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Encyclopedia > 1919 World Series
1919 World Series
Team / Wins Manager Season
Cincinnati Reds (5) Pat Moran 96-44, .686, GA: 9
Chicago White Sox (3) Kid Gleason 88-52, .629, GA: 3½
Dates: October 1October 9, 1919
MVP: none selected
Television: N/A
TV announcers: N/A
Radio network: {{{radio_network}}}
radio announcers: {{{radio_announcers}}}
Umpires: Cy Rigler (NL), Billy Evans (AL), Ernie Quigley (NL), Dick Nallin (AL)
Future Hall of Famers: Reds: Edd Roush. White Sox: Eddie Collins, Red Faber (dnp), Ray Schalk.
ALCS: N/A
NLCS: N/A
World Series Program


The 1919 World Series matched the American League champion Chicago White Sox against the National League champion Cincinnati Reds. Although most World Series' were of the best-of-seven format, the 1919 World Series was a best-of-nine-games series (along with 1903, 1920, and 1921). Partly to increase the popularity of the sport and also increase revenue, baseball decided to try the best-of-nine game format.[1] Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... Patrick Joseph Moran (February 7, 1876 – March 7, 1924) was an American catcher and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... A 1904 photograph of Gleason as the second baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The World Series MVP Award is given to the player who most contributes to his teams success in the World Series. ... A sportscaster is an announcer on radio or television who specializes in reporting or commenting on sports events. ... A radio network is a network system which distributes programming to multiple stations simultaneously, or slightly delayed, for the purpose of extending total coverage beyond the limits of a single broadcast signal. ... A sportscaster is an announcer on radio or television who specializes in reporting or commenting on sports events. ... Home plate umpire Gary Darling signals that the last pitch was a strike In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and meting out discipline. ... Charles Cy Rigler (May 16, 1882 - December 21, 1935) was an American umpire in Major League Baseball who worked in the National League from 1906 to 1935. ... William George Evans (February 10, 1884 - January 23, 1956) was an American umpire in Major League Baseball, working in the American League from 1906 to 1927. ... Ernest Ernie Quigley (March 22, 1880 in Newcastle, New Brunswick, Canada) - December 10, 1960) was notable both as a basketball referee and baseball umpire. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Edd Roush of the Cincinnati Reds at Weeghman Field in 1919. ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... Urban Clarence Red Faber (September 6, 1888 - September 25, 1976) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1914 until 1933, playing his entire career for the Chicago White Sox. ... Ray Schalk of the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park in 1913. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... For other uses, see National League (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... 1903 World Series Poster (a latter-day mockup) The 1903 World Series, the first modern World Series to be played in Major League Baseball, matched the Boston Americans against the Pittsburgh Pirates, with Boston prevailing five games to three. ... In the 1920 World Series, the Cleveland Indians beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games, five games to two. ... The New York Giants beat the New York Yankees in 8 games. ...


The events of the series are often associated with the Black Sox Scandal, when several members of the Chicago franchise conspired with gamblers to throw World Series games. The 1919 World Series was the last World Series to take place without a Commissioner of Baseball in place. In 1920, the various franchise owners installed Kenesaw Mountain Landis as the first "Commissioner of Baseball." Not to be confused with the Baltimore Black Sox of the Negro Leagues. ... In the criminal law, a conspiracy is an agreement between natural persons to break the law at some time in the future, and, in some cases, with at least one overt act in furtherance of that agreement. ... Caravaggio, The Cardsharps, c. ... Match fixing or game fixing in organized sports occurs when a match is played to a completely or partially pre-determined result. ... The Commissioner of Baseball is the chief executive of Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1920 throughout the world. ... This is a list of individuals, groups of individuals, and companies who have owned and operated a professional sports organization. ... Kenesaw Mountain Landis Kenesaw Mountain Landis (November 20, 1866 – November 25, 1944) was an American jurist who served as a federal judge from 1905 to 1922, and subsequently as the first commissioner of Major League Baseball. ...


Future Hall of Famer Red Faber was injured and unable to pitch for the White Sox. This injury severely limited the pitching options for Kid Gleason. Urban Clarence Red Faber (September 6, 1888 - September 25, 1976) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1914 until 1933, playing his entire career for the Chicago White Sox. ...


Records: Cincinnati Reds (W: ) - Chicago White Sox (W: ) Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The...


Managers: (Cincinnati), [|William "Kid" Gleason]] (Chicago)


Umpires:

Contents

Summary

NL Cincinnati Reds (5) vs. AL Chicago White Sox (3) Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The...

Game Score Date Location Attendance
1 Chicago White Sox – 1, Cincinnati Reds – 9 October 1 Redland Field 30,511
2 Chicago White Sox – 2, Cincinnati Reds – 4 October 2 Redland Field 29,690
3 Cincinnati Reds – 0, Chicago White Sox – 3 October 3 Comiskey Park 29,126
4 Cincinnati Reds – 2, Chicago White Sox – 0 October 4 Comiskey Park 34,363
5 Cincinnati Reds – 5, Chicago White Sox – 0 October 6 Comiskey Park 34,379
6 Chicago White Sox – 5, Cincinnati Reds – 4 (10 innings) October 7 Redland Field 32,006
7 Chicago White Sox – 4, Cincinnati Reds – 1 October 8 Redland Field 13,923
8 Cincinnati Reds – 10, Chicago White Sox – 5 October 9 Comiskey Park 32,930

is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:Http://www. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Fix

The conspiracy was the brainchild of White Sox first baseman Arnold "Chick" Gandil and Joseph "Sport" Sullivan, who was a professional gambler of Gandil's acquaintance. New York gangster Arnold Rothstein supplied the major connections needed. The money was supplied by Abe Attell, former featherweight boxing champion, who accepted the offer even though he didn't have the $80,000 that the White Sox wanted. [citation needed]


Gandil enlisted seven of his teammates, motivated by a mixture of greed and a dislike of penurious club owner Charles Comiskey, to implement the fix. Starting pitchers Eddie Cicotte and Claude "Lefty" Williams, outfielder Oscar "Happy" Felsch, and infielder Charles "Swede" Risberg were all involved. Buck Weaver and "Shoeless" Joe Jackson were also asked to participate, but refused; they were later banned with the others for knowing of the fix but not reporting it. Utility infielder Fred McMullin was not initially approached, but got word of the fix and threatened to report the others unless he was in on the payoff. Sullivan and his two associates Sleepy Bill Burns and Billy Maharg, somewhat out of their depth, approached Rothstein to provide the money for the players, who were promised a total of $100,000. [citation needed]


Stories of the "Black Sox" scandal have usually included Comiskey in its gallery of subsidiary villains, focusing in particular on his intentions regarding a clause in Cicotte's contract that would have paid Cicotte an additional $10,000 bonus for winning 30 games. According to Eliot Asinof's account of the events, Eight Men Out, Cicotte was "rested" for the season's final two weeks after reaching his 29th win, presumably to deny him the bonus. However, the record is perhaps more complex. Cicotte won his 29th game on September 19, had an ineffective start on September 24, and was pulled after a few innings in a tuneup on the season's final day, September 28 (the World Series beginning 3 days later). Reportedly, Cicotte agreed to the fix on the same day he won his 29th game, before he could have known of any efforts to deny him a chance to win his 30th.[1]


Matchups

Game 1

October 1, 1919 at Redland Field in Cincinnati, Ohio is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Crosley Field was a baseball stadium that stood in Cincinnati, Ohio from 1912-1970. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ...


The first game began at 3pm that day at Cincinnati's Redland Field with Cicotte on the mound for Chicago, who failed to score in the top of the first inning, and 30,511 fans in the stands with people outside the park paying at least $50 per ticket. In the bottom of that inning Cicotte (who was paid his $10,000 the night before the series began) hit the lead-off hitter, Morrie Rath in the back with just his second pitch, a prearranged signal to Arnold Rothstein that the game was going to be thrown. Despite this, the game remained close for a while, due in part to some excellent defense from the conspirators, who did not wish to bring suspicion on themselves. In the fourth, however, Cicotte gave up a sequence of hits, including a two-out triple to the opposing pitcher, as the Reds scored five times to break a 1-1 tie. Cicotte was replaced by a relief pitcher but the damage was done, and the Reds finally triumphed 9-1. Morrie Rath was an American baseball player who played second baseman for the Chicago White Sox and Cincinnati Reds in the 1910s. ... Arnold Rothstein Arnold Rothstein (January 17, 1882 - November 4, 1928) was a New York businessman and gambler, chiefly famous for his role as a kingpin of organized crime. ...


By the evening of that day, there were already signs that things were going wrong. Only Cicotte, who had shrewdly demanded his $10,000 in advance, had been paid. Burns and Maharg met with Abe Attell, a former world boxing champion who acted as intermediary for Rothstein, but he did not provide the next installment ($20,000), wanting to place it out on bets for the next game. The next morning Gandil met Attell and again demanded their money. Again, the players went unpaid.Kyle Eaton "Big Ears Hitter" Once found in the locker room hitting on Kenton Bryant, and Kyle was then banned from the team. Abraham Washington Attell (born February 22, 1884 in San Francisco, California, United States – died February 6, 1970 in New Paltz, New York), better known in the boxing world as Abe Attell, was a boxer who became known for his involvement in scandals as well as for his long period... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ...

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago (A) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 1
Cincinnati (N) 1 0 0 5 0 0 2 1 x 9 14 1
W: Walter "Dutch" Reuther (1-0)   L: Eddie Cicotte (0-1)

Walter Henry Ruether (September 29, 1893-May 16, 1970) was an American baseball player who pitched for five different Major League teams. ... Edward Victor Cicotte (June 19, 1884 - May 5, 1969 Born and Died in Detroit, Michigan) (pronounced See-Cot) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball best known for his time with the Chicago White Sox. ...

Game 2

October 2, 1919 at Redland Field in Cincinnati, Ohio is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Crosley Field was a baseball stadium that stood in Cincinnati, Ohio from 1912-1970. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ...


Although they had not received their money, the players were still willing to go through with the fix. "Lefty" Williams, the starting pitcher in Game Two, was not going to be as obvious as Cicotte. After a shaky start he pitched well until the fourth inning, when he walked three and gave up as many runs. After that, Williams went back to looking unhittable, giving up only one more run; but a lack of clutch hitting, with Gandil a particular villain, meant that the White Sox lost 4-2. Attell was still in no mood to pay up. Burns managed to get $10,000 and gave it to Gandil, who distributed it among the conspirators. The teams headed to Comiskey Park in Chicago for the third game. They should have pitched Justin Windsor. This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ...

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago (A) 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 10 1
Cincinnati (N) 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 x 4 4 3
W: Harry "Slim" Sallee (1-0)   L: Lefty Williams (0-1)

Harry Franklin Slim Sallee (February 3, 1885 - March 23, 1950) was a former professional baseball player. ... Claude Preston Lefty Williams (March 9, 1893 - November 4, 1959) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ...

Game 3

October 3, 1919 at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...


Dickie Kerr, who was to start Game Three for the Sox, was not in on the fix. The original plan was for the conspirators, who disliked Kerr, to lose this game; but by now dissent among the players meant that the plan was in disarray. Burns still believed, however, and gathered the last of his resources to bet on Cincinnati. It was a decision that would leave him broke, as Chicago scored early - Gandil himself driving in two runs - and Kerr was masterful, holding the Reds to 3 hits in throwing a complete game shutout and a 3-0 victory. Richard Henry Dickie Kerr (July 3, 1893 - May 4, 1963) was a starting pitcher for the Chicago White Sox from 1919-1921. ...

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati (N) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
Chicago (A) 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 x 3 7 0
W: Dickie Kerr (1-0)  L: Ray Fisher (0-1)

Richard Henry Dickie Kerr (July 3, 1893 - May 4, 1963) was a starting pitcher for the Chicago White Sox from 1919-1921. ... Ray Lyle Fisher (October 4, 1887 in Middlebury, Vermont -November 3, 1982) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball. ...

Game 4

October 4, 1919 at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...


Cicotte was again Chicago's starter for the fourth game, and he was determined not to look as bad as he had in the first. For the first four innings he and Reds pitcher Jimmy Ring matched zeroes. With one out in the fifth, Cicotte fielded a slow roller, but threw wildly to first for a two-base error. The next man up singled to center and Cicotte first cut off the throw home from Jackson and then fumbled the ball, allowing the run to score. When he gave up a double to the next batter the score was 2-0 - enough of a lead for Ring, who threw a three-hit shutout of his own. The Reds led the Series 3-1. James Joseph (Jimmy) Ring (February 15, 1895 - July 6, 1965) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds (1917-1920), Philadelphia Phillies (1921-1925, 1928), New York Giants (1926) and St. ...


After the game, "Sport" Sullivan came through with $20,000 for the players, which Gandil split equally between Risberg, Felsch, Jackson, and Williams - who was due to start Game Five the next day.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati (N) 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 5 2
Chicago (A) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2
W: Jimmy Ring (1-0)  L: Eddie Cicotte (0-2)

James Joseph (Jimmy) Ring (February 15, 1895 - July 6, 1965) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds (1917-1920), Philadelphia Phillies (1921-1925, 1928), New York Giants (1926) and St. ... Edward Victor Cicotte (June 19, 1884 - May 5, 1969 Born and Died in Detroit, Michigan) (pronounced See-Cot) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball best known for his time with the Chicago White Sox. ...

Game 5

October 6, 1919 at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...


The next game was delayed by rain for a day, and when it got under way both Williams and Reds pitcher Hod Eller were excellent. By the sixth inning, neither had allowed a runner past first base, before Eller hit a blooper that fell between Felsch and Jackson. Felsch's throw was off line, and the opposing pitcher was safe at third. Leadoff hitter Morrie Rath hit a single over the drawn-in infield and Eller scored. Heinie Groh walked before Edd Roush hit a double - the beneficiary of some more doubtful defense from Felsch - to score two more runs, and Roush himself scored shortly later. Eller pitched well enough for the four runs to stand up and the Reds were only one game from winning the Series. Horace Owen Eller (July 5, 1894 Muncie, IN - July 18, 1961 Indianapolis, IN) was a pitcher with a 5 year career from 1917 to 1921. ... Morrie Rath was an American baseball player who played second baseman for the Chicago White Sox and Cincinnati Reds in the 1910s. ... Heinie Groh (September 18, 1889 - August 22, 1968) was a professional baseball player during the early 1900s, most famous for his unique hitting instrument - the bottle bat. ... Edd Roush of the Cincinnati Reds at Weeghman Field in 1919. ...

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati (N) 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 5 4 0
Chicago (A) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3
W: Hod Eller (1-0)  L: Lefty Williams (0-2)

Horace Owen Eller (July 5, 1894 Muncie, IN - July 18, 1961 Indianapolis, IN) was a pitcher with a 5 year career from 1917 to 1921. ... Claude Preston Lefty Williams (March 9, 1893 - November 4, 1959) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ...

Game 6

October 7, 1919 at Redland Field in Cincinnati, Ohio is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Crosley Field was a baseball stadium that stood in Cincinnati, Ohio from 1912-1970. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ...


Game Six was held back in Cincinnati. Dickie Kerr, starting for the White Sox, was not as dominant as in Game Three. Aided by three errors, the Reds jumped out to a 4-0 lead before Chicago fought back, tying the game at 4-4 in the sixth, which remained the score into extra innings. In the top of the tenth, Gandil drove in Weaver to make it 5-4, and Kerr closed it out to record his - and Chicago's - second win.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R H E
Chicago (A) 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 5 10 3
Cincinnati (N) 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 11 0
W: Dickie Kerr (2-0)   L: Jimmy Ring (1-1)

Richard Henry Dickie Kerr (July 3, 1893 - May 4, 1963) was a starting pitcher for the Chicago White Sox from 1919-1921. ... James Joseph (Jimmy) Ring (February 15, 1895 - July 6, 1965) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds (1917-1920), Philadelphia Phillies (1921-1925, 1928), New York Giants (1926) and St. ...

Game 7

October 8, 1919 at Redland Field in Cincinnati, Ohio is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Crosley Field was a baseball stadium that stood in Cincinnati, Ohio from 1912-1970. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ...


Despite the rumors that were already circulating over Cicotte's prior performances, Chicago manager Kid Gleason showed faith in his ace for Game Seven. This time, the knuckleballer did not let him down. Chicago scored early and, for once, it was Cincinnati that made errors in the field. The Reds threatened only briefly in the sixth before losing 4-1, and suddenly the Series was close again. A 1904 photograph of Gleason as the second baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies. ...


This did not go unnoticed by Sullivan and Rothstein, who were suddenly worried. Prior to the start of the Series, the Sox had been strong favorites and few doubted that they could win two games in a row - presuming they were trying to win. Rothstein had been too smart to bet on individual games but had a considerable sum riding on Cincinnati to win the Series. The night before the eighth game, Williams - who was due to pitch - was visited by an associate of Sullivan's who left him in no doubt that if he failed to blow the game in the first inning, he and his wife would be in serious danger.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago (A) 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 10 1
Cincinnati (N) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 4
W: Eddie Cicotte (1-2)   L: Harry "Slim" Sallee (1-1)

Edward Victor Cicotte (June 19, 1884 - May 5, 1969 Born and Died in Detroit, Michigan) (pronounced See-Cot) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball best known for his time with the Chicago White Sox. ... Harry Franklin Slim Sallee (February 3, 1885 - March 23, 1950) was a former professional baseball player. ...

Game 8

October 9, 1919 at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...


Whatever Williams had been told had made its impression. In the first, throwing nothing but mediocre fastballs, he gave up four straight one-out hits to yield 3 runs before Gleason replaced him with relief pitcher Big Bill James, who allowed one of Williams' baserunners to score. James continued to be ineffective and, although the Sox rallied in the eighth, the Reds ran out 10-5 victors — clinching the Series by 5 games to 3. Immediately after the end of the Series, rumors were rife throughout the country that the games had been thrown. Big Bill James was an American League pitcher for several second division teams and was one of the clean members on the 1919 Chicago White Sox which was made famous by the Black Sox scandal, as several members of the team allegedly threw the World Series. ...

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati (N) 4 1 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 10 16 2
Chicago (A) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 5 10 1
W: Hod Eller (2-0)  L: Lefty Williams (0-3)
HR: CHIJoe Jackson (1)

Horace Owen Eller (July 5, 1894 Muncie, IN - July 18, 1961 Indianapolis, IN) was a pitcher with a 5 year career from 1917 to 1921. ... Claude Preston Lefty Williams (March 9, 1893 - November 4, 1959) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1888 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ...

Notable performances

Cincinnati Reds

  • Alfred "Greasy" Neale (of):10-for-28; .357 batting average; 3 runs; 2 doubles; 1 triple; 4 RBI
  • Hod Eller (p):2 games (started); 2 complete games (1 shutout); 2 wins; 18 innings pitched; 13 hits allowed, 4 earned runs; 2 bases-on-balls; 15 strikeouts; 2.00 ERA

Chicago White Sox

  • "Shoeless" Joe Jackson (OF):12-for-32; .375 batting average; 5-for-12 w/ men in scoring position; 5 runs; 3 doubles; 1 home run; 6 RBI
  • Ray Schalk (C):7-for-23; .304 batting average; 2-for-3 w/ men in scoring position; 1 run; 2 RBI
  • Buck Weaver (3B):11-for-34; .324 batting average; 1-for-5 w/ men in scoring position; 4 runs; 4 doubles; 1 triple
  • Dickie Kerr (P):2 games (started); 2 complete games (1 shutout); 2 wins; 19 innings pitched; 14 hits allowed; 3 earned runs; 3 bases-on-balls; 6 strikeouts; 1.42 ERA

Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1888 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... Ray Schalk of the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park in 1913. ... George Daniel Buck Weaver (August 18, 1890 - January 31, 1956) was an American shortstop and third baseman in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Chicago White Sox. ...

Reference(s)

  1. ^ 1919 Chicago White Sox. historicbaseball. Retrieved on 2007-06-10.
  • Chicago Historical Society: Black Sox
  • Famous American Trials: The Black Sox Trial
  • Asinof, Eliot, Eight Men Out. New York: Henry Holt. 1963. ISBN 0-8050-6537-7.
  • Pietrusza, David Rothstein: The Life, Times, and Murder of the Criminal Genius Who Fixed the 1919 World Series, New York: Carroll & Graf, 2003. ISBN 0-7867-1250-3
  • Neft, David S., and Richard M. Cohen. The World Series. 1st ed. New York: St Martins, 1990. (Neft and Cohen 76-81)

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
1919 Black Sox Scandal (1224 words)
The first World Series was staged in 1903, and the annual contest between the two top teams quickly became one of the most anticipated events in America -- comparable to the Super Bowl today.
The Series was played, and, despite gallant efforts by the other 17 men on the team, the fix was a success, and the fans couldn't even tell the Series had been thrown.
In the Series he hit a robust.375 while setting a major league World Series record with 12 hits, one of which was the only home run hit during the entire Series.
1919 World Series: Information from Answers.com (3168 words)
James C. Hamilton—the official scorer of the 1919 World Series—testified under oath in a later civil trial between Jackson and Charles Comiskey that the throw was honest and that Cicotte jumped up and knocked it down for an error.
His second pitch of Game One of the 1919 World Series hit Reds leadoff batter Morrie Rath in the back, which was the pre-arranged signal to the gamblers that the players had accepted the fix.
The Curse of the Black Sox (1919 2005) was an urban myth, superstition, or scapegoat cited as a reason for the failure of the Chicago White Sox to win the World Series from 1917 until 2005.
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