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Encyclopedia > 1920s Berlin

The Golden Twenties, in Berlin, Germany, were an exciting and extremely vibrant time in the history of Berlin, German history, and European history in general. This "fertile culture" of Berlin extended onwards until Adolf Hitler rose to power in early 1933 and stamped out any and all resistance to the Nazi Party, which paradoxically was never very popular with many Berliners. A sophisticated, innovative culture developed that was centered around Berlin and included architecture and design (Bauhaus, 1919-28), literature (Döblin, Berlin Alexanderplatz, 1929), film (Lang, Metropolis, 1927, Dietrich, Der blaue Engel, 1930), painting (Grosz), music (Weill, Threepenny Opera, 1928), criticism (Benjamin), philosophy/psychology (Jung), and fashion. This culture was generally considered as decadent and socially disruptive by rightists. A scene typical of the Follies of Florenz Ziegfeld, the most popular Broadway impresario of the decade. ... For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation). ... Berlin is the capital city of reunited Germany. ... The history of Germany is, in places, extremely complicated and depends much on how one defines Germany. ... This article discusses the history of the continent of Europe. ... Hitler redirects here. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Nazi swastika symbol The National Socialist German Workers Party ( German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei), better known as the NSDAP or the Nazi Party was a political party that was led to power in Germany by Adolf Hitler in 1933. ... Berliner may refer to A type of doughnut: see Berliner (pastry), Krapfen A newspaper format, slightly larger than tabloid: see Berliner (format) A citizen of Berlin, as used by John F. Kennedy in 1963, saying, “Ich bin ein Berliner. ... The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... Usually considered in the context of the applied arts, engineering, architecture, and other such creative endeavours, design is used as both a noun and a verb. ... ņBauhaus is the common term for the Staatliches Bauhaus, an art and architecture school in Germany that operated from 1919 to 1933, and for the approach to design that it developed and taught. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... Alfred Döblin (August 10, 1878 – June 26, 1957) was a German expressionist novelist, best known for Berlin Alexanderplatz. ... Berlin Alexanderplatz is a novel by Alfred Döblin, published in 1929. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... Friedrich Anton Christian Lang (December 5, 1890 - August 2, 1976) was an Austrian film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of expressionism. ... Metropolis Metropolis is a science fiction film produced in Germany set in a futuristic urban dystopia. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Marlene Dietrich in the 1930s Marlene Dietrich (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born actress, entertainer and singer. ... Der Blaue Engel (English: The Blue Angel) is a film directed by Josef von Sternberg in 1930, and is one of the most famous films made by Marlene Dietrich. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The term Grosz may also refer to George Grosz. ... Music is a form of expression in the medium of time using the structures of tones and silence. ... Sandy Weill in the 1970s Sandy Weill (March 16 1933 -) is a financier, philanthropist, and chairman of Citigroup. ... The Threepenny Opera (Die Dreigroschenoper) was a revolutionary piece of musical theatre written by the German dramatist Bertolt Brecht in collaboration with the composer Kurt Weill in 1928. ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... A critic (derived from the ancient Greek word krites meaning a judge) is a person who offers a value judgement or an interpretation. ... Philosopher in Meditation (detail), by Rembrandt. ... Psychology (Gk: psyche, soul or mind + logos, speech) is an academic and applied field involving the study of the human mind, brain, and behavior. ... Carl Jungs autobiographical work Memories , Dreams and Reflections, Fontana edition Carl Gustav Jung (July 26, 1875 – June 6, 1961) (IPA:) was a Swiss psychiatrist and founder of analytical psychology. ... The term fashion applies to a prevailing mode of expression. ... Decadence was the name given, first by hostile critics, and then triumphantly adopted by some writers themselves, to a number of late nineteenth century fin de siècle writers associated with Symbolism or the Aesthetic movement. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ...


Germany's liberal Weimar constitution (1919) could not guarantee a stable government in the face of rightist violence (Rathenau assassination, 1922) and Communist refusal to cooperate with Socialists. Reparations and Allied occupation of the Rhineland caused staggering inflation that destroyed middle-class savings, but economic expansion resumed after mid-decade, aided by U.S. loans. The Weimar Constitution in booklet form. ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... Violence refers to acts of aggression and abuse which causes or intends to cause criminal injury or harm to persons, and (to a lesser extent) animals and property. ... Walter Rathenau Walther Rathenau (September 29, 1867–June 24, 1922) was a German industrialist and politician who served as Foreign Minister of Germany. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Socialism is any economic system in which the means of production are owned and controlled collectively or a political philosophy advocating such a system. ... Reparations refers to two distinct ideas: Reparations for slavery of groups or individuals War reparations: Payments from one country to another as compensation for starting a war under a peace treaty, such as those made by Germany to France under the Treaty of Versailles. ... The Rhineland (Rheinland in German) is the general name for the land on both sides of the river Rhine in the west of Germany, although some consider the lands to the east of the river culturally distinct, jovially referring to them as Schäl Sick; the bad or wrong side... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... In common usage, saving generally means putting money aside, for example, by putting money in the bank or investing in a pension plan. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ...


As stated, this modern Renaissance occurred throughout the Weimar Republic where art, music, film, and other art-forms flourished, but was firmly rooted in Berlin. Berlin was the centerpiece of European culture from about 1923-1932. It caught on fully once the hyper-inflation and other economic problems of the very early 1920s were brought under control by the newly elected government. Flag of Germany, 1919–1933 The Weimar Republic (German Weimarer Republik, IPA: []) is the historical name for the republic that governed Germany from 1919 to 1933. ... Venus de Milo exhibited in the Louvre museum, France. ... Music is a form of expression in the medium of time using the structures of tones and silence. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... This article is about Germanys largest city. ... → The European Culture might better be described as a series of overlapping cultures of Europe. ... A 500,000,000,000 (500 billion) Serbian dinar banknote circa 1993, the largest nominal value ever officially printed in Serbia, the final result of hyperinflation. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Social issues of the 1920s. ...


Film especially was making huge technical and artistic strides during this period of time in Berlin, and gave rise to the influential movement called German Expressionism. "Talkies" were also becoming more popular with the general public across Europe but especially in 1920s Berlin. (see the article on UFA) See also: List of films featuring Berlin Cinema in Germany can be traced back to the very beginnings of the medium at the end of the 19th Century and German cinema has made major technical and artistic contributions to film. ... F.W. Murnaus Nosferatu German Expressionism, also referred to as expressionism in filmmaking, developed in Germany (especially Berlin) during the 1920s. ... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ... UFA logo Universum Film AG, better known as Ufa or UFA, was the principal film studio in Germany, home of the German film industry during the Weimar Republic and through World War II, and a major force in world cinema during its brief existence from 1917 to 1945. ... Detail from the memorial plaque on the Marlene Dietrich house in the Rote Insel area of Schöneberg This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ...


Radical ideas on both the right and left floated through the wild and exciting streets of Berlin throughout the post-World War I years, with open-clashes between the left-wing Communists and right-wing Fascists not at all uncommon. In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First World War, also known as... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... This article is about communism as a form of society, as an ideology advocating that form of society, and as a popular movement. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, refers to the right-wing authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ...


The heyday of Berlin began in the mid-1920s. It became the largest industrial city of the continent. People like the architect Walter Gropius, physicist Albert Einstein, painter George Grosz and writers Arnold Zweig, Bertolt Brecht, and Kurt Tucholsky made Berlin the cultural and intellectual center of Europe. Night life was blooming in 1920s Berlin. Heyday was a horse that competed in the sport of eventing, ridden by American Bruce Davidson. ... This article is about the continent. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Walter Gropius, c. ... Physicists working in a government lab A physicist is a scientist who is a practitioner of physics. ... Albert Einstein, photographed in 1947 by Oren J. Turner. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... George Grosz (July 26, 1893 - July 6, 1959) was a prominent member of the Berlin Dada and New Objectivity group. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Arnold Zweig (November 10, 1887 - November 26, 1968) was a German writer and an active pacifist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kurt Tucholsky Kurt Tucholsky (Berlin, January 9, 1890 – December 21, 1935 in Gothenburg) was a German journalist, satirist and writer. ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... Nightlife is the collective term for any entertainment that is available and more popular from the late evening into the early hours of the morning. ...


Tempelhof Airport was opened in 1923 and a start was made on S-Bahn electrification from 1924 onwards. Berlin was also the second biggest inland harbor of the country; all of this infrastructure was needed to transport and feed the over 4 million Berliners throughout the exciting yet hectic 1920s. Tempelhof Central Airport, a. ... (Translated from the German wikipedia article) The S-Bahn is a suburban metro railway network in Germany. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The Humboldt University of Berlin (formerly The University of Berlin) became a major intellectual center in Germany, Europe, and the World. The sciences were especially favored -- from 1914 to 1933, Albert Einstein served as director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics in Berlin, only leaving after the anti-Semitic Nazi Party rose to power. Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin The Humboldt University of Berlin (German Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) is Berlins oldest university, founded in 1810 as the University of Berlin (Universität zu Berlin) by the liberal Prussian educational reformer and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt whose university model has strongly influenced... There is no institution called the University of Berlin, but there are four universities in Berlin, Germany: Humboldt University of Berlin (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) Technical University of Berlin (Technische Universität Berlin) Free University of Berlin (Freie Universität Berlin) Berlin University of the Arts (Universität der Künste Berlin) This is... Science in the broadest sense refers to any knowledge or trained skill, especially (but not exclusively) when this is attained by verifiable means. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Albert Einstein, photographed in 1947 by Oren J. Turner. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


The so-called "mystical arts" also experienced a revival during this time-period in Berlin, with astrology, the occult, and esoteric religions and off-beat religious practices becoming more mainstream and acceptable to the masses, who were now more open-minded to spiritual alternatives after witnessing the horrors and traumas of The Great War. Astrology refers to any of several systems, traditions or beliefs in which knowledge of the apparent positions of celestial bodies and related information is held to be useful in understanding, interpreting and organizing knowledge about personality, human affairs and terrestrial events. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Etymology Esoteric is an adjective originating during Hellenic Greece under the domain of the Roman Empire; it comes from the Greek esôterikos, from esôtero, the comparative form of esô: within. It is a word meaning anything that is inner and occult, a latinate word meaning hidden (from which... The band General Public formed after the 1983 break-up of The Beat (see 1983 in music). ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
1920s Berlin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (551 words)
The Golden Twenties, in Berlin, Germany, were an exciting and extremely vibrant time in the history of Berlin, German history, and European history in general.
The heyday of Berlin began in the mid-1920s.
Berlin was also the second biggest inland harbor of the country; all of this infrastructure was needed to transport and feed the over 4 million Berliners throughout the exciting yet hectic 1920s.
Berlin - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (7694 words)
The highest elevations in Berlin are the Teufelsberg in the borough of Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf and the Müggelberge in the borough of Treptow-Köpenick.
Berlin is the national capital of the Federal Republic of Germany and is the seat of the President of Germany, whose official residence is Bellevue Palace.
Berlin's inner city is partly surrounded by a motorway (Autobahn), the A 100, that forms a half circle to the west of the center.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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