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Encyclopedia > 1931 in sports

See also: 1930 in sports, other events of 1931, 1932 in sports and the list of 'years in sports'. 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... This page indexes the individual year in sports pages. ...

Contents


Auto Racing

Auto racing (also known as automobile racing, autosport or motorsport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the article about the island go to Lord Howe Island. ... Alfa Romeo is an Italian automobile manufacturing company, founded as Darracq Italiana by Cavaliere Ugo Stella, an aristocrat from Milan in partnership with the French automobile firm of Alexandre Darracq. ... Louis Schneider (April 29, 1805 - December 16, 1878), German actor and author, was born at Berlin, the son of George Abraham Schneider (1770-1839). ... The Indianapolis 500 is an American race for open-wheel automobiles held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ...

Baseball

Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1892-present) Central Division (1994-present) Eastern Division (1969-1993) American Association (1882-1891) Major league titles World Series titles (9) 1982 â€¢1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934 â€¢ 1931 1926 NL Pennants (16) 2004 â€¢ 1987 â€¢ 1985 â€¢ 1982 1968 â€¢ 1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1943 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934... There have been three professional baseball teams based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania known as the Philadelphia Athletics: 1. ... Frank Francis Frankie Frisch (September 9, 1898 - March 12, 1973) was an American Major League Baseball player of the early 20th century. ... Robert Moses (Lefty) Grove (March 6, 1900 - May 22, 1975) was one of the greatest pitchers in Major League Baseball history. ... William Jennings Bryan Herman (July 7, 1909 - September 5, 1992) was a Major League Baseball player during the 1930s and 1940s. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... Ernesto Natali Lombardi (April 6, 1908 - September 26, 1977) was a Major League Baseball player and catcher during the 1930s and 1940s. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... Robert Abial Red Rolfe (October 17, 1908 – July 8, 1969) was an American third baseman, manager and front-office executive in Major League Baseball. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... Fred Dixie Walker (September 24, 1910 - May 17, 1982) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees (1931, 1933-36), Chicago White Sox (1936-37), Detroit Tigers (1938-39), Brooklyn Dodgers (1939-47) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1948-49). ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... Samuel Paul Derringer (October 17, 1906 Springfield, KY - November 17, 1987 Sarasota, FL) was a pitcher with a 15 year career from 1931 to 1945. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... Major league affiliations National League (1892-present) Central Division (1994-present) Eastern Division (1969-1993) American Association (1882-1891) Major league titles World Series titles (9) 1982 â€¢1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934 â€¢ 1931 1926 NL Pennants (16) 2004 â€¢ 1987 â€¢ 1985 â€¢ 1982 1968 â€¢ 1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1943 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934... Burleigh Arland Grimes (August 9, 1893-December 6, 1985) was an American professional baseball player, and the last pitcher officially permitted to throw the spitball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876-present) Central Division (1994-present) East Division (1969-1993) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1908 â€¢ 1907 NL Pennants (16) 1945 â€¢ 1938 â€¢ 1935 â€¢ 1932 1929 â€¢ 1918 â€¢ 1910 â€¢ 1908 1907 â€¢ 1906 â€¢ 1886 â€¢ 1885 1882 â€¢ 1881 â€¢ 1880 â€¢ 1876 Central Division titles (1) 2003 East Division... Lewis Robert Hack Wilson (April 26, 1900 – November 23, 1948) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball from 1923 to 1934. ...

Basketball

Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005 For other uses, see Basketball (disambiguation). ... Northwestern University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university, located in Evanston, Illinois and Chicago, Illinois. ...

Boxing

Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Dominguez (left) vs. ... This is a chronological list of world heavyweight boxing champions, as recognized by the following organizations: The World Boxing Association (WBA), founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA), The World Boxing Council (WBC), founded in 1963, The International Boxing Federation (IBF), founded in 1983, The World Boxing Organization... Maximillian Adolph Otto Siegfried Schmeling (September 28, 1905 – February 2, 2005) was a German boxer whose two fights with Joe Louis transcended boxing and became worldwide social events because of their racial and national associations. ...

Cycling

Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. ... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle race for professional cyclists held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... Francesco Camusso is an Italian professional road racing cyclist. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is a long-distance road bicycle racing competition for professionals held over three weeks in July in and around France. ... Antonin Magne was a French cyclist who won the Tour de France twice, in 1931 and 1934. ... The professional World Cycling Championship is a one-day cycling event organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), and is a single massed start road race, the winner being the first across the line at the completion of the full race distance. ... Learco Guerra is an Italian professional road racing cyclist. ...

Figure Skating

Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... The World Figure Skating Championships is an annual event in which elite figure skaters compete for the title of World Champion. ... Karl Schäfer (born May 17, 1909 in Vienna, Austria; † April 23, 1976 in Vienna, Austria) was an Austrian figure skater and Olympic champion. ... Sonja Henie Sonja Henie (April 8, 1912 - October 12, 1969) was a Norwegian figure skater and actress. ...

Football (American)

Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Note: Basketball teams from Chicago and Anderson once used the name Packers as well. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The University of Southern California (also known as USC, SC, Southern California and Southern Cal), was founded in 1880 and isCalifornias oldest private research university, and is located in the urban center of Los Angeles, California. ...

Football (Australian Rules)

Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Australian Rules and Aussie Rules redirect here. ... The Victorian Football League (formerly known as the Victorian Football Association or VFA) is widely regarded as Australias 3rd most competitive football league after the AFL and SANFL Australian rules football. ... The Geelong Football Club, nicknamed The Cats, is an Australian rules football club in the Australian Football League. ... The Richmond Football Club, nicknamed The Tigers, is an Australian rules football club playing in the Australian Football League. ... The Charles Brownlow Trophy, better known as the Brownlow Medal, is an annual medal awarded to the fairest and best player in the Australian Football League during the regular season (ie. ... Haydn Bunton is the name of a father and son who were both famous Australian rules footballers. ... The Fitzroy Football Club, latterly known as the Lions, was formed in 1883 and was a foundation member club of the Victorian Football League on its inception in 1897. ...

Football (Canadian)

dfsdfsdfsdfdfsdf[[Image:Link titleInsert non-formatted text here]] Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... Montreal Amateur Athletic Association is an athletic association located in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Saskatchewan Roughriders are a Canadian Football League team based in Regina, Saskatchewan. ...


Football (soccer)

Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...

England

From 1889 until 1992, this was the highest division overall of organized football in England. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in north London. ... Southern England is a vague term referring to the south of England. ... The FA Cup - this is the fourth trophy, in use since 1992, and identical in design to the third trophy introduced in 1911. ... West Bromwich Albion Football Club is an English football club formed by workers from Salters Spring Works in West Bromwich, West Midlands in 1878. ... Birmingham City (BCFC) are an English football club who play in the FA Premier League . ...

Golf

Golf (gowf in Scots) is a game where individual players or teams hit a ball into a hole using various clubs, and is one of the few ball games that does not use a fixed standard playing area. ... The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ... Billy Burke (December 14, 1902 _ April 19, 1972) was a prominent American golfer of the 1930s. ... The Champions Belt & The Claret Jug. ... Tommy Armour (September 24, 1894 in Edinburgh, Scotland - September 12, 1968) was a British-born professional golfer. ... // The PGA Championship is an annual golf tournament, conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA TOUR. The PGA Championship is one of the four Major Championships in mens golf, and it is the golf seasons final major, being played in August. ...

Thoroughbred Horse Racing

Thoroughbred horse racing is the main form of horse-racing throughout the world. ... The 1976 cup won by Van Der Hum. ... The Queens Plate is North Americas oldest thoroughbred horse race, run at a distance of 1 1/4 miles for 3-year-old thoroughbed horses, foaled in Canada, run annually in July at Woodbine Racetrack, Etobicoke (Toronto), Ontario. ... Races at Lonchamp - Édouard Manet, 1867 The Prix de LArc de Triomphe is a flat thoroughbred horse race of a 2400 metres (about 1 mile 4 furlongs) raced on turf for 3 year olds and up, Colts, horses, Fillies and mares (exclude geldings). ... The Irish Derby Stakes have been held annually at The Curragh in County Kildare, Ireland since 1866. ... Sea serpents are a kind of sea monster either wholly or partly serpentine. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... The Two Thousand Guineas Stakes is a Group 1 1 mile (1600 meters) thoroughbred flat racing horse race for 3-year-olds colts and fillies run in May of each year over the Rowley Mile at Newmarket, Suffolk, England. ... Cameronian was a name given to a section of the Scottish Covenanters who followed the teachings of Richard Cameron, and who were composed prinicpally of those who signed the Sanquhar Declaration in 1680. ... Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ... Cameronian was a name given to a section of the Scottish Covenanters who followed the teachings of Richard Cameron, and who were composed prinicpally of those who signed the Sanquhar Declaration in 1680. ... The St. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (Triple Crown for short, but the term is also used in other sports, and thus the full name should be used when it could cause confusion) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ... Churchill Downs ractrack, 2004 The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged yearly in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... Twenty Grand (1928-1948) was an American thoroughbred race horse. ... The Preakness Stakes is a classic 1 3/16 mile (1. ... The Belmont Stakes is a prestigious horse race held yearly in June at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. ... Twenty Grand (1928-1948) was an American thoroughbred race horse. ...

Harness Racing

A trotter training at Vincennes hippodrome Harness racing is a form of horse-racing in which the horses race in a specified gait. ... The Hambletonian is a United States harness racing event held annually for three-year-old trotting standardbreds. ... The Kentucky Futurity is a stakes race for three-year-old trotters, held annually at The Red Mile in Lexington, Kentucky since 1893. ... The Protector is a 1985 Hong Kong action film that was Chinese martial arts movie star Jackie Chans second attempt at breaking into the American (and subsequently, global) film market. ...

Ice Hockey

Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Stanley Cup on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame. ... The Montreal Canadiens are the oldest established National Hockey League franchise, and one of the most successful in all of North American sports history. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a National Hockey League team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Ice Hockey World Championships are an annual event put together by the IIHF, the International Ice Hockey Federation, since 1930. ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government • President • Vice President Federal republic George...

Rugby Union

Rugby union (often referred to as just rugby, or union) is a variant of rugby football. ... History The Five Nations Championship, with its predecessor, the Home Championship, was the premier international rugby union tournament in the Northern hemisphere. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom and England, see British Isles (terminology). ...

Snooker

Snooker table For the dog-agility Snooker class, see dog agility. ... The World Snooker Championship, currently held at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, is the climax of snookers annual calendar and the most important snooker event of the year in terms of prestige, prize money and world ranking points. ... Joe Davis (15 April 1901 - 10 July 1978), was an English professional snooker and billiards player, generally regarded as the father of modern snooker, and one of the greatest players of all time. ... Tom Dennis was a professional snooker and billiards player from England. ...

Tennis

Tennis ball This article is about the sport. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... This article is about the Australian Open tennis tournament. ... Jack Crawford (22 March 1775 in the East End of the Sunderland, England - 10 November 1831) was a sailor of the Royal Navy known as the Hero of Camperdown. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held over two weeks between mid May and early June in Paris, France, and is the second of the Grand Slam tournaments on the annual tennis calendar. ... Jean Borotra (August 13, 1898 in Domaine du Pouy, near Biarritz - June 17, 1994) was a champion tennis player, one of the famous Four Musketeers from France who dominated tennis in the late 1920s and early 1930s. ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Sidney Wood (November 1, 1911) was an American male tennis player. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Ellsworth Vines as an amateur in 1932 Ellsworth Vines (September 28, 1911 - March 17, 1994) was a champion tennis player of the 1930s, the World No. ... A Grand Slam is a term in tennis used to denote winning all four of the following championship titles in the same year: Australian Open French Open Wimbledon U.S. Open These tournaments are therefore also known as the Grand Slam tournaments, and rank as the most important tennis tournaments... This article is about the Australian Open tennis tournament. ... The French Open, officially the Tournoi de Roland-Garros (English: Roland Garros Tournament), is a tennis event held over two weeks between mid May and early June in Paris, France, and is the second of the Grand Slam tournaments on the annual tennis calendar. ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Cilly Aussem (April 5, 1909 in Cologne, March 22, 1963 in Portofino, Italy) was a German female tennis player. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Cover of Time Magazine (July 26, 1926) Helen Wills Moody (October 6, 1905 – January 1, 1999) was one of the greatest womens tennis players of all time, dominating the 1920s and 1930s. ... Logo The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ...

Births

March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (83rd in Leap years). ... Yevgenij Grishin (Евгений Гришин) (23 March 1931, Tula - 9 July 2005, Moscow) was a Russian speedskater. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... Werner Lueg (born September 16, 1931) is a former German middle distance runner who equalised Lennart Strands and Gunder Häggs 1500m world record in 3:43. ... Ernest Ernie Banks (born January 31, 1931) is an American former Major League baseball player who played from 1953 to 1971. ... Kenton Lloyd Boyer (May 20, 1931 - September 7, 1982) was an American All-Star third baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... James Paul David Jim Bunning (born October 23, 1931 in Southgate, Kentucky) is an American politician who was a Hall of Fame pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971. ... Mickey Mantle on a 1953 cover of Time Magazine Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Edwin Lee Mathews (October 13, 1931 - February 18, 2001) was a Major League Baseball star player born in Texarkana, Texas. ... Willie Howard Mays Jr. ... William Charles Virdon (born June 9, 1931) is a retired American baseball player, manager and coach. ... Donald William Zimmer (born January 17, 1931 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former infielder, manager and coach in Major League Baseball. ...

Deaths


  Results from FactBites:
 
A FLASH OF FINLAND´S SPORTS HISTORY (1046 words)
Sport was associated with values, defending oneÕs own country, with Finnish culture and an incentive for increasing the level of education.
In spite of that sport gained acceptability, and was believed to improve the quality of life thanks to the efforts of priests, teachers and other educators.
In 1919 the sports organisation split politically into two, but during the Winter war in 1939-40 all the Finnish athletes were on the same side.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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