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Encyclopedia > 1930s
Millennia: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s - 1930s - 1940s 1950s 1960s
Years: 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934
1935 1936 1937 1938 1939
Categories: Births - Deaths - Architecture
Establishments - Disestablishments

The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... On the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd millennium commenced on 1 January 1001, and ended at the end of 31 December 2000. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 20XX redirects here. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ... // The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginnings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... The 1920s they were sexy referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... East Asia Geographic East Asia. ... Militarism or militarist ideology is the doctrinal view of a society as being best served (or more efficient) when it is governed or guided by concepts embodied in the culture, doctrine, system, or people of the military. ...


In Western Europe, Australia and the United States, more progressive reforms occurred as opposed to the extreme measures sought elsewhere. Roosevelt's New Deal attempted to use government spending to combat large-scale unemployment and severely negative growth. Ultimately, it would be the beginning of World War II in 1939 that would end the depression. A current understanding of Western Europe. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal The New Deal is the name given to the series of programs used by Franklin Delano Roosevelt with the goal of stabilizing, reforming and stimulating the United States economy in the Great Depression. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Technology

Many technological advances occurred in the 1930s, including:

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x2000, 1455 KB) yo motha fuckas this is new york city!! YAYA! auteur : slonecker There are no usage restrictions for this photo. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x2000, 1455 KB) yo motha fuckas this is new york city!! YAYA! auteur : slonecker There are no usage restrictions for this photo. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Frozen food is food preserved by the process of freezing. ... Birdseyes double belt freezer (US Patent #1,773,079) Clarence Birdseye (December 9, 1886 - October 7, 1956) was an American inventor who is considered the founder of the modern frozen food industry. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... A publicity photograph (circa 1929) of Ub Iwerks and his most famous co-creation, Mickey Mouse. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flip the Frog and his girlfriend. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Warner Bros. ... Song of the Flame is a 1930 musical operetta film photographed entirely in Technicolor. ... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... Airmail (or air mail) is mail that is transported by aircraft. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... 3M Company (NYSE: MMM), formerly Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company until 2002, is an American corporation with a worldwide presence. ... Scotch Tape denotes the line of adhesive tapes manufactured by 3M as part of the companys Scotch brand. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... LNER timetable for Autumn 1926 detailing the resumption of services after the General Strike. ... Mallard at York Sir Nigel Gresley introduced the famous LNER Class A4 locomotives in 1935 to pull a new train called the Silver Jubilee, between London Kings Cross and Newcastle, in celebration of King George Vs 25th year of reign. ... Sir Herbert Nigel Gresley (19 June 1876 – 5 April 1941) was one of Britains most famous Steam locomotive engineers who worked for the Great Northern Railway company from 1911 to 1922 as locomotive superintendent and for the London and North Eastern Railway company (LNER) from 1923 to 1941 as... Number 4468 Mallard is a London and North Eastern Railway Class A4 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotive built at Doncaster, England in 1938. ... For the generation of electrical power by fission, see Nuclear power plant. ... Otto Hahn and Lise Meitner, 1913, at the KWI for Chemistry in Berlin Otto Hahn (March 8, 1879 – July 28, 1968) was a German chemist and received the 1944 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. ... Lise Meitner ca. ... Fritz Strassman (February 22, 1902 - April 22, 1980) was a German physical chemist who, along with Otto Hahn, discovered the nuclear fission of uranium in 1938. ... This article is about the original Volkswagen Beetle. ... Car redirects here. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...

War, peace and politics

Socialism is any economic system in which the means of production are owned and controlled collectively or a political philosophy advocating such a system. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... Hitler redirects here. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... The history of Germany is, in places, extremely complicated and depends much on how one defines Germany. ... The Great Purge (Russian: , transliterated Bolshaya chistka) refers collectively to several related campaigns of political repression and persecution in the Soviet Union orchestrated by Joseph Stalin during the 1930s, which removed all of his remaining opposition from power. ... Continental Europe, also referred to as mainland Europe or simply the Continent, is the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and, at times, peninsulas. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article applies to political and organizational ideologies. ... Totalitarianism is a term employed by some political scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ... Éamon de Valera[1][2] (IPA: ) (Irish: ) (born Edward George de Valera 14 October 1882 – 29 August 1975) was one of the dominant political figures in 20th century Ireland. ... This article is about the prior state. ... This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... There have been two regimes known as Estado Novo (meaning New State): Estado Novo (Brazil) Estado Novo (Portugal) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... Anthem Kimi ga Yo Imperial Reign Capital Tokyo Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1868–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1926 Emperor Taishō  - 1926–1989 Emperor Shōwa Prime Minister  - 1885-1888, 1892-1896, 1898, 1900-1901 Itō Hirobumi  - 1888-1889 Kuroda Kiyotaka  - 1889-1891 Yamagata Aritomo  - 1906-1908, 1911-1912 Saionji Kinmochi... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... Combatants China  United States1 Soviet Union2  Empire of Japan Collaborationist Chinese Army3 Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Chen Cheng, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Li Zongren, Xue Yue, Bai Chongxi, Peng Dehuai, Joseph Stilwell, Claire Chennault, Aleksandr Vasilevsky Hirohito, Fumimaro Konoe, Hideki Tojo, Kotohito Kanin, Matsui Iwane, Hajime Sugiyama, Shunroku Hata... Combatants Italy Abyssinia Commanders Emilio De Bono Pietro Badoglio Rodolfo Graziani Haile Selassie Strength 130,000 Italian and Eritrean soldiers 350,000 (some ill-equipped) Casualties 8,000 250,000 (mostly civilians) The Second Italo–Abyssinian War lasted seven months in 1935–1936. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... Mohandas Karamchand “Mahatma” Gandhi, who developed Satyagraha Satyagraha (Sanskrit: सत्याग्रह satyāgraha) is a philosophy and practice of nonviolent resistance developed by Mohandas K. Gandhi. ... The flag adopted in 1931 and used by the Provisional Government of Free India during the Second World War. ... Scenes on the eve of the Salt Satyagraha, Gandhis famous 240 mile march on foot to the sea at Dandi. ...

Economics

For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...

Literature and Art

Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) IPA: ;[1], who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and another filmed in 1978. ... For other persons named Raymond Chandler, see Raymond Chandler (disambiguation). ... The Golden Age of American animation is a period in American animation history that began with the advent of sound cartoons in 1928 and lasted into the 1960s when theatrical animated shorts slowly began losing to the new medium of television animation. ... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... DVD cover showing Bette Davis. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cleopatra is a 1934 film retelling the story of Cleopatra VII of Egypt. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... Monster Movie is the debut album by Krautrock Band Can. ... Dracula is a 1931 horror film produced by Universal Pictures Co. ... Frankenstein is a 1931 science fiction film from Universal Pictures directed by James Whale and very loosely based on the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. ... The Mummy is the title of: a 1932 movie starring Boris Karloff: see The Mummy (1932 movie) a 1959 movie starring Christopher Lee: see The Mummy (1959 movie) a 1999 movie starring Brendan Fraser: see The Mummy (1999 movie) a novel by Anne Rice: see The Mummy (novel) This is... Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... This is about the original movie and novel. ... A wax figure of Luciano Pavarotti in Venetian Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Like the wax museum at the Venetian Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, most wax museums allow visitors to pose for pictures with the figures. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... This article is about the undead. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wolf man. ... Laurel and Hardy, in a promotional still from their 1937 feature film Way Out West. ... This article is about the comedian siblings. ... For other uses, see Tarzan (disambiguation). ... 1938 titlecard Number One Son with the seat of his pants on fire in Charlie Chan at Monte Carlo Charlie Chan is a fictional Chinese-American detective created by Earl Derr Biggers, reportedly in part under inspiration from the career of Chang Apana. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... A poster for the 1931 Our Gang comedy Love Business featuring depictions of (from left to right): Pete the Pup, Jackie Cooper, and Norman Chubby Chaney. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Phantom. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... See also: 1933 in film 1934 1935 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 26 - Samuel Goldwyn (of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) finally purchased the film rights to The Wizard of Oz from Frank J. Baum for $40,000. ... The year 1939 in film involved some significant events. ...

Popular Culture

Cover of the Flip the Frog Annual Comic Book from 1930.
Cover of the Flip the Frog Annual Comic Book from 1930.

Image File history File linksMetadata FlipFrogAnn. ... Image File history File linksMetadata FlipFrogAnn. ... Flip the Frog and his girlfriend. ... Before television, radio was the dominant home entertainment medium. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Over the Rainbow, music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Yip Harburg, is one of the most famous songs of the late 1930s. ... Swing music, also known as swing jazz, is a form of jazz music that developed during the 1920s and had solidified as a distinctive style by 1935 in the United States. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... - The Golden Age of American animation is a period in American animation history that began with the advent of sound cartoons in 1928, peaked during the mid 1940s, and continued into the 1960s when theatrical animated shorts slowly began losing to the new medium of television animation. ... Disney redirects here. ... A scene from The Skeleton Dance (1929). ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ... Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is a 1937 animated feature, the first produced by Walt Disney. ... A publicity photograph (circa 1929) of Ub Iwerks and his most famous co-creation, Mickey Mouse. ... Flip the Frog and his girlfriend. ... Willie Whopper opening title Willie Whopper is an animated cartoon character created by American cartoonist, Ub Iwerks. ... Walter Lantz Productions was an American animation studio. ... An Oswald the Lucky Rabbit movie poster from 1927. ... Fleischer Studios, Inc. ... Bimbo in the 1931 Talkartoon Silly Scandals. ... Betty Boop from the opening title sequence of the earliest entries in the Betty Boop Cartoons Betty Boop is an animated cartoon character appearing in the Talkartoon and Betty Boop series of films produced by Max Fleischer and released by Paramount Pictures. ... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ... Warner Bros. ... Looney Tunes opening title Looney Tunes is a Warner Brothers animated cartoon series which ran in many movie theatres from 1930 to 1969. ... Merrie Melodies end title Merrie Melodies is the name of a series of animated cartoons distributed by Warner Bros. ... Charles B. Mintz (1896 - January 4, 1940) was an American film producer and distributor, who took control over Margaret J. Winklers Winkler Pictures after marrying her in 1924. ... Scrappy is a cartoon character created by Dick Huemer for Charles Mintzs Krazy Kat Studio. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... For other uses, see Phantom. ... Terry and the Pirates is the title of: a comic strip created by Milton Caniff; see: Terry and the Pirates (comic strip) a radio serial, based on the comic strip; see: Terry and the Pirates (radio serial) a television series, also based on the comic strip; see: Terry and the... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... Ruggiero Eugenio di Rodolpho Colombo (January 14, 1908–September 1, 1934), better known by the name Russ Columbo, was an American singer, violinist and actor, most famous for his signature tune, Some Call It Madness, But I Call It Love, and the legend surrounding his early death. ... Triumph of the Will (German: Triumph des Willens) is a propaganda film by the German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl. ... Helene Bertha Amalie Leni Riefenstahl (August 22, 1902 – September 8, 2003) was a German film director, dancer and actress, and widely noted for her aesthetics and advances in film technique. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... For other uses, see Propaganda (disambiguation). ... Georges Prosper Remi (May 22, 1907 – March 3, 1983), better known by the pen name Hergé, was a Belgian comics writer and artist. ... The Adventures of Tintin (French: ) is a series of Belgian comic books created by Belgian artist Hergé, the pen name of Georges Remi (1907–1983). ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Others

Military Enigma machine
Military Enigma machine

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x750, 80 KB)The plugboard of an Enigma machine, showing two pairs of letters swapped: S-O and J-A. Photograph courtesy Bob Lord. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x750, 80 KB)The plugboard of an Enigma machine, showing two pairs of letters swapped: S-O and J-A. Photograph courtesy Bob Lord. ... For a discussion of how Enigma-derived intelligence was put to use, see Ultra (WWII intelligence). ... The Biuro Szyfrów ( (?), Polish for Cipher Bureau) was the Polish agency concerned with cryptology between World Wars I and II. The Bureau enjoyed notable successes against Soviet cryptography during the Polish-Soviet War, helping to preserve Polands independence. ... For a discussion of how Enigma-derived intelligence was put to use, see Ultra (WWII intelligence). ... In cryptography, a plugboard (sometimes stecker or comutator) was a component of certain rotor machines, including some Enigma models, that exchanged letters of the alphabet. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Huey Pierce Long, Jr. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... The Anti-Saloon League launched the Board of Temperance Strategy to coordinate resistance to the growing public demand for the repeal of prohibition (1920-1933) that was occuring in the U.S. in the early 1930s. ... In 1919, the requisite number of legislatures of the States ratified The 18th Amendment to the Federal Constitution, enabling national Prohibition within one year of ratification. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas in 1935 Buried machinery in barn lot. ... Dirigible can refer to : an airship -- a lighter-than-air aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... The Hindenburg redirects here. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New London School explosion occurred on March 18, 1937, when a natural gas leak caused an explosion, destroying the New London School of the city of New London, Texas. ... New London is a city located in Rusk County, Texas. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Amelia Mary Earhart (24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared deceased 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

People

World leaders

Reza Shah Pahlavi changed the name of Persia to Iran in 1935
Reza Shah Pahlavi changed the name of Persia to Iran in 1935

Image File history File links Rezashah. ... Image File history File links Rezashah. ... Reza Shah, also Reza Shah the Great, Reza Shah Pahlavi and Reza Pahlavi (Persian: , Rez̤ā PahlavÄ«), (March 16, 1878 – July 26, 1944), was Shah of Iran[1] from December 15, 1925 until he was forced to abdicate after the Anglo-Soviet invasion of Iran in September 16, 1941 by British... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881–10 November 1938), until 1934 Gazi Mustafa Kemal Pasha, Turkish army officer and revolutionist statesman, was the founder and the first President of the Republic of Turkey. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869–January 30, 1948) (Devanagari : मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी, Gujarati મોહનદાસ કરમચંદ ગાંધી) was a national icon who led the struggle for Indias independence from British colonial rule, empowered by tens of millions of common Indians. ... Anthem God Save The Queen/King British India, circa 1860 Capital Calcutta (1858-1912), New Delhi (1912-1947) Language(s) Hindi, Urdu, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1877-1901 Victoria  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - January-December 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George... Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, KG, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, PC (16 April 1881–23 December 1959), known as The Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934 and as The Viscount Halifax from 1934 until 1944, was a British Conservative politician. ... Anthem God Save The Queen/King British India, circa 1860 Capital Calcutta (1858-1912), New Delhi (1912-1947) Language(s) Hindi, Urdu, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1877-1901 Victoria  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - January-December 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George... Victor Alexander John Hope, 2nd Marquess of Linlithgow (24 September 1887 - 5 January 1952) was a British statesman who served as Viceroy of India from 1936 to 1943. ... Anthem God Save The Queen/King British India, circa 1860 Capital Calcutta (1858-1912), New Delhi (1912-1947) Language(s) Hindi, Urdu, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1877-1901 Victoria  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - January-December 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... King Ghazi I of Iraq Ghazi (Arabic: ) (March 21, 1912 - April 4, 1939) was king of Iraq from 1933 to 1939. ... Faisal II of Iraq Faisal II (May 2, 1935 - July 14, 1958) was the last king of Iraq from April 4, 1939 to 1958. ... ... This article is about the prior state. ... Eamon de Valera (born Edward George de Valera, sometimes Gaelicised Éamon de Bhailéara; October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in the early 20th century, and... This article is about the prior state. ... Eamon de Valera (born Edward George de Valera, sometimes Gaelicised Éamon de Bhailéara; October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in the early 20th century, and... Map of Éire Éire (pronounced ) is the Irish name for Ireland. ... Victor Emmanuel III (Italian: ; 11 November 1869 – 28 December 1947) was King of Italy (29 July 1900 – 9 May 1946), Emperor of Ethiopia (1936–43) and King of Albania (1939–43). ... Mussolini redirects here. ... Emperor Shōwa ) (April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) was the 124th Emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from December 25, 1926 until his death in 1989. ... Sheikh Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah. ... António de Oliveira Salazar, GColIH, GCTE, GCSE, pron. ... This article is about Gen. ... Sultan Mohammed V of Morocco visiting Lawrence Livermore Lab, United States, in 1957 Mohammed V (August 10, 1909–February 26, 1961) was Sultan of Morocco from 1927 to 1953 and 1955 to 1961. ... Michael Joseph Savage (March 23, 1872 - March 27, 1940) was a New Zealand politician and the first Labour Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... Paul Ludwig Hans Anton von Beneckendorff und von Hindenburg, known universally as Paul von Hindenburg (2 October 1847 – 2 August 1934) was a German field marshal and statesman. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Cover of Time Magazine (April 27, 1925) James Barry Munnik Hertzog, better known as Barry Hertzog, (1866-1942) was Prime Minister of South Africa from 1924 to 1939. ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from... Image:F manuel azana. ... Alejandro Lerroux García (La Rambla, Córdoba, 1864 - Madrid, 1949) was a Spanish politician who was the leader of the Spanish Radical Party during the Second Spanish Republic. ... President Bahij Bey El Khatib (1895-1981), origin lebanese he was a Syrian Head of State from July 10, 1939 to September 16, 1941. ... Ahmad II ibn Ali (13 April 1862 - 19 June 1942) (Arabic: أحمد باي بن علي باي) was the ruler of Tunisia from 11 February 1929 until his death. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British prime minister. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... FDR redirects here. ... Pope Pius XI (Latin: ; Italian: Pio XI; May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ... Józef Beck Józef Beck (October 4, 1894 - June 5, 1944) was a Polish statesman, diplomat, military officer, and close associate of Józef PiÅ‚sudski. ...

Sports figures

British Commonwealth

Cliff Bastin (March 14, 1912 — December 4, 1991) was an English football player. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Sir Donald George Bradman AC (27 August 1908—25 February 2001), often called The Don, was an Australian cricketer, administrator and writer on the game, and generally acknowledged as the greatest batsman of all time. ... This article is about the sport. ... Fitzroy or FitzRoy is an Anglo-Norman name originally meaning son of the king - it usually refers to a bastard son of the king, or a descendant thereof. ... Image:Jack crawford. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... John Raymond Dyer senior (November 13, 1913 - August 23, 2003), always known as Jack Dyer, was one of the colossal figures of Australian rules football during two distinct careers, firstly as an outstanding player and coach of the Richmond Football Club in the Victorian Football League between 1931 and 1952... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... Walter Reginald Hammond (June 19, 1903 - July 1, 1965), often known as Wally Hammond, was an English cricketer, who played for Gloucestershire and England, primarily as a batsman, in a career that straddled (and was disrupted by) the Second World War. ... Edris Albert Eddie Hapgood (September 24, 1908 — April 20, 1973) was an English footballer, who captained Arsenal and England. ... Categories: Stub | West Indian cricketers | Jamaica cricketers | West Indian test cricketers | West Indian batsmen | Wisden Cricketers of the Year ... Alexander Wilson James (September 14, 1901 — June 1, 1953) was a Scottish footballer, and is most noted for being one of Arsenal F.C.s greatest players of all time. ... Douglas Robert Jardine (23 October 1900, Bombay - 18 June 1958, Montreux) was a British cricketer and captain of the controversial 1932-33 Bodyline tour of Australia. ... Harold Larwood (November 14, 1904 - July 22, 1995) was an English cricket player, an extremely quick and accurate fast bowler best known for his key role as the implementer of fast leg theory in the infamous Bodyline Ashes Test series of 1932-33. ... John Edward Jack Lovelock (January 5, 1910-December 28, 1949) was a New Zealand athlete, and a 1936 Olympic champion. ... Fred Perry hitting a backhand volley Frederick John Perry (May 18, 1909 – February 2, 1995) born in Stockport, Cheshire. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Sir Leonard Hutton (June 23, 1916 - September 6, 1990) was an English cricketer. ... Percy Alfred Williams, OC (May 19, 1908 - November 29, 1982) was a Canadian athlete, winner of the 100 m and 200 m races at the 1928 Summer Olympics. ... Commemorative stamp issued by the Indian post in 1980. ... Lala Amarnath was an Indian cricketer. ...

United States

For other uses, see Running (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Joe Louis (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Lou Ambers was born Luigi dAmbrosio in Herkimer, New York on November 8, 1913. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Henry Jackson Jr. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Maximilian Adalbert Madcap Maxie Baer (February 11, 1909 – November 21, 1959) was a famous American boxer of the 1930s, onetime Heavyweight Champion of the World, and actor. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Cliff Battles (American Football Player) Born May 1, 1910,Died April 28,1981 Battles, from West Virginia Wesleyan, had caught George Preston Marshalls eye in a game from Georgetown, which was an Eastern football power from 1925-29. ... John Jay Berwanger (March 19, 1914 - June 26, 2002) was an American football player born in Dubuque, Iowa. ... (September , 1991) was an American heavyweight boxing champion. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Ellison Myers Brown (September 22, 1914[1] - August 23, 1975[2]), widely known as Tarzan Brown, was a two-time winner of the Boston Marathon in 1936 (2:33:40) and 1939 (2:28:51). ... For other senses of this word, see Marathon (disambiguation). ... Don Budge hitting a backhand as an amateur in 1935 John Donald (Don or Donnie) Budge (June 13, 1915 – January 26, 2000) was an American tennis champion who was a World No. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Tony Canzoneri (November 6, 1908-December 9, 1959) was an Italian-American boxer who was born in the town of Slidell, Louisiana. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Gordon Stanley Mickey Cochrane (April 6, 1903-June 28, 1962) was a Scottish-American catcher and manager in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the runner, see Glenn Cunningham. ... For other uses, see Running (disambiguation). ... Jerome Hanna Dizzy Dean (January 16, 1910 – July 17, 1974) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball, elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Babe Didrikson in the 1932 Olympic javelin competition Mildred Ella Babe Didrikson Zaharias (June 26, 1911-September 27, American athlete, who excelled in many sports. ... Leo Ernest Durocher (July 27, 1905 — October 7, 1991), nicknamed Leo the Lip, was an American infielder and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Albert Glen Turk Edwards (September 28, 1907 - January 12, 1973) was a professional football player for in the National Football League. ... Millard Fillmore Dixie Howell (November 24, 1912 - March 2, 1971) was an American football running back and head coach. ... Donald Montgomery Hutson (January 31, 1913 - June 24, 1997) was the first star wide receiver in NFL history. ... Cecil Isbell (July 11, 1915, in Houston, Texas, USA - June 23, 1985, in Hammond, Indiana) was a professional football player for the Green Bay Packers. ... John Adelbert Kelley (the Elder) (September 6, 1907 – October 6, 2004) was an American athlete. ... For other senses of this word, see Marathon (disambiguation). ... Nile Clarke Kinnick, Jr. ... Tommy Loughran (November 29, 1902 - July 7, 1982) was a light-heavyweight boxing champion and elected to the International Boxing Hall of Fame. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Alice Marble on the cover of LIFE magazine in 1939 Alice Marble (September 13, 1913–December 13, 1990) was an early American tennis champion. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Ralph Harold Metcalfe (May 30, 1910 - October 10, 1978) was an American athlete who jointly held the world record for the 100 metre sprint. ... Bronislau Bronko Nagurski (November 3, 1908 - January 7, 1990) was an American football player. ... Melvin Thomas Mel Ott (March 2, 1909 – November 21, 1958), nicknamed Master Melvin, was a Major League Baseball right fielder who played his entire career for the New York Giants (1926-1947). ... James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an African American track and field athlete. ... Bobby Riggs on the cover of Sports Illustrated just before his match with Billie Jean King in 1973 Riggs at Wimbledon in 1939 Robert Larimore (Bobby) Riggs (February 25, 1918 – October 25, 1995) was a 1930s–40s tennis player who was the World No. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Helen Herring Stephens (February 3, 1918 – January 17, 1994) was an American athlete, a double Olympic champion in 1936. ... Thomas Edward Eddie Tolan (September 29, 1908 - January 31, 1967) was an American athlete, winner of two gold medals at the 1932 Summer Olympics. ... Ellsworth Vines as an amateur in 1933 Ellsworth Vines (September 28, 1911 – March 17, 1994) was an American tennis champion of the 1930s, the World No. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... StanisÅ‚awa Walasiewicz (April 11, 1911 – December 4, 1980) was a Polish-American athlete. ... Frank Clifford Wykoff (October 29, 1909 - January 1, 1980) was an American athlete, triple gold medal winner in 4x100 m relay at the Olympic Games. ...

References

  1. ^ David M. Gordon; Richard Edwards; Michael Reich (December 1982). "Segmented Work, Divided Workers: The Historical Transformation of Labor in the United States". The Journal of Economic History 42: 958 - 959. Retrieved on 2007-05-29.
  2. ^ Rainer Zitelmann (December 1989). "Hitler: Selbstverstandnis eines Revolutionars". The Journal of Modern History 61: 854 - 856. Retrieved on 2007-05-29.
  3. ^ A. L. Unger (January 1969). "Stalin's Renewal of the Leading Stratum: A Note on the Great Purge". Soviet Studies 20: 321 - 330. Retrieved on 2007-05-29.

Updated Nov. 19, 2007 Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Europe-Asia Studies is an academic peer-reviewed journal published 8 times a year by Routledge on behalf of the Institute of Central and East European Studies, University of Glasgow, and continuing (since vol. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

  • The Dirty Thirties — Images of the Great Depression in Canada

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