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Encyclopedia > 1896 in music
Years: 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899
Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s
Centuries: 18th Century - 19th century - 20th century

Contents

See also: 1892 in music, Other events of 1893, 1894 in music and the list of years in music. // Events February 9 - Premiere of Giuseppe Verdis final opera Falstaff in La Scala in Milan August 14-15 - Americas oldest music organization, the Stoughton Musical Society performs at the... See also: 1893 in music, other events of 1894, 1895 in music and the list of years in music. Events March 14 - Johan Svendsen conducts the world premiere of Carl Nielsens Symphony No. ... // Events August 10 - The first ever Promenade Concert is held at the Queens Hall in London. ... See also: 1896 in music, other events of 1897, 1898 in music and the list of years in music. Events The Cakewalk matures into Ragtime music John Philip Sousas band makes phonograph recordings of Cakewalks and early Ragtime early publications by Scott Joplin Published popular music Asleep In The... See also: 1897 in music, other events of 1898, 1899 in music and the list of years in music. Events Scott Joplin publishes Swipsy Cakewalk Published popular music Because w. ... See also: 1898 in music, other events of 1899, 1900 in music and the list of years in music. Events April 26 - Jean Sibeliuss Symphony No. ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... // Events and trends Technology The First Transcontinental Railroad in the United States is built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... Events and Trends Technology The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... // Events and Trends Technology Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... // Events and Trends Technology Lawrence Hargrave makes the first stable wing design for a heavier-than-air aircraft Orville and Wilbur Wright make the first documented flight in a powered heavier-than-air aircraft Mass production of automobile Wide popularity of home phonograph Panama Canal is built by the United... // Events and trends The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... Sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or primarily in North America and in Australia as the Roaring Twenties . In Europe it is sometimes refered to as the Golden Twenties. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


Events

February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... La Bohème, French for The Bohemians, is an opera in four acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on La Vie de Bohème by Henri Murger. ... Turin (Italian Torino) is a major industrial city in north-western Italy, capital of the Piedmont region, located mainly on the west bank of the Po River. ... Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák (listen ▶(?)) (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of romantic music. ... Antonín Dvořáks Cello Concerto in B minor, Opus 104 is one of the most well-known cello concertos. ... For the pop singer of this name, see Engelbert Humperdinck (singer) Engelbert Humperdinck (September 1, 1854 – September 27, 1921) was a German composer, best known for his opera, Hänsel und Gretel (1893). ...

Published popular music

  • "All Coons Look Alike To Me"     w.m. Ernest Hogan
  • "The Amorous Goldfish"     w. Harry Greenbank m. Sidney Jones
  • "Chin, Chin, Chinaman"     w. Harry Greenbank m. Sidney Jones
  • "El Capitan March"     m. John Philip Sousa
  • "Eli Green's Cakewalk"     w.m. David Reed & Sadie Koninsky
  • "Elsie From Chelsea"     w.m. Harry Dacre
  • "Going For A Pardon"     w. James Thornton & Clara Havenschild m. James Thornton
  • "Happy Days In Dixie"     m. Kerry Mills
  • "Hot Tamale Alley" by George M. Cohan
  • "A Hot Time In The Old Town"     w. Joseph Hayden m. Theodore A. Metz
  • "I Love You In The Same Old Way - Darling Sue"     w. Walter H. Ford m. John Walter Bratton
  • "In The Baggage Coach Ahead"     w.m. Gussie L. Davis
  • "A Jovial Monk Am I"     w. (Eng) Arthur Sturgess m. Edmond Audran
  • "Kentucky Babe"     w. Richard Henry Buck m. Adam Geibel
  • "Laugh And The World Laughs With You"     w. Ella Wheeler Wilcox m. Louis Gottschalk
  • "Love Makes The World Go 'Round"     w. Clyde Fitch m. arr. William Furst
  • "Mister Johnson, Turn Me Loose"     w.m. Ben Harney
  • "Mother Was A Lady"     w. Edward B. Marks m. Joseph W. Stern
  • "Musetta's Waltz Song"     m. Giacomo Puccini
  • "My Gal Is A High Born Lady"     w.m. Barney Fagan arr. Gustave Luders
  • "Remus Takes the Cake" by J. H. Ellis
  • "The Saint Louis Cyclone" by Ren Shields & George Evans
  • "Sambo at the Cakewalk" by Alfred E. Marks
  • "Stars & Stripes Forever" by John Philip Sousa
  • "Sweet Rosie O'Grady" w.m. Maude Nugent
  • "To A Wild Rose"     m. Edward MacDowell
  • "Warmest Baby in the Bunch" by George M. Cohan
  • "When The Saints Go Marching In"     w. Katherine E. Purvis m. James M. Black

Sambo at the Cakewalk, 1896 sheet music cover, image from loc. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... George M. Cohan George Michael Cohan (July 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... Edmond Audran (11 April 1842 - 17 August 1901) was a French composer. ... Ella Wheeler Wilcox (November 5, 1850–October 30, 1919) was an American author and poet. ... Benjamin Robertson Ben Harney (6 March 1871 _ 2 March 1938) was a United States of America songwriter, entertainer, and pioneer of ragtime music. ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Edward and Marian MacDowell. ... George M. Cohan George Michael Cohan (July 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ...

Recorded popular music

  • "All Coons Look Alike To Me" (w.m. Ernest Hogan)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Edison Records
  • "The Amorous Goldfish" (w. Harry Greenbank m. Sidney Jones)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Edison
  • "And Her Golden Hair Was Hanging Down Her Back" (w. Monroe H. Rosenfeld m. Felix McGlennon)
    - Maud Foster on Berliner Records
  • "Annie Laurie" (w. William Douglas m. Lady John Douglas Scott)
    - George J. Gaskin on Edison
    - Edison Male Quartette on Edison
  • "Auld Lang Syne" (w. adapted Robert Burns)
    - Edison Male Quartette on Edison
  • "The Band Played On" (w. John Palmer m. Charles B. Ward)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Columbia records and Berliner
  • "The Belle Of Avenoo A" (w.m. Safford Waters)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Berliner
  • "Ben Bolt" (w. Thomas Dunn English m. Nelson Kneass)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "The Blue Danube" (m. Johann Strauss)
    - Edison Grand Concert Band on Edison
  • "Chin, Chin, Chinaman" (w. Harry Greenbank m. Sidney Jones)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Edison
  • "La Donna È Mobile" (w. Francesco Piave m. Giuseppe Verdi)
    - Ferruccio Giannini on Berliner
  • "Don't You Hear Dem Bells?" (w.m. D. S. McCosh)
    - Brilliant Quartet on Berliner
  • "Down In Poverty Row" (w. Gussie L. Davis m. Arthur Trevelyan)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Berliner
    - George J. Gaskin on Edison
  • "Elsie From Chelsea" (w.m. Harry Dacre)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Edison
  • "Funiculi-Funicula" (w. G. Turco m. Luigi Denza)
    - Ferruccio Giannini on Berliner
  • "The Future Mrs 'Awkins" (w.m. Albert Chevalier)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "The Gladiators" (m. John Philip Sousa)
    - Edison Grand Concert Band on Edison
  • "Hallelujah Chorus" (w. Charles Jennes m. George Frederic Handel)
    - Edison Grand Concert Band on Edison
  • "The Holy City" (w. Frederick Edward Weatherly m. Stephen Adams)
    - Ferruccio Giannini on Berliner
  • "Home Sweet Home" (w. John Howard Payne m. Sir Henry Rowley Bishop)
    - George J. Gaskin on Edison
  • "The Honeymoon" (m. George Rosey)
    - Edison Grand Concert Band on Edison
  • "I Don't Want To Play In Your Yard" (w. Philip Wingate m. Henry W. Petrie)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
    - Maud Foster on Berliner
  • "In The Baggage Coach Ahead" (w.m. Gussie L. Davis)
    - George J. Gaskin on Edison
  • "I'se Gwine Back To Dixie" (w.m. C. A. White)
    - Brilliant Quartet on Berliner
  • "Just Tell Them That You Saw Me" (w.m. Paul Dresser)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
    - Dan W. Quinn on Berliner
  • "Kathleen" (w.m. Helene Mora)
    - George J. Gaskin on Edison
  • "Kathleen Mavourneen" (w. Annie Crawford (Barry) m. Frederick William Nichols Crouch)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "King Cotton March" (m. John Philip Sousa)
    - Edison Grand Concert Band on Edison
  • "Listen To The Mocking Bird" (w. Alice Hawthorne m. Richard Milburn)
    - whistling Billy Golden on Edison
  • "The Lost Chord" (w. Adelaide Anne Procter m. Sir Arthur Sullivan)
    - Edison Grand Concert Band on Edison
  • "Marching Through Georgia" (w.m. Henry Clay Work)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "La Marseillaise" (w.m. Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle)
    - Ferruccio Giannini on Berliner
  • "My Angeline" (w. Harry B. Smith m. Victor Herbert)
    - Frank Daniels on Berliner
  • "My Best Girl's A New Yorker" (w.m. John Stromberg)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Berliner
  • "My Gal Is A High Born Lady" (w.m. Barney Fagan arr. Gustave Luders)
    - George J. Gaskin on Edison
    - Dan W. Quinn on Berliner
  • "My Pearl Is A Bowery Girl" (w. William Jerome m. Andrew Mack)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "Nearer, My God, To Thee" (w. Sarah F. Adams m. Lowell Mason)
    - J. W. Myers on Berliner
    - Len Spencer & Roger Harding on Columbia
  • "Onward, Christian Soldiers" (w. Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould m. Sir Arthur Sullivan)
    - J. W. Myers on Berliner
  • "The Palms" (Gabriel Fauré)
    - Ferruccio Giannini on Berliner
  • "La Paloma" (w. anon m. Sebastian Yradier)
    - Ferruccio Giannini on Berliner
  • "Private Tommy Atkins" (w. Henry Hamilton m. S. Potter)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "Put Me Off At Buffalo" (w. Harry Dillon m. John Dillon)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Berliner
  • "Rock Of Ages" (w. Augustus Montague Toplady m. Thomas Hasting)
    - J. W. Myers on Berliner
  • "'Round His Bed I'm Goin' To Creep" ()
    - Len Spencer on Columbia
  • "Sally In Our Alley" (w. Henry Carey m. trad)
    - Edison Male Quartette on Edison
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "She Is More To Be Pitied Than Censured" (w.m. William B. Gray)
    - Steve Porter on Columbia
  • "She May Have Seen Better Days" (w.m. James Thornton)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Berliner
  • "The Sidewalks Of New York" (w.m. Charles B. Lawlor & James W. Blake)
    - George J. Gaskin on Edison and on Berliner
  • "The Streets Of Cairo" (w.m. James Thornton)
    - Dan W. Quinn on Berliner
  • "The Sunshine Of Paradise Alley" (w. Walter H. Ford m. John Walter Bratton)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "Tenting On The Old Camp Ground" (w.m. Walter Kittredge)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "Then You'll Remember Me" (w. Alfred Bunn m. Michael William Balfe)
    - Ferruccio Giannini on Berliner
  • "There's Only One Girl In the World For Me" (w.m. Dave Marion)
    - J. W. Myers on Berliner
  • "They Are The Best Friends Of All"
    - Helene Mora on US Phonograph Records
  • "Toreador Song" (w. Henri Meilhac, Ludovic Halévy m. Georges Bizet)
    - J. W. Myers on Berliner
  • "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp" (w.m. George Frederick Root)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "Trilby Song"
    - Maurice Farkoa with piano Frank Lambert on Berliner
  • "Watchman Tell Us Of The Night" (Bowring, Mason)
    - J. W. Myers on Berliner
  • "'Way Down Yonder In The Cornfield"
    - Columbia Quartette on Columbia
  • "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" (w.m. Louis Lambert)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner
  • "Where Is My Wandering Boy, Tonight?" (w.m. Rev. R. Lowry)
    - J. W. Myers on Berliner
  • "Wot Cher!" (w. Albert Chevalier m. Charles Ingle)
    - George J. Gaskin on Berliner

Edison Records was the first record label, pioneering recorded sound and an important player in the early record industry. ... Berliner Gramophone was an early record label, the first company to produce disc gramophone records (as opposed to the earlier phonograph cylinder records). ... William Douglas can be one of several people: William Douglas, Duke of Hamilton (1635-1694) William Lewis Douglas who served as governor of Massachusetts from 1905 until 1906 William Orville Douglas who was a jurist and justice This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... George J. Gaskin (1850s - 1920) was an American singer. ... Robert Burns, preeminent Scottish poet Burns redirects here. ... John Palmer is the name of several notable individuals, including: John McAuley Palmer (1817-1900), U.S. Civil War general and governor of Illinois; John McAuley Palmer (1870-1955), American First World War general and military theorist, the grandson of the first John McCauley Palmer; John Palmer (1742-1818), inventor... Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ... Johann Strauss is the name of three famous German composers: Johann Strauss I (1804-1849), composer, popularizer of the waltz Johann Strauss II (1825-1899), composer, son of Johann I, known as the Waltz King Johann Strauss III (1866-1939), composer, son of Eduard Strauss See also: Strauss This is... Harry Greenbank was an author from the late 19th and early 20th century. ... Sidney Jones was a composer most famous for producing the scores for several musical comedies in the last Victorian period. ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (October 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) is to date the most influential composer of the Italian School of Opera. ... Gussie L. Davis (1862 - 1889) was an African-American songwriter from Ohio. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Luigi Denza (February 24, 1846 - January 26, 1922), was an Italian composer. ... Albert Chevalier (March 21, 1861 - July 10, 1923) was an English comedian and actor. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... George Frideric Handel (German Georg Friedrich Händel), (February 23, 1685 – April 14, 1759) was a German Baroque music composer who lived much of his life in Great Britain, a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. ... John Howard Payne (1791-1852) was an American actor and playwright. ... Henry Rowley Bishop (born November 18, 1786 in London; died April 30, 1855) was an English musical composer. ... Henry W. Petrie (March 4, 1857 - May 25, 1925) was a American composer and performer of popular music. ... Paul Dresser (born April 22, 1859; died January 31, 1906) was an important American songwriter in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... Adelaide Anne Procter, (October 30, 1825 _ February 2, 1864), English poet, was the eldest daughter of the poet Bryan Procter. ... Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842 – November 22, 1900) was a British composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist William S. Gilbert. ... Henry Clay Work (October 1, 1832 - June 8, 1884) was an American composer. ... Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle (b. ... Harry B. Smith (born December 28, 1860 in Buffalo, New York - died January 2, 1936 in Atlantic City) was a reknowned and prolific writer, lyricist, and composer. ... Victor August Herbert (February 1, 1859–May 26, 1924) was a popular composer of light opera. ... William Jerome (1865 - 1932) was a United States songwriter. ... Portrait of Lowell Mason Lowell Mason (1792-1872) was a leading figure in American church music, the composer of over 1600 hymns, many of which are often sung today. ... Len Spencer (February 12, 1867 – December 15, 1914) was an early American recording artist. ... The Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould (28 January 1834 – 2 January 1924) was an English Victorian hagiographer, antiquarian, novelist and eclectic scholar. ... Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842 – November 22, 1900) was a British composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist William S. Gilbert. ... Portrait with oils of Gabriel Fauré by John Singer Sargent, about 1889 (in the Paris Museum of Music) Gabriel Urbain Fauré (May 12, 1845 – November 4, 1924) was a French composer. ... First World War British soldiers in the trenches Tommy Atkins (often just Tommy) is a term for a common soldier in the British Army that is particularly associated with World War I. German soldiers would call out to Tommy across no mans land if they wished to speak to... John Dillon (September 4, 1851 - August 4, 1927) was an Irish nationalist politician. ... Augustus Montague Toplady (November 4, 1740 – 1778), Anglican divine, was born at Farnham, Surrey, and educated at Westminster and Trinity College, Dublin. ... Henry Carey is the name of either Henry Charles Carey (1793-1879) - an American economist Henry Carey (died 1743) - dramatist and song-writer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... People named James Thornton. ... Walter Kittredge (October 8, 1834–July 8, 1905), was a famous musician during the American Civil War. ... Alfred Bunn (born April 8, 1796 in London; died December 20, 1860 in Boulogne-sur-Mer) was an English theatrical manager. ... Michael William Balfe (May 15, 1808 - October 20, 1870), was an Irish composer, best known today for his opera The Bohemian Girl. ... Henri Meilhac (February 21, 1831 - 1897), French dramatist, was born in Paris. ... Ludovic Halévy (January 1, 1834 - May 8, 1908), French author, was born in Paris. ... Georges Bizet Georges Bizet (October 25, 1838 – June 3, 1875), was a French composer of the romantic era best known for his opera Carmen. ... George Frederick Root (1820 – 1895) was a popular American songwriter during the Civil War. ...

Classical music

Amy Marcy Beach (September 5, 1867 – December 27, 1944), was an American pianist and composer of classical music. ... Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of Romantic music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... This article is part of the Pipe Organ Refactor Project. ... Anton Bruckner Anton Bruckner (4 September 1824–11 October 1896) was an Austrian composer of the Romantic era. ... Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák (listen ▶(?)) (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of romantic music. ... Gustav Holst Gustavus Theodore von Holst (September 21, 1874 – May 25, 1934) was a English composer with Latvian, Swedish, and Spanish roots. ... Photograph of Vincent dIndy Paul Marie Théodore Vincent dIndy (March 27, 1851 – December 2, 1931) was a French composer and teacher. ... Edward and Marian MacDowell. ... Lucien Denis Gabriel Albéric Magnard (born in Paris, June 9, 1865, died in Baron, Oise, September 3, 1914) was a French composer, sometimes referred to as the French Bruckner. The son of François Magnard, bestselling author and editor of Le Figaro, Albéric couldve chosen to live... Hans Pfitzner (May 5, 1869 - May 22, 1949) was a German composer and self-described anti-modernist. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: , Sergej Vasilevič Rahmaninov, April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian-born American composer, pianist, and conductor. ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns (IPA: ) (9 October 1835–16 December 1921) was a French composer and performer. ... Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Никола́евич Скря́бин, Aleksandr Nikolaevič Skrjabin; sometimes transliterated as Skryabin or Skrjabin) (6 January 1872–27 April 1915) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... Sibelius Jean Sibelius (December 8, 1865 – September 20, 1957) was a Finnish composer of classical music; he also studied the violin as a young man. ... Richard Strauss (June 11, 1864 – September 8, 1949) was a German composer of the late Romantic era, particularly noted for his tone poems and operas. ... This article is about the Strauss musical composition. ... Alexander von Zemlinsky Alexander von Zemlinsky or Alexander Zemlinsky, (October 14, 1871 - March 15, 1942) was an Austrian composer of classical music, a conductor and a teacher. ...

Opera

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Umberto Giordano (August 28, 1867 - November 12, 1948) was a composer, mainly of opera. ... Andrea Chénier is an opera in four acts by Umberto Giordano to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica, based on the life of the French poet André Chénier (1762-1794). ... Paul Juon (Russian: March 6, 1872–August 21, 1940) was a Moscow-born composer and student of Anton Arensky, Sergei Taneyev and Woldemar Bargiel. ... Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... La Bohème, French for The Bohemians, is an opera in four acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on La Vie de Bohème by Henri Murger. ... Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov (Russian: , Nikolaj Andreevič Rimskij-Korsakov), also Nikolay, Nicolai, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, (March 6/18, 1844–June 8/21, 1908) was a Russian composer and teacher of classical music particularly noted for his fine orchestration, which may have been influenced by his synaesthesia. ... Sadko in the Underwater Kingdom, a painting by Ilya Repin (1876) Sadko (Садко in Russian) is an opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. ... Hugo Wolf (March 13, 1860 – February 22, 1903) was a Austrian composer of Slovene origin, particularly noted for his art songs, or Lieder. ...

Musical theater

  • The Art Of Maryland     Broadway production
  • El Capitan     Broadway production
  • The Circus Girl     London production
  • The Gay Parisienne     London production
  • The Geisha     London production
  • The Geisha     Broadway production
  • The Girl From Paris     London production
  • The Grand Duke     London production

Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... El Capitan is a 3,000 foot vertical rock formation in the Yosemite Valley, which is very popular with rock climbers. ... The Geisha is a musical comedy composed by Sidney Jones. ... The Geisha is a musical comedy composed by Sidney Jones. ... The Grand Duke, or The Statutory Duel, was the final operetta written by William S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan. ...

Births

January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Thomas Valentine, commonly known as Kid Thomas (3 February 1896 - 18 June 1987) was a jazz trumpeter and bandleader. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of every year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Nacio Herb Brown (22 February 1896 - 28 September 1964) was a United States songwriter. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... Dimitris Mitropoulos (Greek: Δημήτρης Μητρόπουλος) (March 1, 1896 – November 2, 1960) was a Greek conductor, pianist, and composer who spent most of his career in the United States. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... Edith Day recorded the 1920 song Alice Blue Gown. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining, as the last day in April. ... Reverend Gary Davis (Blind Gary Davis, April 30, 1896 – May 5, 1972) was an African American blues and gospel singer and guitarist. ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... Wilfrid Pelletier (June 20, 1896 – April 9, 1982) was a Canadian orchestra conductor. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... A young Léon Theremin playing a theremin Léon Theremin (born Lev Sergeyevich Termen, Лев Сергеевич Термен in Russian) (August 15, 1896–November 3, 1993) was a Russian inventor, most famous for his invention of the theremin, one of the first electronic musical instruments. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (246th in leap years). ... Amanda Randolph (September 2, 1896 - August 24, 1967) was an African American actress and singer. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... Howard Dietz (September 8, 1896 - July 30, 1983) was an American lyric writer and librettist. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... Adele Astaire, 1927 Adele Astaire (September 10, 1896 -January 25, 1981) was an American dancer and entertainer. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... Saint Ambrose, mosaic in church St. ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years). ... Roberto Gerhard (born September 25, 1896 in Valls, Catalonia; died January 5, 1970 in Cambridge, England), was a Catalan-born composer of classical music. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years). ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Howard Harold Hanson (October 28, 1896 – February 26, 1981) was a composer, conductor and educator from the United States of America. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... Ethel Waters, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1938 Ethel Waters (October 31, 1896 – September 1, 1977) was an African American blues vocalist who frequently performed jazz, big band, gospel, and popular music, on Broadway and off. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... Ruth Etting ( 23 November 1896 – 24 September 1978) was an American singing star of the 1930s, who had over sixty hit recordings. ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Virgil Thomson, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1947 Virgil Thomson (November 25, 1896 - September 30, 1989) was an American composer from Missouri, whose rural background gave a sense of place in his compositions. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... George (left) and Ira Gershwin Ira Gershwin (born Israel Gershowitz) (December 6, 1896 - August 17, 1983) American lyricist, collaborator with, and brother of George Gershwin He is interred in the Westchester Hills Cemetery, Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... Roger Sessions (28 December 1896 – 16 March 1985) was an American composer, critic and teacher of music. ...

Deaths

February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Charles Louis Ambroise Thomas (August 5, 1811 - February 12, 1896) was a French opera composer. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... Juan Morel Campos (May 16, 1857 – May 12, 1896), born in Ponce, Puerto Rico, was one of the composers of danzas who took that musical genre to its highest level. ... 20 May is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... Clara Schumann Clara Josephine Wieck Schumann (September 13, 1819 – May 20, 1896), wife of composer Robert Schumann, was one of the leading pianists of the Romantic era as well as a composer. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Frederick Nicholls Crouch (July 30, 1808 - August 18, 1896) was an English composer and cellist. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years). ... Anton Bruckner Anton Bruckner (4 September 1824–11 October 1896) was an Austrian composer of the Romantic era. ...

See Also


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Hohner marine band harmonica 1896 (479 words)
DC Music is the musician's store and staffed with musicians who want to help you find the right equipment for your needs.
We are an authorized dealer for the Hohner marine band harmonica 1896 and will be more than happy to help you with any questions on the Hohner marine band harmonica 1896.
Purchase the Hohner marine band harmonica 1896 online and pay only $4.99 shipping within the 48 US states or call us toll free at 1-800-225-1403 (US) and order the Hohner marine band harmonica 1896 by telephone.
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Prior to Thomas Edison's invention of the home phonograph in 1896, a music box was one of the only forms of musical entertainment available in the home.
Founded in 1974 by Dwight and Mary Porter, the Porter Music Box Company revitalized the music box industry by manufacturing the first large disc style music box in the United States, in over fifty years.
He acquired a love for the music box and starting with thirty five dollars Dwight built his first Porter Music Box on his kitchen table in 1975.
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