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Encyclopedia > 1908 Summer Olympics
Games of the IV Olympiad

Host city London, United Kingdom
Nations participating 22
Athletes participating 2,008
(1,971 men, 37 women,)
Events 110 in 22 sports
Opening ceremony April 27
Closing ceremony October 31
Officially opened by Edward VII
Stadium White City Stadium

The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. These games were originally scheduled to be held in Rome. At the time they were the fifth modern Olympic games. However, the Athens Games of 1906 have since been retroactively downgraded by the International Olympic Committee and thus the 1908 Games are seen as the start of the Fourth Olympiad, in keeping with the now-accepted four-year cycle. The IOC President for this games was Baron Pierre de Coubertin. Image File history File links A fencer. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Montreals Olympic Stadium The Olympic Stadium is the name usually given to the big centrepiece stadium of the Summer Olympic Games. ... The White City Stadium during the 1908 Summer Olympics Team captains shake hands after a Canada-United States football game at White City Stadium, 14 February 1944 White City Stadium, built in White City, London, England, for the 1908 Summer Olympics, was the first purpose-built Olympic stadium[1]. Completed... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... An Olympiad is a period of four years, associated with the Olympic Games of Classical Greece. ... The Intercalated Olympic Games were to be a series of International Olympic Games half-way between what we now call Games of the olympiad. ... His statue at the Centennial Olympic Park, Atlanta. ...


Italian authorities were preparing infrastructure for the games when Mount Vesuvius erupted on April 7, 1906, devastating the nearby city of Naples. Funds that were to have gone to the Olympics were diverted to the reconstruction of Naples, so a new venue was required. London was selected, and the games were held in White City alongside the Franco-British Exhibition, which at the time was the more noteworthy event. Berlin and Milan were the other candidates. Mount Vesuvius (Italian: Monte Vesuvio, Latin: Mons Vesuvius) is a volcano east of Naples, Italy. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses see, Naples (disambiguation) and Napoli (disambiguation) Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... White City is a place in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in London in England. ... The Franco-British Exhibition (1908) was held in area now called White City. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ...


The White City Stadium, built in very short time especially for the games, held 68,000 people and was considered by some to be a technological marvel for the time. The distance from the start of the Marathon to the finish at the stadium was established at this games; 42.195 km (26 miles 385 yards). The starting line was moved to allow the Royal Family a good view. The White City Stadium during the 1908 Summer Olympics Team captains shake hands after a Canada-United States football game at White City Stadium, 14 February 1944 White City Stadium, built in White City, London, England, for the 1908 Summer Olympics, was the first purpose-built Olympic stadium[1]. Completed... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ...


The games were surrounded by controversy. On opening day, following the practice introduced at the Intercalated Games of 1906, the teams paraded behind their national flags. However, the arrangement caused several complications: The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ...

  • The Finnish team were expected to march under the Russian flag rather than the Finnish flag, so chose to march without a flag at all.
  • Irish athletes were compelled to compete for the British team, so many of them withdrew.
  • The Swedish flag had not been displayed above the stadium, so the members of the Swedish team decided not to take part in the ceremony.
  • The United States flag had also not been displayed above the stadium before the opening so the United States' flag bearer refused to dip the flag to the royal box. Though the flag was later dipped in the collective greeting of the royal family, Martin Sheridan, American team captain, gave the explanation that "This flag dips to no earthly king."[1] Despite international customs that encourage dipping the flag as a sign of respect to heads of state, since 1908 US flag bearers have followed a tradition of not doing so.

The 1908 Olympics also prompted the establishment of standard rules for sports, and the selection of judges from different countries, rather than just the host. One of the reasons for this was the 400 metre run in which the US winner was accused of interfering with the British runner. Part of the problem was the different definition of interference under British and US rules. The race was re-run, but the Americans refused to participate. The British runner, Wyndham Halswelle, won by running around the track on his own because three of the four original runners had been American. Martin Sheridan (born March 28, 1881 in Treenduff, Ireland – died March 27, 1918) is a former athlete from the United States, who came as a sixteen year old to the US. He won the discus throw event at the 1904 Summer Olympics. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Wyndham Halswelle (May 30, 1882 – March 31, 1915) was a Scottish athlete, winner of the controversial 400 m run at the 1908 Summer Olympics. ...

Dorando Pietri finishes the marathon.
Dorando Pietri finishes the marathon.
The medal of the 1908 British Olympic Council.

The most famous incident of the games came at the end of the marathon. It occurred when the first runner to enter the stadium, Dorando Pietri of Italy, collapsed several times and ran the wrong way. Not far from the finish-line, two of the officials took him by the arms, and brought him to the line. As a consequence, after crossing the line he was disqualified. The medal went to American Johnny Hayes who was second over the line, but the glory went to Pietri. Since he himself had not been responsible for his disqualification Queen Alexandra the next day awarded him a gold cup in recognition of his achievement. Image File history File links Dorando_Pietri. ... Image File history File links Dorando_Pietri. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ... Dorando Pietri. ... John Joseph Johnny Hayes (April 10, 1886 - August 25, 1965) was an American athlete, winner of the marathon race at the 1908 Summer Olympics. ... Princess Alexandra of Denmark (Alexandra Carolina Marie Charlotte Louise Julia; 1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925) was Queen Consort to Edward VII of the United Kingdom and thus Empress of India during her husbands reign. ...


These Games were the first to include Winter events, such as had originally been proposed for the Games. There were four figure skating events contested. However, the on-ice events occurred months separated from most of the other events. Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ...


For the first time the Olympic creed saying that "the most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part" was publicly proclaimed, and its creator, a bishop from Pennsylvania, uttered it at a mass held at St. Paul's Cathedral on July 19.. Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Oscar Swahn from Sweden, who won the running deer shooting gold, became the oldest Olympic champion of all time, and he pushed the limit up to 72 years and 279 days by his triumph at the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp, Belgium. The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ...


Serbia and Montenegro were still out of the Olympic affairs, and the first athlete from these parts of Europea to win an Olympic gold medal was a British water polo player and swimmer name Paul Radmilović, who was originally from Boka Kotorska and Dubrovnik. Nicknamed Pavao, he was a member of the champion water polo team and the best 4 x 200m freestyle relay. He also won gold medals in water polo in Stockholm (1912) and in Antwerp (1920). Historic mpap of the Bay, 16th century Boka Kotorska (Bay of Kotor, Bocche di Cattaro) in western Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ...


The official budget of the organizing committee showed a cost of GB£15,000; over one-third of this was labeled as "entertainment expense". Donations were the major source of revenue, with only 28% of income derived from ticket sales. Total receipts of £21,377 resulted in organizers claiming a profit. Construction of the White City Stadium, which cost the British government about £60,000, was not counted as part of the budget.[2] “GBP” redirects here. ... The White City Stadium during the 1908 Summer Olympics Team captains shake hands after a Canada-United States football game at White City Stadium, 14 February 1944 White City Stadium, built in White City, London, England, for the 1908 Summer Olympics, was the first purpose-built Olympic stadium[1]. Completed...

Contents

Sports

22 sports, representing 24 sporting disciplines, were contested at the 1908 Games. Swimming, diving and water polo are considered three disciplines of the same sport, aquatics. At the time, the tug-of-war events were considered part of the Athletics programme and the two different football codes (association and rugby (union)) were listed together. The International Olympic Committee now considers tug-of-war a separate sport, as well as referring to association football as simply "football" and to rugby union as "rugby".[3] Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...

At the 1908 Summer Olympics, three archery events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, twenty-six athletics events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, five boxing events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, seven track cycling events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, two diving events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, four fencing events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, four figure skating events were contested, and winter sports were introduced for the very first time. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, England, an official football tournament was contested for the first time. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, two gymnastics events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, a field hockey tournament was contested for the first time. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, one Jeu de paume event wes contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, a lacrosse event was contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, a polo tournament was contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, two rackets events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, four rowing events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, a rugby event was contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, four sailing events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, fifteen shooting events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, six swimming events were contested. ... The final results of the Tennis competition at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, Great Britain Six tennis events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, a tug of war tournament was contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, three water motorsports events were contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics, a water polo tournament was contested. ... At the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, nine wrestling events were contested, all for men. ...

Participating nations

participants
participants

The 1908 Games featured athletes representing 22 National Olympic Committees. Argentina, Finland, Turkey, and New Zealand (as part of the team from Australasia) made their first appearance at the Olympic Games. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1357x628, 23 KB) Countries which participated in the 1908 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1357x628, 23 KB) Countries which participated in the 1908 Summer Olympics, as listed at the olympic games museum, derived from blank world map. ... National Olympic Committees (or NOCs) are the national constituents of the worldwide olympic movement. ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links Australasian_Olympic_Flag. ... Australasian Olympic Flag, under which Australia and New Zealand competed in 1908 and 1912 Australasia was the name of a combined team at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Habsburg_Monarchy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bohemia. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia competed at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom under the IOC country code BOH. It was the third appearance of the European nation, which had missed only the inaugural 1896 Summer Olympics. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada-1868-Red. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_German_Empire. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece_(1828-1978). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Flag of the Kingdom of Hungary from 1867 to 1918 File links The following pages link to this file: 1896 Summer Olympics Tennis at the 1896 Summer Olympics Swimming at the 1896 Summer Olympics Athletics at the 1896 Summer Olympics 1906 Summer Olympics 1912 Summer Olympics 1908 Summer Olympics 1904... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy_(1861-1946). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links US_flag_46_stars. ...

Medal count

These are the top ten nations that won medals at the 1908 Games. This is the full table of the medal count of the 1908 Summer Olympics. ...

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Great Britain Great Britain (host nation) 56 51 39 146
2 United States United States 23 12 12 47
3 Sweden Sweden 8 6 11 25
4 France France 5 5 9 19
5 Germany Germany 3 5 5 13
6 Hungary Hungary 3 4 2 9
7 Canada Canada 3 3 10 16
8 Norway Norway 2 3 3 8
9 Italy Italy 2 2 0 4
10 Belgium Belgium 1 5 2 8

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links US_flag_46_stars. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_German_Empire. ... Flag of the Kingdom of Hungary from 1867 to 1918 File links The following pages link to this file: 1896 Summer Olympics Tennis at the 1896 Summer Olympics Swimming at the 1896 Summer Olympics Athletics at the 1896 Summer Olympics 1906 Summer Olympics 1912 Summer Olympics 1908 Summer Olympics 1904... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada-1868-Red. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy_(1861-1946). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ...

Notes

  1. ^ London Olympics 1908 & 1948
  2. ^ Zarnowski, C. Frank (Summer 1992). "A Look at Olympic Costs". Citius, Altius, Fortius 1 (1): 16-32. Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  3. ^ Olympic Sports of the Past
  4. ^ Australasia included Australia and New Zealand.
  5. ^ The Grand Duchy of Finland was part of the Russian Empire at the time, but was treated as a separate nation.
  6. ^ The Netherlands was typically referred to in early Olympic competition as "Holland" though the entire nation of the Netherlands was the entity in question rather than the region of the country formally named Holland; the IOC currently refers to all entries from the nation as from "Netherlands".

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Grand Duchy of Finland was a state that existed 1809–1917 as part of the Russian Empire. ... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ...

See also

Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... The International Olympic Committee (IOC) allocates three-letter country codes to all National Olympic Committees and other groups competing in the Olympic Games. ...

External links

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Part of a series of articles on the History of London
Evolution

Londinium · Lundenwic · City of London · City of Westminster · County of London · Greater London London has a recorded history that goes back over 2,000 years. ... London has a recorded history that goes back over 2,000 years. ... London has a recorded history that goes back over 2,000 years. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region Greater London Status sui generis, City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor John Stuttard  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - City  1. ... The City of Westminster is a London borough with city status, situated to the west of the City of London and north of the River Thames. ... The County of London was an administrative county and ceremonial county of England from 1889 to 1965. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ...

Local government

Metropolitan Board of Works · London County Council · Greater London Council · Greater London Authority · London Assembly · Mayor of London The history of local government in London, England can be broken down into a number of periods: History of local government in the United Kingdom History of London ^ a b Barlow, I., Metropolitan Government, (1991) ^ Saint, A., Politics and the people of London: the London County Council (1889-1965), (1989... The Metropolitan Board of Works (MBW) was the principal instrument of London-wide government from 1855 until the establishment of the London County Council in 1889. ... London County Council emblem is still seen today on buildings, especially housing, from that era London County Council (LCC) was the principal local government body for the County of London from 1889 until 1965, when it was replaced by the Greater London Council. ... Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ... The Greater London Authority (GLA) administers the 1579 km² (610 sq. ... The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ...

Events

Peasants' Revolt · Black Death · Great Plague · Great Fire of London · The Great Stink · The Great Exhibition · The Blitz · Swinging London · The London Plan · 7/7 bombings · Olympic Games (1908 · 1948 · 2012) The end of the revolt: Wat Tyler (also spelt Tighler) killed by Walworth while Richard II watches, and a second image of Richard addressing the crowd The Peasants Revolt, Tyler’s Rebellion, or the Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... A bill of mortality for the plague year of 1665. ... Detail of painting from 1666 of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. ... Michael Faraday giving his card to Father Thames, caricature commenting on a letter of Faradays on the state of the river in the Times in Summer 1855 The Great Stink or The Big Stink was a time in the summer of 1858 during which the smell of untreated sewage... The Great Exhibition in Hyde Park 1851. ... For other uses, see Blitz. ... Swinging London is a catchall term applied to a variety of dynamic cultural trends in the United Kingdom (centred in London) in the second half of the 1960s. ... Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ... Locations of the bombings, overlaid onto a real-path map of the London Underground The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... There have been two London Olympics (London hosting the Olympic Games), in 1908 and 1948, with a third scheduled for 2012. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... “London 2012” redirects here. ...

Structures

St. Paul's Cathedral · Tower of London · Baynard's Castle · Westminster Hall · London Bridge · Westminster Abbey · The Monument St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Baynards Castle was at various times a castle, house and palace that existed on the same site, in the south west corner of the City of London, for 600 years from the time of the Norman Conquest until the Great Fire of London. ... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see London Bridge (disambiguation). ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The Monument, London to commemorate the Great Fire of London, designed by Sir Christopher Wren The viewing platform The Monument seen from the ground The Monument to the Fire of London, more commonly known as The Monument, is a 61-metre (202-foot) tall stone Roman doric column in the...

City of London

Corporation of London · Lord Mayor of London · Guildhall · Livery Companies · Lord Mayor's Show · Bank of England Coat of arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. ... Current Lord Mayor of London John Stuttard during the parade on November 11th, 2006 Michael Berry Savory, Previous Lord Mayor (2004–2005) The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London is the Mayor of the City of London and head of the Corporation of London. ... The Guildhall The Guildhall complex in c. ... Livery Companies are trade associations based in the City of London. ... In 1747, the Lord Mayor went to the City of Westminster on a barge via the River Thames. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ...

Services

Bow Street Runners · Metropolitan Police Service · London sewerage system 19th Century depiction of the Bow Street Magistrates Court, to which the Bow Street Runners were attached. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ... The new Abbey Mills Pumping Station The original Abbey Mills pumping station The London sewerage system is part of the water infrastructure serving London. ...

Preceded by
St. Louis
Summer Olympic Games
Host City

IV Olympiad (1908)
Succeeded by
Stockholm
Olympic Games
v  d  e
SportsMedal countsNOCs
MedalistsSymbols
Summer Games: 1896, 1900, 1904, 19061, 1908, 1912, (1916)2, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, (1940)2, (1944)2,3, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020, 2024, 2028
Winter Games: 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, (1940)2, (1944)2, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018, 2022
Athens 2004Turin 2006Beijing 2008Vancouver 2010London 2012Sochi 2014

participants The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Archery competition at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. ... The International Olympic Committee (IOC) allocates three-letter country codes to all National Olympic Committees and other groups competing in the Olympic Games. ... This article gives lists of Olympic medalists for those Olympic Games sports where such lists have been created in Wikipedia. ... The Olympic symbols are various logos, icons, flags and symbols used by the International Olympic Committee for various aspects related to the promotion of the Olympic Movement around the world. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were held in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... participants The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... The Games of the VI Olympiad were to have been held in 1916 in Berlin, Germany. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... The 1928 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IX Olympiad, were held in 1928 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. ... The 1932 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the X Olympiad, were held in 1932 in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... The Games of the XII Olympiad originally programmed to celebrated between September 21 to October 6, 1940 were cancelled due to World War II. Originally slated to be held in Tokyo, Japan, but the Games were given back to the IOC, because the Second Sino-Japanese War broke out in... The Games of the XIII Olympiad were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in London, United Kingdom. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad, were held in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... The 1968 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, were held in Mexico City in 1968. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were held in Munich, West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were held in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... you are such a dumb noob and the red sox rule Size = 200 | Optional caption = | Host city = Seoul, South Korea | Nations participating = 159 | Athletes participating = 8,465 (6,279 men, 2,186 women) | Events = 263 in 27 sports | Opening ceremony = September 17, 1988 | Closing ceremony = October 2, 1988 | Officially opened... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, were awarded to Beijing, China after an exhaustive ballot of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) on July 13, 2001. ... “London 2012” redirects here. ... The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, is a major international sports and cultural festival to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee. ... This article or section contains speculation and may try to argue its points. ... The 2024 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... The 2028 Summer Olympics, what will be officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, is an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ... An athlete carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1924 in Chamonix, France. ... The II Olympic Winter Games were held in 1928 in Sankt-Moritz, Switzerland. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... The 1936 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1936 in the villages of Garmisch and Partenkirchen in Bavaria, Germany. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Sapporo, Japan. ... The anticipated V Olympic Winter Games were cancelled due to World War II. They were to have been held in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... The V Olympic Winter Games were held in St. ... The VI Olympic Winter Games were held in 1952 in Oslo, Norway. ... The VII Olympic Winter Games were held in 1956 in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... The 1960 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1960 in Squaw Valley, California, United States (located in the Lake Tahoe basin). ... The 1964 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1968 Grenoble, France and opened on February 6. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1976 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1976 in Innsbruck, Austria. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... The 1984 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1984 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Yugoslavia. ... The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and opened by Governor General Jeanne Sauvé. The Olympics were highly successful financially as they brought in million-dollar profits. ... The 1992 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVI Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1992 in Albertville, France. ... The 1994 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. ... The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in 1998 in Nagano, Japan. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Neve and Gliz, the 2006 Olympics mascots, on display in Turin The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next Winter Olympics and will be celebrated in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada in 2010. ... The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, is an international winter multiple sports event that will be celebrated from February 7 to February 23, 2014. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... The 2022 Winter Olympics, formally called the XXIV Olympic Winter Games is an event that the International Olympic Committee has yet to organize. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... Neve and Gliz, the 2006 Olympics mascots, on display in Turin The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... The 2008 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, were awarded to Beijing, China after an exhaustive ballot of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) on July 13, 2001. ... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next Winter Olympics and will be celebrated in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada in 2010. ... “London 2012” redirects here. ... The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXII Olympic Winter Games, is an international winter multiple sports event that will be celebrated from February 7 to February 23, 2014. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
1908 Summer Olympics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (724 words)
The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England.
However, these have since been retroactively downgraded by the International Olympic Committee and thus the 1908 Games are seen as the start of the Fourth Olympiad, in keeping with the now-accepted four-year cycle.
The 1908 Olympics also prompted the establishment of standard rules for sports, and the selection of judges from different countries, rather than just the host.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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