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Encyclopedia > 1900s
Millennia: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century
Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s
Years: 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
Categories: Births - Deaths - Architecture
Establishments - Disestablishments

Contents

(19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... On the Gregorian calendar, the 2nd millennium commenced on 1 January 1001, and ended at the end of 31 December 2000. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 20XX redirects here. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... // The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginnings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... The 1920s they were sexy referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Events and trends

Technology

Public flight demonstration of an airplane by Alberto Santos-Dumont in Paris, November 12, 1906.

== Science == Download high resolution version (2675x1462, 1692 KB)photo of the 14 bis. ... Download high resolution version (2675x1462, 1692 KB)photo of the 14 bis. ... This article is about the aviator. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Hargrave (seated) and Swain demonstrate the manlift kites (labelled A, B, D, & E), sling seat and spring balance in the parkland behind Stanwell Park beach, November 1894 Lawrence Hargrave (29 January 1850 – 6 July 1915) was an engineer, explorer, astronomer, inventor and aeronautical pioneer. ... Flying machine redirects here. ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... Tonearm redirects here. ... Two Panamax running the Miraflores Locks The Panama Canal (Spanish: ) is a major ship canal that traverses the Isthmus of Panama in Central America, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. ... The Photostat machine was an early projection photocopier created in the 1900s by both the Rectigraph Company and the Photostat Corporation (an Eastman Kodak affiliate). ... The Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871–January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867–May 30, 1912), were two Americans generally credited with building the worlds first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and heavier-than-air human flight on December 17, 1903. ...

Black body spectrum In physics, Plancks law of black body radiation predicts the spectral intensity of electromagnetic radiation at all wavelengths from a black body at temperature  : where the following table provides the definition and SI units of measure for each symbol: The wavelength is related to the frequency... “Einstein” redirects here. ... For a less technical and generally accessible introduction to the topic, see Introduction to special relativity. ... Three different views of Brownian motion, with 32 steps, 256 steps, and 2048 steps denoted by progressively lighter colors. ... A diagram illustrating the emission of electrons from a metal plate, requiring energy gained from an incoming photon to be more than the work function of the material. ...

Literature and art

Picasso redirects here. ... Les Demoiselles dAvignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon in English) is a celebrated painting by Pablo Picasso that depicts five prostitutes in a brothel, in the Avignon Street of Barcelona. ... // Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born English novelist. ... For other uses, see Heart of Darkness (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ... Buddenbrooks [1]was Thomas Manns first novel, published in 1901 when he was twenty-six years old. ... Pablo Picasso, Le guitariste, 1910 Juan Gris, Portrait of Picasso, 1912, oil on canvas Georges BraqueWoman with a guitar, 1913 Juan Gris, Still Life with Fruit Dish and Mandolin, 1919, oil on canvas Cubist villa in Prague, Czech Republic Cubist House of the Black Madonna, Prague, Czech Republic, 1912 Cubism... Henri Matisse, Portrait of Madame Matisse (The green line), 1905, Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark Henri Matisse, La Danse (second version), 1909 Hermitage Museum, St. ... // Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born English novelist. ... For other uses, see Heart of Darkness (disambiguation). ... // Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born English novelist. ... The Secret Agent is a 1907 novel by Joseph Conrad. ... For other persons named Jack London, see Jack London (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Call of the Wild (disambiguation) The Call of the Wild is a novel by American writer Jack London. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

War, peace and politics

A shocked mandarin in Manchu robe in the back, with Queen Victoria (British Empire), Wilhelm II (German Empire), Nicholas II (Imperial Russia), Marianne (French Third Republic), and Emperor Meiji (Empire of Japan) stabbing into a pie with Chine ("China" in French) written on it. A portrayal of New Imperialism and its effects on China.
A shocked mandarin in Manchu robe in the back, with Queen Victoria (British Empire), Wilhelm II (German Empire), Nicholas II (Imperial Russia), Marianne (French Third Republic), and Emperor Meiji (Empire of Japan) stabbing into a pie with Chine ("China" in French) written on it. A portrayal of New Imperialism and its effects on China.

Source: http://www. ... Source: http://www. ... A Mandarin was a bureaucrat in imperial China. ... The Manchu people (Manchu: Manju; Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Mongolian: Манж) are a Tungusic people who originated in Manchuria (todays Northeastern China). ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... German Emperor Wilhelm (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, Prince of Prussia 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (de: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... Nicholas II redirects here. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... Marianne busts with features of Brigitte Bardot - Catherine Deneuve - Mireille Mathieu Marianne, a national emblem of France, is a personification of Liberty and Reason. ... The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ... Emperor Meiji ) (November 3, 1852 — July 30, 1912) was the 122nd emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from February 3, 1867 until his death. ... Anthem Kimi ga Yo Imperial Reign Capital Tokyo Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1868–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1926 Emperor Taishō  - 1926–1989 Emperor Shōwa Prime Minister  - 1885-1888, 1892-1896, 1898, 1900-1901 Itō Hirobumi  - 1888-1889 Kuroda Kiyotaka  - 1889-1891 Yamagata Aritomo  - 1906-1908, 1911-1912 Saionji Kinmochi... {{}} // The term imperialism was used from the third quarter of the nineteenth century to describe various forms of political control by a greater power over less powerful territories or nationalities, although analytically the phenomena which it denotes may differ greatly from each other and from the New imperialism. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Combatants United States Philippines several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Wesley Merritt Elwell Stephen Otis J. Franklin Bell Henry Ware Lawton† John J. Pershing Joseph Wheeler Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar Pio del Pilar Manuel Tinio Gregorio del Pilar† Licerio Geronimo Vicente Lukban Juan Cailles Maximino Hizon Antonio... The Federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia federated on 1 January 1901, to form the Commonwealth of Australia, of which they became component states. ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... Combatants Russian Empire Principality of Montenegro [1] Empire of Japan Commanders Emperor Nicholas II Aleksey Kuropatkin Stepan Makarov â€  Emperor Meiji Oyama Iwao Heihachiro Togo The Russo–Japanese War (Japanese: Nichi-Ro Sensō, Russian: Russko-Yaponskaya Voyna, Chinese: RìézhànzhÄ“ng, February 10, 1904–September 5, 1905) was a conflict... Anthem Kimi ga Yo Imperial Reign Capital Tokyo Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1868–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1926 Emperor Taishō  - 1926–1989 Emperor Shōwa Prime Minister  - 1885-1888, 1892-1896, 1898, 1900-1901 Itō Hirobumi  - 1888-1889 Kuroda Kiyotaka  - 1889-1891 Yamagata Aritomo  - 1906-1908, 1911-1912 Saionji Kinmochi... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ... The Entente Cordiale (cordial understanding) is a series of agreements signed on 8 April 1904 between the United Kingdom and France. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...

War, peace and politics

A shocked mandarin in Manchu robe in the back, with Queen Victoria (British Empire), Wilhelm II (German Empire), Nicholas II (Imperial Russia), Marianne (French Third Republic), and Emperor Meiji (Empire of Japan) stabbing into a pie with Chine ("China" in French) written on it. A portrayal of New Imperialism and its effects on China.
A shocked mandarin in Manchu robe in the back, with Queen Victoria (British Empire), Wilhelm II (German Empire), Nicholas II (Imperial Russia), Marianne (French Third Republic), and Emperor Meiji (Empire of Japan) stabbing into a pie with Chine ("China" in French) written on it. A portrayal of New Imperialism and its effects on China.

Source: http://www. ... Source: http://www. ... A Mandarin was a bureaucrat in imperial China. ... The Manchu people (Manchu: Manju; Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Mongolian: Манж) are a Tungusic people who originated in Manchuria (todays Northeastern China). ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... German Emperor Wilhelm (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, Prince of Prussia 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (de: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... Nicholas II redirects here. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... Marianne busts with features of Brigitte Bardot - Catherine Deneuve - Mireille Mathieu Marianne, a national emblem of France, is a personification of Liberty and Reason. ... The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ... Emperor Meiji ) (November 3, 1852 — July 30, 1912) was the 122nd emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from February 3, 1867 until his death. ... Anthem Kimi ga Yo Imperial Reign Capital Tokyo Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1868–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1926 Emperor Taishō  - 1926–1989 Emperor Shōwa Prime Minister  - 1885-1888, 1892-1896, 1898, 1900-1901 Itō Hirobumi  - 1888-1889 Kuroda Kiyotaka  - 1889-1891 Yamagata Aritomo  - 1906-1908, 1911-1912 Saionji Kinmochi... {{}} // The term imperialism was used from the third quarter of the nineteenth century to describe various forms of political control by a greater power over less powerful territories or nationalities, although analytically the phenomena which it denotes may differ greatly from each other and from the New imperialism. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Combatants United States Philippines several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Wesley Merritt Elwell Stephen Otis J. Franklin Bell Henry Ware Lawton† John J. Pershing Joseph Wheeler Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar Pio del Pilar Manuel Tinio Gregorio del Pilar† Licerio Geronimo Vicente Lukban Juan Cailles Maximino Hizon Antonio... The Federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia federated on 1 January 1901, to form the Commonwealth of Australia, of which they became component states. ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... Combatants Russian Empire Principality of Montenegro [1] Empire of Japan Commanders Emperor Nicholas II Aleksey Kuropatkin Stepan Makarov â€  Emperor Meiji Oyama Iwao Heihachiro Togo The Russo–Japanese War (Japanese: Nichi-Ro Sensō, Russian: Russko-Yaponskaya Voyna, Chinese: RìézhànzhÄ“ng, February 10, 1904–September 5, 1905) was a conflict... Anthem Kimi ga Yo Imperial Reign Capital Tokyo Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1868–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1926 Emperor Taishō  - 1926–1989 Emperor Shōwa Prime Minister  - 1885-1888, 1892-1896, 1898, 1900-1901 Itō Hirobumi  - 1888-1889 Kuroda Kiyotaka  - 1889-1891 Yamagata Aritomo  - 1906-1908, 1911-1912 Saionji Kinmochi... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ... The Entente Cordiale (cordial understanding) is a series of agreements signed on 8 April 1904 between the United Kingdom and France. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...

People

World leaders

  1. Mozzafar-al-Din Shah, 1896-1907
  2. Mohammad Ali Shah, 1907-1909
  3. Ahmad Shah Qajar, 1909-1925

Sir Edmund Barton, GCMG, QC (18 January 1849 – 7 January 1920), Australian politician and judge, was the first Prime Minister of Australia and a founding justice of the High Court of Australia. ... Alfred William Deakin (3 August 1856 – 7 October 1919), Australian politician, was a leader of the movement for Australian federation and later second Prime Minister of Australia. ... For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ... For other persons named George Reid, see George Reid (disambiguation). ... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Franz Joseph I Franz Joseph (in English also Francis Joseph) (August 18, 1830 - November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria and King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and King of Hungary from 1867 until 1916. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... “Laurier” redirects here. ... German Emperor Wilhelm (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, Prince of Prussia 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (de: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. ... Victor Emmanuel III (Italian: ; 11 November 1869 – 28 December 1947) was King of Italy (29 July 1900 – 9 May 1946), Emperor of Ethiopia (1936–43) and King of Albania (1939–43). ... George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston (January 11, 1859 - March 20, 1925), was a conservative British statesman and sometime Viceroy of India. ... Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810—July 20, 1903), born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was the 256th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, reigning from 1878 to 1903, succeeding Pope Pius IX. Reigning until the age of 93, he was the oldest pope, and had the third longest pontificate... Pope St. ... José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz Mory (15 September 1830 – 2 July 1915), Mexican war volunteer and French intervention hero; later President. ... Nicholas II redirects here. ... Alfonso XIII of Spain (May 17, 1886 - February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ... Antonio Maura y Montaner (Palma de Mallorca, May 2, 1853 - Madrid, December 13, 1925) was Prime Minister of Spain on two separate occasions: October 23, 1900 to March 6, 1902 and January 25, 1907 to October 21, 1909 Born into a rich family, he studied law in Madrid. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury (February 3, 1830–August 22, 1903). ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour (25 July 1848 - March 19, 1930) was a British statesman and the thirty-third Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman (7 September 1836 – 22 April 1908) , also known as Andie McDowell, was a British Liberal statesman who served as Prime Minister from December 5, 1905 until resigning due to ill health on April 3, 1908. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Shah or Shahzad is a Persian term for a monarch (ruler) that has been adopted in many other languages. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... edit The Qajar dynasty ( ) (Persian: - or دودمان قاجار) was a ruling Persian dynasty[1] of Turkic descent[2], that ruled Iran (Persia) from 1781 to 1925. ... Mozaffareddin Shah Mozzafar-al-Din Shah (also Mozaffareddin Shah) (1853 – 1907) was the Shah of Persia between 1896 and 1907. ... Mohammad Ali Shah Qajar (Persian: محمدعلی شاه قاجار)‎ (1872 - 1925) was the shah of Iran from January 8, 1907 to July 16, 1909. ... Photographic portrait of Ahmad Shah Qajar (l) and his brother Mohammad Hassan Mirza (r) Ahmad Shah Qajar (احمد شاه قاجار in Persian) ‎(January 21, 1898 - 21 February 1930) was Shah of Persia from July 16, 1909 to October 31, 1925. ...

Important personalities

Eugen Francis Charles dAlbert (April 10, 1864 – March 3, 1932) was a pianist and composer of Scottish birth who lived primarily in Germany. ... Hugo Emil Alfvén  listen (May 1, 1872 – May 8, 1960) was a Swedish composer, conductor, violinist, and painter. ... Egbert Anson Van Alstyne (born, according to differing sources, March 4 or March 6, 1878; died July 9, 1951) was a United States songwriter and pianist. ... Broncho Billy Anderson (March 21, 1880 – January 20, 1971) was an American actor, writer, director, and producer, who is best-known as the first star of the Western film genre. ... Roscoe Conkling Arbuckle (March 24, 1887 – June 29, 1933) was an American silent film comedian. ... Kurt Magnus Atterberg (December 12, 1887 - February 15, 1974) was a Swedish composer. ... Bartok redirects here. ... Nora Bayes Nora Bayes (1880 - 19 June 1928) was a popular United States entertainer of the early 20th century. ... Sir Jagadish Chandra Bose (Bengali: জগদীশ চন্দ্র বসু Jôgdish Chôndro Boshu) (November 30, 1858 – November 23, 1937) was a Bengali physicist from undivided India, who pioneered the investigation of radio and microwave optics. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... Francis W. Boggs (1870 - October 27, 1911) was a stage actor and important pioneer silent film director and one of the first to work in Hollywood. ... Frank Bridge (February 26, 1879 – January 10, 1941) was an English composer. ... Alfred Bryan (September 15, 1871 _ April 1, 1958) was a United States songwriter. ... Vincent Patrick Bryan (June 22, 1878 - April 27, 1937) was a composer and lyricist. ... Ferruccio Busoni Ferruccio Busoni (April 1, 1866 – July 27, 1924) was an Italian composer, pianist, music teacher and conductor. ... For the song Caruso by Lucio Dalla, see Caruso (song). ... Gustave Charpentier (June 25, 1860 - February 18, 1956) was a French composer, best known for his opera Louise. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Francesco Cilea, (Palmi, near Reggio Calabria, July 26, 1866 - Varazze, near Savona, November 20, 1950) was an Italian opera composer, whose early success was not sustained, as taste in music changed. ... Will D. Cobb (born July 6th, 1876 in Philadelphia - died January 20th1930 in New York) was a famous lyricist and composer. ... George Michael Cohan (July 3, 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... Robert Bob Cole (July 11, 1861–August 2, 1911), American composer, actor, playwright, and stage producer and director. ... Frederick Shepherd Converse (b. ... Henry Creamer (June 21, 1879 – October 14, 1930) was an American popular song lyricist. ... Sir Henry Walford Davies (September 6, 1869 - March 11, 1941) was a British composer, who held the title Master of the Kings Music from 1934 until 1941. ... Peter Dawson (31 January 1882-27 September 1961) was an Australian bass/baritone in the 1920s and 1930s when he was possibly the most popular singer of that era. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... Frederick Albert Theodore Delius CH (January 29, 1862, – June 10, 1934) was an English composer born in Bradford in the West Riding of Yorkshire in the north of England. ... Paul Dresser (born April 22, 1859; died January 31, 1906) was an important American songwriter in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák ( , often anglicized DVOR-zhak; September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of romantic music, who employed the idioms and melodies of the folk music of his native Bohemia and Moravia in symphonic, oratorial, chamber and operatic works. ... Gus Edwards (August 18, 1879 - November 7, 1945) was a songwriter and vaudevillian. ... Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ... August Enna (1859 - August 3, 1939), was a Danish composer, known mainly for his operas. ... Manuel de Falla y Matheu (November 23, 1876 – November 14, 1946) was a Spanish composer of classical music. ... Geraldine Farrar Farrar as the title character in Manon Geraldine Farrar (February 28, 1882 – March 11, 1967) was an opera singer and film actress whose stage presence earned her a fanatic following of Gerryflappers in the early 20th century. ... Fred Fisher (September 30, 1875 - January 14, 1942) was a United States songwriter. ... Paul Le Flem (March 18, 1881 - July 31, 1984) was a French composer and musician. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Rudolf Friml (December 7, 1879 - November 12, 1972) was a composer of operettas, musicals, songs, as well as a pianist. ... Portrait of Julius Fučík Julius Ernst Wilhelm Fučík (18 July 1872 – 15 September 1916) was a Czech composer and conductor of military bands. ... Amelita Galli-Curci Amelita Galli-Curci as the title role in Lakmé Amelita Galli-Curci (18 November 1882 – 26 November 1963) was an operatic coloratura soprano, one of the best regarded of the early 20th century. ... Mary Garden (February 20, 1874 - January 3, 1967) was a popular operatic soprano in the first third of the 20th century. ... Sir Edward German (17 February 1862 - 11 November 1936) was a musician and composer. ... Portrait by Ilya Repin, 1887. ... Emilio de Gogorza (1872-1949) is an Spanish-American tenor. ... Percy Grainger. ... Enrique Granados Enrique Costanzo Granados y Campiña (July 27, 1867 – March 24, 1916) was a Spanish pianist and composer of classical music; he is commonly considered to be a representative of musical Nationalism, and as such his music is in a uniquely Spanish style. ... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ... Guy dHardelot (c. ... Sir (Herbert) Hamilton Harty, conductor, composer and accompanist, was born December 4, 1879 in Hillsborough (Ireland). ... Although virtually forgotten today, at the start of the Twentieth Century The Haydn Quartet were undisputed kings of the Barbershop sound. ... Helene Anna Held (March 8, 1872 – August 12, 1918) was a Polish-born stage performer, most often associated with impresario Florenz Ziegfeld, her common-law husband. ... Victor Herbert Victor August Herbert (February 1, 1859–May 26, 1924) was a popular composer of light opera, and an accomplished cellist and conductor. ... Max Hoffmann Max Hoffman (one n) is the name of an Austrian-born car importer in 1950s New York - see Hoffmann for others. ... Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ... Abe Holzmann, (1874-1939) was a German/American composer, who is most famous today for his march Blaze-Away! Categories: People stubs | Composers | 1874 births | 1939 deaths ... David Horsley (March 11, 1873 – February 23, 1933) was English born pioneer of the movie industry who built the first movie studio in Hollywood. ... Houdini redirects here. ... Mississippi John Smith Hurt (March 8, 1892 , Teoc, Carroll County, Mississippi - November 2, 1966, Grenada, Mississippi) was an influential blues singer and guitarist. ... JenÅ‘ Huszka (a. ... Mikhail Mikhailovich Ippolitov-Ivanov (November 19, 1859 – January 28, 1935) was a Russian composer, conductor and teacher. ... Carrie Minetta Jacobs-Bond (August 11, 1862 – December 28, 1946) was an American singer and songwriter who composed many pieces of popular sheet music during from the 1890s through the early 1940s. ... William Jerome (1865 - 1932) was a United States songwriter. ... 1933 photograph of J. Rosamond Johnson by Carl Van Vechten John Rosamond Johnson (1873–1954), most often referred to as J. Rosamond Johnson, was a composer and singer during the Harlem Renaissance. ... James Weldon Johnson (June 17, 1871 – June 26, 1938) was a leading American author, critic, journalist, poet, anthropologist, educator, lawyer, songwriter, early civil rights activist, and prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance. ... Scott Joplin Scott Joplin (born between June 1867 and January 1868,[1] died April 1, 1917) was an American musician and composer of ragtime music. ... Gustav Gerson Kahn (November 6, 1886 - October 8, 1941) was a famous Jewish-German-American musician, songwriter and lyricist. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. ... This article is about the British author. ... Carl Laemmle Birthplace of Carl Laemmle in Laupheim Carl Laemmle (17 January 1867 – 24 September 1939), born in Laupheim, Württemberg, Germany, was a pioneer in American film making and a founder of one of the original major Hollywood movie studios. ... Sir Harry Lauder, KBE (4 August 1870 - 26 February 1950) was a very famous Scottish entertainer, described by Sir Winston Churchill as Scotlands greatest ever ambassador! // Early Years Born Henry Lauder at 4 Bridge Street Portobello, the residence of his mother’s father, he was the eldest son of... Leadbelly, also known as Lead Belly (born Huddie William Ledbetter; January 20, 1889 (although this is debatable) - December 6, 1949), was an American folk and blues musician, notable for his clear and forceful singing, his virtuosity on the twelve string guitar, and the rich songbook of folk standards he introduced. ... Lehár Franz Lehár (30 April 1870 – 24 October 1948) was an Austrian composer of Hungarian descent, mainly known for his operettas. ... Ruggiero Leoncavallo (March 8, 1857 - August 9, 1919) was an Italian opera composer. ... Paul Lincke (November 7, 1866 - September 4, 1946), German composer. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... Arthur Marshall (November 20, 1881 - August 18, 1968) was an African-American composer and performer of ragtime music. ... Jules Massenet Jules (Émile Frédéric) Massenet (May 12, 1842 – August 13, 1912) was a French composer. ... Nicolai Karlovich Medtner Nikolai Karlovich Medtner (Николай Карлович Метнер) (January 5, 1880 – November 13, 1951) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... Dame Nellie Melba, GBE (19 May 1861 – 23 February 1931), born Helen Porter Mitchell, legendary Australian opera soprano and probably the most famous of all sopranos, was the first Australian to achieve international recognition in the form. ... Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ... Kerry Mills (February 1, 1869 - December 5, 1948) was an American composer of popular music during the Tin Pan Alley era. ... Billy Murray (25 May 1877 - 17 August 1954) was one of the most popular singers in the United States in the early decades of the 20th century. ... Evelyn Nesbit (December 25, 1884 – January 17, 1967) was an artists model and chorus girl, noted for her entanglement in the murder of her ex-lover, architect Stanford White, by her first husband, Harry K. Thaw. ... Ethelbert Woodbridge Nevin November 25, 1862 - February 17, 1901 was an American pianist and composer. ... Carl Nielsen Carl August Nielsen (June 9, 1865, Sortelung – October 3, 1931, Copenhagen) was a conductor, violinist, and the most internationally known composer from Denmark. ... Jack Norworth (5 January 1879 - 1 September 1959) was a U.S. songwriter, singer, and vaudeville performer. ... VítÄ›zslav Novák VítÄ›zslav Novák (December 5, 1870 – July 18, 1949) was one of the most well-respected Czech composers and pedagogues, almost singlehandedly founding a mid-century Czech school of composition. ... Maude Nugent (1877 - 1958) was a U.S. songwriter. ... Sidney Olcott (September 20, 1873 - December 16, 1949) was a Canadian producer, director, actor and writer. ... Charles Pathé (1863 – December 26, 1957) was a major French pioneer of the film and recording industries. ... Edwin Stanton Porter (April 21, 1870 - April 30, 1941) was an influential early film pioneer. ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: , Sergej Vasilevič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 (N.S.) or 20 March 1873 (O.S.) – 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor, one of the last great champions of the Romantic style of European classical music. ... Maurice Ravel. ... Elsa and Ottorino Respighi in the 1920s Ottorino Respighi (Bologna, July 9, 1879 - Rome, April 18, 1936) was an Italian composer, musicologist, pianist, violist and violinist. ... Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6 (N.S. March 18), 1844 – June 8 (N.S. June 21) 1908) was a Russian composer, one of five Russian composers known as The Five, and was later a... Landon Ronald (1873-1938), born Landon Ronald Russell was an English conductor, composer, pianist and administrator, born in London, England. ... Paul Sarebresole (May, 1875 - October 3, 1911) was an early composer of ragtime music. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 Arnold Schoenberg (the anglicized form of Schönberg — Schoenberg changed the spelling officially when he left Germany and re-converted to Judaism in 1933; September 13, 1874 – July 13, 1951) was an Austrian and later American composer. ... Jean Schwartz (November 4, 1878 - November 30, 1956) was a songwriter. ... James Scotts 1904 On the Pike, which refers to the midway of the St. ... Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin (Russian: Александр Николаевич Скрябин, Aleksandr Nikolajevič Skriabin; sometimes transliterated as Skryabin or Scriabine (6 January 1872 [O.S. 26 December 1871]—27 April 1915) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... William Nicholas Selig (born March 14, 1864 - died July 15, 1948) was a pioneer of the American motion picture industry. ... Chris Smith (October 12, 1879 - October 4, 1949) was a United States composer and performer. ... Harry B. Smith (born December 28, 1860 in Buffalo, New York - died January 2, 1936 in Atlantic City) was a reknowned and prolific writer, lyricist, and composer. ... John Singer Sargent: Ethel Smyth, 1901 Dame Ethel Mary Smyth [1] (April 23, 1858 - May 8, 1944) was an English composer and a leader of the womens suffrage movement. ... John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era known particularly for American military marches. ... George K. Spoor (1872, Highland Park, Illinois – 24 November 1953, Chicago) was an early film pioneer who, with Broncho Billy Anderson, founded the historic Essanay Studios in Chicago in 1907. ... Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (September 30, 1852 – 29 March 1924) was an Irish composer. ... Andrew B. Sterling, born on August 26, 1874 in New York City was a U.S. lyricist. ... Oscar Straus (6 March 1870 - 11 January 1954) was a Viennese composer of operettas. ... Harry Von Tilzer (July 8, 1872 - January 10, 1946) was a very popular United States songwriter. ... Tom Turpin Thomas Million Turpin (1873 - August 13, 1922) was an African-American composer of ragtime music. ... Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (December 22, 1883 – November 6, 1965) was a French-born composer. ... Vesta Victoria (November 26, 1873 – April 7, 1951) was an English music hall singer and comedienne. ... Anton Webern (December 3, 1883 – September 15, 1945) was an Austrian composer and conductor. ... Percy Wenrich (January 23, 1880 - March 17, 1952) was a United States composer of ragtime and popular music. ... Bert Williams (November 12, 1874 – March 4, 1922) was the pre-eminent Black entertainer of his era and one of the most popular comedians for all audiences of his time. ... Harry Hiram Williams (August 23, 1879 – May 15, 1922) was an American composer, lyricist, and publisher of popular music from 1903 until his death in 1922. ... Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari (January 12, 1876 - January 21, 1948) was an Italian composer. ... Amy Woodford-Finden (born 1860 in Valparaiso, Chile - died Mar 13, 1919 in London) was the wife of an Indian army officer who is best known for writing the music to The Kashmiri Song from The Four Indian Love Lyrics, featuring lyrics by Laurence Hope (born Adela Florence Cory (1865... Israel Zangwill (February 14, 1864 - August 1, 1926) was an English-born Zionist, humourist and writer. ... Composed Anchors Away in 1906. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 19011 – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nickname Satchmo) was an African American jazz musician. ...

External links

  • Year 1900s

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MySpace.com - The 1900s - CHICAGO, Illinois - Psychedelic / J-POP / K-POP - www.myspace.com/1900s (681 words)
MySpace.com - The 1900s - CHICAGO, Illinois - Psychedelic / J-POP / K-POP - www.myspace.com/1900s
Debut album COLD & KIND out October 2nd, get it NOW at The 1900s online store or at Parasol Records
Debut EP PLUME DELIVERY available at The 1900s online store, itunes and emusic, as well as Parasol Records
Search Results for "1900s" (277 words)
...Brahman cattle, breed of beef cattle developed in the S United States in the early 1900s by combining several breeds or strains of zebu cattle of India.
Situated on an ironstone field, Scunthorpe was a center of iron and steel manufacture from the early 1900s to the...
...Introduced in the early 1900s, acetaminophen is a coal tar derivative that acts by interfering with the synthesis of prostaglandins and other substances necessary...
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