest players ever to have played the game. The epitome of the five... Willie Mays (U.S. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • Ferenc Puskás (Hungarian The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)
  • Maurice Richard in his Canadiens uniform Joseph Henri Maurice Richard, also nicknamed Rocket Richard (born August 4, 1921 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, died May 27, 2000 in Montreal, Quebec) was a professional ice hockey player, and played for the Montreal Canadiens from 1942 to 1960. Playing Career Joseph Henri Maurice... Maurice Richard (Canadian Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. It is known as the fastest team sport in the world, with players on skates capable of going high speeds along with shots of the puck sometimes... ice hockey player)
  • Walker Smith Jr. (May 3, 1921 - April 12, 1989), better known in the boxing world as Sugar Ray Robinson, was a boxer who was a native of Detroit, Michigan. Robinson is the holder of many boxing records, including the one for the most times being a champion in a division... Sugar Ray Robinson (U.S. Boxer redirects here; for other meanings of boxer, see Boxer (disambiguation). In computer science, boxing is a way to wrap primitive types over object types. See object type. Boxer engines for automotive applications redirect to either Flat-4 or Flat-6. 2004 Armed Forces Amateur Boxing Championships, held in 2003... boxer)
  • There are many well-known people named William Russell: Sir William Russell (c.1558-1613), a Lord Deputy of Ireland. Sir William Russell, a 17th century Treasurer of the Navy. William Russell, an 18th century member of the North Carolina General Assembly. William Russell (c.1732_1793), a Virginia legislator. William... Bill Russell (U.S. Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. Basketball is highly suited to viewing by spectators, as it is primarily an indoor sport, played in a relatively small playing area, or court, with... basketball player)
  • Lev Yashin Lev Ivanovich Yashin (Russian: Лев Ива́нович Я́шин) (October 22, 1929 - March 20, 1990) was a Soviet soccer goalkeeper, arguably the best ever in the sport. Life Yashin was born in Moscow in a family... Lev Yashin (Russian The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. Football is the most widely played and watched team sport in the world. The game is often known... soccer player)

See also

  • Bold textItalic textThe 1950s are noted in United States history as a time of both compliance and conformity and also of rebellion. Major U.S. events during the decade included: The Korean War (1950-1953); The election of Second World War hero and retired Army Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower... United States in the 1950s
  • This is a list of albums that are particularly notable or influential. It has been derived by compiling lists published by professional sources. Each album has at least one number following it. See references for the key, which assigns each source a number. All the lists are self-described as... List of rock and roll albums in the 1950s

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
RFC 1950 (rfc1950) - ZLIB Compressed Data Format Specification version 3.3 (1892 words)
Network Working Group P. Deutsch Request for Comments: 1950 Aladdin Enterprises Category: Informational J-L. Gailly Info-ZIP May 1996 ZLIB Compressed Data Format Specification version 3.3 Status of This Memo This memo provides information for the Internet community.
The Adler-32 checksum should be initialized to 1.
RFC 1950: Very helpful, but is there a mathematical background for adler-32, and can it be...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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