FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > 1910s
Millennia: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1880s 1890s 1900s - 1910s - 1920s 1930s 1940s
Years: 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914
1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
Categories: Births - Deaths - Architecture
Establishments - Disestablishments

The 1910s decade ran from January 1, 1910 through December 31, 1919. These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... On the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd millennium commenced on 1 January 1001, and ended at the end of 31 December 2000. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 20XX redirects here. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ... The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually when speaking about the United States. ... The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Contents

Events and trends

The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginnings during the second half of the nineteenth Century. The conservative lifestyles during the first half of the decade, as well as the legacy of military alliances, would forever be changed by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austrian throne, on 28 June 1914. The murder would trigger a chain of events in which, within 30 days, war would break out in Europe. The conflict would drag on until a ceasefire was declared on November 10, 1918 leading to the controversial, one-sided Treaty of Versailles, which would be signed on the 28 June 1919. Franz Ferdinand is the name of: Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the presumptive heir to the throne of Austria. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The war's end triggered the abdication of aging monarchies and the collapse of the last modern empires of Germany and the Ottomans and Austria-Hungary, the later splintered into Austria, Hungary, southern Poland (who acquired most of their land in a war with Soviet Russia), Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia, as well as the unification of Romania with Transylvania and Moldavia. However, each of these states (with the possible exception of Yugoslavia) had large German and Hungarian minorities, there creating some unexpected problems that would be brought to light in the next two decades.


The decade was also a period of revolution in a number of countries. Mexico spear-headed the trend in November 1910, which led to the ousting of dictator Porfirio Diaz, developing into a civil war that dragged on until mid-1920, not long after a new Mexican constitution was signed and ratified. Russia also had a similar fate, since the Great War led to a collapse in morale as well as to economic chaos. This atmosphere encouraged the establishment of Bolshevism, which would be later renamed as Communism. Like the Mexican Revolution, the Russian Revolution immediately turned to civil war that would drag on until approximately late 1920. Porfirio Díaz José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz Mori (15 September 1830 – 2 July 1915) was President of Mexico, considered a dictator, who ruled Mexico from 1876 until 1911 (with the exception of one single four-year period). ... Bolshevik Party Meeting. ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ...


Technology

Gideon Sundbäck (1880 - 1954) was a Canadian (Swedish-born) inventor. ... This article is about the fastening device. ... Monument to Harry Brearley at the former Brown Firth Research Laboratories Harry Brearley (February 18, 1871 – August 12, 1948) was the inventor of rustless steel (later to be called stainless steel). He was born in Sheffield, England. ... The 630 foot (192 m) high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ... Invented the first pop-up bread toaster. ... For the English town, see Towcester. ... The Ford Model T (colloquially known as the Tin Lizzie and the Flivver) was an automobile produced by Henry Fords Ford Motor Company from 1908 through 1927. ... Car redirects here. ...

Science

“Einstein” redirects here. ... For a generally accessible and less technical introduction to the topic, see Introduction to general relativity. ... Max von Laue (October 9, 1879 - April 24, 1960) was a German physicist, who studied under Max Planck. ... The intensity pattern formed on a screen by diffraction from a square aperture Diffraction refers to various phenomena associated with wave propagation, such as the bending, spreading and interference of waves passing by an object or aperture that disrupts the wave. ... In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... For other uses, see Crystal (disambiguation). ... Alfred Wegener, around 1925 Alfred Lothar Wegener (Berlin, November 1, 1880 – Greenland, November 2 or 3, 1930) was a German interdisciplinary scientist and meteorologist, who became famous for his theory of continental drift (Kontinentalverschiebung or die Verschiebung der Kontinente in his words). ... Plates in the crust of the earth, according to the plate tectonics theory Continental drift refers to the movement of the Earths continents relative to each other. ...

War, peace, and politics

The 1917 Constitution of Mexico is the present constitution of Mexico. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... Franz Ferdinand links to here. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... Nicholas II redirects here. ... Combatants Irish Volunteers, Irish Citizen Army, Irish Republican Brotherhood British Army Royal Irish Constabulary Commanders Patrick Pearse, James Connolly Brigadier-General Lowe General Sir John Maxwell Strength 1250 in Dublin, c. ... This article is about the prior state. ... The Jallianwala Bagh Massacre, also known as the Amritsar Massacre, was named after the Jallianwala Bagh (Garden) in the northern Indian city of Amritsar, where, on April 13, 1919, British Indian Army soldiers under the command of Brigadier Reginald Dyer opened fire on an unarmed gathering of men, women and... The term Indian independence movement is diffused, incorporating various national and regional campaigns, agitations and efforts of both Nonviolent and Militant philosophy and involved a wide spectrum of Indian political organizations, philosophies, and movements which had the common aim of ending the British Colonial Authority as well as other colonial... Belligerents Qing Dynasty Chinese Revolutionary Alliance Commanders Feng Guozhang, Yuan Shikai, and local Qing governors. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... There have been numerous alliances known as the Triple Alliance: Aztec Triple Alliance - Tenochtitlan, Texcoco and Tlacopán. ... European military alliances in 1914. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... This article is about the Treaty of Versailles of June 28, 1919, which ended World War I. For other uses, see Treaty of Versailles (disambiguation) . Left to right, Prime Minister David Lloyd George of the United Kingdom, Prime Minister Vittorio Emanuele Orlando of Italy, Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau of France... Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature...

Culture and religion

Radio broadcasts have been a popular entertainment since the 1910s, though popularity has declined a little in some countries since television became widespread. ... The Flying Squadron of America was a temperance organization that staged a nationwide campaign tp promote the temperance movement in the U.S. It consisted of three groups of revivalist-like speakers who toured cities across the country between September 30, 1914 and June 6, 1915. ... A cartoon from Australia ca. ... Edith Smith Davis was a major leader in the temperance movement. ... The Temperance Educational Quarterly was published by the Department of Scientific Temperance Instruction of the Womens Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... Oliver Twist (1838) is Charles Dickens second novel. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Gangster (disambiguation). ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... “WB” redirects here. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square grid of black and white squares. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ... Bramwell Booth (March 8, 1856 – June 16, 1929) was the 2nd General of The Salvation Army (1912-1929). ... For other persons named William Booth, see William Booth (disambiguation). ...

Literature and arts

See also: List of years in literature#1910s

This page indexes the individual year in literature pages. ... David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 – 2 March 1930) was an English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism, and personal letters. ... Sons and Lovers is a novel written by D.H. Lawrence. ... Of Human Bondage (1915) is a novel by William Somerset Maugham. ... W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Tarzan of the Apes is a novel written by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first in a series of books about the title character Tarzan. ... Edgar Rice Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. ... Zane Grey (January 31, 1872 – October 23, 1939) was an American author best known for his popular adventure novels and pulp fiction that presented an idealized image of the rugged Old West. ... Wild Fire is a manned rocket vehicle designed and built as part of the da Vinci Project, an attempt to win the Ansari X Prize for the first privately-funded reusable spacecraft. ... For the Irish folk band, see The Dubliners. ... A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a semi-autobiographical novel by James Joyce, first serialized in The Egoist from 1914 to 1915 and published in book form in 1916. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... Play cover, depicting Mrs Campbell as Eliza Pygmalion (1913) is a play by George Bernard Shaw based on Ovids tale of Pygmalion. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ... The novella Death in Venice was written by the German author Thomas Mann, and was first published in 1912 as Der Tod in Venedig. ... Wilella Sibert Cather (December 7, 1873[1] – April 24, 1947) is an eminent author from the United States. ... Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture. ... Asheville City Hall. ...

Others

Sinking of the Titanic.
Sinking of the Titanic.

Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iceberg (disambiguation). ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Panama Canal is a waterway in Central America which joins the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

World leaders

Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... For the actor Joe Cook see Joe Cook (actor). ... For other persons named Billy Hughes, see Billy Hughes (disambiguation). ... Franz Joseph I Franz Joseph (in English also Francis Joseph) (August 18, 1830 - November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria and King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and King of Hungary from 1867 until 1916. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Karl I, a. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... Aisin-Gioro Puyi¹ (February 7, 1906 - October 17, 1967) was the Xuantong Emperor (宣統皇帝) of China between 1908 and 1924 (ruling emperor between 1908 and 1912, and non-ruling emperor between 1912 and 1924), the tenth (and last) emperor of the Manchu Qing Dynasty to rule over China. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... Sun Yat-sen (Traditional Chinese: 孫中山; Pinyin: SÅ«n Zhōngshān; Simplified Chinese: 孙中山; Pinyin: SÅ«n Yìxiān) (November 12, 1866 – March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader often referred to as the Father of Modern China. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Yuan Shikai (Courtesy Weiting 慰亭; Pseudonym: Rongan 容庵 Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: Yuán ShìkÇŽi; Wade-Giles: Yüan Shih-kai) (September 16, 1859[1] – June 6, 1916) was a Chinese military official and politician during the late Qing Dynasty and the early Republic of China. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... The following table of Chinese monarchs is in no way inclusive. ... Xú Shìchāng (Pinyin) (Chinese: 徐世昌,Courtesy name Ju-ren 菊人) or Hsü Shih-chang (Wade-Giles) (1855-1939) was a prominent figure of the Beiyang Army warlords and President of the Republic of China (Beijing government) from October 10, 1918 to June 2, 1922. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... German Emperor Wilhelm (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, Prince of Prussia 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (de: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg (November 29, 1856–January 1, 1921) was a German politician and statesman who served as Chancellor of the German Empire from 1909 to 1917. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... Victor Emmanuel III (Italian: ; 11 November 1869 – 28 December 1947) was King of Italy (29 July 1900 – 9 May 1946), Emperor of Ethiopia (1936–43) and King of Albania (1939–43). ... Pope Pius X (1903-1914), pictured in 1904, wearing the 1834 Triple Tiara of Pope Gregory XVI Saint Pius X, né Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto, (2 June 1835 - 20 August 1914) was Pope from 1903 to 1914, succeeding Pope Leo XIII. He was the first pope since the Counter-Reformation Pope... Pope Benedict XV Benedict XV, né Giacomo della Chiesa (November 21, 1854-January 22, 1922), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1914 to 1922; he succeeded Pope Saint Pius X. He was born in Genoa, Italy, of a noble family. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Photographic portrait of Ahmad Shah Qajar (l) and his brother Mohammad Hassan Mirza (r) Ahmad Shah Qajar (احمد شاه قاجار in Persian) ‎(January 21, 1898 - 21 February 1930) was Shah of Persia from July 16, 1909 to October 31, 1925. ... Flag Map of Iran under the Qajar dynasty in the 19th century. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Nicholas II redirects here. ... Lenin redirects here. ... Alfonso XIII of Spain (May 17, 1886 - February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ... José Canalejas y Méndez, Spanish statesman José Canalejas y Méndez (July 31, 1854 – November 12, 1912) was a Spanish politician, born in Ferrol. ... Eduardo Dato Iradier (August 12, 1856-March 8, 1921). ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who was Prime Minister throughout the latter half of World War I and the first four years of the subsequent peace. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...

Entertainers

Roscoe Conkling Arbuckle (March 24, 1887 – June 29, 1933) was an American silent film comedian. ... Theda Bara was the stage name of Theodosia Burr Goodman (July 29, 1885 - April 13, 1955), a silent film actress. ... Richard (Dick) Barthelmess (May 9, 1895 - August 17, 1963) was a silent film star. ... Bartok redirects here. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was a Russian-born naturalized American composer and lyricist, and one of the most prolific American songwriters in history. ... Ben Black (December 11, 1889 - December 26, 1950) was an English composer of popular song and an impresario. ... James Hubert Blake (February 7, 1887 – February 12, 1983), was a composer, lyricist, and pianist of ragtime, jazz, and popular music. ... Shelton Brooks Shelton Brooks (May 4, 1886 - September 6, 1975) was a popular music composer who wrote some of the biggest hits of the first third of the 20th century. ... Lew Brown (December 10, 1893 - February 5, 1958) was a lyricist for popular songs in the United States. ... Tom Brown, sometimes known by the nickname Red Brown (June 3, 1888 – March 25, 1958), was an early New Orleans jazz trombonist. ... Anne Caldwell (August 30, 1867 - October 22, 1936), also known as Anne Caldwell ODea was a librettist and lyricist. ... One of 12 Eddie Cantor caricatures by Frederick J. Garner for a 1933 Brown & Bigelow advertising card set. ... For the song Caruso by Lucio Dalla, see Caruso (song). ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... George Michael Cohan (July 3, 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... Henry Creamer (June 21, 1879 – October 14, 1930) was an American popular song lyricist. ... Bebe Daniels (January 14, 1901 - March 16, 1971) was an American actress. ... The claim is made (under the heading Personal Life) that DeMille was in negotiations with MGM to direct Ben-Hur at the time of his death in January, 1959. ... Buddy Gard DeSylva, often credited as Buddy De Sylva, Buddy DeSylva, Bud De Sylva and B.G. DeSylva (January 27, 1895 - July 11, 1950), He was born George Gard DeSylva in New York, New York, USA, but grew up in California and attended the University of Southern California. ... Walter Donaldson (February 15, 1893 - July 15, 1947) was a prolific United States popular songwriter, producing many hit songs of the 1910s and 1920s. ... Marie Dressler (born November 9, 1868; died July 28, 1934) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian actress. ... For other people called Eddie Edwards see Eddie Edwards (disambiguation) Edwin B. Edwards, c. ... Gus Edwards (August 18, 1879 - November 7, 1945) was a songwriter and vaudevillian. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... Fred Fisher (September 30, 1875 - January 14, 1942) was a United States songwriter. ... John Ford (February 1, 1894 - August 31, 1973) was one of the most accomplished American film directors of the 1930s to 1960s, known particularly as a director of the Westerns, although his tributes to the veterans of World War II and Americana are also equally effective. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Beniamino Gigli (March 20, 1890 - November 30, 1957) was an Italian singer, widely regarded as one of the greatest operatic tenors of his time. ... Dorothy Gish photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Dorothy Gish (March 11, 1898 - June 4, 1968) was an American actress. ... Lillian Diana de Guiche (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993), was an Oscar-nominated American actress, better known as Lillian Gish. ... Samuel Goldwyn (July 1882 (some sources say 17 August 1882, others 1879 [1]) – 31 January 1974) was an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning producer, also a well-known Hollywood motion picture producer and founding contributor of several motion picture studios. ... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ... William Christopher Handy (November 16, 1873 – March 28, 1958) was a blues composer and musician, often known as the Father of the Blues. Handy remains among the most influential of American songwriters. ... Lorenz (Larry) Hart (May 2, 1895 - November 22, 1943) was the lyricist half of the famed Broadway songwriting team Rodgers and Hart. ... Victor Herbert Victor August Herbert (February 1, 1859–May 26, 1924) was a popular composer of light opera, and an accomplished cellist and conductor. ... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job. He was the director of a successful insurance agency. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Emil Jannings (July 23, 1884 - January 3, 1950) was an actor and the first winner of the Academy Award for Best Actor. ... William Jerome (1865 - 1932) was a United States songwriter. ... Al Jolson (May 26, 1886–October 23, 1950) was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... Gustav Gerson Kahn (November 6, 1886 - October 8, 1941) was a famous Jewish-German-American musician, songwriter and lyricist. ... Gustave Kahn (December 21, 1859 - September 5, 1936) was a French Symbolist poet and art critic. ... Joseph Frank Buster Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American comic actor and filmmaker. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 - November 11, 1945) was an American popular composer. ... Ringgold Wilmer Lardner (March 6, 1885 - September 25, 1933) was an American sports columnist and short story writer best known for his satirical takes on the sports world, marriage, and the theatre. ... Nick LaRocca. ... Sir Harry Lauder, KBE (4 August 1870 - 26 February 1950) was a very famous Scottish entertainer, described by Sir Winston Churchill as Scotlands greatest ever ambassador! // Early Years Born Henry Lauder at 4 Bridge Street Portobello, the residence of his mother’s father, he was the eldest son of... Florence Lawrence (b. ... Theodore Leopold Friedman, better known as Ted Lewis (June 6, 1890-August 25, 1971), was an American entertainer, bandleader, singer, and musician. ... Harold Clayton Lloyd (April 20, 1893 – March 8, 1971) was an American film actor and director, most famous for his silent comedies. ... Charles McCarron (1891-1919) was a United States Tin Pan Alley composer & lyricist. ... Joseph McCarthy (September 27, 1885 - December 18, 1943) was a composer and lyricist. ... Winsor McCay Winsor McCay (September 26, 1867(?) – July 26, 1934) was a prolific artist and pioneer in the art of comic strips and animation. ... Oscar Micheaux (1893-1951) Oscar Micheaux (January 2, 1893 – March 25, 1951) was a pioneering African American author and is widely recognized as being the first African-American filmmaker (although he was predated by the shortlived Lincoln Motion Picture Company[1]). He is without a doubt the most famous producer... Mae Murray (May 10, 1889 – March 23, 1965) was an American actress and dancer, who became known as The Girl with the Bee-Stung Lips [1] and The Gardenia of the Screen. ... Alla Nazimova, born Mariam Edez Adelaida Leventon (May 22, 1879 – July 14, 1945) was an American theater and film actress, scriptwriter, and producer. ... Pola Negri Pola Negri [1] (December 31, 1894 - August 1, 1987) was a Polish film actress who achieved notoriety as a femme fatale in silent films between 1910s and 1930s. ... Anna Q. Nilsson Anna Quirentia Nilsson (March 30, 1888 – February 11, 1974) was a Swedish born actress who achieved success in American silent movies. ... David Ivor Davies (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951), better known as Ivor Novello, was a Welsh composer, singer and actor who became one of the most popular British entertainers of the early 20th century. ... Alcide Patrick Nunez (March 17, 1884 – September 2, 1934) was an early United States jazz clarinetist. ... Geoffrey OHara (February 2, 1882 - January 31, 1967) was a Canadian American composer, singer and music professor. ... Sidney Olcott (September 20, 1873 - December 16, 1949) was a Canadian producer, director, actor and writer. ... John Charles Smith (August 18, 1896 - January 3, 1933) was a Canadian-born American actor. ... For the Katie Melua song, see Mary Pickford (Used to Eat Roses). ... Armand John A.J. Piron (August 16, 1888 _ February 17, 1943) was a United States jazz violinist and band leader. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... This article is about the American composer. ... Sigmund Romberg (July 29, 1887 – November 9, 1951) was an American composer best known for his operettas. ... Jean Schwartz (November 4, 1878 - November 30, 1956) was a songwriter. ... Mack Sennett (1880 - 1960) Mack Sennett (January 17, 1880 – November 5, 1960) was an innovator of slapstick comedy in film. ... Lawrence J. Larry Shields (September 13, 1893 - November 21, 1953) was an early jazz clarinetist. ... Chris Smith (October 12, 1879 - October 4, 1949) was a United States composer and performer. ... Erich von Stroheim (September 22, 1885 – May 12, 1957) was an Austrian - American star of the silent film age, lauded for his directional work in which he was a proto-auteur. ... Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842 – November 22, 1900) was an English composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist W. S. Gilbert. ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ... Wilbur C. Sweatman (Brunswick, Missouri, February 7, 1882 - New York City March 9, 1961) was an African-American ragtime and jazz composer, bandleader, and clarinetist. ... Blanche Sweet (June 18, 1896 [1] – September 6, 1986) was a silent film actress who began her career in the earliest days of the Hollywood motion picture film industry. ... Albert Von Tilzer (March 29, 1878 - October 1, 1956) was an American songwriter, the younger brother of Harry Von Tilzer. ... Harry Von Tilzer (July 8, 1872 - January 10, 1946) was a very popular United States songwriter. ... Sophie Tucker, 1917 Sophie Tucker (January 13, 1884 - February 9, 1966) was a singer and comedian, one of the most popular United States entertainers of the first third of the 20th century. ... Pete Wendling (June 6, 1888 - April 7, 1974), a American composer and pianist, was born in New York City to German immigrants. ... Pearl Fay White, born March 4, 1889 in Green Ridge, Missouri, United States - died August 4, 1938 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, was a singer and star of silent film. ... Bert Williams (November 12, 1875 – March 4, 1922) was the pre-eminent Black entertainer of his era and one of the most popular comedians for all audiences of his time. ... Clarence Williams ( November 8, 1893 - November 6, 1965) was a Jazz pianist, composer, promoter, vocalist, and publisher. ... Spencer Williams (October 14, 1889 - July 14, 1965) was a USA jazz and popular music composer, pianist, and singer. ... Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, KBE (15 October 1881 – 14 February 1975) (IPA: ) was a comic writer who has enjoyed enormous popular success for more than seventy years. ...

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American Cultural History 1910 - 1919 (1888 words)
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