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Encyclopedia > 1936 Summer Olympics
Games of the XI Olympiad

Host city Berlin, Germany
Nations participating 49
Athletes participating 3,963
(3,632 men, 331 women)
Events 129 in 19 sports
Opening ceremony August 1
Closing ceremony August 16
Officially opened by Adolf Hitler
Athlete's Oath Rudolf Ismayr
Olympic Torch Fritz Schilgen
Stadium Olympic Stadium

The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. Berlin won the bid to host the games, with the International Olympic Committee choosing Berlin over Barcelona in April 1931. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Berlin_1936. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hitler redirects here. ... The Olympic Oath is taken by an athlete and a judge at the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games. ... The flame at the 2002 Winter Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun are all names for an important marketing promotion and symbol of the Olympic Games. ... Athens Olympic Stadium The Olympic Stadium is the name usually given to the big centrepiece stadium of the Summer Olympic Games. ... Olympiastadion redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ...


The bid to host the Olympics was won before the National Socialist Party gained power in Germany. Since, however, the party now was in power, some leaders in the government saw the Olympics as an opportunity to promote their National Socialist ideology. Hitler was convinced by Joseph Goebbels to allow the games to take place in Germany. Preparation for the games started in the early 1930s. Hitler used the Olympics as a tool for propaganda. Film-maker Leni Riefenstahl, a favorite of Hitler, was commissioned by the International Olympic Committee to film the Games. The film, titled Olympia, originated many of the techniques now commonplace to the filming of sports. Many political parties in various contexts have referred to themselves as National Socialist parties. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... Hitler redirects here. ... Paul Joseph Goebbels (German pronunciation: IPA: ; English generally IPA: ) (October 29, 1897 – May 1, 1945) was a German politician and Minister for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda during the National Socialist regime from 1933 to 1945. ... Helene Bertha Amalie Leni Riefenstahl (August 22, 1902 – September 8, 2003) was a German film director, dancer and actress, and widely noted for her aesthetics and advances in film technique. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... Olympia is a 1938 film by Leni Riefenstahl documenting the 1936 Summer Olympics. ...


By allowing only members of the "Aryan race" to compete for Germany, Hitler further promoted his ideological belief of racial supremacy. Although Germany won most of the medals in the Olympics, other athletes, such as African-American athlete Jesse Owens, who won four gold medals, showed great athleticism through performance. James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an African American track and field athlete. ...


Hitler removed signs stating "Jews not wanted" and similar slogans from the main tourist attractions. Hitler desired to clean up Berlin, the German Ministry of Interior authorized the chief of Berlin Police to arrest all gypsies and keep them in a special camp.[1] Nazi officials ordered that foreign visitors should not be subjected to the criminal strictures of anti-homosexual laws.


Total ticket revenues were 7.5 million Reichsmarks, with a profit of over 1 million marks. The official budget did not include outlays by the city of Berlin (which issued an itemized report detailing its costs of 16.5 million marks) or the German National Government (which did not make its costs public, but is estimated to have spent US$30 million in mostly capital outlays).[2] User(s) Germany Subunit 1/100 Reichspfennig Symbol RM Reichspfennig Rpf. ... USD redirects here. ...

Contents

Nazi influence on and use of sporting events

Hans von Tschammer und Osten, who was the head of the Reich Sports Office, played a major role in the structure and organization of the Olympics. He believed that the use of sports would harden the German spirit and instill unity among the German youths. Von Tschammer also believed that sports was a "way to weed out the weak, Jewish, and other undesirables". [3] Many Jews and Gypsies were banned from participating in sporting events. Hans von Tschammer und Osten (October 25, 1887 - March 25, 1943) was the Reich Sports Leader (1933-1943). ...


The Hitler Youth also played a large part in the sporting events. The German leaders instilled a strong drive and work ethic into the youths. To promote a strong drive and work ethic, German leaders encouraged athletic achievement. Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         For the SS division with the nickname Hitlerjugend see; 12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend The Hitler Youth (German:   , abbreviated HJ) was a paramilitary organization of the Nazi Party. ...

Event poster with German eagle.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Categories: Stub | German coats of arms ...

Dispute over boycott of the Olympics in the U.S.

During the 1936 summer Olympics, there were many different views on whether the games should be allowed or discontinued. The people who voiced their opinions on the debate included Americans Avery Brundage, Ernest Lee Jahncke, and Judge Jeremiah Mahoney. The United States considered boycotting the Olympic games, since participating in the festivity might be considered as support for the Nazi Germany regime and its anti-Semitic policies. However, others argued that the Olympic Games should not be a reflection of political views but strictly a contest of the greatest athletes. Avery Brundage (September 28, 1887 – May 8, 1975) was an American athlete, sports official, art collector and philanthropist. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Avery Brundage, President of the American Olympic Committee was against the boycott, stating that the Jewish athletes were being treated fairly and that the games should continue. Brundage believed that politics played no role in sports, and they should be considered two different entities during the controversial Olympics. He explained stating, “The very foundation of the modern Olympic revival will be undermined if individual countries are allowed to restrict participation by reason of class, creed, or race.”[4] Brundage also believed that there was a “Jewish-Communist conspiracy” that existed to keep the United States out of competing in the Olympic games. Avery Brundage (September 28, 1887 – May 8, 1975) was an American athlete, sports official, art collector and philanthropist. ...


Unlike Brundage, Jeremiah Mahoney was against the Olympics and supported a boycott against the games. Mahoney, president of the Amateur Athletic Union, led newspaper editors and anti-Nazi groups to protest against an American team participating in the Berlin Olympics. Mahoney contested that discrimination went against Olympic rules and participation showed support for Hitler’s Reich. - The Amateur Athletic Union, widely known as the AAU, was formed in United States. ...


African Americans and Jewish Americans also expressed their opinions for or against American participation. Most African American newspapers supported the Olympics. The Philadelphia Tribune and The Chicago Defender both agreed that Black victories would undermine Nazi views of Aryan supremacy. They believed it would spark more Black pride at home. American Jewish organizations opposed the Olympics. The American Jewish Congress and the Jewish Labor Committee staged rallies and supported the boycott of German goods to show their disdain for American participation.[5] The Chicago Defender was the United States’ most influential black weekly newspaper by the beginning of World War I. The Defender was founded on May 5, 1905 by Robert S. Abbott with an investment of 25 cents and a press run of 300 copies. ... The American Jewish Congress is a civil rights body formed both to protect the civil rights of Jewish Americans, as well as to act as a conduit for pro-civil rights activities in the American Jewish community. ... The Jewish Labor Committee, an independent secular organization, has represented the organized Jewish community on questions relating to trade unionism and human rights since 1934, when it was founded as a labor-based operation in response to the rise of Nazism in Europe. ...


Eventually, Avery Brundage won the debate, manipulating the Amateur Athletic Union to close a vote in favor of sending an American team to the Berlin Olympics, winning by only two and a half votes. Mahoney’s efforts to incite a boycott of the Olympic games in America failed. President Roosevelt demanded the participation of the United States in the Olympics, intending to keep the tradition of America being void of outside influence intact. FDR redirects here. ...


The 1936 summer Olympics had the largest representation of nations participating than any other previous Olympics. These nations included the United States which, despite the debate, decided to send an Olympic team to Berlin, although some American competitors (including Milton Green and Norman Canners, both Jewish athletes) decided to abstain from participating and boycotted the Olympic games. Milton Green (October 31, 1913 - March 30, 2005) was a world recorder holder in High Hurdles during the 1930s. ...


Jesse Owens

Main article: Jesse Owens

Jesse Owens' participation in the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics was controversial because he was African American in a world where segregation and racial discrimination were the norm in the USA at the time. However, during the Olympics Owens was able to freely use public transportation and enter bars and other public facilities without the difficulty he would face as a Black man in America. Adolf Hitler was present during the Olympics and did not acknowledge the accomplishments of any Olympian, as the Olympic Committee believed that Hitler should retain Olympic neutrality and avoid congratulating any Olympic participants. It was therefore not abnormal that Hitler didn't shake his hand after his victories. Indeed, on Owens return to America, the American president did not deign to shake his hand in congratulations. The German crowds adored Owens, and he forged a long-term friendship with German competitor Lutz Long.[6] James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an African American track and field athlete. ... James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an African American track and field athlete. ...


Highlights

Olympic fire
Olympic fire
Olympic Stadium
Olympic Stadium
Swastika on the plane of Ernst Udet used for acrobatic shows held during the 1936 Summer Olympics (on display in the Polish Aviation Museum).
Swastika on the plane of Ernst Udet used for acrobatic shows held during the 1936 Summer Olympics (on display in the Polish Aviation Museum).
  • It is widely repeated that Hitler snubbed Jesse Owens and his achievements. However, while Hitler did not congratulate Owens, he did not congratulate any athlete (including the German athletes) after the first day. Hitler did leave the stadium just before another black American athlete, Cornelius Johnson, was set to receive his medal[7].
  • United States Olympic Committee president Avery Brundage became a main supporter of the games being held in Germany, arguing that "politics has no place in sport", despite having initial doubts.[8]
  • In the cycling match sprint finals, the German Toni Merkens fouled Arie van Vliet of the Netherlands. Instead of being disqualified, he was fined 100 marks and kept his gold.
  • Jesse Owens won four gold medals in the sprint and long jump events. His German competitor Lutz Long offered Owens advice after he almost failed qualifying in the long jump and was posthumously awarded the Pierre de Coubertin medal for sportsmanship.
  • Rie Mastenbroek of the Netherlands won three gold medals and a silver in swimming.
  • In the freestyle, swimmers originally dove from the pool walls, but diving blocks were incorporated at the 1936 Olympics.
  • Rower Jack Beresford won his fifth Olympic medal in the sport, and his third gold medal.
  • The U.S. eight-man rowing team from the University of Washington won the gold medal, coming from behind to defeat the Germans and Italians with Adolf Hitler in attendance.
  • The Olympic Flame was used for the second time at these games, but this marked the first time it was brought to the Olympic Town by a torch relay, with the starting point in Olympia, Greece.[9]
  • The games were the first to have live television coverage. The German Post Office, using equipment from Telefunken and Fernseh, broadcast over seventy hours of coverage to special viewing rooms throughout Berlin and Potsdam and a few private TV sets, over Paul Nipkow TV Station. The broadcasts were used as a plot element in Contact, a science fiction novel by Carl Sagan, later adapted as a movie.
  • Basketball and handball made their debut at the Olympics, both as outdoor sports. Handball would not appear again on the program until 1972.
  • German gymnasts Konrad Frey and Alfred Schwarzmann both won three gold medals.
  • In the marathon two Korean athletes won medals — Sohn Kee-chung (gold) and Nam Sung-yong (bronze) — running for Japan and under Japanese names. Japan had annexed Korea in 1910.
  • In the quarter-finals of the football tournament, Peru beat Austria 4-2 in extra-time, but a rematch was ordered, since Peruvian fans had stormed the field when the score was 2-2 and had injured an Austrian player. The Peruvian government ordered the Olympic team to withdraw in protest, seeing this as an insult, while Austria went on to receive the silver medal.[10]
  • The Republic of China's Three Principles of the People was chosen as the best national anthem of the games.
  • Germany had a prosperous year in the equestrian events, winning individual and team gold in all three disciplines, as well as individual silver in dressage.
  • Basketball was added to the Olympic program. In the final game, the United States beat Canada 19-8. The contest was played outdoors on a dirt court in driving rain. Due to the quagmire, the teams could not dribble, thus the score was held to a minimum. Joe Fortenbury was the high scorer for the U.S. with 7 points. Spectators did not have seats, and the people (approximately 1000) in attendance had to stand in the rain.
  • Despite not coming from fascist countries, French and Canadian Olympians gave what appeared to be the Hitler salute at the opening ceremony, although some have later claimed that they were just performing the Olympic salute, which was in fact a very similar action.[11]
  • India won the gold medal in the field hockey event once again (they won the gold in all Olympics from 1928-1956, though they did not win any other awards in any other sport), defeating Germany 8-1 in the final. However, Indians were considered Indo-Aryans by the Germans and there was no controversy regarding their victory.
  • Estonia's Kristjan Palusalu won two gold medals in Men's Wrestling, marking the last time Estonia competed as an independent nation in the Olympics until 1992.
  • Italy's football team continued their dominance, winning the gold medal in these Olympics between their two consecutive World Cup victories (1934 and 1938). Much like the successes of German athletes, this triumph was claimed by supporters of Benito Mussolini's regime as a vindication of the superiority of the fascist system.

Image File history File links Olympic_Fire_in_Berlin_1936. ... Image File history File links Olympic_Fire_in_Berlin_1936. ... Image File history File links Berlin36-2. ... Image File history File links Berlin36-2. ... Image File history File links Olympics_in_Berlin_1936. ... Image File history File links Olympics_in_Berlin_1936. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2080x1544, 649 KB) [edit] Opis [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Swastika Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2080x1544, 649 KB) [edit] Opis [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Swastika Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... This article is about the symbol. ... Ernst Udet (April 26, 1896 – November 17, 1941) was the second-highest scoring German flying ace of World War I. He was one of the youngest aces and was the highest scoring German ace to survive the war (at the age of 22). ... Albatros B.II Grigorovich M-15 Curtiss Export Hawk II De Havilland 82A Tiger Moth II Jak-17UTI Lim-6bis in Museum (behind it - the MiG alley) LWD Szpak-4T PWS-26 PZL M-4 Tarpan RWD-13 SAAB J 35J Draken SAAB AJSF 37 Viggen WSK-Mielec M-15... James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an African American track and field athlete. ... Cornelius Cooper Johnson (August 28, 1913 - February 15, 1946) was an African-American athlete in the high jump. ... The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) is a non-profit organization that serves as the National Olympic Committee (NOC) for the United States and coordinates the relationship between the United States Anti-Doping Agency and the World Anti-Doping Agency and various international sports federations. ... Avery Brundage (September 28, 1887 – May 8, 1975) was an American athlete, sports official, art collector and philanthropist. ... James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an African American track and field athlete. ... Long jumper at the GE Money Grand Prix in Helsinki, July 2005. ... Carl Ludwig Lutz Long (aka Luz Long) (April 27, 1913 – July 13, 1943) was a German Olympic athlete, most notable for giving advice to his competitor, Jesse Owens. ... The Pierre de Coubertin medal (also known as the De Coubertin medal or the True Spirit of Sportsmanship medal) is a special medal given by the International Olympic Committee to those athletes that demonstrate the spirit of sportsmanship in Olympics events. ... Hendrika Wilhelmina Rie Mastenbroek (February 26, 1919 - November 6, 2003) was a Dutch swimmer and a triple Olympic champion. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Jack Beresford, (1899-December 3, 1977) one of the most accomplished rowers of his generation, he won medals at 5 straight Olympics, which was an Olympic record in rowing (since tied by Steven Redgrave). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Live television refers to television broadcasts of events or performances on a delay of between zero and fifteen seconds, rather than from video recordings or film. ... Telefunken is a German radio- and television company, founded in 1903. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Contact is a science fiction novel written by Carl Sagan and published in 1985. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Contact is a 1997 science fiction film adapted from the novel by Carl Sagan. ... This article is about the sport. ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... Konrad Frey (April 24, 1909 in Bad Kreuznach - May 24, 1974 ib. ... Alfred Schwarzmann (born 22 March 1912; died 11 March 2000) was a German Olympic Gymnast and Fallschirmjäger during World War II. He won three Gold medals and two Bronze medals in the Gymnastics at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin and another Silver medal in the Gymnastics at the... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ... Sohn Kee-chung (August 29, 1912 – November 15, 2002) became the first medal-winning Korean Olympian when he won the gold medal in the Marathon at the 1936 Berlin Olympics as a member of the Japanese delegation, under the name of Son Kitei, which is the Japanese pronunciation of the... Nam Sung-yong (November 23, 1912 - February 20, 2001), was the bronze winner of the Marathon of the 1936 Summer Olympics, completing the run in 2 hours, 31 minutes, and 42 seconds. ... Soccer redirects here. ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Vice President Annette Lu Premier Su Tseng-chang Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... National Anthem of the Republic of China (中華民國國歌, pinyin: zhōnghúa míngúo gúogē), is the current national anthem of the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Equestrian Events at the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics included Dressage, Eventing, and Show Jumping. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... The Indo-Aryans are a wide collection of peoples united by their common status as speakers of the Indo-Aryan (Indic/Indian) branch of the family of Indo-European and Indo-Iranian languages. ... Kristjan Palusalu (until 1935 Kristjan Trossmann, March 10, 1908-July 17, 1987) was an Estonian heavyweight wrestler and Olympic medalist. ... Ancient Greek wrestlers (Pankratiasts) Wrestling is the act of physical engagement between two unarmed persons, in which each wrestler strives to get an advantage over or control of their opponent. ... First international  Italy 6 - 2 France  (Milan, Italy; 15 May 1910) Biggest win  Italy 9 - 0 USA  (Brentford, England; 2 August 1948) Biggest defeat  Hungary 7 - 1 Italy  (Budapest, Hungary; 6 April 1924) World Cup Appearances 16 (First in 1934) Best result Winners, 1934, 1938, 1982, 2006 European Championship Appearances... The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football (soccer) competition contested by the mens national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA... Qualifying countries The 1934 FIFA World Cup was the second World Cup staged, and was hosted in Italy from May 27 to June 10. ... Qualifying countries The 1938 FIFA World Cup was the third staging of the World Cup, and was held in France from June 4 to June 19. ... Mussolini redirects here. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ...

Events

The swimming venue today.
The swimming venue today.

At the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, 29 athletics events were contested, 23 for men and 6 for women. ... Basketball at the 1936 Summer Olympics was the first appearance of the sport as an official medal event. ... Final results for the Boxing competition at the 1936 Summer Olympics // Medals Results Flyweight (-50. ... canoeing is fun! ... The cycling competition at the 1936 Summer Olympics consisted of two road cycling events and four track cycling events, all for men only. ... At the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, four diving events were contested. ... The Equestrian Events at the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics included Dressage, Eventing, and Show Jumping. ... At the 1936 Summer Olympics, seven fencing events were contested. ... The 1936 Olympic football competition, won by Italy, has, obviously, come to share an affinity with the political backdrop against which it was being played; in terms of the history of football, however, the tournament suffered as a reaction to the development of the FIFA World Cup. ... At the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, nine events in gymnastics were contested. ... Handball at the 1936 Summer Olympics was the first appearance of the sport at the Olympics. ... Final results for the Hockey competition at the 1936 Summer Olympics: Only a mens competition occurred that year. ... At the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, a single modern pentathlon event was contested. ... Polo returned to the Olympic program at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, after not being contested at the 1928 Games or 1932 Games. ... Rowing at the 1936 Summer Olympics featured 7 events, for men only. ... At the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, four events in sailing were contested. ... Shooting at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin saw the reintroduction of 50 m Pistol (then called Free Pistol) but still only had three events. ... At the 1936 Summer Olympics, 11 swimming events were contested. ... Final results for the water polo tournament at the 1936 Summer Olympics: Categories: | ... The weightlifting competition at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin consisted of five weight classes, all for men only. ... At the 1936 Summer Olympics, 14 wrestling events were contested, for all men. ...

Demonstration sports

Baseball was again a demonstration sport at the 1936 Summer Olympics after a 24 year absence. ...

Participating nations

Nations participating for the first time shown in blue.
Nations participating for the first time shown in blue.

A total of 49 nations attended the Berlin Olympics, up from 37 in 1932. Six nations made their first official Olympic appearance at these Games: Afghanistan, Bermuda, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Liechtenstein, and Peru. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1357x628, 49 KB) Countries which participated in the 1936 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1357x628, 49 KB) Countries which participated in the 1936 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bermuda. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bolivia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria_(1878-1944). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Colombia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Costa_Rica. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Czechoslovakia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt_1922. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany_1933. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece_(1828-1978). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary_(state). ... Image File history File links British_Raj_Red_Ensign. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iceland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy_(1861-1946). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan_-_variant. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Latvia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Luxembourg. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico_(1934-1968). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malta. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Monaco. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Peru_(1825_-_1950). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... The Republic of China competed at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa_1928-1994. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uruguay. ... Image File history File links US_flag_48_stars. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia competed at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany. ...

Medal count

These are the top ten nations that won medals at these Games. This is the full table of the medal count of the 1936 Summer Olympics. ...

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Germany Germany (host nation) 33 26 30 89
2 United States United States 24 20 12 56
3 Hungary Hungary 10 1 5 16
4 Italy Italy 8 9 5 22
5 Finland Finland 7 6 6 19
France France 7 6 6 19
7 Sweden Sweden 6 5 9 20
8 Japan Japan 6 4 8 18
9 Netherlands Netherlands 6 4 7 17
10 Great Britain Great Britain 4 7 3 14

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany_1933. ... Image File history File links US_flag_48_stars. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary_(state). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy_(1861-1946). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan_-_variant. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ...

Quotes

"The sportive, knightly battle awakens the best human characteristics. It doesn't separate, but unites the combatants in understanding and respect. It also helps to connect the countries in the spirit of peace. That's why the Olympic Flame should never die."

Adolf Hitler, commenting on the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games Hitler redirects here. ...

"German sport has only one task: to strengthen the character of the German people, imbuing it with the fighting spirit and steadfast camaraderie necessary in the struggle for its existence."

Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels Paul Joseph Goebbels (German pronunciation: IPA: ; English generally IPA: ) (October 29, 1897 – May 1, 1945) was a German politician and Minister for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda during the National Socialist regime from 1933 to 1945. ...

See also

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) allocates three-letter country codes to all National Olympic Committees and other groups competing in the Olympic Games. ... The Peoples Olympiad or Peoples Olympics (Spanish: Olimpiada Popular) was planned for Barcelona, Spain as a protest event against the 1936 Summer Olympics planned for Berlin during the period of Nazi rule. ... The Frente Popular (Spanish Popular Front) was an electoral coalition and pact signed in January 1936 by various left-wing political organisations, instigated by Manuel Azaña for the purpose of contesting that years election. ... The Maccabiah Games (Hebrew: ) is an international Jewish athletic event similar to the Olympics. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
1936 Summer Olympics

References

  1. ^ "The Façade of Hospitality," United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/olympics/zcd060.htm
  2. ^ Zarnowski, C. Frank (Summer 1992). "A Look at Olympic Costs". Citius, Altius, Fortius 1 (1): 16-32. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  3. ^ Nazification of Sport
  4. ^ Boycott
  5. ^ The Nazi Olympics
  6. ^ Adolf Hitler, Jesse Owens and the Olympics Myth of 1936
  7. ^ Was Jesse Owens snubbed?
  8. ^ Deciding whether to boycott
  9. ^ Olympic Flame history
  10. ^ Football at Summer Olympics 1936
  11. ^ Opening Ceremony
  • Berlin Games – How Hitler Stole the Olympic Dream, by Guy Walters ISBN 0-7195-6783-1 (UK) 0060874120 (USA)
  • All That Glitters is Not Gold, by William O. Johnson, Jr. ISBN 0-399-11008-9 (USA)
  • Hitler's Olympics: The 1936 Berlin Olympic Games, by Christopher Hilton
  • The Nazi Olympics: Berlin 1936 United States Holocaust Museum, by Susan D. Bachrach
  • The Nazi Olympics (Sport and Society), by Richard D. Mandell
  • Olympische Spiele Berlin / Olympic Games 1936: Erinnergunsalbum / Album-Souvenir unter dem Patronat des schweizerischen Olympischen Komitees, by Julius, ed., publ. Wagner
  • The Nazi Olympics: Sport, Politics, and Appeasement in the 1930s by Arnd Kruger and W. J. Murray
  • The Berlin Olympics (World Focus Books), by James P. Barry

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Guy Walters (born August 8, 1971, Kensington, London) is a British author and journalist. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ... An all-time medal count for all Olympic Games from 1896 to 2006, including Summer Olympic Games, Winter Olympic Games and a combined total of both, is tabulated below. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... This article includes lists of all Olympic medalists since 1896, organized by each Olympic sport or discipline. ... The Olympic symbols are the icons, flags and symbols used by the International Olympic Committee to promote the Olympic Games. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were celebrated in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The Olympisch Stadion in 1928 The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were celebrated in 1928 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad originally programmed to celebrated between September 21 to October 6, 1940 were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, but the Games were given back to the IOC, because the Second Sino-Japanese War broke out in... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were celebrated in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were held in Munich, West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were celebrated in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... London 2012 redirects here. ... The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, is a major international sports and cultural festival to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2020 Summer Olympics The International Olympic Committee has yet to begin the selection process for the host city; the site of the Games of the XXXII Olympiad—as they will be officially known—is expected to be announced in mid 2013. ... The 2024 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2028 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch during the 2002 torch relay The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1924 in Chamonix, France. ... The II Olympic Winter Games were held in 1928 in Sankt-Moritz, Switzerland. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... The 1936 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1936 in the villages of Garmisch and Partenkirchen in Bavaria, Germany. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Sapporo, Japan. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... The V Olympic Winter Games were held in St. ... The 1952 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1952 in Oslo, Norway. ... The VII Olympic Winter Games were held in 1956 in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... Sign outside Olympic Village at Squaw Valley The 1960 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California, United States (located in the Lake Tahoe basin). ... The 1964 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1968 Grenoble, France and opened on February 6. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1984 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia. ... The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and opened by Governor General Jeanne Sauvé. The Olympics were highly successful financially as they brought in million-dollar profits. ... The 1992 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1992 in Albertville, France. ... The 1994 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, is an international winter multiple sports event that will be celebrated from February 7 to February 23, 2014. ... The 2018 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXIII Olympic Winter Games, will be celebrated in 2018, and are an international winter sports athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ... The 2022 Winter Olympics, formally called the XXIV Olympic Winter Games is an event that the International Olympic Committee has yet to organize. ... The Youth Olympic Games (YOG)[1] are planned to be an international multi-sport event held every four years in staggered summer and winter events complementing the current Olympic Games,[2] and will feature athletes between the ages of 14 and 18. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, will be celebrated from August 8, 2008, to August 24, 2008, with the opening ceremony commencing at 08:08:08 pm CST (12:08:08 UTC) at the Beijing National Stadium in... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next winter Olympics and will take place in 2010 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... London 2012 redirects here. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
1936 Summer Olympics - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (976 words)
The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany.
The Berlin Olympics also saw the introduction to the ceremonies of the Olympic Torch bringing the Olympic Flame by relay from Olympia.
The Olympic Flame was used for the second time at these games, but they marked the first time it was brought to the Olympic Town by a torch relay, with the starting point in Olympia, Greece.
World Almanac for Kids (1093 words)
The winter Olympics were begun in 1924 and were held in the same year as the summer games until the 1994 winter games in Lillehammer, Norway, when the alternating cycles began.
The 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, Spain, reflected a changed political landscape: the 172 participating nations and territories included the Unified Team (with athletes from 12 former Soviet republics), a reunited Germany, and South Africa, which was allowed to compete for the first time since 1960.
The Olympic games are competitions of individual athletes, not of nations, and the IOC does not keep national scores; however, the media of all nations report national standings according to one of two scoring systems.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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