FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
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Encyclopedia > 1920's
These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. The individual century pages contain lists of decades and years. See history for different organizations of historical events. See Calendar and List of calendars for other groupings of years. For earlier time periods see cosmological timeline, geologic timescale, evolutionary timeline, pleistocene... Centuries:
Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. In the sense of the Common Era... 19th century - (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 20th century - (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2000-2099. The 21st century is the first century of the 3rd millennium... 21st century
This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. See also centuries and history. Decade is also an album by Neil Young. During the 20th Century and continuing today it became popular to look at that centurys decades as historical entities in themselves. Particular... Decades:

Events and trends Technology Early commercial production of automobiles. Science Henri Becquerel discovers radioactivity Discovery of x-rays by Wilhelm Röntgen Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius and US geologist Thomas Crowder Chamberlain independently come to the conclusion that burning fossil fuels might cause global warming due to CO2 emissions War... 1890s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s Years: 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 Events and Trends Technology Lawrence Hargrave makes the first stable wing design for a heavier-than-air aircraft Orville and... 1900s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s - 1910s - 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s Years: 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 Events and trends Science Einsteins theory of general relativity Max von Laue discovers the diffraction of x-rays by... 1910s - 1920s - Events and trends Technology Jet engine invented Science Nuclear fission discovered by Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner and Fritz Strassmann Pluto, the ninth planet from the Sun, is discovered by Clyde Tombaugh British biologist Arthur Tansley coins term ecosystem War, peace and politics Socialists proclaim The death of Capitalism Rise to... 1930s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s - 1940s - 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s Years: 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 Events and trends Technology First nuclear bomb First cruise missile, the V1 flying bomb and the first ballistic missile, the... 1940s Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. See History of nuclear weapons Sputnik, the first man-made satellite, and thus the Sputnik crisis The De Havilland Comet enters service as the worlds first jet airliner Charles Townes builds a maser in 1953 at Columbia University... 1950s

Years:

1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. January 9 - Britain announces it will build 1,000,000 homes for war veterans. January 10 - League of Nations holds its first meeting... 1920 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). Events January 2 - The first religious radio broadcast ( KDKA AM in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) January 2 - Spanish liner Santa Isabel sinks off Villa Garcia - 244 dead January 2 - DeYoung Museum in Golden Gate Park San Francisco opens. January 20... 1921 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Events January 7 - Dáil Éireann, the extra-legal parliament of the Irish Republic, ratifies the Anglo-Irish Treaty by 64-57 votes. January 10 - Arthur Griffith is elected President of Dáil Éireann... 1922 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-June January 1 - Grouping of all UK railway companies into four larger companies January 10 - Lithuania seizes and annexes Memel January 11 - Troops from France and Belgium occupy the Ruhr area to force Germany... 1923 1924 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 7 - Great fire in London harbour January 8 - Heavy blizzards in England January 10 - British submarine L-34 sinks in the English Channel - 43 dead. January 21 - Vladimir Lenin dies and Joseph Stalin... 1924 Events January-May January 3 - Benito Mussolini announces he is taking dictatorial powers over Italy. January 5 - Nellie Tayloe Ross becomes the first female governor in the United States. January 21 - Albania declares itself a republic January 30 - Government of Turkey throws Patriarch Constantine VI out of Istanbul February 1... 1925 1926 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-April January 1 - Irelands first regular radio service, 2RN (later Radio Éireann), begins broadcasting. January 8 - Abdul-Aziz ibn Saud becomes the King of Hejaz January 12 - Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll... 1926 Events January 7 - First transatlantic telephone call - New York City to London January 9 - Military rebellion crushed in Lisbon January 14 - Paul Doumer elected president of France January 19 - Britain sends troops to China February 12 - First British troops lad on Shanghai February 14 - Earthquake in Yugoslavia - 700 dead February... 1927 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-May January 6- 7 - River Thames floods in London - 14 drowned January 17 - OGPU arrests Lev Trotsky in Moscow; he assumes a status of passive resistance and is exiled to Turkestan February - Kurume University... 1928 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 2 - Canada and the United States agree on a plan to preserve Niagara Falls. January 9 - The Seeing Eye is established with the mission to train dogs to assist the blind ( Nashville, Tennessee... 1929

Sometimes referred to as the "Roaring Twenties".


Contents

Events and trends

Technology

  • John Logie Baird (b. August 14, 1888, d. June 14, 1946) of Helensburgh, Scotland. Educated at the University of Glasgow, he was the first to invent a working system of television capable of showing moving images with shades of grey. Baird experimented with Nipkow disk. After many accidents, he finally... John Logie Baird invents the first working See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band Family watching television in the 1950s. Television is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound over a distance. The term has come to refer to all the aspects of television programming and transmission... television system. (1925)
  • Charles Lindbergh with the Spirit of St. Louis. Charles Augustus Lindbergh ( February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) was a pioneering United States aviator famous for piloting the first solo non-stop flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 1927. Early life Lindbergh was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of... Charles Lindbergh becomes the first person to fly solo non-stop across the The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of its surface. The oceans name, derived from Greek mythology, means the Sea of Atlas. This ocean occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending in a north-south direction and is divided into the North Atlantic... Atlantic Ocean ( May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). There are 225 days remaining. Events 325 - The First Council of Nicaea is held; the first Ecumenical Council of the Christian Church. 526 - An Earthquake kills about 300,000 people in Syria and... 20 May- May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). There are 224 days remaining. Events 996 - Sixteen year old Otto III is crowned Holy Roman Emperor. 1674 - John Sobieski is elected by the nobility to be the King of Poland. 1856 - Lawrence... 21 May 1927)
  • Penicillin is a β-lactam antibiotic used in the treatment of bacterial infections caused by susceptible, usually Gram-positive, organisms. The name penicillin can either refer to several variants of penicillin available, or to the group of antibiotics derived from the penicillins. Penicillin nucleus Penicillin has a molecular formula R... Penicillin is discovered by Alexander Fleming Sir Alexander Fleming (August 6, 1881 - March 11, 1955) is famous as the discoverer of the antibiotic substance lysozyme and for isolating the antibiotic substance penicillin from the fungus Penicillium notatum. Fleming was born on a farm at Lochfield in Ayrshire, Scotland and was schooled for two years... Sir Alexander Fleming. (1928)

Science

  • Great advances in Fig. 1: The wavefunctions of an electron in a hydrogen atom possessing definite energy (increasing downward: n=1,2,3,...) and angular momentum (increasing across: s, p, d,...). Brighter areas correspond to higher probability density for a position measurement. The angular momentum and energy are quantized, and only take on... quantum mechanics
    • The wave equation is an important partial differential equation which generally describes all kinds of waves, such as sound waves, light waves and water waves. It arises in many different fields, such as acoustics, electromagnetics, and fluid dynamics. Variations of the wave equation are also found in quantum mechanics and... Wave mechanics and the In physics, the Schrödinger equation, proposed by the Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger in 1925, describes the time-dependence of quantum mechanical systems. It is of central importance to the theory of quantum mechanics, playing a role analogous to Newtons second law in classical mechanics. In... Schrödinger equation
    • Werner Heisenberg Werner Karl Heisenberg (December 5, 1901 – February 1, 1976) was a celebrated German physicist and Nobel laureate, one of the founders of quantum mechanics. He was born in Würzburg, Germany and died in Munich. Heisenberg was the head of Nazi Germanys nuclear energy program, though... Werner Heisenberg formulates the In quantum physics, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, sometimes called the Heisenberg indeterminacy principle, expresses a limitation on accuracy of (nearly) simultaneous measurement of observables such as the position and the momentum of a particle. It furthermore precisely quantifies the imprecision by providing a lower bound (greater than zero) for the... uncertainty principle
    • Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, (August 8, 1902 - October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. Biography Paul Dirac was born in the English city of Bristol. His father, Charles Dirac, was an immigrant from the Valais Canton in Switzerland who taught... Paul Dirac's unification of quantum mechanics with Special relativity (SR) or the special theory of relativity is the physical theory published in 1905 by Albert Einstein. It replaced Newtonian notions of space and time, and incorporated electromagnetism as represented by Maxwells equations. The theory is called special because it is a special case of Einsteins... special relativity

War, peace and politics

  • Rise of Communism is a term that can refer to one of several things: a social and economic system, an ideology which supports that system, or a political movement that wishes to implement that system. As a theoretical social and economic system, communism would be a type of egalitarian society with no... communism after Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. Battle aftermath. Remains of the Chateau Wood World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations, and the War to End All Wars, was a world conflict occurring from 1914 to... World War I
  • The Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. If you can do so, please leave a note on the talk page or adjust the article text as necessary, and then remove this notice. The term Red Scare has been applied to two distinct periods of intense anti-Communism... Red Scare (1920-1921)
  • In the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States, peak of the Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) was originally a Protestant white-supremacist fraternal organization founded by ex-servicemen of the Confederate Army in 1865, but it was disbanded by 1880. The original group opposed the reforms enforced on... Ku Klux Klan
  • The Civil War (June 1922–April 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. Opponents of the Treaty objected to the fact that it retained constitutional links... Irish Civil War
  • The The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann) was (1922–1937) the name of the state comprising the 26 of Irelands 32 counties which were separated from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland under the Irish Free State Agreement (or Anglo-Irish Treaty) signed by British... Irish Free State gains independence from the The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom in 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Events January 7 - Dáil Éireann, the extra-legal parliament of the Irish Republic, ratifies the Anglo-Irish Treaty by 64-57 votes. January 10 - Arthur Griffith is elected President of Dáil Éireann... 1922
  • The Turkish War of Independence is a part of the History of Turkey that spans from the defeat of the Ottoman Empire by the Allies in World War I to the declaration of the Republic of Turkey on October 29, 1923. Part of this war which was fought against Greece... Turkish War of Independence
  • Polish-Bolshevik War Conflict Polish-Bolshevik War Date 1919– 1921 Place Central and Eastern Europe Result Polish victory The Polish-Soviet War was the war (February 1919 – March 1921) that determined the borders between the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic and Second Polish Republic. The war ended with... Polish-Soviet war
  • First The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. Under its leader Tony Blair it won a landslide in the 1997 general election, and formed its first government since 1979. It... Labour Government of James Ramsay MacDonald (October 12, 1866 - November 9, 1937) was Britains first Labour Prime Minister (January-November 1924 and June 1929-August 1931) and subsequently Prime Minister of the National Government of August 1931-June 1935. Biography Born at Lossiemouth in Scotland, he was from very humble beginnings and... Ramsay MacDonald formed in the The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom
  • The Kellogg-Briand Pact, also known as the Pact of Paris, is a treaty between the United States and other nations providing for the renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy. It was proposed in 1927 by Aristide Briand, foreign minister of France, as a treaty between the... Kellogg-Briand Pact to end war

Economics

  • Economic boom ended by " The phrase Black Tuesday refers to October 29, 1929, five days after the United States stock market crash of Black Thursday, when general panic set in and everyone with investments in the market tried to pull out of the market at once. This week and its aftermath marked the start... Black Tuesday" ( October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 63 days remaining. Events 437 - Valentinian III, Western Roman Emperor, marries Eudoxia, daughter of his cousin Theodosius II, Eastern Roman Emperor in Constantinople. This unifies the two branches of the House of... October 29, 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 2 - Canada and the United States agree on a plan to preserve Niagara Falls. January 9 - The Seeing Eye is established with the mission to train dogs to assist the blind ( Nashville, Tennessee... 1929); the A stock market crash is a sudden dramatic loss of value of shares of stock in corporations. Crashes often follow speculative stock market bubbles such as the dot-com boom. The most famous crash in 1929, (known as Black Thursday) when the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 50%, preceded the... stock market crashes, leading to the The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. However, most of the remainder of the 1930s was spent recovering from the contraction, and it would be well after World War II when such indicators as industrial production, share prices and global GDP... Great Depression

Culture, religion

  • Youth culture of The The Lost Generation also refers to the ex-Red Guards in China. See Red Guards (China). The term Lost Generation was coined by Gertrude Stein to refer to a group of American literary notables who lived in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s. Significant members included Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott... Lost Generation; The term flapper, which became common slang in the 1920s, referred to a new breed of young women who wore short skirts, bobbed their hair and flaunted their disdain for what was then considered decent behavior. The typical flapper was unafraid to wear cosmetics or to be seen smoking or... flappers, A USPS stamp from the Celebrate the Century series: Flappers Doing the Charleston by John Held Jr. The Charleston is a dance, named for the city of Charleston, South Carolina. It was popular in the 1920s, and spawned Lindy Hop in the 1930s. Charleston is danced in 8-count: solo... Charleston, bobbed hair
  • This article is about the prohibition of alcoholic beverages; separate articles on the prohibition of drugs in general and writs of prohibition are also available. Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. Prohibition was any of several periods during which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages were... Prohibition — legal attempt to end consumption of In general usage, alcohol (from Arabic al-khwl الكحول, or al-ghawl الغول) refers almost always to ethanol, also known as grain alcohol, and often to any beverage that contains ethanol (see alcoholic beverage). This sense underlies the term alcoholism ( addiction... alcohol in the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... USA
  • "The Jazz Age" — For other article subjects named Jazz see jazz (disambiguation). Jazz is a musical art form characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms, and improvisation. It has been called the first original art form to develop in the United States of America. Jazz has roots in West African... Jazz and jazz-influenced dance music widely popular
  • Rise of broadcast Radio transmission diagram and electromagnetic waves Radio is a technology that allows the transmission of signals by modulation of electromagnetic waves with frequencies below those of light. Radio waves Radio waves are a form of electromagnetic radiation, and are created whenever a charged object accelerates with a frequency that lies... radio as an entertainment medium
  • Start of commercially viable " A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. Although not the first, the most famous of the early talkies was The Jazz Singer in 1927. In the early years after introduction of sound, sound films were called talkies, from talking... Talking Pictures" ( For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... motion pictures with sound tracks)
  • Beginning of Surrealism is an artistic movement and an aesthetic philosophy that aims for the liberation of the mind by emphasizing the critical and imaginative powers of the subconscious. Originated in early-twentieth century European avant-garde art and literary circles, many early Surrealists were associated with the earlier Dada movement. Surrealism... surrealist movement
  • Beginning of the Asheville City Hall. This building epotomizes the Art Deco style of the 1920s. Art Deco was a movement in decorative arts that also affected architecture. It derived its name from the Worlds fair held in Paris in 1925, formally titled the Exposition Internationale des Arts D coratifs et Industriels... Art Deco movement
  • Fads such as dance marathons, This article discusses the four-player game of Chinese origin. For the tile-matching game, see Mahjong Solitaire. A game of Mahjong in progress. Mahjong is a gambling game for four players that originated in China. In Chinese, Mahjong is most commonly written 麻將, which is romanized as m... mah-jongg, Crossword Puzzle was the second to last album made by The Partridge Family, and was not one of the most popular albums. It was released in 1973 and did not produce a U.S. single. This album was finally released on CD in 2003 on Aristas BMG Heritage label... crossword puzzles and pole-sitting are popular
  • The Harlem Renaissance
  • The The Scopes Trial of 1925 pitted William Jennings Bryan against Clarence Darrow and teacher John T. Scopes in an American court case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, forbidding the teaching of evolution in Tennessee public schools. It has often been called the Scopes Monkey Trial. Testing... Scopes Trial (1925) which questioned evolution

People

World leaders

  • Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King ( December 17, 1874– July 22, 1950) was the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921, to June 28, 1926; September 25, 1926, to August 7, 1930; and October 23, 1935, to November 15, 1948. He had the longest combined time in the Prime... William Lyon Mackenzie King ( Canada is an independent sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. Bordering the United States, its territorial claims extend north into the Arctic Ocean as far as the North Pole. Canada is a federation of ten provinces... Canada)
  • President Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866 - March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary leader and statesman who is considered by many to be the Father of Modern China. He had a significant influence in the overthrow of the Qing Dynasty and establishment of the Republic of China. A founder of... Sun Yat-sen ( The Republic of China ( Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a multiparty democratic state that is composed of the... Republic of China)
  • President Chiang Kai-shek ( October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was a Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. He commanded the Northern Expedition to unify China against the warlords and emerged victorious in 1928... Chiang Kai-shek ( The Republic of China ( Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a multiparty democratic state that is composed of the... Republic of China)
  • President Paul von Hindenburg President of Germany Paul von Hindenburg (full name Paul Ludwig Hans Anton von Beneckendorff und von Hindenburg) ( October 2, 1847– August 2, 1934) was a German Field Marshal and statesman. An important figure during World War I, he also served as President of Germany from 1925... Paul von Hindenburg ( The Federal Republic of Germany ( German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is one of the worlds leading industrialised countries, located in the heart of Europe. Due to its central location, Germany has more neighbours than any other European country: these are Denmark in the north, Poland and the Czech Republic in the... Germany)
  • King Victor Emmanuel III Victor Emmanuel III (Italian: Vittorio Emanuele III) (November 11, 1869 - December 28, 1947), nicknamed The Soldier, was the King of Italy (July 29, 1900 - May 9, 1946), and claimed the titles Emperor of Ethiopia (1936 - 1943) and King of Albania (1939 - 1943). Victor Emmanuel IIIs position... Victor Emmanuel III ( The Italian Republic or Italy ( Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a country in southern Europe. It comprises a boot-shaped peninsula and two large islands in the Mediterranean Sea, Sicily and Sardinia, and shares its northern alpine boundary with France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. The independent countries of San... Italy)
  • Prime Minister Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini ( July 29, 1883 – April 28, 1945) ruled Italy as a dictator from 1922 to 1943. He created a fascist state through the... Benito Mussolini ( The Italian Republic or Italy ( Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a country in southern Europe. It comprises a boot-shaped peninsula and two large islands in the Mediterranean Sea, Sicily and Sardinia, and shares its northern alpine boundary with France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. The independent countries of San... Italy)
  • President William Thomas Cosgrave, (June 6, 1880 - November 16, 1965) served as the first President of the Executive Council of the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1932. W.T. Cosgrave, as he was generally known, was born in Dublin in 1880. He was elected as a member of Dublin Corporation... W.T. Cosgrave ( The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann) was (1922–1937) the name of the state comprising the 26 of Irelands 32 counties which were separated from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland under the Irish Free State Agreement (or Anglo-Irish Treaty) signed by British... Irish Free State)
  • President Mustafa Kemal Atatürk Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881 – November 10, 1938), Turkish soldier and statesman, was the founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey. Early career Atatürk was born in the Ottoman city of Selânik (now Thessaloníki, Greece), where his birthplace is within... Mustafa Kemal(Attaturk) ( The Republic of Turkey is a country located in Southwest Asia with a small part of its territory (3%) in southeastern Europe. Until 1922, the country was the center of the Ottoman Empire. The Anatolian peninsula, between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Sea, forms the core of the country... Turkey)
  • Emperor Hirohito (裕仁), the Shōwa Emperor (昭和天皇), (April 29, 1901 - January 7, 1989) reigned over Japan from 1926 to 1989. He was known in the West by his given name Hirohito (he had no surname). He was the 124th Emperor of Japan. Emperor Hirohito His... Hirohito ( Official language Japanese Capital Tokyo Largest City Tokyo Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 60th 377,835 km² 0.8% Population  - Total ( 2004)  - Density Ranked 10th 127,333,002 337/km² GDP  - Total (PPP, 2005)  - Total (nominal)  ... Japan)
  • Pius XI (born Achille Ratti May 31, 1857 - Rome, February 10, 1939) was Pope from February 6, 1922 until February 10, 1939. Pope Pius XI Crowned He issued the encyclical Quas Primas establishing the feast of Christ the King. The main idea here is that the Catholic religion, beliefs, morality... Pope Pius XI
  • Vladimir Ilyich Lenin ( Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин  listen?), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) ( April 22 (April 10 ( O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was... Vladimir Lenin ( The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) .( Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик... Soviet Union)
  • Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin ( Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili ( Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვილ... Joseph Stalin ( The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) .( Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик... Soviet Union)
  • King King George V King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert) (3 June 1865–20 January 1936) was the last British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changing the name to the... George V ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Prime Minister David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM (January 17, 1863–March 26, 1945) was a British statesman and the last Liberal to be Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Upbringing Although born in Manchester in 1863, David Lloyd George was a Welsh-speaking Welshman, the only... David Lloyd George ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law (September 16, 1858 _ October 30, 1923) was a Conservative British statesman and Prime Minister. Although born in Kingston, New Brunswick, Canada, son of a Presbyterian minister, Law was raised by wealthy Scottish cousins. Law eventually became a partner in a Glasgow iron-working firm, and was... Andrew Bonar Law ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (August 3, 1867 - December 14, 1947) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on three separate occasions. Early Life Born at Bewdley in Worcestershire he was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, and went into the family business. In 1908 he succeeded... Stanley Baldwin ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • Prime Minister James Ramsay MacDonald (October 12, 1866 - November 9, 1937) was Britains first Labour Prime Minister (January-November 1924 and June 1929-August 1931) and subsequently Prime Minister of the National Government of August 1931-June 1935. Biography Born at Lossiemouth in Scotland, he was from very humble beginnings and... Ramsay MacDonald ( The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the British Commonwealth and European Union. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, UK or, inaccurately, as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent parts. Three of these parts... United Kingdom)
  • President Dr. Thomas Woodrow Wilson ( December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 45th state Governor of New Jersey ( 1911- 1913) and later the 28th President of the United States ( 1913- 1921). He was the second Democrat to serve two consecutive terms in the White House ( Andrew Jackson was the... Woodrow Wilson ( The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States)
  • President Warren Gamaliel Harding ( November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) was the 29th ( 1921- 1923) President of the United States and the sixth President to die in office. Hardings presidential legacy has never found a consensus among historians, nor among American citizens. Overshadowed by scandals instigated by three of his... Warren G. Harding ( The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States)
  • President John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ( July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the twenty-ninth ( 1921- 1923) Vice President and the thirtieth ( 1923- 1929) President of the United States, succeeding to that office upon the death of Warren G. Harding. Biography He was born in Plymouth, Windsor County, Vermont on... Calvin Coolidge ( The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States)
  • President Herbert Clark Hoover ( August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) is best known as being the 31st ( 1929- 1933) President of the United States. However, prior to that, he was a successful mining engineer, humanitarian, and administrator. He had the longest retirement of any U.S. President. Family background Hoover... Herbert Hoover ( The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States)

Entertainers

  • For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). Chaplin in his costume as The Tramp Charles Spencer Chaplin (April 16, 1889 _ December 25, 1977) was the most famous actor in early to mid cinema, and later also a notable director. His principal character was The Tramp... Charlie Chaplin
  • George Gershwin photograph by Edward Steichen in 1927. This Photo is said to be Iras favorite[1] he died when he was five { States|American]] composer. He was born Jacob Gershowitz in Brooklyn, New York to Russian Jewish immigrant parents. George made most of his works with his lyricist... George Gershwin
  • Edward Kennedy Duke Ellington (Born: April 29, 1899 in Washington, DC – Died: May 24, 1974 in New York City) was an American jazz composer, pianist and bandleader. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969 and the Legion of Honor by France in 1973. Both are the... Duke Ellington
  • Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. (December 18, 1897 - December 28, 1952) was an African American pianist, bandleader, arranger and composer, important in the development of big band jazz and Swing music. Henderson was born in Cuthbert, Georgia. His father was a principal and his mother taught piano. He attend Atlanta University... Fletcher Henderson
  • Asa Yoelson (May 26, 1886 - October 23, 1950), better known as Al Jolson, was an American immigrant son of a Russian Jew, and was born in Seredzius, Lithuania. Jolson became a popular singer and a superstar of the Broadway stage, radio and film, becoming the first pop music star to... Al Jolson
  • Ferdinand Jelly Roll Morton (September 20, 1890 - July 10, 1941) was a virtuoso pianist, a bandleader, and a composer who some call the first true composer of Jazz music. Morton was a colorful character who liked to generate publicity for himself by bragging. His business card referred to him as... Jelly Roll Morton
  • Cole Porter ( June 9, 1891 - October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter. His works include the musical comedies Kiss Me, Kate ( 1948) (based on Shakespeares The Taming of the Shrew), Fifty Million Frenchmen and Anything Goes, as well as songs like Night and Day, I Get a... Cole Porter
  • Bessie Smith photographed by Carl Van Vechten Bessie Smith ( April 15, 1894 - September 26, 1937) was an early American blues singer born in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Initially hired as a dancer, she landed her first job with the Moses Stokes company, a show that also included Ma Rainey, who did not... Bessie Smith
  • Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. Born Hubert Prior Vallée in Island Pond, Vermont, he grew up in Westbrook, Maine. In high school he took up the saxophone and acquired the nickname Rudy after then famous saxophonist... Rudy Vallee
  • Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 - December 29, 1967) was a popular United States orchestral leader. 1928 Columbia Records label with caricature of Paul Whiteman Whiteman was born in Denver, Colorado. He started out as a classical violinist and violist, then started leading a jazz-influenced dance band which became locally... Paul Whiteman
  • Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 19011 – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nickname Satchmo) was an African American jazz musician. Probably the most famous jazz musician of the 20th century, Armstrong was a charismatic, innovative performer whose musical skills and bright personality transformed jazz from a rough regional... Louis Armstrong
  • Eddie Cantor (January 31, 1892 - October 10, 1964) was a comedian, singer, actor, songwriter, and one of the most popular entertainers in the United States of America in the early and middle 20th century. His nickname was Banjo Eyes. Eddie Cantor in the 1920s Cantor was born as Edward Israel... Eddie Cantor
  • Helen Kane
  • Buster Keaton in Sherlock Jr., 1924 Joseph Francis Buster Keaton (October 4, 1895 _ February 1, 1966) was a popular and influential American silent_film comic actor and filmmaker. His trademark was physical comedy with a stoic, deadpan expression on his face, earning him the nickname The Great Stone Face. His... Buster Keaton

Sports figures

  • Ruth batting for the Yankees George Herman Ruth, ( February 6, 1895 - August 16, 1948), better known as Babe Ruth and also commonly known by the nicknames The Bambino and The Sultan of Swat, was an American baseball player and United States national icon. He was one of the first five... Babe Ruth (U.S. A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium in Saint Louis, Missouri. Baseball is a team sport, in which a fist-sized ball is thrown by a player called a pitcher and hit with a bat. Scoring involves running and touching markers on the ground called bases. The ball... baseball player)
  • Gordon Coventry was an Australian Rules Football player who played the full-forward position for the Collingwood Football Club in the great Collingwood teams of the 1920s and 1930s. He held the record for most career goals (1299) for 60 years, until it was broken by Tony Lockett. He was... Gordon Coventry (Australian Australian rules football (also known as Aussie Rules or Footy) is a game played between two teams of 18 players, generally played on cricket ovals during the winter months. Developed in Melbourne, this football code has become the predominant winter sport in many parts of Australia. General description Football competitions... Australian Rules Football player)
  • William Tatem Tilden II (February 10, 1893 _ June 5, 1953), often called Big Bill, was an American tennis player. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to a wealthy family, he was a Junior at birth but changed his name to II when he was in his mid-20s. Bill Tilden hitting... Bill Tilden (U.S. Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a... tennis player)
  • This article is about the boxer named Jack Dempsey. There is another article on the fish commonly called Jack Dempsey. William Harrison Jack Dempsey (June 24, 1895-May 31, 1983), was an American boxer who won the world heavyweight title. During the 1920s he was involved in many famous fights... Jack Dempsey (U.S. boxer)
  • Time Magazine, October 5, 1925 Harold Edward Grange, better known as Red Grange (June 13, 1903 - January 28, 1991), was a college football player. He was a charter member of both the College and Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was born in Forksville, Pennsylvania. When he was five, his... Red Grange (U.S. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. It is one of the more physically demanding sports, with a great deal of physical contact occurring on each play, and requiring rare athletic talent. However, it is also a complex game of... American football player)
  • Bobby Jones can refer to different people: Bobby Jones: a golf player Bobby Jones: a baseball player Bobby Jones: a basketball player Bobby Jones: a gospel singer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article... Bobby Jones (U.S. This article is about the sport of golf. For other meanings, see Golf (disambiguation). Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. It is defined in the Rules of... golfer)

  Results from FactBites:
 
INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE - OLYMPIC GAMES (339 words)
The 1916 Olympics were scheduled to be held in Berlin, but were canceled because of what came to be known as World War I. The 1920 Games were awarded to Antwerp to honor the suffering that had been inflicted on the Belgian people during the war.
The Opening Ceremony was notable for the introduction of the Olympic flag and the presentation of the Athletes’ Oath.
The 1920 12-foot dinghy sailing event was the only event in Olympic history to be held in two countries.
1920 Census :: 1920 U.S. Federal Census :: 1920 Free Census Resources (748 words)
The 1920 U.S. Federal Census was the fourteenth enumeration of the United States population.
The 1920 census schedules are arranged by state or territory, and thereunder by county, and finally by enumeration district.
The 1920 census, however, did not ask about unemployment on the day of the census, nor did it ask about service in the Union or Confederate army or navy.
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