FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
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Encyclopedia > 1920s
Millennia: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s - 1920s - 1930s 1940s 1950s
Years: 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924
1925 1926 1927 1928 1929
Categories: Births - Deaths - Architecture
Establishments - Disestablishments

The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the "Jazz Age" or the "Roaring Twenties," usually when speaking about the United States. In Europe the decade is sometimes referred to as the Golden Twenties. Since the closing of the 20th Century, the economic strength during the 1920s has drawn close associations with the 1950s and 1990s, especially in the United States. These three decades are regarded as periods of economic prosperity, which lasted throughout almost the entire decades following a tremendous event that occurred in the previous decade (World War I and Spanish flu in the 1910s, World War II in the 1940s, and the end of the Cold War in the late 1980s). Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... On the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd millennium commenced on 1 January 1001, and ended at the end of 31 December 2000. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 20XX redirects here. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ... // The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginnings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jazz Age , 1929 movie poster: A Scathing Indictment of the Bewidered Children of Pleasure. ... For the film, see The Roaring Twenties. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... It is a term, mostly used in Europe, to describe the 1920s, in which most of the continent had an economic boom following the First World War and the severe economic downturns that took place between 1919-1923. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The 1918 flu pandemic (commonly referred to as the Spanish flu) was a category 5 influenza pandemic caused by an unusually severe and deadly Influenza A virus strain of subtype H1N1. ... // The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginnings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


However, not all countries enjoyed this prosperity. The Weimar Republic, like many other European countries, had to face a severe economic downturn in the opening years of the decade, because of the enormous debt caused by the war as well as the one-sided Treaty of Versailles. Such a crisis would culminate with a devaluation of the Mark in 1923, eventually leading to severe economic problems and, in the long term, favour the rise of the Nazi Party. Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature... This article is about the Treaty of Versailles of June 28, 1919, which ended World War I. For other uses, see Treaty of Versailles (disambiguation) . The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was a peace treaty that officially ended World War I between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany. ... The National Socialist German Workers Party, (German: , or NSDAP, commonly known as the Nazi Party), was a political party in Germany between 1919 and 1945. ...


Additionally, the decade was characterized by the rise of radical political movements, especially in regions that were once part of empires. Communism began attracting large numbers of followers following the success of the October Revolution and the Bolsheviks' determination to win the subsequent Russian Civil War. The Bolsheviks would eventually adopt a policy of mixed economics, from 1921 to 1928, and also give birth to the USSR, at the end of 1922. This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Bolshevik faction in the RSDLP 1903-1912. ... Combatants Local Soviet powers led by Russian SFSR and Red Army Chinese mercenaries White Movement Central Powers (1917-1918): Austria-Hungary Ottoman Empire German Empire Allied Intervention: (1918-1922) Japan Czechoslovakia Greece  United States  Canada Serbia Romania UK  France Foreign volunteers: Polish Italian Local nationalist movements, national states, and decentralist... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ...


The twenties marked the first time in America that the population in the cities surpassed the population of rural areas. This was due to rapid urbanization starting in the 1920s.


The 1920s also experienced the rise of the far-right in Europe and elsewhere, starting with Fascism in Italy as a perceived antidote to Communism. The knotty economic problems also favoured the rise of dictatorships and monarchies in Eastern Europe and the Balkans, such as Józef Piłsudski in Poland and Peter and Alexander Karađorđević of Yugoslavia. Far right, extreme right, ultra-right, or radical right are terms used to discuss the qualitative or quantitive position a group or person occupies within a political spectrum. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Fascism is a term used to describe authoritarian nationalist political ideologies or mass movements that are concerned with notions of cultural decline or decadence. ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... Pilsudski redirects here. ... King Peter I of Serbia (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар I Карађорђевић, Petar I KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević) (29 June 1844 – 16 August 1921) was King of Serbia from 1903 to 1918 after which he became the first King of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. ... Alexander I of Yugoslavia also called King Alexander Unificator (Serbo-Croatian: Kralj Aleksandar I KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević/Краљ Александар I Карађорђевић) (Cetinje, Principality of Montenegro, 16 December 1888 – Marseille, France, 9 October 1934) of the Royal House of KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević was the first king of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1929–34) and...


The Stock Market collapsed during October 1929 (see Black Tuesday) and drew a line under the prosperous 1920s. Crowd gathering on Wall Street. ...

Contents

Technology

Poster for the second All-Color All-Talking movie: Gold Diggers of Broadway 1929.

Image File history File linksMetadata GoldDiggersBroadway2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata GoldDiggersBroadway2. ... Winnie Lightner and Albert Gran. ... For other persons named John Baird, see John Baird (disambiguation). ... Warner Bros. ... Don Juan is a 1926s Warner Bros silent film, directed by Alan Crosland. ... The Jazz Singer (1927) is a U.S. movie musical and the first feature-length motion picture with talking sequences. ... The Lights of New York (1928) was the first ever feature film that had complete sound sychronization. ... Color Fragment from Film. ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) (aka Lucky Lindy; The Lone Eagle) was an American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and peace activist who, on May 20–21, 1927, rose from virtual obscurity to instantaneous world fame as the result of his exploits as the pilot of the... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Karl Ferdinand Braun (6 June 1850 in Fulda, Germany – 20 April 1918 in New York City, U.S.) was a German inventor, physicist and Nobel Prize laureate. ... Cathode ray tube employing electromagnetic focus and deflection Cutaway rendering of a color CRT: 1. ... Company Masthead Logo Logo until circa 1969, also current logo on company web site Logo 1969–1983 Hi Dan! Western Electric (sometimes abbreviated WE and WECo) was an American electrical engineering company, the manufacturing arm of AT&T from 1881 to 1995. ... Robert Goddard is the name of several notable individuals, including: Robert Goddard (scientist) (1882-1945), one of the pioneers of modern rocketry. ...

War, peace and politics

See also Social issues of the 1920s
Vladimir Lenin in 1920. He was the leading figure of the Communist movement until his death in 1924.
Vladimir Lenin in 1920. He was the leading figure of the Communist movement until his death in 1924.

This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... From: http://www. ... From: http://www. ... Lenin redirects here. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Political cartoon of the era depicting an anarchist attempting to destroy the Statue of Liberty. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... The second Ku Klux Klan (KKK), often called the Klan of the 1920s, was officially the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. ... Combatants Irish Republic United Kingdom Commanders Michael Collins Richard Mulcahy Cathal Brugha Important local IRA leaders Henry Hugh Tudor Strength Irish Republican Army c. ... The Irish Civil War (June 28, 1922 – May 24, 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the prior state. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Suffragette Marie C. Brehm was the first legally qualified candidate to run for the vice-presidency of the United States, which she did in 1924 on the ticket of the Prohibition Party. ... A cartoon from Australia ca. ... Combatants   Turkish Revolutionaries United Kingdom Greece France Italy Armenia Ottoman Empire Georgia Commanders Mustafa Kemal Ä°smet Ä°nönü Kazım Karabekir Ali Fuat Cebesoy Fevzi Çakmak George Milne Henri Gouraud Papoulas Georgios Hatzianestis Drastamat Kanayan Movses Silikyan Süleyman Åžefik Pasha The Turkish War of Independence (Turkish: KurtuluÅŸ Savaşı or... The Moderation League of New York was founded in 1923 to change the legal definition of the intoxicating liquors prohibited by the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution establishing prohibition. ... In 1919, the requisite number of legislatures of the States ratified The 18th Amendment to the Federal Constitution, enabling national Prohibition within one year of ratification. ... Combatants Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic Republic of Poland Ukrainian Peoples Republic Commanders Mikhail Tukhachevsky Semyon Budyonny Józef PiÅ‚sudski Edward Rydz-ÅšmigÅ‚y Strength 950,000 combatants 5,000,000 reserves 360,000 combatants 738,000 reserves Casualties Dead estimated at 100,000... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... President Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, and Frank B. Kellogg, standing, with representatives of the governments who have ratified the Treaty for Renunciation of War (Kellogg-Briand Pact), in the East Room of the White House. ... Wayne Wheeler (1869-1927) and Ernest Cherrington (1877-1950) were major prohition leaders. ... Flag Map of Iran under the Qajar dynasty in the 19th century. ... Photographic portrait of Ahmad Shah Qajar (l) and his brother Mohammad Hassan Mirza (r) Ahmad Shah Qajar (احمد شاه قاجار in Persian) ‎(January 21, 1898 - 21 February 1930) was Shah of Persia from July 16, 1909 to October 31, 1925. ... Shah Reza Pahlavi Reza Pahlavi (Persian: رضا پهلوی), (March 16, 1877–July 26, 1944), called Reza Shah the Great after his death, was Shah of Persia (later Iran) from December 15, 1925 to September 16, 1941. ... The Pahlavi dynasty (in Persian: دودمان پهلوی) of Iran began with the crowning of Reza Shah Pahlavi in 1925 and ended with the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and the subsequent collapse of the ancient tradition of Iranian monarchy. ... Mein Kampf (English translation: My Struggle) is a book by the German-Austrian politician Adolf Hitler, which combines elements of autobiography with an exposition of Hitlers National Socialist political ideology. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... Fascism is a term used to describe authoritarian nationalist political ideologies or mass movements that are concerned with notions of cultural decline or decadence. ... Amendment XIX in the National Archives The Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution provides that neither any individual state or the federal government may deny a citizen the right to vote because of that citizens sex. ...

Economics

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... At the conclusion of World War I the Allies imposed in the Treaty of Versailles a plan for reparations to be paid by Germany. ... Black Tuesday refers to a number of different things: The Wall Street Crash of 1929. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A stock market crash is a sudden dramatic decline of stock prices across a significant cross-section of a stock market. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...

Literature and Arts

See also: List of years in literature#1920s

This page indexes the individual year in literature pages. ... For the American writer, see Virginia Euwer Wolff. ... Mrs. ... To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... Virginia Woolf, the author of A Room of Ones Own. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Cover of the original sheet music of the two piano version of Rhapsody in Blue. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... The Waste Land (1922)[1] is a highly influential 434-line[2] modernist poem by T. S. Eliot. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... Kafka redirects here. ... This article is about the novel by Kafka. ... Erich Maria Remarque (June 22, 1898 – September 25, 1970) was the pseudonym of Erich Paul Remark, a German author. ... For the films, see All Quiet on the Western Front (1930 film) and All Quiet on the Western Front (1979 film). ... René François Ghislain Magritte (November 21, 1898 - August 15, 1967) was a Surrealist artist, born in Lessines, Belgium. ... The Treachery Of Images (La trahison des images 1928-29) is a painting by Belgian Surrealist painter René Magritte, famous for its inscription Ceci nest pas une pipe ( (help· info)) or this is not a pipe. ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ... For information about British rock band, see Bauhaus (band). ... Dessau is a town in Germany on the junction of the rivers Mulde and Elbe, in the Bundesland (Federal State) of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... This Side of Paradise is the debut novel of F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... This article is about the novel. ... Hermann Hesse (pronounced ) (2 July 1877 – 9 August 1962) was a German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. ... Siddhartha is an allegorical novel by Hermann Hesse which deals with the spiritual journey of an Indian man called Siddhartha during the time of the Buddha. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... This article is about the novel. ... For the Machine Head song, see A Farewell to Arms (song). ... Image:Thorntonwilderteeth. ... The Bridge of San Luis Rey is a 1927 novel by American author Thornton Wilder that tells the story of several interrelated people who happen to be on an Inca rope-fiber suspension bridge in Peru, and the events that lead up to them being on the bridge at the... Aleksei Nikolaevich Tolstoi. ... Aelita (Russian: Аэлита), also known as Aelita: Queen of Mars, is a silent movie directed by Soviet filmmaker Yakov Protazanov and released in 1924. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ... Back to Methuselah (A Metabiological Pentateuch) is a 1921 series of five plays and a preface by George Bernard Shaw. ... The Pulitzer Prize is a United States literary award given out each April. ... Beyond the Horizon may refer to a stage play by Eugene ONeill a 1961 book on automatic writing by Grace Rosher a song from Bob Dylans album, Modern Times. ... Anna Christie is a play in four acts by Eugene ONeill. ... Strange Interlude is an experimental play by the great American playwright Eugene ONeill. ... Sinclair Lewis Sinclair Lewis (February 7, 1885 — January 10, 1951) was an American novelist and playwright. ... babbitt metal plain bearing shells Babbitt metal, also called white metal, is an alloy used to provide the bearing surface in a plain bearing. ... Dodsworth is a satiric novel written by American novelist Sinclair Lewis, published in 1929. ... Arrowsmith may mean: Arrowsmith (comics) Arrowsmith (film) Arrowsmith (novel) Alex Arrowsmith (rock musician) Aerosmith (rock band) Arrowsmith, Illinois Percy and Florence Arrowsmith Aerosmith, an American rock band This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... For information on the UK singer Elmer Gantry, aka Dave Terry, see Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera Elmer Gantry is a 1927 novel by Sinclair Lewis. ...

Culture and religion

The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of an alcohol includes many other compounds. ... DN-0072930, Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago Historical Society. ... DN-0072930, Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago Historical Society. ... For other uses, see Lost Generation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flapper (disambiguation). ... Josephine Baker dancing the Charleston at the Folies Bergère, Paris, in 1926 A USPS stamp from the Celebrate the Century series: Flappers Doing the Charleston by John Held Jr. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... This Side of Paradise is the debut novel of F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... The Beautiful and Damned , F. Scott Fitzgeralds second novel, tells the story of Anthony Patch (a 1920s socialite and presumptive heir to a tycoons fortune), and the relationship with his wife Gloria, his service in the army, and alcoholism. ... This article is about the novel. ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... Gangsters are members of a professional crime organization, i. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... Bootleg liquor is liquor that is sold with disregard to the applicable laws, regulations, and taxes. ... A rum row refers to any line of ships that anchored beyond the three mile limit near large U.S. cities on the east coast to off-load their cargoes of alcoholic beverages onto speed boats during national prohibition (1920-1933). ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... The Methodist Board of Temperance, Prohibition, and Public Morals was a major organization in the temperance movement. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ... Don Juan is a 1926s Warner Bros silent film, directed by Alan Crosland. ... The Jazz Singer (1927) is a U.S. movie musical and the first feature-length motion picture with talking sequences. ... The Lights of New York (1928) was the first ever feature film that had complete sound sychronization. ... Color Fragment from Film. ... Surrealism is an artistic movement and an aesthetic philosophy that aims for the liberation of the mind by emphasizing the critical and imaginative powers of the subconscious. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Marathon dancing is a dance activity that became very trendy in the 1920s and 1930s. ... This article discusses the four-player game of Chinese origin. ... Crossword Puzzle was the second to last album made by The Partridge Family, and was not one of the most popular albums. ... Pole-sitting is the practice of sitting on a pole for extended lengths of time, generally used as a test of endurance. ... A clip joint is an establishment, usually a strip club or entertainment bar, typically one claiming to offer adult entertainment, in which customers are tricked into paying money and receive poor, or no, goods or services in return. ... The Harlem Renaissance was named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... The Scopes Trial (, often called the Scopes Monkey Trial) was an American legal case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, which forbade the teaching, in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee, of any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Creationism is a religious belief that humanity, life, the Earth, and the universe were created in their original form by a deity or deities (often the Abrahamic God of Judaism, Christianity and Islam), whose existence is presupposed. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... After the death of powerful Anti-Saloon League leader Wayne Wheeler in 1927, Bishop James Cannon, Jr. ... A cartoon from Australia ca. ... The Group of Seven was a group of Canadian landscape painters in the 1920s, originally consisting of Franklin Carmichael, Lawren Harris, A. Y. Jackson, Frank Johnston, Arthur Lismer, J. E. H. MacDonald, and Frederick Varley. ... As increasing numbers of people became disillusioned with the negative effects of national prohibition in the United States, a variety of repeal organizations emerged. ... Daisy Douglas Barr was Imperial Empress (leader) of the Indiana Womens Ku Klux Klan (WKKK) in the early 1920s and an active member of the Womens Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). ... The WKKK or Womanss Ku Klux Klan was one of a number of auxiliaries of the Ku Klux Klan. ... King Tut redirects here. ... For other persons of the same name, see Howard Carter. ... Evolution of Civilization a portion of the mural by Edwin Blashfield (1895) above the Main Reading Room of the Library of Congress. ... For the anti-Japanese volunteer armies, see National Salvation Army. ...

People

World leaders

Mustafa Kemal Atatürk Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881 – November 10, 1938), Turkish soldier and statesman, was the founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey. ... Mustafa Kemal Atatürk Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881–November 10, 1938), Turkish army officer, revolutionary, and anti-imperialist statesman, was the founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Alexandre Millerand (February 10, 1859 - April 7, 1943) was a French socialist politician. ... Pierre-Paul-Henri-Gaston Doumergue (Aigues-Vives, Gard, August 1, 1863 – June 18, 1937 in Aigues-Vives) was a French politician of the Third Republic. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... Stanley Melbourne Bruce, 1st Viscount Bruce of Melbourne, CH, MC, FRS, PC (15 April 1883–25 August 1967) was an Australian politician and diplomat, and the eighth Prime Minister of Australia. ... Rt Hon Billy Hughes William Morris Billy Hughes (September 25, 1862 - October 28, 1952), Australian politician, was the seventh Prime Minister of Australia, the longest-serving member of the Australian Parliament, and one of the most controversial figures in Australian political history. ... Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ... Dr. Sun Yat-sen Traditional Chinese: 孫中山; Pinyin: SÅ«n Zhōngshān; or Sun Yixian (Pinyin: SÅ«n Yìxiān) (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the father of modern China. Sun played an instrumental role in the... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... This is not the Friedrich Ebert involved in the founding of the GDR, but rather his father. ... Paul Ludwig Hans Anton von Beneckendorff und von Hindenburg, known universally as Paul von Hindenburg (2 October 1847 – 2 August 1934) was a German field marshal and statesman. ... Eamon de Valera (born Edward George de Valera, sometimes Gaelicised Éamon de Bhailéara; October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in the early 20th century, and... Photographic portrait of Ahmad Shah Qajar (l) and his brother Mohammad Hassan Mirza (r) Ahmad Shah Qajar (احمد شاه قاجار in Persian) ‎(January 21, 1898 - 21 February 1930) was Shah of Persia from July 16, 1909 to October 31, 1925. ... Flag Map of Iran under the Qajar dynasty in the 19th century. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Shah Reza Pahlavi Reza Pahlavi (Persian: رضا پهلوی), (March 16, 1877–July 26, 1944), called Reza Shah the Great after his death, was Shah of Persia (later Iran) from December 15, 1925 to September 16, 1941. ... The Pahlavi dynasty (in Persian: دودمان پهلوی) of Iran began with the crowning of Reza Shah Pahlavi in 1925 and ended with the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and the subsequent collapse of the ancient tradition of Iranian monarchy. ... Victor Emmanuel III (Italian: ; 11 November 1869 – 28 December 1947) was King of Italy (29 July 1900 – 9 May 1946), Emperor of Ethiopia (1936–43) and King of Albania (1939–43). ... Mussolini redirects here. ... ... This article is about the prior state. ... Horthy redirects here. ... Emperor Shōwa ) (April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) was the 124th Emperor of Japan according to the traditional order reigning from December 25, 1926 until his death in 1989. ... Pope Pius XI (Latin: ; Italian: Pio XI; May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ... Pilsudski redirects here. ... Lenin redirects here. ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from... Alfonso XIII of Spain (May 17, 1886 - February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who was Prime Minister throughout the latter half of World War I and the first four years of the subsequent peace. ... Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923) was a British Conservative Party statesman and Prime Minister. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ...

Entertainers

Roscoe Conkling Arbuckle, also known as Fatty Arbuckle (March 24, 1887 – June 29, 1933), was an American silent film comedian, director, and screenwriter. ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... For the first female director of Public Health, see Sara Josephine Baker. ... This article is about John Barrymore, Sr. ... Lionel Barrymore (born Lionel Herbert Blythe on April 28, 1878 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – November 15, 1954 in Van Nuys, California) was an American Academy Award Winning actor of stage, radio and film. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was a Russian-born naturalized American composer and lyricist, and one of the most prolific American songwriters in history. ... Clara Gordon Bow (July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965) was an American actress and sex symbol who rose to fame in the silent film era of the 1920s. ... Louise Brooks (14 November 1906 – 8 August 1985) was an American dancer, showgirl, and silent film actress. ... One of 12 Eddie Cantor caricatures by Frederick J. Garner for a 1933 Brown & Bigelow advertising card set. ... Lon Chaney (April 1, 1883 – August 26, 1930), nicknamed The Man of a Thousand Faces, was an American actor during the age of silent films. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Bebe Daniels (January 14, 1901 - March 16, 1971) was an American actress. ... Marion Davies (January 3, 1897 – September 22, 1961) was an American actress. ... This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... Janet Gaynor (October 6, 1906 – September 14, 1984) was an American actress who, in 1928, became the first winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress for her three most prominent films: Sunrise (1927), Seventh Heaven (1927), and Street Angel (1928). ... Gershwin redirects here. ... John Gilbert may refer to several people: John Gilbert (actor) John Gilbert (naturalist) John Gilbert (painter) John William Gilbert (British, Labour Party politician) John Gilbert (Canadian politician) (NDP) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Dorothy Gish photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Dorothy Gish (March 11, 1898 - June 4, 1968) was an American actress. ... Lillian Diana de Guiche (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993), was an Oscar-nominated American actress, better known as Lillian Gish. ... William Haines as he appeared in his first part-talkie Alias Jimmy Valentine in 1928. ... Wiliam Surrey Hart Movie poster for Harts 1916 western The Aryan in which he played a white (Anglo-Saxon) member of a Mexican gang, having turned against his own people. ... Houdini redirects here. ... Al Jolson (May 26, 1886–October 23, 1950) was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... Joseph Frank Buster Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American comic actor and filmmaker. ... Harold Clayton Lloyd (April 20, 1893 – March 8, 1971) was an American film actor and director, most famous for his silent comedies. ... Thomas Edwin Mix (born Thomas Hezikiah Mix; January 6, 1880 – October 12, 1940) was an American film actor and the star of many early Western movies. ... Colleen Moore, born Kathleen Morrison (August 19, 1900 – January 25, 1988) was an American film actress, and one of the most fashionable stars of the silent film era. ... Mae Murray (May 10, 1889 – March 23, 1965) was an American actress and dancer, who became known as The Girl with the Bee-Stung Lips [1] and The Gardenia of the Screen. ... Morton in the 1920s Ferdinand Jelly Roll Morton September 20, 1890 - July 10, 1941) was an American virtuoso pianist, bandleader and composer who some call the first true composer of jazz music. ... Pola Negri Pola Negri [1] (December 31, 1894 - August 1, 1987) was a Polish film actress who achieved notoriety as a femme fatale in silent films between 1910s and 1930s. ... Ramón Novarro (February 6, 1899 – October 30, 1968) was a Mexican actor who achieved fame as a Latin lover in silent films. ... William Penn Adair Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was a Cherokee-American cowboy, comedian, humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, and actor. ... For the Katie Melua song, see Mary Pickford (Used to Eat Roses). ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... Edith Norma Shearer (August 10, 1902 (some sources indicate 1900) – June 12, 1983) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian-American actress. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ... Chief Tahachee (born 4 March 1904 in James Mill, Arkansas - died June 9, 1978 in San Gabriel, California) was an American-born Old Settler Cherokee Indian who was a stage and film actor, expert horseman, circus and wild west performer, contortionist and firewalker. ... Norma Talmadge Norma Talmadge (May 26, 1893 – December 24, 1957) was an American actress. ... Rudolph Valentino (May 6, 1895 – August 23, 1926) was an Italian actor, sex symbol, and early pop icon. ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... 1928 Columbia Records label with caricature of Paul Whiteman Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 – December 29, 1967) was a popular american orchestral leader. ... Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. ...

Sports figures

Warwick Windridge Armstrong (born May 22, 1879 in Kyneton, Victoria, died July 13, 1947 in Sydney, New South Wales) was an Australian cricketer. ... This article is about the sport. ... Gordon Coventry was an Australian Rules Football player who played the full-forward position for the Collingwood Football Club in the great Collingwood teams of the 1920s and 1930s. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... For other uses, including another boxing champion, see Jack Dempsey (disambiguation). ... Harold (Red) Edward Grange (June 13, 1903 – January 28, 1991), was a professional and college American football player. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Sir John Berry Jack Hobbs (born 16 December 1882 in Cambridge, England, died 21 December 1963 in Hove, Sussex) played cricket for Surrey and England. ... This article is about the sport. ... Alexander Wilson James (September 14, 1901 — June 1, 1953) was a Scottish footballer, and is most noted for being one of Arsenal F.C.s greatest players of all time. ... Bobby Jones won the first Grand Slam of golf in 1930. ... This article is about the game. ... Kenesaw Mountain Landis Kenesaw Mountain Landis (November 20, 1866 – November 25, 1944) was an American jurist who served as a federal judge from 1905 to 1922, and subsequently as the first commissioner of Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the sport. ... Suzanne Rachel Flore Lenglen (24 May 1899 – 4 July 1938) was a French tennis player who achieved much success in the French and British womens game from 1919 to 1926, winning 25 Grand Slam titles. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Helen Newington Wills Roark (October 6, 1905 – January 1, 1998), also known as Helen Wills Moody, was an American tennis player who is generally considered to have been one of the greatest female tennis players of all time. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Paavo Johannes Nurmi ( ) (June 13, 1897 Turku – October 2, 1973 Helsinki) was a Finnish runner. ... Wilfred Rhodes (born October 29, 1877, North Moor, Kirkheaton, near Huddersfield, Yorkshire; died July 8, 1973, Branksome Park, Poole) was one of the greatest cricketers of the twentieth century. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... This article is about the sport. ... Herbert Sutcliffe (born November 24, 1894, Summerbridge, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England; died January 22, 1978, Cross Hills, Yorkshire, England) was arguably the greatest opening batsman in cricket history and undoubtedly one of the greatest players of any type the game has known. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Henry Louis Lou Gehrig (June 19, 1903 â€“ June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig[2], was an American baseball player in the 1920s and 1930s, who set several Major League records and was popularly called the The Iron Horse[2] for his durability. ... This article is about the sport. ...

Styles

Robert Sobel in a promotional photo for his publisher. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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